B 11 (C) COMMUNICATION OPTIONS: MANUAL OPTIONS, PIB Ear

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Content: AC dated: Item No. UNIVERSITY OF MUMBAI BACHELOR OF EDUCATION -SPECIAL EDUCATION (HEARING IMPAIRMENT) B.Ed. Spl. Ed.(HI) FROM 2016-17 1
University of Mumbai Syllabus for the Bachelor of Education - Special Education (Hearing Impairment) B.Ed. Spl. Ed. (HI) As per the NCTE Regulations 2014 Notification 346 dated 1.12.2014 and subsequent letter No8-A/ Recog./ Policy /2014-RCI dated 28th January 2015 and letter # 7-128 RCI/ 2015 from Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI), New Delhi, the B.Ed.- Special Education (Hearing Impairment) program of one academic year is revised to two years in the University of Mumbai. The said program is now Choice Based Credit System as per the UGC guidelines. It has semester system comprising of four semesters and offers choice based optional courses in theory component. Being a teacher education program it is extensively skill based. It is implemented from academic year 2016-2017. The syllabus of B.Ed.- Special Education (Hearing Impairment) is based on the syllabus prescribed by the Rehabilitation Council of India. The Title and Eligibility of the programme are: O............Title: Bachelor of Education- Special Education (Hearing Impairment) [ B. Ed. Spl.Ed.(HI)] O............Eligibility: Following candidates are eligible for admission to B. Ed. Spl.Ed: A candidate for the degree of B.Ed.Spl.Ed. must have passed a Bachelors' degree examination of this University in any discipline or a corresponding degree examination of any other UGC recognized University with minimum 50% in the qualifying degree examination. R.............Duration: The duration of the programme is two academic years (four semesters) with 40 credits in each year. · Aim and Objectives of the Programme: The B.Ed.Spl.Ed. programme aims to develop special education teachers/educators for children with disabilities and in particular for children with hearing impairment for various educational settings (Inclusive, Special, Open School , Home Based services etc.). The B.Ed. Spl. Ed. programme will prepare human resources to enable them to acquire knowledge and competencies to impart effective education to children with hearing impairment and other disabilities with adequate emphasis on education of ALL children. The program further aims to develop special teachers/educators who are able to 2
deliver the best in all the roles like classroom teacher, resource teacher, itinerant teacher, cross disability teacher facilitator.
The objectives of the programme are to facilitate learners to:
i. Acquire knowledge & skills about human development, contemporary Indian education, pedagogy of various school subjects and assessment for learning. ii. Acquire knowledge & skills about nature and educational needs of children with disabilities with emphasis on children with hearing impairment. iii. Develop conceptual understanding of education for working with children with and without disabilities in various settings. iv. Enhance knowledge and skills related to professional competencies.
v. Facilitate proactive and desirable attitudes towards education of children with special needs.
I
The programme of B. Ed. Spl.Ed. comprises of Part-I Theory courses ( A,B,C & D),
Part-II Practical courses (E) and Part-III Field engagement (F),which will be covered
in four consecutive semesters. The programme structure has four sets of theory courses
(A) core courses including two choice based pedagogy courses, (B) Courses in cross
disability and inclusion including two optional courses which can be chosen from two
pools of courses (C) Disability specialization courses and (D) Courses for enhancement
of professional capacities.
II. ATTENDANCE: The programme will be conducted for minimum 180 days each year exclusive of the period of semester end examination and admission. The institution shall work for a minimum of thirty six hours in a week. The Minimum attendance of learners will be as per Mumbai university guidelines. However, for practical and field engagement of the programme, the learners must complete all course work within the stipulated period. A candidate for the examination in Part I, II & III courses must apply to the Registrar of University of Mumbai with certificates required, through the Principal/ Head of the College in which he/she has received education.
III The entire programme of B. Ed. Spl. Ed. is of 80 credits. Each credit will comprise of 30 learning hours.
LIST OF COURSES:
PART I:
AREA `A' : CORE COURSES
A1: Human Growth & Development
3
A2: Contemporary India and Education A3: Learning, Teaching and Assessment A4 :Pedagogy of Teaching (Special Reference to Disability) ANY ONE a) Science b) Mathematics c) Social Studies A5: Pedagogy of Teaching (Special Reference to Disability) ANY ONE a) Hindi b) English c) Marathi AREA B: CROSS DISABILITY AND INCLUSION (Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course AECC) Note: a. All student-teachers will be learning about all disabilities in theory and practical. b. All student-teachers will be learning about one more disability over and above the main disability specialization in practical and field engagement courses c. In case of student-teachers with disability; the choice of both optional courses either from B-10 or from B-11 can be chosen on case to case basis (e.g. Student-teachers with VI and HI may opt for both courses that are appropriate for him/her from either B10 & B11). B6: Inclusive Education B7: Introduction to Sensory Disabilities (VI, HI, Deaf-Blind) B8: Introduction to Neuro - Developmental Disabilities (LD, ID, ASD) B9: Introduction to Locomotor & Multiple Disabilities (CP, MD) B10: Skill-based Optional Course-Basket (Cross Disability and Inclusion) ANY ONE a. Guidance and Counselling b. Early Childhood Care & Education 4
c. Orientation & Mobility d. Community Based Rehabilitation e. Application of ICT in Classroom f. Management of Learning Disability g. Gender and Disability B11: Skill-based Optional Course-Basket (Disability Specialization) ANY ONE a. Applied Behavioural Analysis b. Communication Options: Oralism c. Communication Options: Manual options d. Augmentative and Alternative Communication e. Braille and Assistive Devices f. Vocational Rehabilitation & Transition to Job Placement AREA C: DISABILITY SPECIALIZATION COURSES C12: Assessment and Identification of Hearing Loss and Needs C13: Curriculum Designing, Adaptation and Evaluation C14: Educational Intervention and Teaching Strategies C15: Technology and Disability C16: Psycho Social and Family Issues AREA D: ENHANCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL CAPACITIES (EPC) (3 PROJECTS) (These 3 courses are PROJECT BASED wherein each candidate is expected to work upon, submit and present project with reference to disabilities) D17: Reading and Reflecting on Texts D18: Drama and Art in Education D 19: basic research & Basic Statistic PART II: AREA E: SKILL DEVELOPMENT PRACTICAL RELATED TO DISABILITY 5
E1. Cross Disability and Inclusion (Linked with Area B)
E2. Disability Specialization (Linked with Area C)
PART III: AREA F: SKILL BASED FIELD ENGAGEMENT (Internship)
F1. Special School/Centre of Main Disability (Related to Area C)
F2. Special School/centre of Other Disability (Related to Area B)
F3. Inclusive school (Related to Area B & C)
THE OVERALL PROGRAMME STRUCTURE (FOUR SEMESTERS):
Part Course code
Number of
courses
Areas
Hours credits Marks
IA
5
THEORY: Core courses
450
15
375
IB
6
THEORY: Cross Disability & 540
18
450
Inclusive Education (AECC)
IC
5
THEORY: Disability Specialization 450
15
375
ID
3
PROJECT BASED : Enhancement of 180
06
150
Professional Capacities EPC)
II E
2
III F
3
Total
24
SKILL BASED Practical related to 450
15
disability
SKILL
BASED
Engagement(Internship)
Field 330
11
2400 80
375 275 2000
The total hours allotted to each theory course will include both instructional and notional hours. The instructional hours for all theory courses as specified in the structure include lecture and 6
tutorials as contact hours. The notional hours include hands on tasks/experience specified under each theory course.
IV. The assessment in Part I comprising of theory courses (A, B, C) shall be semester wise as per the scheme of courses given in item # VI by way of written papers and internal assessment. The Principal/Head of the College shall forward to the University, the marks obtained by each candidate for internal assessment of parts I,II &III.
V The assessment in Part I D, Part II (E1 & E2) comprising of project / practical courses and Part III (F1, F2 and F3) comprising of field engagement courses shall be evaluated internally by each College at the end of semester as per the details given in item # VII. The Principal/Head of college shall forward to the University, the marks obtained by each candidate in part II and III in relevant semesters.
VI. Semester-wise scheme of courses: SEMESTER I
course code
short title
A1
Human Growth & Development
credits (instructional +notional) 3 (2+1)
total internal external Total hours marks marks
90 15
60
75
A2
Contemporary India and Education
3 (2+1)
90 15
60
75
B7
Introduction to Sensory Disabilities
3 (2+1)
B8
Introduction to Neuro -Developmental 3 (2+1)
Disabilities
B9
Introduction to Locomotor & Multiple 3 (2+1)
Disabilities
90 15
60
75
90 15
60
75
90 15
60
75
C12 E1 TOTAL
Assessment and Identification of Hearing 3 (2+1) loss and Needs Practical: Cross disability and inclusion 2 20
90 15
60
75
60 50
Nil
50
600 140
360
500
7
SEMESTER II Part Course Short title code
I
A3
Learning ,Teaching and Assessment
A4
Pedagogy of Teaching (optional course)
A5
Pedagogy of Teaching (optional course)
B6
Inclusive Education
C13 Curriculum
II E2
Practical: Disability specialization
TOTA L
Credits (instructional +notional)
Hours Internal marks
Externa Total l marks
3 (2+1)
90
15
60
75
3 (2+1)
90
15
60
75
3 (2+1)
90
15
60
75
3 (2+1) 3 (2+1) 5 20
90 15 90 15 150 125 600 200
60
75
60
75
Nil
125
300
500
SEM ESTER III
Part Course code
Short title
Credits
Hours
(instructional
+notional)
Internal External Total marks marks
I
C14
Educational Intervention and Teaching 3 (2+1)
90
15
60
75
Strategies
C15
Technology and Disability
3 (2+1)
90
15
60
75
C16
Psycho Social and Family Issues
3 (2+1)
90
15
60
75
D17
Reading and Reflecting on Texts
2 (1+1)
60
50
Nil
50
B 11
optional (specialization) ANY ONE 3(2+1)
90
15
60
75
II E2
Practical: Disability Specialization
4
120
100
Nil
100
III F1
Field Engagement: specialization
Disability 3
90
75
Nil
75
8
TOTAL
21
630
285
240
525
SEMESTER IV
Part Course code
Title
Credits (instruction al +notional)
Hours
Internal marks
Extern al marks
Total
I
B10
Skill based Optional Course (Cross 3 (2+1)
90
15
disability and inclusion) ANY ONE
60
75
D 18
Drama & Art in Education
2 (1+1)
D19
Basic Research & Basic Statistic
2 (1+1)
II E1
Practical: Cross Disability and Inclusion 4
III F2
Field Engagement: Other disability
4
III F3
Field Engagement: Inclusive school
4
TOTAL
19
60
50
60
50
120
100
120
100
120
100
570
415
Nil
50
Nil
50
Nil
100
Nil
100
Nil
100
60
475
VII Scheme and Details of Assessment of courses:
The performance of the candidates in each of the theory courses shall be evaluated through internal assessment and semester end assessment.
1. Internal Assessment for theory courses will be on the basis of continuous evaluation as
indicated in item # VI.
2. Internal Assessment for Areas A, B & C of PART I
(15 Marks)
(i) Average of two class tests
05 Marks
(ii) Performance on notional hour tasks/experience
10 marks
The list of tasks given in the syllabus is a sample list. College may add appropriate tasks to
make learning more relevant for students.
9
3. Internal Assessment for Area D
(50 Marks)
i) Class participation and interaction during activities / tasks (Students can be divided into groups wherein each group is assigned to a faculty / supervisor who breaks down the project into smaller tasks, give ongoing input and feedback during the project work 15 marks ii) Submitted project journal of activities / tasks (student groups and supervisors are exchanged for assessing the submitted projects) 25 marks iii) Post submission class presentation on learning and reflections (Not less than two supervisors attend and assess all presentations. The average of the marks assigned by each is taken to be the final score. All students are given opportunity to attend the session for learning and transparency.) 10 marks
4. Semester End Assessment for theory courses Semester End Assessment will be on the basis of performance in the semester end written examinations. The weightage of semester end assessment (theory examination) is 80% (rounded about) of the total marks of each theory course.
· Question Paper Pattern for Areas A, B & C: 2 hrs. 30 min.
(60 Marks)
5 Essay type questions: one per module (any three)
(12 x 3 = 36 marks)
6 short questions: Minimum one per module (any four)
(6 x 4 = 24 marks)
VIII Schemes and Details of Assessment of Part II & III Courses
There will be no Semester End examination for part I.D, II & III. There will be only internal assessment as indicated in item # VI.
R........... STANDARD OF PASSING
·
The passing percentage of Part I, Part II & Part III is 50% for each course (Internal
and external together) in all the four semesters separately.
If the minimum passing mark is in decimal points, the same is to be converted to the next
whole number (Eg. a course of 75 marks (including internal marks) will require a
minimum pass marks of 38).
10
·
The overall grade of the B. Ed.Spl. Ed. programme will be calculated on the basis of total
marks obtained in all four semesters. The grade marks and grade points are as follows:
Grades and Grade Points for 4 semester together
Letter Grade
Marks
Grade Point
R: ............... (A) METHOD TO CARRY FORWARD THE MARKS (i) Candidates are required to pass in both internal and external assessments. (ii) A candidate who scores 50% or more in the Internal Assessment but FAILS in the Semester End Examination of the Course shall reappear for the Semester End Examination of that Course only. However, his/her marks of the internal assessment shall be carried forward. (iii) Improvement opportunities for the candidates who have passed the course are as per the Mumbai University norms. (B) ATKT (ALLOWED TO KEEP TERM) (i) A student shall be allowed to keep term/s for consecutive semester/s irrespective of number of heads of failure in earlier semester/s. (ii) The result of semester IV shall be kept in abeyance until the student passes all semesters (semester I, II, III and IV) with all necessary tasks. (iii) a) A maximum of three years from the date of admission to the programme is allowed for programme completion. b) Number of attempts is limited to maximum 3 per course inclusive of the first attempt. c) whichever earlier (from a and b), is applicable. 11
(iv) A candidate failing in course of part I semester-end examination can reappear for the examination without putting in attendance for the instructional hours of that course/s. (v) Colleges are expected to provide opportunities to complete and pass the tasks of non theory components if the candidate fails to complete or pass the tasks in the first attempt. (vi) If a candidate does not appear for the semester-end examination fully or partially, he/she will be considered as a failure candidate. However, he/she is eligible for reappearing facility as per failure candidates and his/her internal marks will be carried forward. R.............. Student Intake: As per the RCI recognition given to the college, the college can admit minimum 20 and maximum 30 students per batch (Additional seats for OBC candidates as per Govt. of India Directives wherever applicable.) R--------------Faculty Norms: As per RCI Norms R..................Fee structure: As per RCI / University/ State Government /Central Government ­whichever applicable Note: It is mandatory for every teacher with BEd.Spl.Ed. to obtain a "Registered Professional Certificate" from the Rehabilitation Council of India to work in the field of education of children with disabilities in India. Hence, successful candidates of B.Ed.Spl. Ed. shall have to register their names with RCI. As continuous professional growth is necessary for the renewal of the certificate in every 5 years, the teachers in this field should involve self in Professional Development activities like undergoing in-service programmes periodically or publishing articles. Amendments, if any, to the regulations will be made periodically by the Rehabilitation Council of India. COURSE OUTLINE: PART I: AREA A, B, C, D
A 1 HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT
Course Code: A1 Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours 30
Introduction
Credit: 03 Marks: 75
12
This course exposes student teachers to the study of child and human development in order to gain a better understanding about variations and the influence of socio-cultural-political realities on development. A critical understanding of theoretical perspectives of development would aid in their application in teaching learning process. Through close observation of children in their natural environments the teacher trainee would be able to situate their theoretical knowledge within realistic frames. This course would also be able to equip the trainees to reflect and critique the normative notions of childhood and adolescence. Objectives: After studyingthis course the student- teachers will be able to · explain the process of development with special focus on infancy, childhood and adolescence · critically analyze developmental variations among children · comprehend adolescence as a period of transition and threshold of adulthood · analyze different factors influencing child development Module 1: Approaches to Human Development 1.1 Human development as a discipline from infancy to adulthood 1.2 Concepts and Principles of development 1.3 Developing Human- Stages (Infancy, Childhood, Adolescence) 1.4 Basic understanding of Nature versus Nurture 1.5 Basic understanding of Domains (Physical, Sensory- perceptual, Cognitive, socio- emotional, language and communication, Social relationship) Module 2: Theoretical approaches to development 2.1 Cognitive & Social- cognitive theories: Basic understanding of key concepts:Piaget, Vygotsky 2.2 Cognitive & Social- cognitive theories: Basic understanding of key concepts: Bruner, Bandura 2.3 PsychoSocial Theory: Basic understanding of key concepts: Erikson 2.4 Psychoanalytic Theory Basic understanding of key concepts: Freud 2.5 Holistic Theory: Basic understanding of key concepts: Steiner Module 3: The Early Years (Birth to Eight Years) 3.1 Influences on prenatal development, 3.2 Screening the newborn -APGAR Score, Reflexes and responses, neuro-perceptual development 3.3. Basic Milestones and variations in Development 3.4 Environmental factors influencing early childhood development 13
3.5 Role of play in enhancing development
Module 4: Middle Childhood to Adolescence (From nine years to eighteen years) 4.1 Emerging capabilities across domains: Social and Emotional 4.2Emerging capabilities across domains: cognition (metacognition and creativity 4.3 Issues related to puberty 4.4 Gender and Development 4.5 Influence of the environment (social, cultural, political) on the growing child
Module 5: Transitions into Adulthood 5.1 Psychological well-being 5.2 Formation of identity and self-concept 5.3 Emerging roles and responsibilities 5.4 Life Skills and independent living 5.5 Career Choices
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Observe children in a setting (like preschool or primary class) and report identified milestones achieved by the children therein. Submit reflections. 2. Attend a Seminar/parent meeting on human development. Submit report with reflections. 3. Submit Journal of a case study of a child with disability focussing developmental issues.
Suggested References: · Berk, L. E. (2000). Human Development, Tata Mc.Graw Hill Company, New York · Brisbane, E. H. (2004). The developing child, Mc.Graw Hill, USA · Cobb. N. J. (2001). The child infants, children and adolescents, Mayfield Publishing company, California · Hurlocl, E. B. (2005). Child growth and development, Tata Mc.Graw Hill Publishing company, New york · Hurlocl, E. B. (2006). Developmental Psychology- A life span approach, Tata Mc.Graw Hill Publishing company, New Delhi · Mittal. S. (2006). Child development- Experimental Psychology, Isha books, Delhi · Nisha, M. (2006). Introduction to child development, Isha books, Delhi · Papalia, D. E. and Olds, S. W.(2005). Human development, Tata Mc.Graw Hill Publishing company, New York
14
· Santrock. J. W. (2006). Child Development, Tata Mc.Graw Hill Publishing company, New York · Santrock. J. W. (2007). Adolescence,Tata Mc.Graw Hill Publishing company, New Delhi · Meece, J.S. & Eccles J.L (Eds) (2010).Handbook of Research on Schools, Schooling and Human Development, Routledge
A 2 CONTEMPORARY INDIA AND EDUCATION
Course Code: A2
Credit: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks:75
Introduction
This course will enable student-teachers to explore education from philosophical and sociological perspective and hands on experience of engaging with diverse communities, children and schools. It also traces the educational developments in the historical context leading to contemporary India. The course also includes various commissions and policies and issues and trends in the field of education, special education and inclusive education.
