CASE STUDY 1: BEAUFORT WEST, D van Rooyen

Tags: Beaufort West, Beaufort West Municipality, municipality, Central Karoo District, Correctional Services, Western Cape, Provincial Government Western Cape, provincial hospital, Central Karoo District Municipality, Beaufort Wes