Objectives After completing this course the student teachers will be able to- · Explain the history, nature and process and Philosophy of education · Analyse the role of educational system in the context of Modern Ethos · Understand the concept of diversity · Develop an understanding of the trends, issues, and challenges faced by the contemporary Indian Education in global context
Module 1: Philosophical Foundations of Education 1.1 Education: Concept, definition and scope 1.2 Agencies of Education: School, family, community and media 1.3 Philosophies of Education: idealism, naturalism, pragmatism, existentialism, humanism, constructivism and connectionism 1.4 Historical Perspective of Indian Education (Gandhi, Tagore, Krishna Murthy, Aurobindo) 1.5 Contemporary Indian Perspective
Module 2: Understanding Diversity 2.1 Concept of Diversity 2.2 Types of Diversity: Gender, linguistic, cultural, socio-economic and disability 2.3 Diversity in learning needs and learning 2.4 Addressing diverse learning needs 15
2.5 Diversity: Global Perspective
Module 3: Contemporary Issues and Concerns 3.1 Universalisation of School Education, Right to Education and Universal Access 3.2 Issues of a) Universal enrolment b) Universal retention c) Universal learning 3.3Issues of quality and equity: Physical, economic, social, cultural and linguistic, particularly w.r.t girl child, weaker sections and PWDs 3.4 Equal Educational Opportunity: constitutional provisions and preventing inequality 3.5 Nature of Inequality in Schooling: Public-private schools, rural-urban schools, Dominent- minority, single teacher schools and other forms of inequalities in school systems
Module 4: Education Commissions and Policy 4.1 Concepts of National ideals (Equality, liberty, secularism, and social justice)
4.2 National Commissions and Policies: NPE and POA (1986, 1992), National Policy for Persons with Disabilities (2006) 4.3 National Acts: RCI Act, 1992, PWD Act, 1995, NT Act, 1999, RTE Act (2009 &2012). 4.4 Programmes and Schemes: IEDC (1974, 1983), SSA (2000, 2011), RMSA, 2009, IEDSS, 2009 4.5 International Conventions and Policies: UNCRPD, 2006, MDG, 2015, INCHEON strategies
Module 5: Issues and Trends in Education 5.1 Challenges of education from preschool to senior secondary 5.2 Inclusive education as a rights based model 5.3 Complementarity of inclusive and special schools 5.4 Language issues in education 5.5 community participation and community based education
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Education as a tool to deal with current inequalities. Write an essay with reference to any one: Women, Dalit, Tribal people or PWDs 2. First generation learners : interview a parent and submit a report 3. Make a poster on RTE act in the context of disadvantaged 4. Linguistic and religious diversity: Present data graphically
Essential Readings
16
· Government of India (GoI) (1966). National Education Commission (1964-66), Ministry of Education: New Delhi. · Government of India (GoI) (1986/92). New Education Policy, MHRD: New Delhi. · Guha, Ramchandra (2007). India after Gandhi: The History of the World's Largest Democracy. Macmillon: Delhi · GoI (2010). Right to Education Act 2009, MHRD: New Delhi. Suggested Readings · Aggarwal. J.C. (1992). Development and Planning of Modern Education: New Delhi Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd. · Amartya Sen, and Jean Dreze (1997). India: economic development and Social Opportunity, Oxford India: Delhi. Select Chapters. · Anand, S. P. (1993).The Teacher & Education in Emerging Indian society, New Delhi: NCERT. · Bhat. B.D. (1996). Educational Documents in India, New Delhi: Arya Book Depot. · Bhatia, K. & Bhatia, B. (1997): The Philosophical and Sociological Foundations, New Delhi Doaba House. · Biswas. A. (1992): Education in India, New Delhi: Arya Book Depot. · Biswas. A. and Aggarwal, J.C. (1992). Education in India, New Delhi: Arya Book Depot. · Chakravarty, Sukhamoy (1987). Development Planning: The Indian Experience, Oxford University press: New Delhi. · Choudhary. K.C. and Sachdeva, L. (Eds) (1995): Total literacy by 2000: New Delhi: IAE Association. · Dubey, S.C (2001). Indian Society, National Book Trust: New Delhi. · Ain, L.C. (2010). Civil Disobedience, Book Review Literary Trust: New Delhi. Select chapters. · Kashyap, S.C. (2009). The Constitution of India, National Book Trust: New Delhi. · Mohanty, Jagannath. (1993). Indian Education in the Emerging Society, New Delhi Sterling publishers Pvt. Ltd. · Sapra. C.L. and Ash Aggarwal, (Ed.,) (1987): Education in India some critical Issues. New Delhi: National Book Organisation. · Saraswathi, T.S. (1999). Culture, Socialization and Human Development, New Delhi: Sage Publications. · Steven, B. (1998).School and Society, New Delhi: Sage Publications. · Suresh, D. (1998). Curriculum and Child Development, Agra: Bhargava. 17
· Taneja. V.R. (1998).Educational Thoughts and Practice, Delhi University Publications. · Vaidyanathan, A. (1995). The Indian Economy: Crisis, Response and Prospects. Tracts of the Times. Orient Longman Publications: New Delhi. · Weber. O.C. (1990). Basic Philosophies of Education, New York Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
A 3 LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT
Course Code: A 3 Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Credits: 03 Marks: 75
Introduction This Course will initiate teacher Trainees to understand learning theories and as these translate into teaching and learning actions. Assessment of learning as a continuous process is also focused. The course also needs to focus on the PwD as Learner and their special education needs that teacher needs to address in diverse education settings. Objectives After completing this course the student will be able to: · Comprehend the theories of learning and intelligence and their applications for teaching children · Analyse the learning process, nature and theory of motivation · Describe the stages of teaching and learning and the role of teacher · Situate self in the teaching learning process · Analyze the scope and role of assessment in teaching learning process in order to introduce dynamic assessment scheme for educational set up towards enhanced learning. Module 1: Human Learning and Intelligence with implications on classroom Teaching and Learning 1.1 Human learning: Meaning, definition and concept formation 1.2 Learning theories: - Behaviourism: Skinner, Thorndike - Cognitivism: Piaget, Kohlberg - Social Constructism: Vygotsky, Bandura 1.3 Intelligence: Concept and definition 1.4 Theories: Two-factor, Multifactor, Triarchic Theory (Robert Steinberg) 1.5 Creativity: Concept, Definition and Characteristics
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Module 2: Learning Process and Motivation 2.1 Sensation: Definition and Sensory Process 2.2 Attention: Definition and Affecting Factors 2.3 Perception: Definition and Types 2.4 Memory, Thinking, and Problem Solving 2.5 Motivation: Nature, Definition and Maslow's Theory
Module 3: Teaching Learning Process 3.1 Maxims of Teaching 3.2 Stages of Teaching: Plan, Implement, Evaluate, Reflect 3.3 Stages of Learning: Acquisition, Maintenance, Generalization 3.4 Learning Environment: Psychological and Physical 3.5 Leadership Role of Teacher in Classroom, School and Community
Module 4: Overview of Assessment and School System 4.1 Assessment: conventional meaning and constructivist perspective 4.2 `Assessment of Learning' and `Assessment for Learning': Meaning and difference 4.3 Curriculum Based Measurement 4.4 Formative and summative evaluation, 4.5 Understanding key concepts in school evaluation: filtering learners, marks, credit, grading, choice, alternate certifications, transparency, internal-external proportion, improvement option
Module 5: Assessment: Strategies and Practices 5.1 Strategies: (Oral, written, portfolio, observation, project, presentation, group discussion, open book test, surprise test. untimed test, team test, records of learning landmark, cloze set/open set and other innovative measures) Meaning and procedure 5.2 Typology and levels of assessment items: open ended and cloze ended; direct, indirect, inferential level 5.3 Assessment of diverse learners: Exemptions, concessions, adaptations and accommodations 5.4 School examinations: Critical review of current examination practices and their assumptions about learning and development 5.5 Efforts for exam reforms: Comprehensive and Continuous Evaluation (CCE), NCF (2005) and RTE (2009)
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Preparation of Self study report on individual differences among learners 2. Prepare a leaflet for parents on better emotional management of children 3. Compilation of 3 CBM tools from web search in any one school subject
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4. Study recent ASAR report to understand school independent assessment. Submit reflections. TRANSACTIONS Understanding most of the concepts introduced through this course is essential for any classroom teacher. Hence, curriculum transactions may involve lectures with adequate explanations and examples with reference to Indian context. Class discussions must follow theoretical introductions so that the student teachers are able to link this knowledge with whatever observations and reflections they are making in schools. Suggested library readings prior to the lecture will help student teachers to get familiarized with the notions and appropriate terms. Evaluations must focus on understanding the concepts and processes with reference to students with and without special needs. Essential Readings · Amin, A. Assessment of Cognitive Development of Elementary School Children A Psychometric Approach Jain Book Agency 2002 · Panch, R. (2013). Educational Psychology: Teaching and Learning PerspectivesMcGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited · Misra, G., Jha, A., & Woolfolk, A.(2012). Fundamentals of Educational Psychology11thedn Pearson Publication · Whitcomb, S. and Merrell, K.W.(2012). Behavioral, Social, and Emotional Assessment of Children and AdolescentsRoutledge 4thedn. · Chauhan, S.S.(2013). Advanced Educational Psychology. Jain Book Agency, Delhi · Salvia, John, Ysseldyke, James, E. And Bolt, Sara. (2007). Assessment in Special and Inclusive Education. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. · King-Sears, E. Margaret. (1994). Curriculum Based Assessment in Special Education. Singular Publishing Group · Paul, P.(2009). Language and deafness. Singular publication Suggested Reading · Geisinger, K.F. (2013) APA Handbook of Testing and Assessment in Psychology. Available at American Psychological Association, USA · Howell, Kenneth W., (2000). Curriculum Based Evaluation. (3 rd Ed). WordswortThompson Learning. · McMillan, James H. (2001). Classroom Assessment: Principles and Practice for Effective Instruction. Allyn and Bacon, London. 20
· Nevo, David. (1995). School based Evaluation. Pergramon Publishing · Salvia, J. (1998). Assessment. (7th ed) Boston:Houghton Mifflin · Guskey, T. R. & Bailey. J (2000). Grading and Reporting. Thousnad Oaks,CA: corwin King- · Howell, Kenneth, W. & Nolet Victor (2000). Curriculum based Evaluation (3rd ed.). Wadsworth Thomson Learning.
A 4 (a) PEDAGOGY OF TEACHING SCIENCE
Course Code: A 4 (a)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30 Marks: 75
Introduction The course will help the student-teachers to generate their student's interest for learning science and develop a scientific attitude. It is designed to equip the student-teachers to teach science using innovative methods, techniques and teaching learning material to students with & without disabilities.
Objectives After completing the course the student-teachers will be able to: · Explain the role of science in day to day life and its relevance to modern society. · Describe the aims and objectives of teaching science at school level. · Demonstrate and apply skills to select and use different methods of teaching the content of sciences. · Demonstrate competencies of planning for teaching sciences, organizing laboratory facilities and equipment designing pupil centered teaching learning experiences. · Demonstrate skills to design and use various evaluation tools to measure learner achievement in sciences.
Module 1: Nature and Significance of Science 1.1 Nature, Scope, Importance and Value of Science. 1.2 Science As An Integrated Area of Study 1.3 Science and Modern Indian Society: Relationship of Science and Society. 1.4 Impact Of Science With Special Reference To Issues Related With Environment, Industrialization and Disarmament. 1.5 Role Of Science For Sustainable Development
Module 2: Planning for Instruction
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2.1 Aims and Objectives of Teaching Science in Elementary and Secondary School 2.2 Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives and Writing Objectives in Behavioural Terms 2.3 Lesson Planning ­ Importance and Basic Steps. Planning Lesson for an Explanation, Demonstration, and Numerical Problem in Teaching of Sciences. 2.4 Unit Planning ­ Format of A Unit Plan. 2.5 Pedagogical Analysis: Meaning and Need. Guidelines for Conducting Pedagogical Analysis
Module 3: Approaches and Methods of Teaching Sciences 3.1 Process approach, Direct Experience Approach, Inductive-Deductive Approach, 3.2 Lecture, Demonstration, Discussion, Problem-solving, Concept-mapping, Programmed Instruction, Team Teaching, Seminar, Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) 3.3 Project Method and Heuristic Method 3.4 Creating Different Situations of Learning Engagement: Group Learning, Individual Learning, Small Group, Cooperative (Peer-Tutoring, Jigsaw Etc.), Situated/Contextual Learning with reference to Children With Disabilities 3.5 Constructivist Approach and its Use in Teaching Science
Module 4: Learning Resources with reference to Children with Disabilities for Teaching Science
4.1 Teaching Learning Aids ­ Need, Importance, Selection, Use and Classification of Aids Based on Type of Experience, Audio Visual Aids, Multimedia, Charts, and Models (Tactile and Visual) 4.2 Importance of Co-Curricular Activities-Science Club, Science Exhibition, Science Text Books-Characteristics and Significance With Reference To Children With Disabilities 4.3 The Science Laboratory-Planning Organization of Lab, Storage, Record Keeping And Safety of Scientific Equipments With Reference To Children With Disabilities 4.4 Use of net based Resources: Open Educational Resources (OER), Virtual laboratories 4.5 Use of net based Resources: Learning Management Systems (LMS)
Module 5: Evaluation 5.1 Comprehensive and Continuous Evaluation: Concept and Significance 5.2 Tools and Techniques for Formative and Summative Assessments 5.3 Curriculum Based Assessment 5.4 Adaptations of Evaluation Procedure With Reference To Children With Disabilities 5.5 Reflections on how this paper facilitates the teacher within you
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
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1. Pedagogical analysis of a unit from Science content. Summarize and submit. 2. Preparation of a multimedia presentation on a topic from Science content keeping students with disabilities in view. 3. Select a science based concept. Review 3 to 4 boards in terms of how and when it is introduced in science curriculum. Submit comparative statement. 4. Curricular adaptations for teaching Sciences to students with disabilities: Write a letter to a school head suggesting Dos and Donts Essential Readings · Brown, R. (1978). Science instruction of visually Impaired Youth. New York: AFB. · Buxton, A C. (2010). Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle School. NewDelhi: Sage Publications. · Bybee.w.Roger (2010) The Teaching of Science 21st Century Perspective National Science Teachers. Association, USA · Fensham, P.J. (1994). The content of Science: A constructive Approach to its Teaching and Learning.Washington, D.C: The Falmer Press. · Gupta, V. K. (1995). Teaching and learning of Science and Technology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd. · Henninen, K. A. (1975). Teaching of Visually Handicapped, Ohio: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company · Joshi, S. R (2005). Teaching of Science.New Delhi: A.P.H Publishing Corporation. · Kelley, P. & Gale, G. (1998). Towards Excellence: Effective education for students with vision impairments, Sydney: North Rocks Press. · Layton, D. (1989). Innovations in Science and Technology Education, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers · Lawson, E. A. (2010). Teaching Inquiry Science in Middle School, New Delhi: Sage Publications. · Mani, M. N. G. (1992). Techniques of teaching blind children, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers. · Mukhopadhyay, S., Jangira, N. K., Mani, M.N. G., & Raychowdhary, N. (1987). Sourcebook for training teachers of visually impaired, Delhi: NCERT. · Murray, L. J. (1988). Basic Skills ­ Science, Boston: John Murrey. · NCERT (1982). Teaching Science in secondary schools, New Delhi: NCERT. · NIVH (1992). Handbook for the teachers for the visually handicapped, Dehradun: NIVH. · Scholl, G.T. (1986). Foundations of education for blind and visually handicapped children and youth, New York: American Foundation for the blind. 23
· Sharma, R. C. (2005). Modern Science teaching, Delhi: Dhanpat Rai & Sons. · Siddiqui, H. M. (2007). Teaching science, New Delhi: Balaji offset. · Siddiqui, N.N & Siddiqui, M. N. (1994). Teaching of science today & tomorrow, Delhi: Doaba House. · Starin, A. & Sund, B. (1983). Teaching science through discovery. Ohio: Charles E. Merril Publishing Company. · Tripathi, S. (2004). Teaching of Physical Science, Delhi: Dominant Publications · UNESCO (1966). Source Book for Science Teaching, Paris: UNESCO. · Vaidya, N. (2003). Science Teaching in Schools, New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publishers. · Vanaja, M. (2006). Teaching of Physical Science, Hyderabad: Neelkamal Publications. Suggested Readings · Gupta, S. K. (1983). Technology of Science Education, Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd. · Gupta, V. K. (1995). Readings in Science and Mathematics Education, Ambala: The Associated Press. · Mangal S. K & Shubhra (2005). Teaching of Biological Sciences, Meerut: International Publishing House. · Rao, V.K. (2004). Science Education, APH Publishing Corpn. New Delhi
A 4 (b) PEDAGOGY OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS
Course Code: A4 (b)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours:60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Introduction The course will help the student-teachers to generate their student's interest for learning maths and develop dispositions towards the subject. It is designed to equip the learners to teach math using innovative methods, techniques and teaching learning material for childrenwith & without disabilities.
Objectives After completing the course the student-teachers will be able to: · Explain the nature of Mathematics and its historical development with contribution of Mathematicians. · Describe the aims and objectives of teaching Mathematics at school level.
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· Demonstrate and apply skills to select and use different methods of teaching Mathematics. · Demonstrate competencies of planning for teaching Mathematics, organizing laboratory facilities and equipment designing pupil centered teaching learning experiences. · Demonstrate skills to design and use various evaluation tools to measure learner achievement in Mathematics. Module 1: Nature of Mathematics 1.1 Meaning, Nature, Importance of Mathematics 1.2 Values of Mathematics. 1.3 Maxims of teaching Mathematics 1.4 Contribution of Mathematicians (Ramanujam, Aryabhatta, Bhaskaracharya, Euclid, Pythagoras) 1.5 Perspectives on Psychology of Teaching and Learning of Mathematics-Constructivism, Vygotskyian Perspectives Module 2: Objectives and Instruction Planning in Mathematics 2.1 Aims and Objectives of Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Secondary Schools 2.2 Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives and Writing Objectives in Behavioural Terms 2.3 Lesson Planning­Importance and Basic Steps. Planning Lesson of Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry. 2.4 Unit Planning ­ Format of A Unit Plan. 2.5 Pedagogical Analysis: Meaning and Need and Procedure for Conducting Pedagogical Analysis. Classification of Content, Objective, Evaluation, Etc Module 3: Strategies for Learning and Teaching Mathematics 3.1 Understanding mathematical concepts 3.2 Concept Formation and Concept Attainment: Concept Attainment Model for Learning and Teaching of Concepts. 3.3 Methods of Teaching- Discussion, Lecture cum Demonstration, Inductive-Deductive, Analytic-Synthetic, Problem-Solving, And Project 3.4 Techniques of Teaching Mathematics: Oral Work, Written Work, Drill-Work, Brain- Storming And Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) 3.5 Creating Different Situations of Learning Engagement: Group Learning, Individual Learning, Small-Group, Cooperative (Peer-Tutoring, Jigsaw Etc.), And Situational/Contextual Learning Module 4: Teaching-Learning Resources in Mathematics for Students with Disabilities 4.1 Mathematics Laboratory- Concept, Need, And Equipments 25
4.2 Utilization of Learning Resources in Mathematics: Charts and Pictures, Weighing and Measuring Instruments, Drawing Instruments, Models, Concrete Materials, Abacus ( With Reference To Children With Disabilities) 4.3 Use of net based Resources: Open Educational Resources (OER), Virtual laboratories 4.4 Use of net based Resources: Learning Management Systems (LMS) 4.3 Calculators, Smart Boards, and Special Aids and Appliances For Children With Disabilities Module 5: Assessment and Evaluation for Mathematics Learning 5.1 Assessment And Evaluation-Concept, Importance and Purpose 5.2 Error Analysis, Diagnostic Tests, Identification of Hard Spots and Remedial Measures. 5.3 Tools and Techniques for Formative and Summative Assessments of Learner Achievement in Mathematics and Comprehensive And Continuous Evaluation in Mathematics 5.4 Adaptations in Evaluation Procedure for Students With Disabilities 5.5 Reflections on how this paper facilitates the teacher within you
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs (10 Marks)
1. Pedagogical analysis of a unit of content from secondary school Mathematics Syllabus. Submit a report 2. Prepare a multimedia presentation on a topic with special reference to students with disabilities and submit. 3. Construct a question paper based on current CBSE / State Board of education, prepare its Scoring key, and marking scheme and submit 4. Analyzing errors committed by school children in Mathematics and preparing a remedial plan in the form of report
Transactions Lecture cum demonstration, Workshops and Seminars
Essential Readings · Carey, L.M. (1988). Measuring and Evaluating School Learning, Boston: Allyn and Bacon. · Chambers, P. (2010).Teaching Mathematics, New Delhi: Sage Publication South Asia. · Chapman, L. R. (1970). The Process of Learning Mathematics, New York: Pregamon Press. · David, H., Maggie, M. & Louann, H. L. (2007). Teaching Mathematics Meaningfully: Solutions for Reaching Struggling Learners, Canada: Amazon Books. 26
· David, W. (1988). How Children Think and Learn, New York: Blackwell Publishers Ltd. · James, A. (2005).Teaching of Mathematics, New Delhi: Neelkamal Publication · Kumar, S. (2009). Teaching of Mathematics, New Delhi: Anmol Publications. · Mangal, S.K. (1993).Teaching of Mathematics, New Delhi: Arya Book Depot. · Mani, M. N. G. (1992). Techniques of Teaching Blind Children, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers. · Mukhopadhyaya, S., Jangira, N. K., Mani, M.N. G., & Raychaudhary, N. (1987). Sourcebook for Training Teachers of Visually Handicapped, Delhi: NCERT. · Nemeth, A. (1973). Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Scientific Notation, Loviseville K: American Printing House. · Shankaran & Gupta, H. N. (1984). Content-Cum-Methodology of Teaching Mathematics, New Delhi: NCERT. · Siddhu, K.S. (1990). Teaching of Mathematics, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.
Suggested Readings · Keeley, P. K., & Cheryl, T. R. (2011). Mathematics Formative Assessment, Canada: Sage Publications. · National Curriculum Framework. (2005). NCERT, New Delhi: NCERT. · National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education. (2009). NCTE, New Delhi. · Teaching of Mathematics (ES-342), Blocks 1-4. (2000). IGNOU, New Delhi. · Text Books of Mathematics for Class-VI to X. (2006). NCERT, New Delhi. A 4 (c) PEDAGOGY OF TEACHING SOCIAL SCIENCE
Course Code: A 4 (c)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Introduction
This course explores the scope of social science. It develops competencies in designing
lesson plans and evaluations tools. It addresses the knowledge and understanding of the
methodologies, approaches to teach social sciences at secondary level and also modify and
adapt content-area curricula, materials and techniques for students with disabilities. The course
also focuses on various skills and competencies that teachers need to develop.
Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Explain the concept, nature and scope of social science. · Develop competencies for designing unit and lesson plans, as well as tools of evaluation for social science teaching. 27
· Develop skills in preparation and use of support materials for effective social science teaching. · Develop the ability to organize co-curricular activities and community resources for promoting social science learning. Module 1: Nature of Social Sciences 1.1 Concept, scope and nature of social science 1.2 Difference between social sciences and social studies 1.3 Aims and objectives of teaching social science at school level. 1.4 Significance of social science as a core subject 1.5 Role of social science teacher for an egalitarian society Module 2: Curriculum and Instructional Planning 2.1 Organization of social science curriculum at school level 2.2 Instructional Planning: Concept, need and importance 2.3 Unit plan and lesson plan: need and importance 2.4 Procedure of Unit and lesson Planning 2.5 Adaptation of unit and lesson plans for children with disabilities Module 3: approaches to teaching of Social Science 3.1 Curricular approaches: a) Coordination b) Correlational c) Contentric d) Spiral e) Integrated f) Regressive 3.2 Methods of teaching social science: Lecture, discussion, socialized recitation, source and project method. 3.3 Devices and techniques of teaching social studies ­ Narration, description, illustration, questioning, assignment, field trip, story telling, role play, Group and self study, programmed learning, inductive thinking, Concept mapping, expository teaching and problem solving 3.4 Instructional material for teaching of social science: Time-lines & Genealogical charts, Maps & Globes, Use of different types of Boards(Smart boards, Chalk Board, Flannel Board), Tape-records, Radio, Television, Films & Filmstrips, Overhead Projector, Social science games and Power Point Presentation. 3.5 Adaptations of material for teaching children with disabilities Module 4: Evaluation of learning in Social Science 4.1 Techniques of evaluating learner achievement in social Science: Written and Oral tests, Observation Tools 4.2 Techniques of evaluating learner achievement in social Science: Work Samples, Portfolio 28
4.3 Assessment: tools and techniques of Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE) for curricular and co-curricular subjects 4.4 Understanding teacher made test 4.5 Adaptations and accommodations for children with disabilities
Module 5: Social Science Teacher as a Reflective Practitioner 5.1 Reviewing text books of any three boards at primary level 5.2 Use of net based Resources: Open Educational Resources (OER), Virtual laboratories 5.3 Use of net based Resources: Learning Management Systems (LMS) 5.4 Development of a Professional Portfolio/ teaching Journal 5.6 5.5 Reflections on how this paper facilitates the teacher within you Transaction The student-teachers should be encouraged to read chapters and articles. There may be quizzes, seminars, field trips, lectures, demonstrations, school visits and observations to teach this course.
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Prepare a unit of social science content for a given child with disabilities 2. Create a sample LMS for a class and submit reflections 3. Prepare and submit an adapted teaching learning aid for a child with disabilities. 4. Construct a question paper based on current CBSE / State Board of education, prepare its Scoring key, and marking scheme and submit 5. Organize activities like quiz, mock-parliament, field trips, exhibitions and any other co-curricular activities in schools and write a report and submit. Essential Readings · Aggarwal, J. C. (2008). Principles, methods & techniques of teaching. UP: Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd. · Batra, P. (2010). Social Science Learning in Schools Perspective and Challenges, Sage Publications Pvt. Ltd; Pap/Com edition. · Chauhan, S. S. (2008). Innovations in teaching learning process. UP: Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd. · Dhand, H. (2009). Techniques of Teaching. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation. · Duplass, J. A. (2009). Teaching elementary social studies. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers. · Mangal, U. (2005). Samajik Shikshan, Arya Book Depot, New Delhi.
Suggested Readings: · Aggarwal, D.D (2000) Methods of Teaching Geography, Sarup & Sons, New Delhi · George Alex M. & Manad Amman(2009) Teaching Social Science in Schools : NCERT'S New Textbook Initiative · Mangal S.K. (2004) Teaching of Social Science, Arya Book Depot, Delhi 29
· Rai B.C (1999) Methods of Teaching Economics, Prakashan Kendra, Lucknow. · Sharma, R. A. (2008). Technological foundation of education. Meerut: R.Lall Books Depot. · Sharma, R. N. (2008). Principles and techniques of education. Delhi: Surjeet Publications. · Singh,Y. K. (2009). Teaching of history: Modern methods. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation. · Stone Randi(2008) Best Practices for Teaching Social Studies: What Award-Winning Classroom Teachers Do, Corwin
A 5 (a) PEDAGOGY OF TEACHING HINDI
Course Code: A 5 (a) Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours 30
Credits: 03 Marks: 75
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A 5 (b) PEDAGOGY OF teaching English
Course Code: A5 (b) Contact Hours: 60 Introduction
Notional Hours : 30
Credits: 03 Marks: 75
This course will enable the student-teachers to gain a strong knowledge base in nature of English language & literature, instructional planning and evaluation. It will help in applying theory to practice to design your own materials and plan lessons in preparation for teaching real classes. The course offers you the opportunity to explore in-depth aspects of English and to find out about the approaches and Current Practices of language teaching in relation to Indian and international contexts. The course also equips you with analytical and investigative skills and provides a foundation in issues related to English language teaching,second language pedagogy and language acquisition.
Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Explain the principles of language teaching, and evolution and trends in English literature. · Prepare an instructional plan in English · Adapt various approaches and methods to teach English language. · Use various techniques to evaluate the achievement of the learner in English. Module 1: Nature of English Language & literature 1.1 Principles of Language Teaching 1.2 Language Proficiency : Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency( CALP) 1.3 English Language in the school context: An evolutionary perspective 1.4 Current Trends in Modern English literature in Indian context 1.5 Teaching English as second language and challenges faced by Indian teachers Module 2: Instructional Planning 2.1 Aims and objectives of Teaching English at different stages of schooling 2.2 Instructional Planning: Need and Importance 2.3 Unit and lesson plan: Need and Importance 2.4 Procedure of Unit and Lesson Planning 2.5 Planning and adapting units and lessons for children with disabilities Module 3: Approaches and methods of teaching English
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3.1 Difference between an approach and a method. 3.2 Task based approach, co-operative learning, language across curriculum, communicative language teaching, Bilingual, Eclectic and Constructive approach 3.3 Methods Teaching English (Prose, Poetry, Drama, Grammar and Vocabulary)- i) Translation method. ii) Structural ­ Situational method. iii) Direct method. 3.4 Development of four basic language skills: Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing. 3.5 Accommodation in approaches and techniques in teaching children with disabilities Module 4: Instructional Materials 4.1 Importance of instructional material and their effective use. 4.2 The use of the instructional aids for effective teaching of English: Smart boards, Chalk Board, Flannel Board, Pictures/ Picture-cut-outs, Charts, Language games, reading cards, Worksheets, Handouts, and Audio Visual Aids (Tape-recorders, Radio, Television, Films and Filmstrips, Overhead Projector, Language Laboratory, and Powerpoint etc) 4.3 Construction of a teacher made test for English proficiency 4.4 Teaching portfolio 4.5 Adaptations of teaching material for children with disabilities Module 5: Evaluation 5.1 Evaluation - concept and need. 5.2 Testing language skills and language elements (vocabulary, grammar and phonology) 5.3 Adaptation of evaluation tools for children with disabilities 5.4 Individualized assessment for children with disabilities 5.5 Error analysis, diagnostic tests and enrichment measures.
Transaction This course should be taught through a series of workshops, seminars and presentations. Lectures, demonstrations and discussions for theory based topics. Students should be encouraged to use instructional material in their practice of teaching lessons. Adaptations in pedagogy, material and evaluation should be taught through workshops and specific case studies
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Design teaching programme based on error analysis and submit. 2. Develop a strategy to rectify any common error in the use of English. 3. Develop a language game to teach any language element. 4. Prepare worksheets to enrich vocabulary among secondary students with disabilities and submit. 5. Critically analyze any one poem or essay of a well known poet or writer and submit the report.
Essential Readings 35
· Allen, H., & Cambell, R. (1972). Teaching English as second Language, McGraw Hill, New York. · Bharthi, T., & Hariprasad, M. (2004). Communicative English, Neelkamal Publications, Hyderabad. · Bhatia, K.K. (2006). Teaching and Learning English as a Foreign Language. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi. · Grellet, F.(1980). Developing Reading Skills, Cambridge University Press, New York. · IGNOU CTE ­ 02 Certificate in Teaching of English (1989). The Structure of English, IGNOU, New Delhi. · IGNOU EEG ­ 02 Elective Course in English (1989). The Structure of Modern English Blocks (1 to 7), IGNOU, New Delhi. Suggested Readings: · Agnihotri, R.K. and Khanna A.L. (Ed.) 1996, English Grammar in context, Ratnasagar, Delhi. · Bhatia, K.K. (2006). Teaching and Learning English as a Foreign Language. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers. · Bhatia, K.K. and Kaur, Navneet (2011). Teaching and Learning English as a Foreign Language. Ludhiana :Kalyani Publishers. · Bindra, R. (2005). Teaching of English. Jammu: Radha Krishan Anand and Co. · Brumfit, C.J and Johnson (Ed.) 1979, The communicative Approach to Language Teaching, Oxford University Press, Oxford. · Donn Bryne (1988), Teaching Writing Skills, Longman, England. · Francoise Grellet (1980), Developing Reading Skills, Cambridge University Press. · Hari Prasad, M. & Prakashan, V. (2004), Communicative English, Neelkamal Publications, Hyderabad. · IGNOU EEG ­ 02 Elective Course in English (1989), The structure of modern English Blocks (1 to 7), IGNOU, New Delhi. · Krashen, D. (1992), Principles and Practice in second Language Acquisition, Pergamum Press Oxford. · Krishna Swamy (2003), Teaching English: Approaches, Methods and Techniques, Macmillan Publication New Delhi · Sachdeva, M. S. (2007). Teaching of English. Patiala: Twenty First Century Publications. · Sahu, B. K. (2004). Teaching of English. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers. · Shaik, M & Gosh, R. N (2005), Techniques of Teaching English, Neelkamal Publications, Hyderabad. 36
· Sharma, P. (2011). Teaching of English: Skill and Methods. Delhi: Shipra Publication. 37
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B GROUP: ABILITY ENHANCEMENT COMPULSORY COURSES
B 6 INCLUSIVE EDUCATION
Course Code: B 6
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Introduction
The course is designed to develop an understanding about inclusive education and addressing
diversity in the mainstream classroom. It is also formulated in a way that the learners will know
the pedagogical practices and recognizes ways in which different stakeholders can collaborate
for the success of inclusive education.
Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Explain the construct of inclusive education & the progression from segregation towards valuing& appreciating diversity in inclusive education · Explicate the national &key international policies & frameworks facilitating inclusive education · Enumerate the skills in adapting instructional strategies for teaching in mainstream classrooms · Describe the inclusive pedagogical practices & its relation to good teaching. · Expound strategies for collaborative working and stakeholders support in implementing inclusive education Module 1: Introduction to Inclusive Education 1.1 Marginalization versus Inclusion: Meaning & Definitions 1.2 Changing Practices in Education of Children with Disabilities: Segregation, Integration& Inclusion 1.3 Understanding Diversity in Classrooms: Learning Styles, Linguistic & Socio-Cultural Multiplicity 1.4 Principles of Inclusive Education: Access, Equity, Relevance, Participation & Empowerment, Natural proportion 1.5 Barriers to Inclusive Education: Attitudinal, Physical & Instructional Module 2: Polices & Frameworks Facilitating Inclusive Education 2.1 Need and scope of policies and legislations
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2.2 International Conventions: Convention on Rights of a Child (1989), United Nations Convention of Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) (2006) 2.3 International Framework: Biwako Millenium Framework of Action (2002), MDG, 2015 2.4: National Programs: SSA (2000), RTE (2006), RMSA (2009), IEDSS (2013) 2.5: Future Constitutional Provisions: RPD Bill (Proposed), NPE (Draft 2016)
Module 3: Adaptations Accommodations and Modifications 3.1 Meaning, Difference, Need & Steps 3.2 Specifics for Children with Sensory Disabilities 3.3 Specifics for Children with Neuro-Developmental Disabilities 3.4 Specifics for Children with Loco Motor & Multiple Disabilities 3.5 Engaging Gifted Children
Module 4: Inclusive Academic Instructions 4.1 universal design for Learning: Multiple Means of Access, Expression, Engagement & Assessment 4.2 Co-Teaching Methods: One Teach One Assist, Station-Teaching, Parallel Teaching, Alternate Teaching & Team Teaching 4.3 Differentiated Instructions: Content, Process & Product 4.4 Peer Mediated Instructions: Class Wide Peer Tutoring, Peer Assisted learning strategies 4.5 ICT for Instructions
Module 5: Supports and Collaborations for Inclusive Education 5.1 Stakeholders of Inclusive Education & Their Responsibilities 5.2 Advocacy & Leadership for Inclusion in Education 5.3Family Support & Involvement for Inclusion 5.4 Community Involvement for Inclusion 5.5 Resource Mobilisation for Inclusive Education
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs (10 Marks)
1. Visit Special Schools Of Any Two Disabilities & An Inclusive School & Write Observation Report Highlighting Pedagogy 2. Prepare A Checklist For Accessibility In Mainstream Schools For Children With Disabilities and submit 3. Design A Poster On Inclusive Education and submit for evaluation 4. Prepare A Lesson Plan On Any One School Subject Of Your Choice Using Any One Inclusive Academic Instructional Strategy and submit
TRANSACTIONS Group discussions following videos and visits; Debate for Inclusion vs. Segregation &
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Self study for legislations and frameworks Suggested Readings · Bartlett, L. D. and Weisentein, G. R. (2003).Successful Inclusion for Educational Leaders. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. · Chaote, J. S. (1991). Successful Mainstreaming.Allyn and Bacon · Choate, J. S. (1997).Successful Inclusive Teaching. Allyn and Bacon · Daniels, H. (1999) .Inclusive Education.London: Kogan. · Deiner, P. L. (1993). Resource for Teaching Children with Diverse Abilities, Florida: Harcourt Brace and Company · Dessent, T. (1987).Making Ordinary School Special. Jessica Kingsley Pub. · Gargiulo, R. M. Special Education in Contemporary Society: An Introduction to Exceptionality.Belmont: Wadsworth. · Gartner, A. &Lipsky, D. D. (1997) Inclusion and School Reform Transferring America's Classrooms,Baltimore: P. H. Brookes Publishers. · Giuliani, G. A. &Pierangelo, R. (2007) Understanding, Developing and Writing IEPs . Corwin press:Sage Publishers. · Gore, M. C. (2004) .Successful Inclusion Strategies for Secondary and Middle School Teachers, Crowin Press, Sage Publications. · Hegarthy, S. &Alur, M. (2002) Education of Children with Special Needs: from Segregation to Inclusion, Corwin Press. Sage Publishers · Karant, P. &Rozario, J. ((2003).LEARNING DISABILITIES in India.Sage Publications. · Karten, T. J. (2007). More Inclusion Strategies that Work. Corwin Press, Sage Publications. · King-Sears, M. (1994) Curriculum-Based Assessment in Special Edcuation. California: Singular Publications. · Lewis, R. B. &Doorlag, D. (1995) Teaching Special Students in the Mainstream.4th Ed. New Jersey: Pearson · McCormick, Sandra.(1999)Instructing Students who Have Literacy Problems. 3rd Ed. New Jersey, Pearson · Rayner, S. (2007).Managing Special and Inclusive Education, Sage Publications. · Ryandak, D. L. &Alper, S. (1996) Curriculum content for Students with Moderate and SevereDisabilities in Inclusive Setting.Boston, Allyn and Bacon · Sedlak, R. A. &Schloss, P. C. (1986).Instructional Methods for Students with Learning and Behaviour Problems. Allyn and Bacon 43
· Stow L. &Selfe, L. (1989) Understanding Children with Special Needs. London :Unwin Hyman. · Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R. Turnbull, M. Shank, D. L. (1995). Exceptional Lives: Special Education in Today's Schools. 2nd Ed.New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.Inc. · Vlachou D. A. (1997) Struggles for Inclusive Education: An ethnographic study. Philadelphia: Open University Press · Westwood P. (2006) Commonsense Methods for Children with Special Educational Needs-Strategies for the Regular Classroom.4th Edition, London RoutledgeFalmer: Taylor & Francis Group. B 7 INTRODUCTION TO SENSORY DISABILITIES
Course Code: B 7
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Introduction
The course is designed to provide a basic understanding to the student-teachers about the nature
and needs of different types of sensory disabilities. It will also equip them in undertaking
screening, planning and instructing students with sensory disabilities.
Objectives: After completing this course, the student-teachers will be able to: · Name the different types of sensory impairments &its prevalence& describe the process of hearing & implications of various types of hearing loss · Explain the issues & ways to address challenges in educating students with hearing loss · Describe nature, characteristics & assessment of students with low vision & visual impairment · Suggest educational placement and curricular strategies for students with low vision & visual impairment · Explicate the impact of deaf-blindness & practices for functional development Module 1: Hearing Impairment: Nature & Classification 1.1 Types of sensory impairments: Single (Hearing Impairment/ Hard of Hearing & Visual Impairment / low vision) & Dual sensory impairment (Deaf-blindness) 1.2 Importance of hearing 1.3 Process of hearing & its impediment leading to different types of hearing loss 1.4 Definition of hearing loss, demographics& associated terminologies: deaf/Deaf/deafness/ impairment/disability/handicapped 44
1.5 Developmental challenges arising due to congenital and acquired hearing loss Module 2: Impact of hearing loss 2.1Characteristics of learners with hearing loss and impact of different degrees of hearing impairment on communication 2.2 Language & communication issues attributable to hearing loss& need for early Intervention 2.3 Communication options, preferences & facilitators of individuals with hearing loss 2.4 Issues & measures in literacy development and scholastic achievement of students with hearing loss 2.5 Restoring techniques using human (interpreter) & technological support (hearing devices) Module 3: Visual Impairment--Nature and Assessment 3.1. Process of Seeing and Common Eye Disorders in India; 3.2. Blindness and Low Vision--Definition and Classification; 3.2. Demographic Information--NSSO and Census 2011; 3.4. Importance of Early Identification and Intervention; 3.5. Functional Assessment Procedures. Module 4: Educational Implications of Visual Impairment 4.1. Effects of Blindness--Primary and Secondary; 4.2. Selective Educational Placement; 4.3. Teaching Principles; 4.4. Expanded Core Curriculum--Concept and Areas; 4.5. Commonly Used Low Cost And Advanced Assistive Devices. Module 5: Deaf-blindness 5.1 Definition, causes, classification, prevalence and characteristics of deaf-blindness 5.2 Effects and implications of deaf-blindness on activities of daily living & education 5.3 Screening, Assessment, Identification & interventional strategies of deaf-blindness 5.4 Fostering early communication development: Methods, assistive devices and practices including AAC 5.5 Addressing orientation, mobility & educational needs of students with deaf-blindness Transactions Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions Videos and Interactions with Students/adults with Disabilities, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. Hands on Experience for Notional Hours: (Any Two): 30 hours 10 marks 45
1. Interact with 2-3 Deaf adults and reflect upon their preferences about communication methods 2. Make a poster on positive attitude towards sensory impairments. 3. Make a check list for identifying low vision in primary classes 4. Do web search on deafblindness and write an essay on strategies for developing daily living skills. Essential readings: · Bradford, L. J. & Hardy, W.G. (1979). Hearing and Hearing Impairment. New York: Grune and Stratton · Davis, H. & Silverman, S. R. (1970). Hearing and Deafness - Part I. Holt, London: Rinehart & Winston. · Holbrook Cay M. & Koenig Alan. J (Eds.) (2000) Foundations of Education, Vol I: History and Theory of Teaching Children and Youths with Visual Impairments. (2nd ed):New York : AFB Press · Handbook on Deafblindness (2005) Sense International India. Retrieved online on 24/4/2015 · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Kelley, P. & Gale, G. (1998). Towards Excellence: Effective education for students with vision impairments. Sydney: North Rocks Press. · Lowenfeld, B (1973).Visually Handicapped Child in School and Society; American Foundation for the Blind; NewYork. · Lynas, W. (2000). Communication options. In J. Stokes (Ed), Hearing Impaired Infants ­ Support in the first eighteen months. London: Whurr Publishers Ltd · Martin, F. N. Clark, J.G. (2009). Introduction to Audiology. 10th ed. Boston: Pearson Education. OR · Martin, F. N. Clark, J.G. (2012). Introduction to Audiology. 11th ed. Boston: Pearson Education. · National institute for the Visually Handicapped.(2015). Information Booklet on Visual Impairment in India, Dehradun: Government of India. · Nerbonne, M. A. & Schow, R.L. (2002). Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. OR · Nerbonne, M. A. & Schow, R.L. (2013). Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation. 6th ed. Boston: Pearson Education. · Northern, J. L. & Downs, M. P. (2002). Hearing in Children. (5th Ed.) Philadelphia: · Williams & Wilkins · Prescod, S. V. (1978). Audiology hand book of hearing disorders. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company. 46
· Sataloff, R. T. & Sataloff, J. (2005). Hearing Loss. (4th Ed.) London: Taylor & Francis · Sims, L. G., Walter, G. G., & Whitehead, R. L. (1981). Deafness and Communication: Assessment and Training. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins. · Warren, D. H. (1994). Blindness and Children: An Individual Differences Approach. New York: Cambridge University Press Suggested Readings: · Auditory-Verbal International (1991). Auditory-verbal position statement. Auricle 4:1112 · Harp, B. (2006). The handbook of literacy assessment and evaluation, (3rd Eds). Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon Publishers, Inc. · Katz, J. (1985). Handbook of Clinical Audiology. (4th Ed.) Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins · Loreman.T, Deppeler.J & Harvey.D (2005).Inclusive education- A practical guide to supporting diversity in the classroom.(2nd Eds.). U.K. Routledge · Norris G, Haring & Romer L.T (1995). Welcoming Students who are deafblind to typicalclassrooms.U.S : Paul H Brookes · Pandey, R. S. & Advani, L. (1995).Perspectives in disability and rehabilitation. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing house Pvt. Ltd. · Proceedings from National Conference on Centenary for Work for the Blind in India(1987); All India Confederation of the Blind and Christoffel Blinden Mission; Delhi:R.K.Printers · Scholl, G.T. (1986). Foundations of education for blind and visually handicapped children and youth. New York: American Foundation for the blind. · Tucker, I. & Nolan, M. (1984).Educational Audiology. London: Croom Helm. · Tye-Murray, N. (1998). Intervention plans for children. In Tye-Murray N. (Eds) Foundations of aural rehabilitation. San Diego: Singular. P381­413.
B 8 INTRODUCTION TO NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
CourseCode: B 8
Credits: 03
Contact Hours:60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks:75
Introduction The course integrates relevant subject matter in the areas of Learning Disability, intellectual Disability and Autism Spectrum Disorder. This course will prepare pre-service teachers to work
47
with students with Neuro Developmental disabilities in inclusive and specialized settings. It fosters the acquisition of the broad-based knowledge and skills needed to provide effective educational programs for students with learning and behavior characteristics. The course emphasizes implications for educational and vocational programming, curriculum, and instruction. Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Discuss the characteristics and types of learning disability. · Describe the tools, areas of assessment and apply intervention strategies to enhance learning · Explain the characteristics and types of Intellectual disability. · Describe the tools, areas of assessment and prepare and apply intervention strategies for independent living · Explain the characteristics and types of Autism spectrum Disorder · Describe the tools, areas of assessment and apply intervention strategies Module 1: Overview of Neuro-developmental disabilities 1.1 Neuro-developmental disabilities: concept 1.2 Types and characteristics 1.3 Prevalence and incidence 1.4 Educational implications: Needs 1.5 Educational implications: Classroom Strategies Module 2: Learning Disability: Nature, needs and intervention 2.1 Definition, Types 2.2 Characteristics (Typewise) 2.3 Areas of assessment 2.4 Strategies for reading, writing and maths 2.5 Curricular adaptation, IEP Module 3: Intellectual Disability: Nature, needs and intervention 3.1 Definition, Types and Characteristics 3.2 Areas of assessment 3.3 Strategies for functional academics and social skills 3.4 Assistive devices, Adaptations, Individualized Education Plan, Person centered plan, Life skill education 3.5 Vocational training and independent living 48
Module 4: Autism Spectrum Disorder: Nature, needs and intervention 4.1 Definition, Types and Characteristics 4.2 Areas of assessment 4.3 Instructional Approaches 4.4 Teaching Methods 4.5 Vocational training and career opportunities
Module 5: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Nature, needs and intervention 1.1 Definition, types and characteristics 1.2 Areas of assessment 1.3 Environmental adaptations 1.4 Instructional methods 1.5 Behaviour management methods
Hands on experience for notional hours (any two).
30 hrs 10 marks
1. Review an assessment tool for a child with learning disability in the given area and report Your reflections 2. Read a life skill curriculum and reflect upon it 3. Study a screening tool for children with autism Spectrum Disorder. Use it with three children and submit report. 4. Plan an educational program on the basis of an assessment report of a child with ID/Autism 5. Prepare a small checklist to suspect ADHD among children
Transactions: Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. SuggestedReadings: · Accardo,P.J., Magnusen,C., and Capute,A.J Autism: Clinical and Research Issues. York Press, Baltimore, 2000 · American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. TR). Washington DC. 2000 · Bala, M.J : Methods of Teaching Exceptional Children, 2004 · Browning , R, E: Teaching Students with Behaviour and Serve Emotional Problems, Jampala, M, B: Methods of Teaching Exceptional Children, 2004 · Higgins J : Practical Ideas that Really work for students with Dyslexia and other reading Disorders, 2003 · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Moyes, R.A Building Sensory Friendly Classrooms to Support Children with Challenging Behaviors: Implementing Data Driven Strategies, 2010
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· Pierangelo, R. & Giuliani G.A.Transition services in Special Education, Allyn& Bacon, 2003 · Reddy G.L. & Rama, R: Education of children with special needs, New Delhi - Discovery Pub. 2000 · Simpson, R. L, Myles, B, S: Educating children and youth with autism: strategies for effective practice. (2nd edition) Pro Ed. Texas, 2008 · Smith, D.D: Introduction to Special Education Teaching in an Age of opportunity, Allyn& Bacon, 2003 · Strichart, S., S :Teaching Study Strategies to Students with Learning Disabilities, Allyn & Bacon, Boston 1993 · Swady, E.R: Diagnosis & Correction of Reading, Difficulties, Allyn& Bacon Boston 1989 · Taylor, B: Reading Difficulties : Instruction and Assessment, Random House, New York, 1988 · Wong. B, Y, L: .The ABCs of Learning Disabilities, 1996.
B 9 INTRODUCTION TO LOCOMOTOR AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES
CourseCode: B 9 Contact Hours:60
Notional Hours: 30
Credits: 03 Marks:75
Introduction The course aims to develop understanding about planning effective educational programme and functional activities for students with locomotor and multiple disabilities. This course intends to develop required skills in teacher trainee to identify the children with locomotor and multiple disabilities and also plan an effective programme education as well as for creating awareness on these conditions. Teacher is also expected to plan an effective therapeutic and programme and also refer for medical intervention whenever if necessary. Objectives After completing the course the student-teachers will be able to · Identify the persons with Locomotor disabilities such as Cerebral Palsy, Amputees, Polio, Leprosy cured, Muscular dystrophies, Neural and spinal defects and Multiple disabilities. · Plan an effective programme for creating awareness about the persons with Locomotor disabilities and Multiple disabilities. · Plan an effective therapeutic and programme for the persons with Locomotor disabilities and Multiple disabilities and to refer for medical intervention if necessary. · Plan an effective educational programme and functional activities for the persons with Locomotor disabilities and Multiple disabilities. Unit 1: Cerebral Palsy (CP) 1.1. CP: Nature, Types and its Associated Conditions 50
1.2. Assessment of Functional Difficulties of CP including Abnormalities of Joints and Movements (Gaits) 1.3. Provision of Therapeutic Intervention and Referral of Children with CP 1.4. Implications of Functional Limitations of Children with CP in Education 1.5. Creating Prosthetic Environment in School and Home: Seating Arrangements, Positioning and Handling Techniques at Home and School Unit 2: Amputees, Polio, Spinal Cord Injuries Spina-bifida and Muscular Dystrophy 2.1. Meaning and Classification 2.2. Basic understanding of Assessment of Functional Difficulties 2.3. Provision of Therapeutic Intervention and Referral 2.4. Implications of Functional Limitations for Education 2.5. Creating Prosthetic Environment in School and Home: Seating Arrangements, Positioning and Handling Techniques at Home and School Unit 3: Multiple Disabilities and Other Disabling Conditions 3.1 Multiple Disabilities: Meaning and Classifications 3.2 Various Combinations of Multiple Disabilities and Associated Conditions (Epilepsy, Motor and Sensory Conditions) 3.3 Basic understanding of other Disabling Conditions such as Leprosy Cured Students, Tuberous Sclerosis and Multiple Sclerosis 3.4 Implications of Functional Limitations for Education 3.5 Creating Prosthetic Environment in School and Home: Seating Arrangements, Positioning and HandlingTechniques at Home and School Module 4: Facilitating Teaching-Learning in school 4.1 Introduction to early intervention and multidisciplinary team 4.2 Introduction to functional and vocational education 4.3 Government Concessions, schemes and facilities- educational, aids and appliances, transport 4.4 Introduction to IEP and TLM for children with CP, Amputees, Polio, Spinal Cord Injuries, Spina-bifida and Muscular Dystrophy and Multiple Disabilities and Other Disabling Conditions 4.5 Facilitating social and peer group relationships
Module 5: Introduction to Therapeutic Intervention
5.1 Problems & Management of hand function
5.2 Assistive Technology to Facilitate Learning and Functional Activities for CP, Amputees,
Polio, Spinal Cord Injuries, Spina-bifida and Muscular Dystrophy, Multiple Disabilities and
Other Disabling Conditions
5.3 Universal Design for accessibility
5.4 Partnership with individuals and families
5.5 Alternative and Augmentative Communication in classroom
Hands on experience for notional hours (any two).
30 hrs 10 marks
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1. Make a list of child's difficulties in activities of daily living and academic activities. 2. Make a poster on providing barrier free environment to be put up in mainstream schools. 3. Learn any one option available for AAC and write your reflections on it. 4. Make a power point presentation on multidisciplinary approach. 5. Observe two sessions of therapeutic intervention provided to CWCP and submit reflections Essential Readings · Banerjee, Arundhati. Infant assessment (0-2 years) Calcutta: Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy · Cerebral palsy grast bachchon ke liye aao ek sath padhe Majumdar, Manjulika Sen Reena . Calcutta : Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy · Audiovisual training kit on cerebral palsy part 1-14 Calcutta: Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy · Cerebral palsy : a complete guide for care giving / Miller, F ; Bachrach, S J .-2nd Ed. . Baltimore : Johns Hopkins Press Health Book , 2006 · Manual (series-Curriculum guidelines for students with multiple disabilities) : physical and neurological / Choudhary, Sipra Roy ; Banerjee, Ranu and Dutt, Vijaya Calcutta : Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy , 1999 · Vocational rehabilitation for persons with Locomotors disabilities / Goel, Sushil Kumar; Parameshwar, Kannekanti. Agra: Harprasad Institute of Behavioral Studies, 2012 · Training module on multiple disabilities / Sarv Shiksha Abhiyaan . New Delhi : Sarv Shiksha Abhiyaan · Training module on cerebral palsy and locomotors impairment / Sarv Shiksha Abhiyaan . New Delhi : Sarv Shiksha Abhiyaan · Physical assessment of child with cerebral palsy part 3-4/ IICP, Calcutta: Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy · Bridge Course manual locomotors impairment and associated disabilities /Goyal, H C,; Ramachandran, B . New Delhi : RCI · Miller, F. and Bachrach, S.J. (2012). Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving.A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. · SarvaSikshaAbhiyan. Module on Cerebral Palsy. http://ssa.nic.in/inclusiveeducation/ training-module-for-resource-teachers-for-disablechildren/ Module%205%20Cerebral%20Palsy.pdf/at_download/file · SarvaSikshaAbhiyan .Module on Multiple Disabilities. http://ssa.nic.in/inclusiveeducation/ training-module-for-resource-teachers-for-disablechildren/ Module%203%20Multiple%20Disability.pdf/at_download/file B 10 (A) GUIDANCE & COUNSELLING 52
Course Code: B 10 (A) Contact Hours: 60
Credits: 03
Notional Hours: 30 hrs
Marks: 75
Introduction
Guidance and counseling have been vital aspects of education. One of the purposes of education is to help an individual becoming useful member of society. This course has been designed with the fullest understanding of the important role you are going to play in schools and community as a whole. The course modules have been written to enable you to assist the young students with hearing impairment in schools to develop values and life orientations, to assist students in making appropriate and satisfying personal, vocational and educational choices; and to assist students acquire a positive image of self through self understanding the needs and problems
Objectives After completing this course the student will be able to: · Apply the skills of guidance and counselling in classroom situations · Describe the process of development of self-image and self-esteem · Appreciate the types and issues of counselling and guidance in inclusive settings Module 1: Introduction to Guidance 1.1 Guidance : concept, aims and Functions 1.2 Need for Guidance 1.3 Principles of Guidance 1.4 Areas of Guidance : Educational / Vocational / Personal Guidance 1.5 Role of teachers in guidance for students with disability
Module 2: Introduction to Counseling 2.1 Counseling: Meaning, nature and characteristics of counseling 2.2 Core conditions in counseling (special concerns in counseling) 2.3 Types of counseling: Directive, non directive and eclectic counseling 2.4 Skills and competencies of a counselor 2.5 Professional ethics of a counselor Module 3: Enhancing Self Image and Self Esteem 3.1 Concept of Self as Human 3.2 Understanding of Feelings and Changes 3.3 Developing Mental Health and Coping Skills 3.4 Personality Development, 3.5 Role of Teacher in Developing Self-Esteem in Children Module 4: Approaches and Services offered in guidance and counseling 4.1 Approaches: child centered, supportive and family 4. 2 Services offered in guidance and counseling: placement Services 53
4.3 Services offered in guidance and counseling: remedial service 4.4 Services offered in guidance and counseling: Student information service 4.5 Services offered in guidance and counseling: Follow-up service
Module 5: Guidance and Counseling in Inclusive Education 5.1 Current status with Reference to Indian schools 5.2 Role of a counsellor in mainstreaming and providing supportto students with special needs 5.3 Guidance/ couselling needs of families of children with special needs 5.4 Group Guidance: Group Leadership Styles and Group Processes 5.5 Challenges in Group Guidance
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Report your reflections on 2 sessions of professional guidance that you observed 2. Hold simulation of a parent guidance session and submit your reflections 3. Interview a professionally active school counsellor and make a report on counselling needs of children with special needs 4.Make a poster on encouraging school students to seek counsellors help for academic as well as interpersonal concerns 5.Make a list of points to be covered with parent guidance of a specific disability
Transactions : Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. Essential reading
· Shah, A (2008) Basics in guidance and Counselling. Global Vision Publishing House · Nayak, A.K. (1997) Guidance and Counselling. APH Publishing, Delhi · Rao, V.K. & Reddy, R.S. (2003) Academic Environment: Advice, Counsel and Activities. Soujanya Books · Sharma, V.K. (2005) Education and Training of Educational and Vocational Guidance. Soujanya Books · Naik, P.S (2013) Counselling Skills for Educationists. Soujanya Books Suggested Reading · Kapunan, R.R (2004) Fundamentals of Guidance and Counselling. Rex Printing Company, Phillipines · Pal, O.B. (2011) Educational and Vocational Guidance and Counselling. Soujanya Books
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B 10 (B) EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE, INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION
Course Code: B 10(B)
Credits:03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Introduction The course is designed to provide the student-teachers with an insight into developmental milestones of typical children. This will enable the learners to understand deviations and strategies to address them in the critical phase of development. It will also help the learnersunderstand the importance of transitions and its requirements.
Objectives After undertaking the course the students will be able to: · Explain the biological & sociological foundations of early childhood education · Describe the developmental systems approach and role responsibilities of interdisciplinary teams for early education of children with disabilities · Enumerate the inclusive early education pedagogical practices · Understand the dynamics of early intervention
Module 1: The Early Years: An Overview 1.1 Facts about Early Childhood Learning & Development 1.2 Basic understanding of Neural Plasticity 1.3 Critical Periods of Development of Motor, Auditory, Visual, Linguistic & Cognitive Skills 1.4 Understanding basic concept of Sensitive Periods of Learning: Maria Montessori's Framework, Windows of Opportunity & Learning Timelines of Development in Young Children 1.5 Integrating Theories of Development & Learning for designing Early Childhood Education activities
Module 2: Early Education of Children with Disabilities 2.1Young Children at Risk & Child Tracking 2.2 Interdisciplinary Assessments & Intervention Plans: Need and challenges 2.3 Developmental Systems Model for Early Intervention (Of Guralnick, 2001) 2.4 Curricular Activities for Development of Skills of: Imagination, Joy, Creativity, Symbolic Play, Musical, Aesthetic, Linguistic, Emergent Literacy, Scientific & Cultural Skills 2.5 Involving Families in early education / intervention: why and How
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Module 3: Inclusive Early Childhood Educational (ECE) Practices 3.1 Concept of Natural Environments and Importance of Universal Designs of Learning (UDL). 3.2 Practices for Inclusive ECE Programs: Adaptations of Physical Environment & Equipments, Visual Support Materials, Parent Partnerships, Friendships & Engagements with Typical Children 3.3 Principles of Inclusive ECE Practices: Full Participation, Open Ended Activities, Collaborative Planning, 3.4Collaborating with Parents, Family Education &Developing Individualised Family Service Plan (IFSP) 3.5 Concept of School Readiness and transition
Module 4: Early screening, identification and intervention 4.1 Early identification and intervention: defining the terms and setting criteria 4.2 Early Intervention: Need and Justification 4.3 Parameters of effective early intervention programs 4.4 Early screening, identification and early intervention: managing the link 4.5 Managing early intervention-Multi disciplinary involvement
Module 5: Early Intervention: National and International scene
5.1 Outcomes of early intervention: Areas and Preconditions of success) 5.2 Global benchmarks/global trends including JCIH Reference 5.3 Early intervention services: Indian scenario and challenges 5.4 Early intervention and inclusive education 5.5 Reflections on learnt content and drawing pro active conclusions
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs (10 Marks)
1. Prepare and submit a poster on developmental milestones & learning timelines of children of any age group 2. Participation in Family empowerment program and writing reflections 3. Develop a creative teaching learning materials for children for overall stimulation 4. Make a checklist for early identification of preschoolers for teachers. 5. Visit early intervention center / preschool unit and make a list of learning points
Transactions : Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge.
Essential Readings
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· Costello.P.M (2000).Thinking Skills & Early Childhood Education. London: David Fulton Publishers. · Dunn.S.G. & Dunn.K (1992).Teaching Elementary students through their individual learning styles:Practical approaches for grades 3-6. Massachusetts: Allyn & Bacon. · Klausmeir H.J. & Sipple. T.S. (1980). Learning & Teaching Concepts. A strategy for testing applications of theory. New York: Academic Press · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Mohanty J & Mohanty. B (1999).Early Chilhood Care and Education. Delhi: Offset Printers Suggested Readings · Barbour.N & Seefeldt.C (1998).Early Childhood Education. An Introduction (4th Eds). U.K: Prentice Hall. · Broman.B.C (1978).The Early Years in Childhood Education. Chicago: RandMcNally College Publishing Company. · Catron.C.E. & Allen.J (1993).Early Childhood Curriculum. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company. · Dahlberg.G , Moss.P & Pence. A (2007). Beyond Quality in Early Childhood Care and Education.(2nd Ed.). New York: Routledge Publication. · Dopyera.M.L & Dopyera. J (1977). Becoming a Teacher of Young Children. New York:Random House Publications. · Gordon.I.J (1972).Early Childhood Education. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Hamilton.D.S & Flemming (1990).Resources for Creative Teaching in Early Childhood Education (2nd Edition). Tokyo: Harcourt Brace Jovanvich. · Hilderbrand.V (1991).Introduction to Earcly Childhood Education. New York: MacMillan Publishing · Krogh.S.L & Slentz.K (2001).Early Childhood Education, Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow.London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers · Range.D.G, Layton.J.R.& Roubinek.D.C.(1980). Aspects of Early Childhood Education.Theory to Reserch to Practice. New York: Academic Press. · Spodek.B, Saracho.O.N & Davis.M.D (1987).Foundations of Early Childhood Education. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, · Wortham.S.C (NK).Measurement & Evaluation in early childhood education (2nd Eds.).Ohio: Merrill Prentice Hall. B 10 (C) ORIENTATION AND MOBILITY 57
Course Code: B 10 (C) Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Credits: 03 Marks: 75
Introduction
Movement with independence in the environment has been stated to be one of the major challenges of vision loss. In order to facilitate their meaningful empowerment, therefore, it is necessary to provide students with visual impairment skills and techniques which enable them to cope with these challenges. Developments, especially during and after World War II, have led to the emergence of a large variety of such strategies, skills and technologies, which are covered under the discipline titled Orientation and Mobility. So, the present course carrying the same title introduces the learners to various crucial aspects of this vital subject. It is hoped that through the study of the course, the learners would be in a better position to understand the implications of vision loss with reference to independent movement. It would also enable them to get insights into basic skills and components essential for meaningful orientation and easy and graceful movement for the visually impaired.
Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Describe the nature and scope of O&M as also the O& M related responsibilities of the special teacher. · Acquire basic knowledge of human guide techniques. · Describe pre-cane and cane travel skills and devices. · Get acquainted with the importance and skills of training in independent living for the visually impaired. Module 1: Introduction to Orientation and Mobility 1.1 Orientation and Mobility --Definition, Importance and Scope 1.2 Basic Terminologies Associated with O&M: Trailing, Landmarks, Clues, Cues, Shoreline, Squaring Off, Clockwise Direction, Sound Masking, Sound Shadow 1.3 Roles of Other Senses in O&M Training 1.4 Special Responsibilities of Special Teacher/ Educator with reference to O&M Training 1.5 Blindfold--Rationale and Uses for the Teacher Module 2: Understanding and practicing Human/Sighted Guide Technique 2.1 Grip 2.2 Stance 2.3 Hand Position 2.4 Speed Control 58
2.5 Negotiating: Narrow Spaces, Seating Arrangements, Staircases, Muddy paths
Module 3: Pre-Cane Skills 3.1 Upper and Lower Body protection 3.2 Room Familiarization 3.3 Using Oral Description for Orientation 3.4 Search Patterns 3.5 Building Map reading Skills
Module 4: Cane Travel Techniques and Devices 4.1 Canes--Types, Parts, Six Considerations 4.2 Cane Travel Techniques: Touch Technique, Touch and Drag Technique, Diagonal Cane Technique 4.3 Use of Public Transport 4.4 Asking for Help: When and How 4.5 Electronic Devices, Tactile and Auditory Maps -- Description and Uses
Module 5: Training In Independent Living Skills 5.1 Self Care, Gait and Posture 5.2 Personal Grooming 5.3 Eating Skills and Etiquette 5.4 Identification of Coins and Currency Notes 5.5 Basics of Signature Writing
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Act as a sighted guide in different situations/settings and submit reflections. 2. Prepare a list of canes and other devices available with various sources along with prices. 3. Undergo an experience of moving under a blindfold for a few minutes and describe the experience in 200 words. 4. Make a short PowerPoint presentation on the importance of O&M for the visually impaired. 5. Draw up a list of important clues /cues/landmarks which the visually impaired student can use in the school. Transactions : Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, Demonstrations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge.
Essential Readings:
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· Blasch, B. B., Weiner, W. R., & Welsh, R. L. (1997). Foundations of Orientation and Mobility (2nd ed.). New York: AFB Press. · Cutter, Joseph (2006). Independent Movement and Travel in Blind Children. North Carolina: IAP · Fazzi, D. L. & Petersmeyer, B. A. (2001). Imagining the Possibilities: Creative Approaches to Orientation and Mobility Instruction for Persons who are Visually Impaired. New York: AFB Press. · Jaekle, Robert C.( 1993). Mobility Skills for Blind People : A Guide for Use in Rural Areas. Christoffel BlindenMission. · Knott, N. I. (2002). Teaching Orientation and Mobility in the Schools: An Instructor's Companion. New York: AFB Press. · Smith, A. J. & Geruschat, D. R. (1996). Orientation and Mobility for Children and Adults with Low Vision. In A. L. Corn & A. J. Koenig (Eds.), Foundations of Low Vision: Clinical and Functional Perspectives .New York: AFB. Suggested Readings: · Dodds, Allan(1986). Mobility Training for Visually Handicapped People. London: Croom Helm · Hill, Everett and Ponder, Purvis (1976). Orientation and Mobility Techniques. New York: AFB · Jacobson, W.H. (1993). The Art and Science of Teaching Orientation and Mobility to Persons with Visual Impairments. New York: AFB Press. · Singh, J.P. (2003). Technology for the Blind. New Delhi: Kanishka Publication
B 10 (D) COMMUNITY BASED REHABILITATION
Course Code: B 10(D) Notional Hours: 30
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60 Marks: 75
Objectives After completing this course the student will be able to: · Explain the concept, principles and scope of community based rehabilitation · Learn the strategies for promoting public participation in CBR · Apply suitable methods for preparing persons with disability for rehabilitation within the community · Provide need-based training to persons with disabilities 60
· Develop an understanding of the role of government and global agencies in CBR Module 1 Introduction to Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) 1.1 Concept and definition of CBR 1.2 Principles of CBR 1.3 Difference between CBR and institutional living 1.4 Socio-cultural and economic contexts of CBR 1.5 Scope and inclusion of CBR in government policies and programs Module 2Preparing Community for CBR 2.1Awareness program-Types and methods 2.2 Advocacy - citizen and self 2.3 Focus group discussion 2.4 Family counselling and family support groups 2.5 Corporate social responsibility Module 3Preparing Persons with Disability for CBR 3.1 Early identification and intervention 3.2 Development of Person Centred Plan for education 3.3 Individual Transition Plan 3.4 Community related vocational training 3.5 Skill training for living within community Module 4 CBR Strategies for Persons with Disabilities 4.1 Visual impairment - Orientation and mobility training - Braille 4.2 Hearing impairment - Training in sign language and system 4.3 Physical impairment and Cerebral Palsy - Training in use of assistive devices - Training in use of augmentative and alternative communication systems 4.4 Autism and intellectual disability - Training in functional and survival skills 4.5 Access to school and higher education Module 5 Role of Government and International Agencies 5.1 Poverty alleviation and development programs 5.2 Disability related legislations & judicial activism 5.3 Disability related policies and schemes 5.4 United Nation's Conventions and Declarations 61
5.5 Review of global legislations Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Visit an ongoing CBR program and write a report on its efficacy 2. Participate in a community awareness program and submit a report 3. Prepare an outline of a CBR program for a given type of disability 4. Prepare a feedback form to be given to benefiaries after CBR program 5. Make a list of parameters to measure the success of a CBR program Transactions Besides lecture method the topics in this course may be transacted through discussion on selected case studies, classroom seminar/debates. Essential Readings · Loveday, M. (2006). The HELP Guide for Community Based Rehabilitation Workers: A Training Manual. Global-HELP Publications, California. · McConkey, R. and O'Tool, B (Eds). Innovations in Developing Countries for People with Disabilities, P.H. Brookes, Baltimore. · Neufelt, A. and Albright, A (1998). Disability and Self-Directed Employment: Business Development Model. Campus Press Inc. York University. · Peat, M. (1997). Community Based Rehabilitation, W.B. Saunders Company. · Scheme of Assistance to Disabled for Purposes of Fitting of Aids/Appliances, -- Ministry of Social Welfare, Govt. of India, New Delhi. · Scheme of Assistance to Organizations for Disabled Persons, Ministry of Social Welfare, Govt. of India, New Delhi. · WHO .(1982). Community Based Rehabilitation -- Report of a WHO International Consultation, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 28 June- 3 July. WHO (RHB/IR/82.1) · WHO .(1984). "Rehabilitation For AIl" in World Health Magazine, WHO, Geneva
B 10 (E) APPLICATION OF ICT IN CLASSROOM
Course Code: B 10 (E) Notional Hours 30 Introduction
Credit: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Marks: 75
This course has dual purpose: firstly it aims to orient the teacher trainee to various applications of Information and Communication Technology in teaching learning process; and secondly it intends to orient the learners to understand the scope and application of ICT for students with disabilities. The course includes uses of all kinds of media and computer in order to give hands
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on experience of applying ICT in various learning environments as well to familiarize the student teacher with different modes of computer based learning. Objectives After completing the course the student teacher will be able to: · Gauge the varying dimensions in respect of ICT and Applications in Special Education · Delineate the special roles of ICT Applications · Acquire Familiarity with Different Modes of Computer-Based Learning Module 1: Information Communication Technology (ICT) and Special Education 1.1.Meaning and Scope of ICT 1.2.Role of ICT in 'Construction of Knowledge'; 1.3. Possible Uses of Audio-Visual Media and Computers (Radio, Television, Computers) 1.4. Integrating ICT in Special Education With Reference To Articles 4 and 9 of UNCRPD and Goal 3 of Incheon Strategy 1.5. Three As of ICT Application--Access, Availability, Affordability Module 2: Using Media and Computers 2.1. Media: Radio and Audio Media- Script Writing, Storytelling, Songs, Etc., 2.2 Television and Video in Education, 2.3 Importance of Newspaper in Education 2.4. Computers: Functional Knowledge of Operating Computers­On/Off, Word Processing, Use Of Power Point, Excel, 2.5 ICT Applications For Access To Print Module 3. Computer as a Learning Tool 3.1 Effective Browsing of the Internet for Discerning and Selecting Relevant Information 3.2 Survey of Educational Sites and Downloading Relevant Material; 3.3 Cross Collating Knowledge from Varied Sources, 3.4. Computer-Aided Learning: Application of Multimedia in Teaching and Learning, Programmed Instruction; Computer-Assisted Instruction; Web based learning, Interactive Learning & i-learning; virtual classrooms 3.5. E-Classroom: Concept, Organizing E-Classroom and Required Adaptations for Students with Disabilities;& mobile learning and mobile learning apps. Module 4: Visualising Technology-Supported Learning Situations 4.1 Preparation of Learning Schemes and Planning Interactive Use of Audio-Visual Programme 4.2 Developing PPT for Classroom Use; skype and ISL, using software for `captioning' 4.3 Using of Available Software or CDs 63
4.4 Using LCD Projection for Subject Learning Interactions; 4.5. Generating Subject-Related Demonstrations Using Computer Software and Enabling Students to Plan and Execute Projects;
Module 5: Interactive use of ICT 5.1 Participation in Social Groups on Internet, 5.2 Creation of 'Blogs', 5.3 Organizing Teleconferencing and Video-Conferencing; 5.4 Identifying and Applying Software for Managing Disability Specific Problems. 5.5 Overview of WCAG (Web Content Access Guidelines)
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Develop a plan for making audio or video program on a given topic. 2. Prepare a PPT by inserting photos and videos on a topic of your choice. 3. Compile Youtube films on disability and education . 4. Learn about Open Education Resources and explain the same to your classmates 5. Learn about web based Discussion Boards and explain the same to your classmates 6. Learn about Learner Management System and explain the same to your classmates
Transactions : Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. Essential Readings · Abbot, C. (2001). ICT: Changing Education. Routledge Falmer · Florian, L. & Hegarty J. (2004). ICT and Special Educational Needs: A Tool for Inclusion. Open University Press
Suggested Readings · Kozma, R.B. (2003). Technology, Innovation, and Educational Change: A Global Perspective: A Report of the Second Information Technology in Education Study, Module 2. International Society for Technology in Education
B 10 (F) MANAGEMENTOF LEARNINGDISABILITY
Course Code: B 10 (F) Notional hours: 30
Credits: 03 Marks: 75
Contact Hours: 60
Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to:
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· Explain the concept, causes and characteristics of learning disabilities. · Discus different types of learning disabilities and its associated conditions · Develop teacher made assessment test in curricular areas · Plan appropriate teaching strategies as per the specific needs of children with learning disability.
Module 1: Learning Disabilities: Types 1.1 Verbal learning disabilities: Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia. 1.2 Nonverbal learning disabilities 1.3 Language Disorders 1.4 Associated Conditions: ADHD & ADD 1.5 Emotional & Behavioral problems.
Module 2: Assessment of basic curricular skills 2.1 Assessment of Readiness skills 2.2 Assessment of Reading, Writing and Math skills 2.3 Teacher made test 2.4 Standardized Tests: Need, Types & Purpose 2.5 Interpretation of Test report
Module 3: Intervention strategies in Basic Skills of Learning 3.1 Language skills 3.2 Reading 3.3 Writing 3.4 Maths Skills 3.5 Study skills
Module 4: Inclusion of children with LD 4.1 Curriculum Adaptation 4.2 Differentiated Curriculum 4.3 Transition Planning 4.4 Vocational Education and Higher Education 4.5 Collaborative efforts: Teachers, Peers, family
Module 5: Trends, needs and issues 5.1 Provisions for children with LD at school (across boards) and college level in India 5.2 Open schooling and home schooling 5.3 Community partnership 5.4 Advocacy 5.5 Use of technology
Hands on experience for notional hours (any two)
30 hrs 10 marks 65
1. Study a checklist for screening LD. Administer it for 2 cases and report reflections. 2. Develop teacher made assessment test in any one curricular area for a given child. 3. Plan appropriate teaching strategies as per the specific needs of a given child with learning disability. 4. Conduct a seminar on trends and issues in the field of LD 5. Make a poster for mainstream teachers on dealing with students with LD Transactions : Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. Essentail readings · Adamson & Adamson: Handbook of Specific Learning Disabilities, Gardner Press USA 1979 · Eddy G.L: Adaptive Language Disorders of Youth, Adults with Learning disabilities, ingular Pub., California 1992. · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Langone, J: Teaching Students with Mild & Moderate Learning problems, Allyn& Bacon, Boston 1990 · Myklebust, H:Progress in Learning Disabilities, Guene and Stratton ­ New York ­ 1983 · Pierangelo, R & Robert, J: Parent's complete Special Education Guide, 1996 · Reddy G.L. & Ramar R: Education of children with special needs, New Delhi ­ Discovery Pub. 2000 Suggested Readings: · Reid, K: Teaching the Learning Disabled, Allyn and Bacon, Baston, 1988 · Strichart, S., S :Teaching Study Strategies to Students with Learning Disabilities, Allyn & Bacon, Boston 1993 · Swady, E.R: Diagnosis & Correction of Reading, Difficulties, Allyn& Bacon Boston 1989 · Taylor, B: Reading Difficulties : Instruction and Assessment, Random House, New York, 1988 · Selikowitzi M : Dyslexia and other Learning Disabilities, Oxford Univ, Press ­ 1998 B 10 (G) GENDER AND DISABILITY 66
Course Code: B 10(G)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Objectives: After completion of this course the student will be able to
· Develop an understanding of human rights based approach in context of disability
· Explain the impact of gender on disability
· Describe the personal and demographic perspectives of gender and disability
· Analyse the issues related to disabled women and girl children
· Describe the role of advocacy and legislation in creating gender equity
Module 1: Human Right-based Approach& Disability 1.1 Human Rights-based approach - Concept and history 1.2 Principles of HRbA - Equality and non-discrimination - Universality & Inalienability - Participation and inclusion - Accountability and rule of law 1.3 Elements of Human Rights System - Legal framework - Institutions - Development policies & programs - Public awareness - Civil society 1.4 Advantage of HRbA 1.5 HRbA and Disability - Empowerment - Enforceability - Indivisibility - Participation
Module 2: Gender and Disability 2.1 Sex &Gender - Concept & difference 2.2 Disability& impairment - Concept& difference 2.3 Gendered experience of disability - Public domain - Private and familial domain 2.4 Gender and disability mainstreaming 2.5 Gendered patterns in relation to disability - Developed countries - Developing countries
Module 3: Gender and Disability Analysis 3.1 Gender analysis 3.2 Disability analysis
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3.3 Sex-disaggregated data 3.4 Psyche and gender 3.5 Normalization and social role valorisation Module 4: Women and Girl Child with Disability 4.1 Inclusive equality - Equal access to family life - Equal access to education - Equal access to political participation 4.2 Factors contributing to disability - Gender-based violence - Traditional practices 4.3 Sexual and reproductive health 4.4 Standard of living and social protection 4.5 Work and employment Module 5: Advocacy and Legal Framework 5.1 Women's movement 5.2 Disability rights movement 5.3 International initiatives - CEDAW - CRC - UNCRPD 5.4 Constitutional provisions & schemes for disability 5.5 Gender critique of government schemes Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Study the case of a given woman with disability in terms of challenges and solutions. Submit your reflections. 2. Review selected paper/s authored by women with disability 3. Prepare community awareness material for gender equity and disability rights 4. Submit a power point presentation on gender ­ disability ­ poverty links. 5. Prepare a checklist for measuring awareness on gender discrimination issues for a chosen set of people (for example: college students, house maids, police constable etc) Transactions This course has been designed to provide the student teachers a socio-cultural perspective to disability. It aims to promote awareness about the space for disability equity and rehabilitation within the human rights system. As such the transaction of the course topics should be done through focus group discussions, and issue-based classroom interactions in addition to lectures and seminars. Essential Readings · Habib, L. A. (1997). Gender and Disability: Women's Experiences in the Middle East. 68
Oxfam, UK. · Hans, A. (2015). Disability, Gender and the Trajectories of Power. Sage Publications Pvt. Ltd. · Meekosha, H. (2004). Gender and Disability. Sage Encyclopaedia of Disability. · O'Brien, J., & Forde, C. (2008). Tackling Gender Inequality, Raising Pupil Achievement , Dunedin Academic. · Ridgeway, C. L. (2011). Framed by Gender: How Gender Inequality Persists in the Modern World. Oxford University Press. · Samuels, E. (2014). Fantasies of Identification: Disability, Gender, Race. NYU Press, USA. · Smith, B. G., & Hutchison, B. (2013). Gendering Disability. Rutger University Press, New Jersey Suggested Readings · Beeghley, L. (1999). Angles of Vision: How to Understand Social Problems, West View Press. · Purkayastha, D. (2010). Economic Growth, Intra-Household Resource Allocation and Gender Inequality, Atlantic Economic Journal, Vol. 38, No. 4. · Treas, J., & Drobnic, S. (2010). Dividing the Domestic: Men, Women, and Household Work in Cross-National Perspective, Stanford University Press.
B 11 (A) APPLIED BEHAVIOUR ANALYSIS
Course Code: B 11(A)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Objectives: at the completion of this course, the student will be able to
· Develop and understanding of the underlying principles and assumptions of applied
behavioural analysis
· Use various measures of behavioural assessment
· Apply methods of ABA in teaching and learning environments
· Integrate techniques of ABA in teaching programs
· Select suitable strategies for managing challenging behaviours
Module 1 Introduction to Applied Behaviour Analysis
1.1 Principles of Behavioural Approach 1.2 ABA - Concept and definition 1.3 Assumptions of ABA ­ Classical and Operant Conditioning 1.4 Behaviour- definition and feature 1.5 Reinforcement & Punishment
Module 2Methods of Behaviour Assessment
2.1 Antecedent, Behaviour & Consequence 2.2 Behaviour frequency and rate 2.3 Behaviour duration.
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2.4 Behaviour latency 2.5 Inter-response time &percent of occurrence Module 3Methods of ABA 3.1 Identification of behavioural goals 3.2 Functional analysis of behaviour 3.3 Discrete Trial Teaching -Discriminative stimulus -characteristics -Response -Consequence -characteristics -Inter-trial interval 3.4 STAR (Setting Triggers Action Result) Model 3.5 Pivotal Response Training Module 4 Techniques for Positive Behaviour Support 4.1 Types of positive reinforcement - Primary - Secondary - Token economy 4.2 Schedules of reinforcement - Continuous - Fixed ratio - Fixed interval - Variable ratio - Variable interval - Fading 4.3 Negative reinforcement - Escape - Avoidance 4.4 Shaping and Chaining 4.5 Types of Prompt - Physical - Gestural - Pointing - Visual - Positional - Verbal Module 5Management of Challenging Behaviour 5.1Differential reinforcements of behaviour 5.2 Extinction and Time out 5.3 Response cost and overcorrection 70
5.4 Maintenance 5.5 Generalization and fading Hands on tasks for Notional Hours: (Any Two): 30 hours 10 marks 1. Conduct a functional analysis of behaviour of a given case and submit report 2. Develop and submit an ABA program for management of a challenging behaviour 3. Develop teaching material for Discrete Trial Teaching/Pivotal Response Training 4. Make a poster inviting college graduates to join certificate course on ABA 5. Make a list of pro active learning points drawn from this course Transactions The course consists of several concepts from behavioural theories. The concepts should beexplained through real life examples and selected case studies. Students should be encouraged to conduct systematic observations of behaviour and suggest suitable plan of action for dealing with behavioural deficits in children. Essential Readings · Bailey, J., & Burch, M. (2011). Ethics for Behaviour Analysts. Routledge, New York. · Cooper, J.O., Timothy, E.H., & Heward, W.L. (2007). Applied Behaviour Analysis. Pearson Publications. · Fisher, W.W., Piazza, C.C., & Roane, H.S. (2013). Handbook of Applied Behaviour Analysis. Guilford Press, New York. · Kearney, A. J. (2007). Understanding Applied Behaviour Analysis: An Introduction to ABA for Parents, Teachers and Other Professionals. Jessica Kingsley, Philadelphia. · Lewis, P. (2006). Achieving Best Behaviour for Children with Developmental Disabilities. Jessica Kingsley Publishers London Suggested Readings · Aune, B., Burt, B., & Gennaro, P. (2013). Behaviour Solutions for the Inclusive Classroom. Future Horizons Inc, Texas. · Moyes, R.A. (2002). Addressing the Challenging Behaviour of Children with HFA/AS in the Classroom. Jessica Kingsley Publishers London.
B 11 (B) COMMUNICATION OPTIONS: ORALISM
Course Code: B 11(B) Contact Hours: 60
Credits: 03 Notional Hours: 30 Marks: 75
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Introduction Communication, language and speech have always been at the centre stage when education of children with deafness is being discussed. Without going into much of judgemental discussions in the direction of `either ­ or' options to be the `best', this syllabus intends to expose the student teachers to all the dominant options. However, over and above the said exposure offered through compulsory courses, this optional course offers the student teachers an additional opportunity to sharpen the skills in one of the categories of options. This is expected to emphasize use of appropriate options rather than advocating one among the many. Moreover, learning this optional course is also expected to provide wider career choices for the student teachers. Objectives After learning this course the students will be able to: · Discuss the Aural Oral Options with reference to persons with hearing impairment in the context of India · Discuss the relevant issues like literacy, inclusion and training with reference to Oralism /Oral Rehabilitation · Exhibit beginner level hands on skills in using these options · Motivate self to learn and practice more skills leading to linguistic adequacy and fluency to be used while developing spoken language in children with hearing losses. Module 1: Understanding Hearing Loss in Real Life Context 1.1 Basic Awareness on Paradigms of D/Deafness (Medical And Social) 1.2 Basic Awareness on Deafness and Communicative Access: Challenges and Concerns 1.3 Basic Awareness on Autonomy and Inclusion with Reference to Oral Options 1.4 Basic Awareness on Identity Issues with Reference to Oral Options 1.5 Oral / Aural Options: myths and facts Module 2: Advance Understanding of Oral Options 2.1 Difference Between Uni Sensory and Multi Sensory Approach in Oralism 2.2 Oracy To Literacy: Why And How 2.3 Speech Reading: Need, Role And Strategies in All Communication Options 2.4 Training And Guidance on Aural Oral Practices for Families And Tuning Home Environment: Current Scenario 2.5 Tuning Mainstream Schools/Classrooms For Aural Oral Communication: Do's And Don'ts Module 3: Skill Development Required for Oralism 3.1 Practicing Interpreting Audiograms and Exposure to Goal Setting In Listening Skills 72
3.2 Practicing Motherese (Addressing /Talking To Young Children) and Age Appropriate Discourse with Children Using Appropriate Language, Turn Taking and Eye Contact 3.3 Practicing Fluency Skills in Verbal Communication: Spontaneous Conversations, Narrations and Loud Reading 3.4 Practicing Skills in Story Telling /Narrations/Jokes/ Poems / Nursery Rhymes (with special attention to suprasegmental aspects) 3.5 Ongoing Monitoring and Assessing Auditory Functioning and Speech Development: Reflecting upon Model Formats Used For the Purpose (Checklists, Recordings, Developmental Scales)
Module 4: Understanding Skills related to Auditory Verbal (AV) Approach 4.1 AV Approach: Meaning, Misconcepts and Justification 4.2 Stages of Auditory Hierarchy 4.3understanding Listening Strategies, Techniques of AV Approach and their Relation to Listening Environment 4.4 Reading Model Plans 4.5 Observing a Few Weekly Individual Sessions
Module 5: Implementing Oralism and AV Approach in Indian Special Schools & Course conclusions 5.1 Use Of Oralism and AV Approach in Indian Special Schools: Current Scenario 5.2 Oralism / AV Approach: Prerequisites for Special Schools 5.3 Strategies of Implementation Oral Communication Policy and Fulfilling Prerequisites 5.4 Resource Mobilization For Listening Devices: (ADIP, Organized Charity, CSR, Fund Raising Events, Web Based Fund Raising) 5.5 Reflections On The Course: From Theory to Practice to Initiating Change
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Watching videos of individual session / classroom teaching using genuine oralism and submitting reflections. 2. Developing learning material / worksheet for acilitating connectivity among listening, language and cognition 3. Recording self narrated stories / poems and writing reflections upon it. 4. Interacting with orally raised adults to understand them in terms of autonomy and identity. Submit learning points. 5. Interacting with non disabled children for practicing expansion of ideas Transactions
Curricular transactions of this course must involve skill based approach. This course being placed in the 4th semester, the students are expected to have adequate exposure of special school
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system, aural activities therein and the school environment. Lecturers of this course are expected to use those experiences while teaching theory component of this course. The transaction strategies however, must focus on skill development of aural oral techniques through observations (live or recorded) and reflecting upon it. Mock parent child conversations, demonstrations and practicing tuning speech and language to suit needs of CWHI etc are expected to support the understanding of student teachers. Unconventioanl ASK strategy of working first on Attitude, then on Skills and lastly backing it up with Knowledge or theory is expected to work better. Application in diverse situation and professional conviction needed for aural option can be focussed at the time of evaluations. Essential Readings · RCI (2010) Communication Options And Students With Deafness. Rehabilitation Council Of India , New Delhi · Dhvani (English) Balvidyalaya Publication:Chennai · Estabrooks. W. (2006) Auditory-Verbal Therapy And Practice , Ag Bell · Paul, Peter V. (2009). Language and Deafness. Jones And Bartlett: Boston · Borden, Gloria J.; Harris, Katherine S. & Raphael, Lawrence J. (2005). Speech Science Primer (4th) Lippincott Williams And Wilkins: Philadelphia · Ling, Daniel.(1990) Acoustics, Audition And Speech Reception. (Cd)Alexandria, Auditory Verbal International · Heller, Robert. (1999). Managing Change. Dk Publishing: New York Suggested Reading · Estabrooks , W. (2001) 50 Frequently Asked Questions (Faqs) About Auditory-Verbal Therapy. Learning To Listen Foundation · Estabrooks W. & Marlowe J, (2000) The Baby is Listening, A G Bell Association For The Deaf And Hard Of Hearing, Inc, Washington Dc · Chaney, Ann L. & Burk, Tamara L. (1998). Teaching Oral Communication In Grades K ­ 8.Boston: Allyn And Bacon · Directory of Rehabilitation Resources for Persons With Hearing Impairment In India. (2000) Ayjnihh Publication, Mumbai · Ling, D. And Ling, A.H. (1985) Aural Habilitation: The Foundations Of Verbal Learning InHearing Impaired Children. A.G. Bell Association For The Deaf And Hard Of Hearing.Washington D.C. · Ling, D. (1989) Foundations Of Spoken Language For Hearing Impaired Children. A.G.Bell Association For The Deaf And Hard Of Hearing. Washington D.C. 74
· Dhvani (Marathi) Balvidyalaya ­ Ccym Publication · Play It By Ear, John Tracy Clinic Publication: La · Heller, Robert. (1999). Effective Leadership. Dk Publishing: New York. · Heller, Robert. (1999). Managing Change. Dk Publishing: New York · Resource Book on Hearing Impairment. Ayjnihh Publication · Cole, Elizabeth, B. And Flexer, Carol. (2007). Children With Hearing Loss Developing Listening And Talking (Birth To Six) Plural Publishing Inc: Uk. · Unpublished Dissertations And Thesis On Profiling Communication Options In Special Schools In India
B 11 (C) COMMUNICATION OPTIONS: MANUAL OPTIONS
Course Code: B 11(C) Contact Hours: 60
Credits: 03 Notional Hours 30
Marks: 75
Introduction Communication, language and speech have always been at the centre stage when education of children with deafness is being discussed. Without going into much of judgemental discussions in the direction of `either ­ or' options to be the `best', this syllabus intends to expose the student teachers to all the dominant options. However, over and above the said exposure offered through compulsory courses, this optional course offers the student teachers an additional opportunity to sharpen the skills in one of the categories of options. This is expected to emphasize use of appropriate options rather than advocating one among the many. Moreover, learning this optional course is also expected to provide wider Career Choices for the Student Teachers. Objectives After learning this course the students will be able to: · Discuss the two manual options with reference to Indian special schools · Discuss the relevant issues like literacy, inclusion and training with reference to manual options · Describe manual options in the light of issues like language, culture and identify · Exhibit beginner level hands on skills in using manual options · Motivate self to learn and practice more skills leading to linguistic adequacy and fluency Module 1: Understanding Deafness in Real Life Context 1.1 Basic Awareness of Paradigms of D/Deafness (Medical and Social) 1.2 Basic Awareness of Deafness and Communicative Challenges / Concerns
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1.3 Basic Awareness on Deafness with Reference to Culture, Language, Identity, Minority Status, Deaf Gain, Literacy and Inclusion 1.4 Basic Awareness of Difference between ISL and ISS; 1.5 ISL / ISS: Myths and Facts
Module 2: Advance Understanding of Manual Options and Indian Scenario 2.1 Use of Simcom and Educational Bilingualism an Indian Schools: Current Scenario 2.2 Challenges, Prerequisites and Fulfilling Prerequisites 2.3 Monitoring and Measuring Development of ISL/ISS in Students: Why and How 2.4 Training and Guidance for Families on use of manual options: current options 2.5 Tuning Mainstream Schools/Classrooms For Students Using Manual Communication: Do's And Don'ts
Module 3: ISL Skill Development: Middle Order Receptive and Expressive Skills 3.1 Practicing `Motherese' (Tuning Language to Suit Young Children) and Age Appropriate Discourse with Children with Appropriate Language, Turn Taking and Eye Contact 3.2 Practicing Natural Signing in Short Common Conversations 3.3 Practicing Natural Signing in Stories/Poems/Narrations/Jokes 3.4 Practicing Natural Signing in Discussing Emotions, Expansion of Ideas and Current Affairs 3.5 Practicing identifying linguistic structures of ISL and 5 parameters of signs Module 4: ISL Skill Development: Towards Higher Order Receptive and Expressive Skills 4.1 Insights into grammatical components: Learning to Express Gender, Number, Person, Tense, Aspect 4.2 Insights into grammatical components: Practicing Sentence Types: Affirmative, Interjections, Imperative and Interrogative and Negativization 4.3 Practicing Sentence Types: Simple, Complex, Compound 4.4 Observing Using ISL in Classrooms ­ Social Science / Science / Mathematics 4.5 Basic understanding of native and not native ISL processing Module 5: ISS Skill Development and Course Conclusions 5.1 Practicing Markers (Local Language) 5.2 Practicing Syntax in Conversations and Discussions 5.3 Observing Using ISS in Classrooms for School Subjects 5.4 Resource Mobilization for Skill Development / Training in manual options: (Organized Charity Sources, CSR, Fund Raising Events, Web Based Fund Raising) 5.5 Reflections on the Course: From Theory to Practice to Initiating Change
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
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1. Watching videos of individual sessions and classroom teaching of signing. submit reflections on communication process and learning. 2. Role play and dramatization in isl. marks assigned to performance. 3. Developing learning material for facilitating connectivity among signing, language and cognition 4. Recording and submittingself narrated stories / poems. 5. Interacting with deaf for practicing expansion of ideas Transactions: As the course title suggests, this course is expected to be completely an action / practice oriented experience. Lecturers are expected to touch upon basic theory in a rather summarised manner working basically towards skill development and professional conviction needed to apply manual option. Curricular transactions here must involve interactions with adults / adolescents with Deafness and their siblings. The optional course is an extension of the compulsory practical units learnt during the third semester. Brushing up earlier learnt skills and practicing them more in real life situations is therefore recommended. Extensive use of web based material on sign language is also suggested. Modern and communicative approach (as against close door structural approach) typically used for foreign Language Learning is to be used. Unconventioanl ASK strategy of working first on Attitude, then on Skills and lastly backing it up with Knowledge or theory is expected to work better. Application in diverse situation; importance to fluency and confidence rather than correctness and non purist approach to evaluation is recommended so that the student teachers become independent users of ISL. Essential Readings · Communication Options and Students with Deafness. (2010). Rehabilitation Council Of India Publication · Heller, Robert. (1999). Managing Change. Dk Publishing: New York · ISS Learning Material and Dictionaries · Paul, Peter V. (2009). Language and Deafness. Jones And Bartlett: Boston · Teaching Learning Isl Material Developedat Ayjnihh, Mumbai, SRKV Coimbatore and d NISH, Trivandrum · Zeshan, Ulrike. (2000). Sign Language in Indo-Pakistan. John Benjamins Pub Co:Philadelphia SuggestedReadings · Akamatsu, C. T. & Armour, V. A. (1987). Developing Written Literacy In Deaf Children Through Analyzing Sign · Andrews, J. F., Winograd, P., & Deville, G. (1994). Deaf Children Reading Fables: Using Asl Summaries To 77
· Bhasha Plsi Vol 38 Indian Sign Language(S). Editors: Tanmoy Bhattacharya Nisha Grover, Surinder Pk Randhawa. Orient Blackswan · Delhi. New Delhi: All IndiA Federation Of The Deaf, 1981. · Directory of Rehabilitation Resources For Persons With Hearing Impairment In India. (2000)Ayjnihh Publication · Evans, L. (1982). Total Communication, Structure And Strategy. Washington Dc: Gallaudet College Press. · Ezell And Justice (2005). Programmatic Research On Early Literacy: Several Key Findings. Ies 3rd Annual Research Conference: American Speech Language & Hearing Association (Asha). · Frank, Smith (1985). Reading Without Nonsense. New York: Teachers College Press, 10027. · Ghate, Prabha (1996). Indian Sign System. Ayjnihh In-House Publication: Mumbai. · Ghate, R. A. (2009). Survey Of Teachers' Opinion On Status Of Education Of The Deaf. Unpublished Report Of Rci · Heller, Robert. (1999). Effective Leadership. Dk Publishing: New York. · Huddar, Asmita. (Ed) Language and Communication. (2008) Dse Manuals. Rehabilitation Council Of India Publication · Indian Sign Language Dictionary. 2001. Coimbatore: Sri Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya · Johnson, R., Liddell, S., and Erting, C. (1989). Unlocking The Curriculum: Principles For Achieving Access In Deaf · Lewis, Rena B. & Doorlag, Donald H.(1999). (5th Ed) Teaching Students with Special Needs in General Education Classrooms. Prentice Hall Inc. New Jersy. Printing Press. · Unpublished Dissertation And Thesis On Signing, Structure Of ISL And Its Impact On Education · Unpublished Dissertations And Thesis On Profiling Communication Options In Special Schools In India · Vasishta M., Woodward J, De Santis S. An Introduction To Indian Sign Language: Focus On · Vasishta, M.M., Woodward, J. De Santis, S. 1980. An Introduction To Indian Sign Language (Focus On Delhi). New Delhi: All Indian Federation of The Deaf.\\ · Websites For Signed Dictionaries · Woodward, J (1993). "The Relationship Of Sign Language Varieties In India, Pakistan And Nepal". Sign Language Studies (78): 15­22. 78
B 11 (D) AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION
Course Code: B 11(D)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Objectives After learning this course the student-teachers will be equipped with a basic knowledge of: · Concept of AAC, · AAC systems, · AAC assessment, · programme planning and strategies Module 1: Organizational frame work for Communication: 1.1 Normal development of speech, language and communication 1.2 Factors that influence communication, speech and language in relation to each other 1.3 Levels of communication in children; Functional (Emergent) 1.4 Situational ( Context Dependent) 1.5 Independent ( Creative) Module 2: Basic principles of AAC interventions: 2.1 Child - Child capacity 2.2 Child capacity and context 2.3 Working towards symbolic expression 2.4 Communication skills and 2.5 Functions Module 3: Areas of AAC Assessment: 3.1 Sensory areas 3.2 Cognition , communication and language 3.3 Posture and positioning. Motor planning and control 3.4 Scanning 3.5 Environment, Interaction &Symbols Module 4: Context of Communication: 4.1 Partner /skills , user skills and environment 4.2 Competency development - types of competencies and its development 4.2.1 Linguistic competence 4.2.2 Operational Competence 4.2.3 Social competence 4.2.4 Strategic competence Module 5: Introduction to communication tools and Access Mode: 5.1 Types of AAC devices and systems 5.1.1 No Technology 79
5.1.2 Low Technology 5.1.3 High Technology 5.2 Access to communication charts - hand, finger, eye point 5.3 Access to devices: 5.3.1 Switches - hand switch , blow switch, infrared devices etc 5.3.2 Software -scan mode combined with a switch 5.4 Selection of AAC 5.4.1 Child competency and environment 5.4.2 Design, Access, Motor, Devices 5.5 Challenges in the development of AAC and Literacy 5.5.1 Grammar; spelling 5.5.2 Building Vocabulary: and richness of language 5.5.3 Motor expression Hands on tasks for Notional Hours: (Any Two): 30 hours 10 marks 1. Learn basic skills involved in an AAC system and exhibit performance 2. Make a poster on AAC for family members 3. Websearch AAC options and report your reflections on learning Transactions:Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. Essential readings: · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY Suggested Reading: · Silverman, F.H.(1994).Communication for the Speechless (3rd Edn.). Allyn & Bacon, Boston. · David R. Beukelman,D.R., & Mirenda,P (2013). Augmentative and Alternative Communication Supporting Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs (4th Edn.) Brookes Publishing Co. Baltimore. · Lynch, C., & Cooper, J.(1991).Early Communication Skills: Practical Activities for Teachers and Therapists, Speechmark Publishing Ltd, Bicester, Oxon · Warrick, A., & Kaul,S.(1997).Their manner of speaking : augmentative communication for children and young adults with severe speech disorders, Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy, Kolkata · Communication, compiler: T.N. Southgate. BA, Ormerod School, Oxford, Editor G.M. Cochrane MA, FRCP, Equipment for Disabled People , Mary Mariboroug Lodge, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford OX3 7 LD · Tina, D., & Mike, D.(1997).Literacy Through Symbols: Improving Access forChildren and Adults, David Fulton Publishers, London. 80
· McCurtin, A., & Geraldine, M.(2000). The Manual of AAC Assessment. Speechmark Publishing Ltd., London.
B 11 (E) BRAILLE AND ASSISTIVE DEVICES
Course Code: B 11(E) Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Credits: 03 Marks: 75
Introduction Braille, the embossed system of reading and writing for the blind along with its inventor, Louis Braille (1809-1852), has opened a wide range of avenues and opportunities for effective mainstreaming and empowerment for persons with visual impairment. In addition, a plethora of devices are now available which help the visually impaired to access meaningful education in all school-subjects as also skills of independent living and economic activities. This course familiarizes the learners with the importance and operational aspects of Braille, which has stood the test of time and competition for the last about 185 years. It also introduces them to basic devices used for teaching blind and low vision children. It is hoped that through the study of the course, the learners will be motivated to know more about these and various other devices and technologies and be in a position to help children with visual impairment/their parents to procure the needed devices with ease and speed. Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Acquire basic information about Braille, its relevance and some important functional aspects; · Get basic information on types and significance of different Braille devices; · Get acquainted with the types and significance of basic devices relating to Mathematics, Science, Geography and Low Vision as also on sources of their availability. Module 1: Braille 1.1 Louis Braille and the Evolution of Braille 1.2 Continuing Relevance of Braille vis-a-vis Audio Material; 1.3 Braille Signs, Contractions and Abbreviations--English Braille; 1.4 Braille Signs and Symbols--Hindi/Regional Language; 1.5 Braille Reading and writing processes. Module 2: Braille Devices -- Types, Description, Relevance 2.1 Slate and Stylus 2.2 Braille Writer 81
2.3 Electronic Devices--Notetakers and Refreshable Braille Displays 2.4 Braille Embossers 2.5 Braille Translation Software Module 3: Other Devices ­ Types, Description, Relevance 3.1 Mathematical Devices: Taylor Frame and Types, Abacus, Geometry Kit, Algebra Types 3.2 Geography: Maps--Relief, Embossed, Models 3.3 Science Material 3.4 Low Vision Aids--Optical, Non-Optical, Vision Training Material 3.5 Schemes and Sources of Availability Hands on tasks for Notional Hours: (Any Two): 30 hours 10 marks 1. Observe at least five devices in use in at least five school periods. 2. Draw up an item-wise price list of at least ten devices from different sources. 3. prepare a presentation ­ Oral/Powerpoint ­ on the relevance of Braille for children with visual impairment 4. Prepare a report on the availability and use of Mathematical devices (at least two) in one special school and on inclusive school 5. Make a report on the application of at least two non-optical devices for children with low vision. Transactions :Conventional lecturing, Demonstrations , PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge. Essential Readings: · A Restatement of the Layout, Definitions and the Rules of the Standard English Braille System (1971). London: The Royal National Institute for the Blind · Ashkroft, S.C. and Henderson, F. (1963). Programmed Instruction in Braille. Pittsburgh : Stanwick House · Lowenfeld, B.(1969). Blind Children Learn to Read. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas · Mani, MNG (1997). Amazing Abacus. Coimbatore: SRVK Vidyalaya · Manual on Bharti Braille (1980). Dehradun: NIVH · Olson, Myrna R. (1981). Guidelines and Games for Teaching Efficient Braille Reading. New York: AFB · Proceedings: National Conference on Past and Present Status of Braille in India · ( 2001). New Delhi: All India Confederation of the Blind Suggested Readings: · Hampshire, Barry (1981). Working with Braille - A Study of Braille as a Medium of 82
Communication. Geneva: UNESCO · Kusanjima, T. (1974). Visual Reading and Braille Reading. New York: AFB · Mani, MNG (1992).Techniques of Teaching Blind Children. N.Delhi: Sterling Publishers · Mellor Michael C. (2006). Louis Braille A touch of Genius. Boston: National Braille Press
B 11 (F) VOCATIONAL TRAINING, TRANSITION & JOB PLACEMENT
Course Code: B 11(F)
Credits: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Marks: 75
Objectives
After learning this content the trainees are expected to
· Develop an understanding of vocational education & its relevance for PWD's. · Carry out vocational assessment and make vocational training plan. · Plan for transition from School to job. · Identify various avenues for job placement. · Facilitate PWD's in making choice of vocational trades. · Acquire the concept of independent living and empowerment.
Module 1: Fundamentals & Assessment of Vocational rehabilitation 1.1.Definition, meaning and scope of Vocational Education. 1.2.Legislations, policies, agencies, schemes, concessions & benefits for PWDs with respect to employment. 1.3.Approaches and models of Vocational training 1.4.Assessment, Evaluation of Generic skills & specific job skills using various tools. 1.5.Approaches & Principles of vocational assessment.
Module 2: Vocational Transition & Curriculum Planning 2.1. Concept, meaning, importance of Transition 2.2. Vocational transition models. 2.3. Transitional Planning at Pre vocational & post vocational level. 2.4. Development of Individualized Vocational Transitional Plan. 2.5. Development of Vocational Curriculum.
Module 3: Process of Vocational Rehabilitation & Placement
10 Hours
3.1. Types of Employment Settings. 3.2. Process of Job Placement & Creation of Need based employment settings.
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3.3. Adaptations, accommodation, Safety skills and First Aid. 3.4. Self Advocacy & Self Determination skill training 3.5. Equal opportunities and attitudes towards persons with disabilities Hands on Experience for notional hours (ANY TWO) 30 hours 10 marks 1. Review 2-3 curriculums on any vocational skill/s and write reflections. 2. Observing Administering any vocational assessment tool on 2 individuals and submitting report with reflections. 3. Visit to any vocation Institution and submit report with learning points. Transactions: Conventional lecturing, PPTs, Visits, Observations, class discussions, Videos, reflecting upon learnt knowledge.
References: · Kutty A.T. &. Rao L.G, (2001) Transition of Persons with Mental Retardation from School to Work ­ A Guide, NIMH Publications, Secunderabad. · Kutty A.T. &. Rao L.G, (2003), Curriculum for Vocational Education, Transition of Persons with Mental Retardation from School to Work. Series -2, NIMH Publications, Secunderabad. · John McDonnell & Michael L. Hardman, (2010), Successful transition Programs, Pathways for students with Intellectual & developmental disabilities, Sage Publications, Los Angeles. · Mukhobadhyay, M. Editor Kutty A.T. (2006), Principles of Vocational Training Part-II, DVTE(MR) Manual , RCI & Kanishka Publisher, New Delhi. · Rao, V.K. (2004), Vocational Education , A.P.H Publishing Corporation, New Delhi · Whitehead, Tanya D & Hughey Joseph B, (2004) Exploring Self Advocacy From a Social Power Perspective, Nova Science publishers, New York · Wehmeyer Michael.L. (2007), Promoting Self-Determination in students with Developmental Disabilities, Guilford Press, Washington.
C12 ASSESSMENT AND IDENTIFICATION OF HEARING LOSS AND NEEDS
Course Code: C 12 Contact Hours: 60
Credit: 03
Notional Hours 30
Marks: 75
Introduction
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Hearing loss needs to be identified at the earliest in order to provide timely intervention to children with hearing impairment. This in turn would help them to develop adequate speech and language to function similar to typically developing children in school and beyond. The course is designed to provide inputs to learners about various assessment to be undertaken for identifying needs in order to plan the intervention program. Objective: After completion of this course, the student will be able to: · Explain the need and techniques for early identification of hearing loss in children · Acquire knowledge in the area of audiological assessment and its relevance in education · To discuss communicative and language related needs with the understanding of its development and assessment · Understand the need for assessment of various processes involved in production of speech · Describe and identify different components of educational assessment and analyse various educational needs of individuals with hearing impairment. Module 1: Early Identification of hearing loss: Need & strategies 1.1 Need for early identification of hearing loss 1.2 Overview to behavioural and objective techniques in screening for hearing loss 1.3 Team members involved in hearing screening and their role 1.4 Use of checklists and behavioural observation in early identification of hearing loss by school teachers (congenital & acquired) 1.5 Referral of children based on signs and symptoms of hearing loss Module 2: Audiological Assessment 2.1 Orientation: Sound, physical and psychological parameters/attributes, concept of dB HL vs dB SPL, auditory milestones in typical children (0-2 years) 2.2 Assessment & methods of assessment: Subjective & Objective tests. Orientation to these tests and their importance 2.3 Audiometer: Block diagram, parts & use; Types of audiometry [sound field (BOA, VRA) & close field]; role of special educators in conditioning for pure tone audiometry 2.4 Audiogram: Understanding of audiogram and its implication in assessing the educational needs of children with different types and degrees of hearing loss. 2.5 Concept of unaided, aided audiograms, Speech spectrum and its applications Module 3:Assessment of Language & communication 3.1 Communication: Concepts and types (Linguistic versus Non Linguistic); 3.2 Receptive and Expressive Language: Concept, Types (verbal and manual) and Structure 85
3.3 Developmental milestones in typically growing children; Impact of deafness on communication and language with reference to clinical (type, degree, onset) and environmental (parental participation, access to language early intervention services) factors 3.4 Assessing communication and language: Developmental checklists, scales, standardized tools and assessing language samples using parameters of measurement (productivity, complexity, correctness and communicativeness) 3.5 Identification of needs related to communication and language Module 4: Assessment of Speech 4.2 Respiration and Phonation: Pre-requisites, process, types and need for assessment 4.2 Basics of Articulation and phonology (active and passive articulators; classification of vowels and consonants; assessment of articulation) 4.3 Suprasegmental aspects of speech and its assessment 4.4 Milestones of speech development in typically developing children 4.5 Speech Intelligibility: concept, factors & assessment Module 5: Educational assessment and identification of needs 5.1 Educational assessment: Concept and scope 5.2 Factors affecting educational performance: individual, family & environment 5.3 Understanding Types of Assessment: Norm referenced & Criterion Referenced test, Comprehensive & Continuous assessment, Summative & Formative, Formal & Informal, conventional & alternate, Performance based & curriculum based 5.4 Tools & techniques of Educational Assessment: Observations, Interviews, Developmental scales, Standardized &Criterion based tests, Teacher Made Tests at different levels and classroom assessment techniques (Conventional & Modern). 5.5 Current trends and challenges in educational assessment of children with hearing losses
Transaction Lectures, Presentations, Project, subject seminar, linking observations with theory
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
(30 Hrs) 10 Marks
1. Compiling checklists (at least two) to identify hearing impairment in children. Report 2. Using the audiograms of children (at least two), identify the audiological needs of each. 3. Profiling the speech of children (at least two) by using a speech assessment kit 4. Record the interaction with the three year old typically developing child and write your brief reflections in terms of use of vocabulary and syntax 5. Study various tools used for educational assessment of children and submit your reflections.
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Essential Readings · Martin, F. N. Clark, J.G. (2012). Introduction to Audiology. 11th ed. Boston: Pearson Education. · Martin, FN & Clark, J.G. (2009). Introduction to Audiology. 10th ed. Boston: Pearson Education. · Northern, J.L. Downs, M.P. (2002). Hearing in Children. 5th Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Rehabilitation Council of India (2007). Status of Disability in India - 2007: Hearing Impairment and Deaf-blindness. New Delhi: Rehabilitation Council of India. · Jalvi R, Nandurkar A., Bantwal A., (2006). Introduction to hearing impairment. New Delhi: Kanishka Publication. · Newby, H. A., & Popelka, G. R. (1992). Audiology (6th ed.). New York: AppletonCentury-crofts. · Bel, R.L. and Frisbie, D.A.(1991) 5th ed, Essentials of Educational Measurement, Prentice hall publication, New Jersy · Linn, R. L. and Gronlund, N. E. (1995) 7th ed Measurement and Assessment in Teaching,Prentice hall publication, New Jersy · Jurs, S.G. and Wiersma, W.(1990) 2nd ed Educational Measurement and Testing,Allyn and Bacon publication, Boston · Nitko, A. J. (1983) Educational Tests and Measurement, An Introduction, Harcourt Brace Publication, New York · Brigance, A.H. and Hargis, C.H. (1993) Educational Assessment, Charles C Thomas publication, USA · Quigley & Paul, (1984) Language and deafness, College ­ Hill Press Inc. California · Patel, R.N. (1985), Educational Evaluation, Himalaya publication, Bombay · Mathew, S. and Misra, A. (2010) Knowledge based evaluation of students with hearing impairment, Journal of NCED, Vol 2, Issue 1, page 26-33 · UNICEF (2006), new trends in development evaluation. Retrieved from http://www.unicef.org/ceecis/new_trends_dev_evaluation.pdf Suggested Readings: · Madell, JR & Flexer, C., (2008) Pediatric Audiology: Diagnosis, Technology and Management. New York: Thieme Medical Publishers. 87
· Waldman, D., & Roush, J. (2010). Your child's Hearing Loss; A Guide for Parents. San Diego: Plural Publishing. · Yoshinaga-Itano, C. (2003). From screening to early identification and intervention: Discovering predictors to successful outcomes for children with significant hearing loss. Journal of deaf studies and deaf education, 8(1), 11-30. · McMillan, J.H (2001) Classroom assessment: Principles & practices for effective instruction (2nd Eds), Allyn & Bacon, Boston. · Evens, P. and Varma. V (1990). Special Education Past, Present and Future, The Falmer Press · Poham, James. W. (1993), Educational Evaluation. Prentice Hall, New Jersy. · Gregory, Jnight, et al. (1998), Issues in Deaf Education. Cromwel Press · Singh, B. (2004) Modern educational Measurement and Evaluation System, Anmol Publication, New Delhi · Boyle, J. and Fisher, S. (2007) educational testing (A competence based approach), BPS Blackwell publication, Singapore · Warden, P, Winter, J. and Broadfoot, P(2002)Assessment, Routledge Falmer Publication, London
C 13 CURRICULUM DESIGNING, ADAPTATION AND EVALUATION
Course Code: C 13
Credit: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours 30
Marks: 75
Introduction:
The course intends to develop capacities of learners to design curriculum keeping in view the special needs of children with hearing impairment. Learners are expected to go beyond the 3Rs with broad understanding of 21st century learning. The learner would also develop requisite skills of developing literacy skills of reading and writing as well as appreciate need and decide suitable adaptation to be undertaken for curricular transactions.
Objectives: After completing the course, the student shall be able to: · Familiarize with concept of curriculum and explain the importance of designing it for children with hearing impairment in the context of 21st Century learning skills; · Develop capacity of developing literacy skills of reading and writing in children with hearing impairment;
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· Describe the need for curricular adaptation and decide suitable adaptation and undertake it; · Appreciate the need for curricular evaluation and describe the tools and methods for evaluating it. Module 1: Curriculum and Its' Designing 1.1. Curriculum-Concept, Types and Models; 1.2. Steps for Curriculum Designing; 1.3. Curricular Needs of children with hearing impairment in Scholastic Areas 1.4. Curricular Needs of children with hearing impairment in Non-scholastic Areas 1.5. Curricular Framework for 21st Century. Module 2: Developing Literacy Skills: Reading 2.1. Concept of reading and reading related challenges of CWHI 2.2 Pre-requisites for Reading and Emergent Reading Skills; 2.3. Assessment of Reading Skills at Different Levels; 2.4. Strategies to develop reading Skills and Independent Reading; 2.5. Types and Models of Developing Reading Skills; Module 3: Developing Literacy Skills: Writing 3.1. Pre-requisites for Writing and Emergent Writing Skills; 3.2. Assessment of Written Language at Different Levels; 3.3. Components and Types of Writing; 3.4. Steps and Strategies in Developing Independent Writing; 3.5. Challenges and Remedial Strategies. Module 4: Curricular Adaptation 4.1. Curricular Adaptation- Meaning and Principles; 4.2. Need Assessment and Decision Making for Adaptation; 4.3. Adapting Curriculum- Content, Teaching-Learning Material, and Instruction; 4.4. Types of Adaptation and Process; 4.5. Adaptation and Accommodations in Student's Evaluation and Examinations. Module 5: Curricular Evaluation 5.1. Concept, Need for Curricular Evaluation; 5.2. Factors Associated with Curricular Evaluation (Learner, Content, Instructor and Resources); 5.3. Areas of Curricular Evaluation: Context, Input, Process and Product; 5.4. Methods and Tools for Curricular Evaluation; 5.5. Challenges in Curricular Evaluation Transactions 89
Lectures,Presentations,Self-study and use of Online Education Resources,Project,Workshops/ Seminars
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Review the syllabus, annual calendar and time table of any class in a school and write your brief reflections on how syllabus is converted into action plan.
2. Go through any pre-school curriculum and write your reflections on how this differs from school curriculum in terms of structure, activities and evaluation.
3. Take any two pages from either history or science text book from secondary section and adapt the content and presentations of the same for a child with hearing impairment.
4. Make a leaflet for teachers on good reading / writing habit
Essential Readings · Gathoo, V. (2006). Curricular Startegies and Adaptations for children with Hearing Impairment New Delhi: Kanishka Publishers · Bunch, G.O. (1987). The Curriculum and the Hearing Impaired student: Theoritical and practical considerations. Boston, MA: College-Hills Press. · Marsh, C.J. (2004). Key concepts for understanding curriculum. Routledge Falmer. · Moores, D.F., Martin, D.S. (2006). Deaf Learner: developments in curriculum and Instruction. Gallaudet University Press. · Fontas, I. (2001). Guiding reader and Writers (Grades 3-6): Teaching comprehension, Genre and Context Literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Suggested Reading · Posner, G.J., Rudnitsky A.N. (2005). Course Design: A Guide to curriculum Development for Teachers. Pearson. · Bialostok, S. (1992). Raising Readers: Helping your child to literacy. Winnipeg, MB: Peguis Publishers · Culliman, B.E. (2000). Read to Me: Raising Kids Who Love to Read. New York: Scholastic. C 14 EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION AND TEACHING STRATEGIES 90
Course Code: C 14
Credit: 03
Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours 30
Marks: 75
Introduction:
Early identification of hearing loss needs to be followed by a good quality intervention. This enables the children to develop adequate speech & language which in turn would facilitate school readiness. Teachers need to use specialised techniques for developing listening, speaking, communication and linguistic skills to children with hearing impairment for them to access knowledge.
Objectives: After completion of this course, the student will be able to: · understand about programmes for early intervention of infants and children with HI · Describe the need, stages and importance of auditory listening & Speech reading for facilitating development of spoken language of children with hearing impairment · Explain various approaches to teaching, strategies for speech intervention · Describe methods, techniques and options to facilitate language and communication · Explain the concept, principles and practices, linkages and outcomes of educational intervention
Module 1 Need & strategies for early intervention of hearing loss 1.1 Parent-infant programmes for children with HI: Overview, need, requirements and plan of action. 1.2 Pre-school training programmes: Overview, need, requirements and plan of action. 1.3 Individual Speech-Language Therapy Programmes: Overview, need, requirements and plan of action. 1.4 Impact of early intervention on school outcomes 1.5 Intervention of late identified children with hearing impairment: Challenges & Strategies
Module 2 Auditory Learning (AVT & Auditory Training) & Speech Reading 2.1 Concept of `Auditory Listening': Unisensory & Multisensory approaches 2.2 Auditory training: Importance, types (Individual & Group) and Stages 2.3 Auditory Verbal Therapy: Principle, importance and role of teacher 2.4 Auditory Training and AVT: Pre-requisites, challenges, similarities & differences 2.5 Speech Reading: Concept, importance, Pre-requisites, challenges and Role of teacher
Module 3 Speech Intervention strategies 3.1 Approaches to teaching speech: Auditory Global Approach; Multi-sensory Syllable unit approach; Ling's Approach
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3.2 Formulation of Lesson plan: Long term goals; Short term goals; Activities for teaching correct production of various vowels and consonants 3.3 Orientation to acoustics of speech 3.4 Strategies for production of speech: Modelling & Shaping through Auditory, Visual, Tactile modalities 3.5 Individual and Group speech teaching: Strengths and challenges
Module 4 Communication and Language teaching strategies 4.1 Methods of teaching language: Natural, Structural and Combined 4.2 Principles and Techniques of developing language 4.3 Communication Options: Compare and contrast 4.4 Communication Options: justification and challenges 4.5 Tuning the environment (Home & School) for facilitating language & Communication
Module 5 Educational intervention strategies 5.1 Educational Intervention: Concept, Need & Areas (curricular & co curricular) & Types of educational intervention (group, individual, developmental, remedial) 5.2 Principles and practices in early educational intervention: Family centred, contextualised (natural & inclusive environment) & integrated (collaborative) support and services 5.3 Maxims, Methods of teaching & Lesson planning (group, individual, developmental, and remedial) 5.4 Partnership of various professionals & agencies in educational intervention 5.5 Child & Family Outcomes of Early Educational Intervention Transaction Understanding most of the concepts introduced through this course is essential for any classroom teacher. Hence, curriculum transactions may involve lectures with adequate explanations and examples with reference to Indian context. Class discussions must follow theoretical introductions so that the student teachers are able to link this knowledge with whatever observations and reflections they are making in schools. Suggested library readings prior to the lecture will help student teachers to get familiarized with the notions and appropriate terms. Evaluations must focus on understanding the concepts and processes with reference to students with and without special needs.
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Observe any two activities in a Parent-infant programme / pre-school programme and write a report - `what and why'. 2. Classify the vowels and consonants of your language into low, mid & high frequency and make word list for auditory training
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3. Read and reflect upon five lesson plans for teaching speech to children with hearing impairment and submit your report. 4. Select a story and write for three levels (pre-school, third and seventh standard) using appropriate complexity of language (idea, vocabulary & syntax) 5. Read and reflect upon five lesson plans for teaching curricular subjects to children with hearing impairment. Record your reflections. Essential Readings · Bess, F. H., & Humes, L. E. (1990). Audiology: The fundamentals. London: Williams & Wilkins. · Finitzo-Hieber, T. (1981). Classroom Acoustics. In R. J. Roeser & M. P. Downs (Eds.) Auditory disorders in school children. New York: Theime-Stratton. · Katz, J. (1978, 1985, 1994). Handbook of Clinical Audiology. (2nd, 3rd& 4th eds.). Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins. · Nerbonne, M. A. & Schow, R.L. (2002). Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. · Nerbonne, M. A. & Schow, R.L. (2013). Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation. 6th ed. Boston: Pearson Education. · Calvert, D.R. Silverman, S.R. (1983). Speech and Deafness: A Text for Learning and Teaching. Washington: Alexander Graham Bell Assn for Deaf. · Rhoades, E., & Duncan, J. (2010). Auditory-verbal practice: Toward a family centered approach. Springfield: Illinois: Charles C. Thomas · Powell, F., Finitzo-Hieber, T., Friel-Patti, S., & Henderson, D. (1985). (Ed.) Education of the Hearing Impaired Child. London: Taylor and Francis Ltd. / San Diego: CollegeHill Press. · Maxon, A., & Brackett, D. (1992). The Hearing Impaired Child: Infancy Through High School Years. Boston: Andover medical Publishers. · Estabrooks, W., (2006). Auditory-Verbal therapy and practice. Washington DC: Alexander Graham Bell Association for Deaf. · Ling, D. (2002). Speech hearing-impaired child: Theory and practice. 2nd Ed. Deaf and hard of hearing. · Easterbrooks,S. (2007).Helping Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students to Use Spoken Language: A Guide for Educators and Families .Amazon · Aggarwal,J.C. (2010).Principles, Methods and Techniques of Teaching .Amazon · Ling, D. ( 2000).Early Intervention For Hearing Impaired Children . Amazon 93
· Maluccio, Canali & Vecchiato (2002).Assessing Outcomes in Child and Family Services: Comparative Design and Policy Issues. Amazon · Guralnick, M, J, (2005).The Developmental Systems Approach to Early Intervention. London: PAULH Brooks · Lynas, Wendy (1994). Communication Options in the Education of Deaf Children. London: Whurr Publishers Ltd · Moores, Donald, F (1997), Educating the deaf, Houghton Nifflin Company · Beattie, Rod G. (2001). Ethics in Deaf Education: The First Six Years. New York: Academic Press Inc. · Owens, R.E. (2012). Language development: An introduction (8th ed.) Boston: Pearson · Marschark, Marc Spencer, Patricia Elizabeth (2003). Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education. London: Oxford University Press. · Paul, Peter V. Whitelaw, Gail M. (2011). Hearing and Deafness: An Introduction for Health and Education Professionals. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Learning. · Schirmer, Barbara R (2001). Psychological, Social and Educational Dimensions of Deafness. Boston: Allyn and Bacon · Livingston, Sue (1997). Rethinking the Education Deaf Students: Theory and Practice from a Teachers Perspective. London: Heinemann. · English, Kristina M (2002). Counseling Children with Hearing Impairment and Their Families. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. · Mahshie S. N.(1995) educating deaf children bilingually, Gallaudet University, Washington · Lynas, Wendy (1994). Communication Options in the Education of Deaf Children. London: Whurr Publishers Ltd ford university press Suggested Reading · Jeffers, J., & Barley, M. (1975). Speech reading (Lip reading). Spring field, IL: Charles C. Thomas. · Paul, P.V. Whitelaw, G.M. (2011). Hearing and Deafness: An Introduction for Health and Education Professionals. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Learning. · Rossetti, L. M., & Kile, J. E. (1997). Early intervention for special populations of infants and toddlers. San Diego: Singular Publishing Group, Inc. · Sanders, D. A., & Derek, A. (1993). Management of hearing handicap: Infants to elderly (3rd edn). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. · Yarrow, L.J. Rubenstein , J.L. Pedersen, F.A. (1975). Infant and Environment: Early Cognitive and Motivational Development. New York: John Wiley and Sons. 94
· Nolan, Michael Tucker, Ivan (1984) Educational Audiology. London: Croom Helm. · Plant, G.S., Karl E., (1995). Profound Deafness and Speech Communication. London: Whurr Publishers Ltd. · McCracken, W., & Laoide-Kemp (1997). Ed. Audiology in Education. London: Whurr Publishers Ltd., · Richerg, C.M., & Smily, D.F. (2012). School-Based Audiology. San Diego: Plural Publishing. · McAnally, P.l., Rose, S., & Quigley, S.P. (1987). Language Learning practices with Deaf Children. San Diego: A College-Hill Publication. · Van Riper C. & von Emerick, L. (1984). Speech correction ­ An introduction to speech pathology and audiology. 7th Ed. NJ: Englewood Cliffs Prentice Hall Inc.
C 15 TECHNOLOGY AND DISABILITY
Course code: C 15 Contact Hours: 60
Notional Hours: 30
Credits: 03 Marks 75
Introduction: Technology plays a vital role in development including teaching learning process. It is especially beneficial to children with hearing impairment to access information through different modalities which otherwise would have been inaccessible to them. Use of technology eases out the process of learning and makes it easier, enjoyable and meaningful. The said course is designed to provide the learners with knowledge of technology so that the same could be used effectively for children with hearing impairment. Objectives: After completion of this course, the student will be able to: · Enumerate various listening devices and describe ways of effective usage and maintenance · Create awareness and basic exposure to state-of-the-art technology for management of various aspects of speech · Narrate the range of technological applications that can be used for facilitating communication and language · Explain the present and future technologies facilitating the education of children with hearing impairment · Identify different resources (financial & human) to obtain technology 95
Module 1: Listening devices and classroom acoustics 1.1.Listening devices: Types (Individual & Group), functioning of Hearing aids, classification of hearing aids based on style (body level, ear level), technology (analog, programmable, digital), Ling's six sound test and other outcome measures 1.2.Ear moulds: Types, importance, care & maintenance 1.3.Classroom amplification devices: Individual, Speech Trainer & group, Hard wire, loop induction, infra-red & FM systems, their importance in educational management 1.4.Cochlear Implant, middle ear implant, BAHA & Auditory Brainstem implant: Candidacy, components, functioning & importance with special reference to ADIP 2014 scheme 1.5.Comparison between individual hearing aids, group hearing aids & cochlear implant and their care & maintenance Module 2: Technology for management for speech 2.1 Computer based training aids / equipment for management of speech (Dr.Speech; Vaghmi; Speech viewer) 2.2 Use of computer based speech equipment for management of voice in children with hearing impairment 2.3 Use of computer based speech equipment for management of suprasegmental features of speech in children with hearing impairment 2.4 Basic infrastructure required for using computer based speech training aids/ equipment 2.5 Tele Speech Therapy Module 3: Technology facilitating language & communication 3.1 Low cost technology and its application in development of teaching learning material 3.2 Electronic and web-based technology and applications: TV, digital Recorders, downloaded AV films, search engines, online learning material, language apps 3.3 Web based technology for using and training of ISL 3.4 Sign to text and text to sign technology, Concept of captioning, types and its role in literacy development 3.5 Mobile communication / Applications, social media, web based media to be used for communication Module 4: Technology facilitating Education 4.1 Technology and its impact on education: Changing Trends in teaching & learning 4.2 Technology products for educational purposes : Listening (Induction loop/FM/IR), Visual (Speech to text/text to speech) Audio-Visual (computer based learning & selflearning packages, Multimedia) 4.3 Technology Based Educational Services: online - learning, Web based learning, Computer assisted Learning, video remote interpreting, C-Print technology, open, close and real time Captioning 96
4.4 ICT and education of children with hearing impairment: Planning, implementation & evaluation of teaching-learning 4.5 Future technologies: Universal Design: Meaning & scope
Module 5: Resource Mobilisation for technology 5.1 Agencies for Aids & Appliances: Government and non-government 5.2 Eligibility criteria for availing funding under government schemes 5.3 Procedure for availing funding from different agents 5.4 Challenges encountered with cost involved in maintenance of devices after availing funding and ways to overcome 5.5 Agencies / Strategies to locate required human resources for various services and referrals Transaction Understanding most of the concepts introduced through this course is essential for any classroom teacher. Hence, curriculum transactions may involve lectures with adequate explanations and examples with reference to Indian context. Class discussions must follow theoretical introductions so that the student teachers are able to link this knowledge with whatever observations and reflections they are making in schools. Suggested library readings prior to the lecture will help student teachers to get familiarized with the notions and appropriate terms. Evaluations must focus on understanding the concepts and processes with reference to students with and without special needs.
Hands on Experience for notional hours: (ANY TWO)
30 Hrs 10 Marks
1. Draw a neat labelled block diagram of hearing aid. Prepare a list of tips for minor trouble shooting 2. Prepare a list of agencies for procuring equipment and software for teaching speech 3. Make a story using web based content, pictures, images and video clips 4. Compile different educational apps 5. Compile a list of government and non-government funding agencies for aids & appliances.
Essential Readings · Bess, F. H., & Humes, L. E. (1990). Audiology: The fundamentals. London: Williams & Wilkins. · Finitzo-Hieber, T. (1981). Classroom Acoustics. In R. J. Roeser & M. P. Downs (Eds.) Auditory disorders in school children. New York: Theime-Stratton. · Katz, J. (1978, 1985, 1994). Handbook of Clinical Audiology. (2nd, 3rd& 4th eds.). Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins.
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· Allum, D.J. (Ed). (1996). Cochlear Implant Rehabilitation in Children and Adults. England, London; Whurr Publishers. · Berg, F. (2008). Speech Development Guide for Children With Hearing Loss. San Diego: Plural Publishing. · Maltby, M.T. (1994). Principles of Hearing Aid Audiology. London: Whurr Publishers. · Taylor, Brian M., H. Gustav (2011). Fitting and Dispensing Hearing Aids. San Diego: Plural Publishing. · Tweedie, J. (1987). Children's Hearing Problems, Their Significance, Detection and Management. Bristol: The Bath Press. · Waldman, D., & Roush, J. (2010). Your child's Hearing Loss; A Guide for Parents. San Diego: Plural Publishing. · Rapp, W.H. (YNK). Universal design for learning in action. Baltimore MD: Brooks · Mathew, S.M. (2012).Technology for persons with hearing impairment. Status of Disability in India-2012.NewDelhi: RCI · Stewart, D.A. & Kluwin, T.N. (2001).Teaching Deaf & Hard of Hearing Students : Content , Strategies & Curriculum. London : Allyn & Baccon · Kumar, K. L. (2009).Educational Technology: A Practical Textbook for Students, Teachers, Professionals and Trainers .Amazon Pub. · Andersson, C. (2014).Assistive Technology for the Hearing-impaired, Deaf and Deafblind. Amazon Pub. · Lynas, Wendy (1994). Communication Options in the Education of Deaf Children. London: Whurr Publishers Ltd · Schirmer, Barbara R (2001). Psychological, Social and Educational Dimensions of Deafness. Boston: Allyn and Bacon · Riekehof, Lottie L. (1978), The joy of learning signs, Gospel publishing House, Missouri · Moores, Donald, F (1997), Educating the deaf, Houghton Nifflin Compan Suggested Reading · Dillon, Harvey (2001). Hearing aids. New York: Thieme Medical Publications · Krumenacker, S. (2014). Hearing Aid Dispensing Training Manual. San Diego: Plural Publishing. · Sanders, D. A. (1993). Management of hearing handicap: Infants to elderly (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. PSYCHOSOCIAL AND FAMILY ISSUES 98
Course code: C 16 Contact Hours: 60 Marks: 75
Credits: 03 Notional Hours 30
Introduction: Family and environment play a crucial role in development and education of a child and the same is true in case of children with hearing impairment. As a learner in the field of special education one must not only understand and acknowledge the role of context in which the child is growing, but also try to tune it to facilitate overall development including easily accessible, age appropriate and fluent language. The course is expected to draw learner's attention to these factors which are likely to impact education of children with hearing impairment and perceive family to be a determinant of success.
Objectives: After learning the course the learners will be able to: · Explain psycho social development of early childhood and role of family · To understand the family needs and find himself/herself ready to support families for empowering the child with disability · Ensure family involvement in educational programs by understanding acceptance, attitude and advocacy Module 1: Introduction to Psychosocial issues in early childhood
1.1 Overview of psychosocial development
1.2 Domains of Psychosocial development
1.3 Challenges in psychosocial development of children with hearing impairment 1.4 Ways to overcome challenges related to psychosocial development 1.5 Ensuring school support in psychosocial development Module 2: Family and family interventions
2.1 Introduction to family types and contexts of families in India
2.2 Family's responses to hearing losses (Parents with and without hearing losses) 2.3 Acceptance (adjustment and coping) of hearing disability
2.4 Domains of family assessment: Rating forms, observations 2.5 Skills and ethics of family intervention
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Module 3: Family Needs 3.1 Identifying Family Needs for information, decision making, skill transfer and referral; 3.2. Fostering family's acceptance of child's impairment and creating a positive home environment; 3.3. Building parents' competencies for making informed choices (communication options, options for listening devices, school placement) 3.4. Supporting family in raising children with hearing impairment: Time management, resource management, technology management and stress management 3.5. Encouraging family participation in self-help groups and family support networking Module 4: Family Collaborations with professionals 4.1. Parent Teacher Associations and encouraging family involvement in educational processes 4.1 Ensuring rights: meaning and options (negotiations, family association, complaints, litigation, media) 4.3 Parent professional partnership 4.4 Individual Educational Plan and parent professional collaborations 4.5 Supporting family in fostering allround development and developing communication and language Module 5: Family, Attitude and Advocacy 5.1 Paradigms of disability (charity, medical, social, cultural, right based) and its impact on family 5.2 Attitude: meaning and types 5.3 Attitude towards disability: Indian scenario 5.4 Family advocacy: Meaning and need 5.5 Strategies to facilitate pro active attitude and advocacy Notional Hours Hands on Tasks (ANY TWO) 30 Hours 10 marks 1 Compile five activities that could be undertaken to tune the home environment for a growing child with hearing impairment. 2 Read 3 IEPs and reflect upon family needs. 3 Select/make a tool to measure parent's acceptance and administer it on three parents.Submit with brief reflections. 4 Attend a parent meeting of a special school and report tips provided for fostering parent advocacy. Transaction & Evaluation Curricular transactions for this course must involve more pragmatic approach than mere theoretical discussions. Best outcomes in terms of understanding, skills and pro active attitude towards role of environment and family can be obtained if this course is well linked with 100
experiences from F 1 (School internship) of the same semester. Discussions, case presentations, structured debates and mock family interactions are recommended as transaction strategies. Evaluations in the form of action oriented tasks rather than conventional written tasks are recommended for at least internal assessment. Essential Reading: · Dunst.C, Trivette.C & Deal.A (1996). Enabling & empowering families. Principles & guidelines for practice. Cambridge, MA : Brookline Books. · Gregory Susan, Bishop Juliet and Sheldon Lasley, (1999), Cambridge University, Psychological perspectives of deafness · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Spencer Patricia, Erting Carol, J.marMarschark, Mane, (2000), The deaf child in the family and school, laurance Erlbaum · Scheetz nancyA. Orientation to Deafness (2000), Allyn and Bacon Suggested Reading: · Corter Mairian (1966) deaf transactions:Deaf families, deaf communities and deaf identities, Jessica Kingsley publishers · Brown Ivan and ray Brown (2000), Quality of life and disability · Marscark m and Clark M.D. , Psychological perspectives on deafness Vol I & II, 1998 · Beazley Sarah & Moore Michele, Deaf children their families and professionals dismantling barriers, david Fultron publishers (2005) · Ed Par Ila, cultural diversity and the deaf experiences (1966), Cambridge university press, USA · Caspe, M., Lopez, M. E., Chu, A., & Weiss, H. B. (2011). Teaching the teachers: Preparing educators to engage families for student achievement. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project.
D 17 READING AND REFLECTING ON TEXT
CODE: D 17
CREDIT: 2
Hours: 60
MARKS: 50 (10 class participation, 25 journal submission, 15 presentation with reflections)
Introduction:
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One of the core areas that schools focus upon is age appropriate and fluent literacy skills. Hence, aspirant graduates who intend to make career in education must be good readers and good writers (in literally sense). Due to several reasons a student teacher like you may not have adequate skills, interest and motivation for reading and writing. Here is a skill based and activity oriented course designed to give you an opportunity to look at reading writing seriously, relearn it as a professional activity, apply it for students with special needs and enjoy it like never before. Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Reflect upon current level of literacy skills of the self · Show interest and begin working upon basic skills required to be active readers in control of own comprehension. · Show interest and begin working upon basic skills required to be independent writers understanding adequate intent, audience and organization of the content. · Prepare self to facilitate good reading writing in students across the ages. · Find reading writing as learning and recreational tools rather than a course task. MODULE 1: UNDERSTANDING LITERACY SKILLS UNIT 1 a. Literacy and Current University Graduates: Status and Concerns b. Role of Literacy in Education, Career and Social Life UNIT 2 Meta cognitive awareness of reading UNIT 3 Understanding basic Braille skills and reflections on literacy concerns of children with specific disability UNIT 4 Developing Good Reading Skills and Habits in Primary Level Students: Activities And Strategies UNIT 5 Understanding writing as a process: i) Content (Intent, Audience and Organization) ii) Language (Grammar, Vocabulary, Spelling) iii) Surface Mechanics (Handwriting, Neatness, Alignment And Spacing etc) MODULE 2: Project of Activities / tasks (preparation, submission and presentation of the journal) Students have to do ANY SIX practice tasks as a project out of the options given here (preferably 3 from A and 3 from B) Students are expected to submit journal and make presentation: A. PRACTICING READING SKILLS 1. Responding to recreational Reading Material (Narrations) by Retelling, Summarizing / concluding, Answering, Predicting, Commenting and Discussing (Any three) 2. Responding to School Textbooks (Description) by Retelling, Summarizing, Answering, Predicting, Commenting and Discussing (Any three) 102
3. Responding to Reports, Policy Documents And News (Expositions) by Retelling, Summarizing, Answering, Predicting, Commenting and Discussing (Any three) 4. Responding to Editorial, Academic Articles, Advertisement Copy, Resume (Argumentation) by Retelling, Summarizing, Answering, Predicting, Commenting and Discussing (Any three) 5. Practicing web search on a given topic 6. Practicing reading graphically presented information B. PRACTICING INDEPENDENT WRITING SKILLS 7. Practicing Self Editing And Peer Editing Of Sample Texts 8. Practicing Evaluating Students Writing Using Parameters: Productivity, Correctness, Complexity, Text Organization And Literary Richness 9. Practicing Writing: Picture Description/ Expansion Of Ideas / Essays / Stories 10. Practicing Daily Leaving Writing: Applications / Agenda - Minutes/ Note Taking 11. Practicing Converting Written Information Into Graphical Representation and writing book/movie review 12. Practicing Filling Up Surveys, Forms, Feedback Responses, Checklists MODULE 3: Mid project interaction and feedback: Students are exposed to basic skills through workshops or subject seminars. They are grouped under the supervisors who review the progress of the practice and journal preparation by showing them role model responses. Students discuss and learn from each others. They improve the strategies and output on the basis of the feedback from supervisor and peers. MODULE 4: Submission and presentation with reflections: Each student submits the journal and makes a presentation on reflections and learning. This presentation is to be attended by all supervisors and students ­ preferably also of first year and students from other disability. Transactions It is highly recommended that this course reaches meta-level understanding of own reading process by the student teachers. Hence lecturers are suggested to float the theory bare minimum focussing more on `insights through practice sessions'. To keep the motivation high and complexity low the transactions must involve hands on activities based on the units of the course. The terminology used in units is more for the understanding of the lecturers than the student teachers since this is a newly introduced course in this revised syllabus. Experiential discussions, team tasks and internalising learning by doing are expected to obtain best outcomes. Evaluation must target process of reflecting upon own personalised insights into reading and responding to texts. Hence, entire internal assessment must focus on progressions through activities rather than written tests. 103
Essential Reading · Soundarapandian, M. (2000). Literacy campaign in India. Discovery Publishing House: New Delhi. · May, Frank B. (2001). Unravelling the seven myths of reading. Allyn and Bacon: Boston · Tovani.C & Keene.E.O (2000).I Read It, but I Don't Get It: Comprehension Strategies for Adolescent Readers. Stenhouse Publishers · McGregor.T(2007). Comprehension Connections: Bridges to Strategic Reading. Heinemann Educational Books · Anderson, R., Hiebert, E., Scott, J., & Wilkinson, I. (1985). Becoming a Nation of Readers: The report of the commission on reading. Washington, DC: National Institute of Education and the Center for the Study of Reading. · ASER report of 2015: Pratham Publication · Collection of reading material locally collected by the college including articles, newspapers, surveys, files, portfolios etc Suggested Readings: · McCormick, Sandra. (1999). Instructing students who have literacy problems.(3rd) Merrill: New Jersy · Aulls, Mark W. (1982). Developing readers in today's elementary school. Allyn and Bacon: Boston · Heller, Robert. (1998). Communicate clearly. DK Publishing: New York. · May, Frank B. (1998). Reading as communication. Merrill: New Jersy · Gallangher.K (2004).Deeper Reading: Comprehending Challenging Texts. Stenhouse Publishers · Miller.D (2002).Reading With Meaning: Teaching Comprehension in the Primary Grades. New York: Stenhouse Publishers · Baniel, Anat. (2012). Kids beyond limits. Perigee Trade: New York · Pandit, Bansibihari, Suryawanshi, Dhyane Kute & Meena Prakash. (2007) Communicative language teaching in English: Nityanutan Prakashan: Pune · Paul, Peter V. (2009). Language and Deafness. Jones and Bartlett: Boston · Ezell and Justice (2005). Programmatic Research on Early Literacy: Several Key Findings. IES 3rd Annual Research Conference: American Speech Language & Hearing Association (ASHA). · Frank, Smith (1985). Reading without Nonsense. New York: Teachers College Press, 10027. 104
· Luetke-Stahlman and Nielsen (2003). Early Literacy of Kindergartners with Hearing Impairment. High Beam · Research The Gale Group, Inc.& GRIN Publishing Munich Germany.
D 18 DRAMA AND ART IN EDUCATION
CODE: D 18
CREDIT: 2
Hours: 60
MARKS: 50 (10 class participation, 25 journal submission, 15 presentation with reflections)
Introduction: India has an excellent historical backdrop as well as contemporary talents in the field of art. However, it is debatable whether the same has been translated into our school system effectively. Do most of our students get exposure to a variety of activities involving knowing, exploring and appreciating art? Most probably they do not. It is time that we take a fresh look at what art education is and what role it plays in school education. More than anything, art education is also expected to enhance learning. And do teachers know how to go about it to achieve it? Here is an opportunity to facilitate the art within you which in turn will reflect art in within students. Important Note: for a student teacher with disability appropriate learning alternatives are to be given by the college. For example, a candidate with blindness must get alternative learning opportunities and evaluative tasks for visual art or a candidate with deafness for music art ­ if and when needed.
Objectives After completing the course the learners will be able to: · Exhibit Basic understanding in art appreciation, art expression and art education · Plan and implement facilitating strategies for students with and without special needs · Discuss the adaptive strategies of artistic expression · Discuss how art can enhance learning
MODULE 1: UNDERSTANDING ART AND ART EDUCATION UNIT 1: Art education: Meaning and scope, Strategies to enhance learning through art, UNIT 2: Performing Arts (drama, dance and Music): Range of activities, Appreciating and performing, Identifying skills used in performing arts, Facilitating interest and learning UNIT 3: Visual Arts: Range of activities, Appreciating and performing, Identifying skills used in visual arts, Facilitating interest and learning 105
UNIT 4: Media and electronic art: Range of activities, Appreciating and performing, Identifying skills used in visual arts, Facilitating interest and learning UNIT 5: Art therapy, linking art with multiple intelligences, Adaptations for special needs MODULE 2: Project of Activities / tasks (preparation, submission and presentation of the journal) Students have to do ANY SIX practice tasks as a project out of the options given here (preferably 3 from A and 3 from B) Students are expected to submit journal and make presentation: A. PERFORMING ART 1. Learn Mudras / postures / Todas (or any basic skills) of classical dance. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections. 2. Learn voice modulation needed in dramatics. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections 3. Learn comprehending notations of music. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections 4. Prepare a short skit / street play / folk item for awareness on any social issue (This may be a group activity) 5. Select one art creation like music album / play / dance show etc and write critical appreciation with reflections 6. Review the adaptations required for children with various types of special needs while learning performing arts B. VISUAL / ELECTRONIC ART 7. Learn basic skills of still photography. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections. 8. Learn basic line drawings / stick figures to be used for developing teaching aids. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections. 9. Learn basic puppet making. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections. 10. Learn copy writing for advertisement. Submit summary / portfolio of it with reflections. 11. Carry out web search on Indian sculpture and submit a brief compilation. 12. Select one art creation like movie / painting / Advertisement / sculpture etc and write critical appreciation with reflections 106
MODULE 3: Mid project interaction and feedback: Students are exposed to basic skills through workshops or subject seminars. They are grouped under the supervisors who review the progress of the practice and journal preparation by showing them role model responses. Students discuss and learn from each others. They improve the strategies and output on the basis of the feedback from supervisors and peers. MODULE 4: Submission and presentation with reflections: Each student submits the journal and makes a presentation on reflections and learning. This presentation is to be attended by all supervisors and students ­ preferably also of first year and students from other disability. Transactions Curriculum transactions of this course are recommended to involve holistic teaching learning rather than the conventional `unit by unit' steps. More number of local visiting faculties may be invited to talk about the ideas and its applicability in art education. Collaborative sessions and workshops with local B Ed colleges (in general as well as special education) will help students see the diverse perspective of art appreciation. Transactions of this course may involve student demonstrations, role plays, hands on experiences with basic skill development and outdoor visits for exploring best practices of art education for students with and without special needs. Evaluation strategies may focus reflections and innovative ideas rather than theoretical data based information. Essential Reading: · Finlay, Victoria. The brilliant History of Color in Art. Getty Publications. China · Khoda, Ritu & Pai Vanita. Eye Spy. (2016) Takshila publication · Shirley, Greenway. (2000). Art, an A to Z guide. Franklin Watts: USA · Vaze, Pundalik. (1999). How to Draw and Paint Nature. Jyosna Prakashan: Mumbai · Ward, Alan.(1993) Sound and Music. Franklin Watts: New York Suggested Readings: · Beyer, E. London. (2000). The arts, popular culture and social change · Heller, Robert. (1999). Effective Leadership. DK Publishing: New York. · Greene, Sheila & Hogan, Diane. (2005).Researching children's experience. Sage Publication: London · Baniel, Anat. (2012). Kids beyond limits. Perigee Trade: New York · Efland, A. D. (1990). A history of Art Education: Intellectual and social currents in teaching the visual arts. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. · C. Lewiecki-Wilson & B. J. Brueggemann (Eds.), Disability and the teaching of writing: A critical sourcebook. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's. 107
· L. Nyman & A. M. Jenkins (Eds.), Issues and approaches to art for students with special needs (pp. 142­154). Reston, VA: National Art Education Association. · Gair, S. B. (1980). Writing the arts into individualized educational programs. Art Education,33(8), 8­11
D 19 BASIC RESEARCH AND STATISTICS (PROJECT)
Course Code: D 19
Credit: 02 Hours: 60
MARKS: 50 (10 class participation, 25 journal submission, 15 presentation with reflections)
Objectives: After completion of this course the student will be able to
· Describe the concept and relevance of research in education and special education · Develop an understanding of the research process and acquire competencies for conducting a research · Explain the various types of tools used in conducting research · Describe the methods of measurement and organization of data · Apply suitable measures for data analysis PLEASE NOTE: Students are expected to work on a project of the 4 tasks given in the module content. Journal Submission and presentation with reflections are part of this project. Each student submits the journal and makes a presentation on reflections and learning. This presentation is to be attended by all supervisors and students ­ preferably also of first year and students from other disability
Module 1: Introduction to Research (Basic theory with lot of examples)
1.1 Scientific method 1.2 Research: concept and definition 1.3 Application of scientific method in research 1.4 Purpose of research 1.5 Research in education and special education
Module 2: Types and Process of Research 2.1 Types, methods and process of research (To be taught by the faculty) 2.2 Student to select a topic for research. The topic needs to be relevant in special education and could be from the following areas. · inclusive education of children with disability · rehabilitation and other services · parental involvement and training · early intervention services / special schools · needs and issues of children and families with disability · attitudes and perceptions about disability
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TASK 1.Each student will submit a brief research proposal on selected topic. (Colleges make the template available for the students) Module 3:Tools of Research 3.1 Introduction to types of research tools (To be taught by the faculty) TASK 2: Student to develop a tool relevant for the selected topic of research (under supervision of faculty member) Module 4:Measurement Scale and Organization of Data 4.1 Introduction to various scales and methods for organization of data ((To be taught by the faculty) TASK 3: Student will select and review any 2 published articles / unpublished dissertations in terms of data organization. Brief reflections to be submitted. Module 5: Descriptive Statistic 5.1 Introduction to measures of central tendency TASK 4: Student will apply the measures to the organized data (3-4 Data samples to be provided by the college) TRANSACTIONS AND EVALUATIONS: Curricular transactions for this course must involve more pragmatic approach than mere theoretical discussions. Best outcomes in terms of understanding, skills and pro-active attitude towards role of research can be obtained if this course is well linked with experiences. Focus has to be placed on understanding research carried out by others and their outcomes. Also minimum jargon to be used with more applicability to be emphasized. Evaluations too will involve application rather than theory. Essential reading · Best, J. W. and Kahn, J. V. (1996) Research in Education Prentice-Hall of India New Delhi · Dooley, D. (1997) Social Research Methods. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India. · Grewal, P. S. (1990) Methods of Statistical Analysis. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers · Guptha, S. (2003) Research Methodology and Statistical Techniques. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publishing. · Kauffman James M. & Hallahan Daniel P. (Ed) (2011) Handbook of Special Education. Routledge NY · Koul, Lokesh. (1996). Methodology of Educational Research. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House · Potti, L. R. (2004) Research Methodology. Thiruvananathapuram: Yamuna Publications Suggested Reading · Cohen, J. (1988) Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. New York: Academic Press 109
· Greene, Sheila & Hogan, Diane. (2005). Researching children's experience. Sage Publication: London PART II: AREA E PRACTICAL COURSES E 1: Cross disability & inclusion (other disability) IMP: Practical activities in this section must be conducted on children with LD OR ID OR ASD OR VI OR MD
Semester-I Credits: 02
Hours: 60 Marks: 50
# Task
Educational settings
1 Visit to special Special
school
school
2 Identification of Needs & its implications
3 Classroom teaching observation TOTAL
Specific activities
Hrs Marks Submissions
Study the infrastructure 18
available in a special school Any 3 10
for children
schoo
ls
Study the summary report 18 20
of the evaluation carried out
on any two children &
study its implications in
terms of educational
placement
Observe the teaching in any 24 20
one special classroom and
write reflections
60 50
Report including reflections
E 2: Disability Specialisation(Hearing Impairment)
Semester-II Credits: 05
Hours:150 Marks:125
# Tasks
Educati- Specific activities onal settings
Hrs Marks Submissions
110
1 Assessment Institute *Observation of: BOA, conditioned Pure
of hearing /clinic tone Audiometry, VRA ,Speech 30 20
Audiometry , Hearing aid trial & hearing
aid testing
*Studying 10 Audiograms and noting
the diagnosis and recommendations
*Practicing Ling's 6 sound test
2 Assessment Institute *Listening to speech of children with and
of speech /clinic without hearing loss and identifying
parameters (Non segmental, segmental &
supra segmental) 3 children each
*Observing
speech assessment
(screening) ­ 2 children
30 20
*Carrying out speech assessment
( screening) -2 children
*Observing speech assessment using
standardized tool ­2 children
3 Assessment Institute/ *Studying & describing standardized
of language clinic language tests ­ 1 number
*Observations of any one test
administration ­ 1 child
*Administering any 1 test in a group
36 20
*Observation of developmental scale-3
children
* Observing a reading comprehension
test- 1 group of students of primary level
4 Assessment Institute *Studying & describing DST, GDS,
in
/Clinic CPM , SFB ,VSMS
developme
*Observing assessment of children
ntal
using any two of the above
36 45
psychology
*Studying 10 assessment reports and
noting
the
diagnosis
and
recommendations
5 Learning Institute Finger spelling, daily phrases, short 18 20
Basic level /Clinic structured conversations
ISL OR
ISS
TOTAL
150 125
Journal with reflections Journal with reflections Journal with reflections Journal with reflections Recording of outcome for 10 mins
111
E 2: Disability Specialisation(Hearing Impairment) Semester-III Credits: 04 Hours: 120 Marks: 100
# Task
Education Specific activities
Hrs Marks Submi
al settings
ssions
1 Aural
Institute / - Carrying out daily listening checks on 6 10
intervention Clinic
children with hearing impairment (5
children)
-Use Aided Audiogram for (2 children
each)
A. Linking Ling's 6 sound test
B. Selecting modality of training
(auditory,
speech
reading,
combination)
C. Selecting method of communication
(oral vs manual)
2 Speech
Clinic
- Observing individual speech teaching 12 10
intervention
sessions (2 children)
- Observing group teaching sessions (2
children)
- Planning and executing lesson plan
for teaching non-segmental,
segmental and supra segmental
aspects of speech (2 children)
3 Learning Institute / To learn and practice basic vocabulary, 30 10
and
school / common phrases, conversations, sample
practicing ISL center subject texts, stories in signs.
ISL
(Preferably involving a Deaf individual
and taught by certified signer)
4 Classroom Special Preschool - Observing and Hrs. 24 10
observation school for reporting classroom teaching for
of teaching children various subjects as per the time
with
table of the school- Minimum 18
hearing school periods
4
impairmen -Language
4
t
-subjects
4
-co-curricular
112
Primary - Observing and
reporting classroom teaching for
various subjects as per the time
table of the school- Minimum 18
school periods
-Language
4
-school subjects
4
-co-curricular
4
5 Lesson
Institute Supervised activity by college faculty 6 0
planning
with specific feedback
6 Delivering Special 20 lessons (Science/Maths-5, Social 30 50
Lessons
school
Science- 5, Language ­ 8, Art ­ 2)
7 Individualis
5 lessons on 1 student
6 10
ed lessons
8 Delivering Inclusive 4 lessons of school periods indicating 6 00
lessons
school
appropriate curricular adaptations
TOTAL
120 100
E 1: Cross disability & inclusion (Other disability)
Semester-IV
Credits:4 Hours:120
Marks: 100
# Tasks
Educational Specific activities
Hrs Marks Subm
settings
ission
1 Infrastructure of
Studying the extent of barrier
an inclusive
free environment ( infrastructure 40 20
school
including assistive devices ,
Inclusive human resource & inclusive
school
teaching practices)available in an
inclusive school
2 Classroom
Observing 10 lessons ( 5
teaching
language + 5 subjects)and writing 40 40 Report
observations
report
with
3 Assisting
Working as teacher assistant for
reflect-
Teacher
prayers / assembly, checking 40 40 ions
hearing device, attendance, home
113
TOTAL
work/class work, writing diaries, preparing TLM, teaching practice sessions recapitulation, and break times, 120 100
PART III: AREA F FIELD ENGANGEMENT
F1 Hearing Impairment
Semester-III Credits: 03 Hours: 90 Marks: 75
Setting: Special school for the deaf
# Tasks
Specific activities
Hrs Marks Submissions
1 Teacher Working as teacher assistant for prayers / 18 10
Journal of
assistant assembly, checking hearing device,
daily
**
attendance, home work/class work, writing
reflections
diaries, preparing TLM, teaching practice
and learning
sessions recapitulation, and break times
2 Practicing Undertaking continuous whole day 18 10
Daily diary
functioning teaching using daily diary system for
as a teacher planning and recording.
**
3 Understandi Assisting in exam related planning, setting 6
10
Portfolio of
ng school question papers, assessing, entering
assessment
examination outcome in records, writing progress
activities
**
reports, feedback to students and parents,
drawing pedagogic decisions. Any 3
4 Understand Participating in School committees 12 10
*
ing beyond meetings, Sports, Picnics, trips, visits,
classrooms Parent Teacher Association (PTA) meeting,
competitions, Celebrations, annual
gatherings, medical check ups ­ any 3
5 Developme Developing 2 TLM and 5 worksheet for the 18 10
TLM
nt
of assigned class
114
teaching
learning
material
(TLM),
worksheet,
6 Document Reading and reporting on academic 6
10
*
study
calendars, time table, diaries, work books,
progress reports, case files, parent meeting
reports, certificates, forms to avail
exemptions and concessions, assessment
formats for pre school
7 Use of Using technology for classroom teaching, 6
00
internet and art education, record keeping,
modern
communication, downloading power
technology points, AVs for concept development
for
involving students
improving
the class
processes
8 Program Power point presentation on consolidations, 6
15
end
reflections and take away points from field
presentatio engagement to be able to become a teacher
n
TOTAL
90 75
* Certificate from school head grading the performance 0n 10 point scale. Candidates below the score 5 repeat the placement ** For these tasks each student will be assigned a class. The class teacher is expected to support as a long term mentor for the student placed in her / his class.
F2 Cross disability & inclusion (Other disability)
Semester ­ IV Credits: 4
Hours: 120 Marks: 100
Setting: Special school of other disability than HI
# Task 1 Teacher assistant
Specific activities
Hrs
Studying the background of the 42
children in the allotted class &
working as teacher assistant for
Marks 40
Submissions Journal of daily reflections and
115
prayers / assembly, attendance , home
work/class work, writing diaries &
assisting in school celebrations
2 Document
Reading and reporting on academic
study
calendars, time table, diaries, work 12 10
books, progress reports, case files,
3parent meeting reports, certificates,
forms to avail exemptions and
concessions, assessment formats for
pre school
3 Use
of Using technology for classroom
internet and teaching, art education, record 18 00
modern
keeping,
communication,
technology downloading power points, AVs for
for improving concept development involving
the
class students
processes
4 Understandin Participating in School committees 36 25
g beyond meetings, Sports, Picnics, trips, visits,
classrooms Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
meeting, competitions, Celebrations,
annual gatherings, medical check ups
­ any 3
5 Program end Power point presentation on 12 25
presentation consolidations, reflections and take
away points from field engagement to
be able to become a teacher
TOTAL
120 100
learning Journal on reflections School head's certificate School head sends marks to college as per performance
F 3: Inclusive School Semester-IV Credits: 04
Hours: 120 Marks: 100
Setting: Inclusive school having children with any disabilities
# Tasks
Specific activities
Hrs Marks Submissions
1 Understanding Studying the background of children in 06 5
Report with
the children in the allotted class
annexures &
the classroom
reflections
116
2 Understanding Studying the half yearly, monthly & unit 12 5
the plans
plans & calendar of activities and
progress report
3 Teaching
Assisting the teachers in adaptation of 60 50
support
content, lesson planning, scheduling,
resource mobilisation &preparing TLM,
planning celebrations
4 Remedial
Teaching special children for specialised 30 30
support
support for achieving the content
mastery- 2 students
5 Involvement in Assist the teachers in developing teacher 12 10
Student
made tests, marking scheme, scoring
evaluation
key,exam supervision, evaluation of
answer scripts & reporting
TOTAL
120 100
117

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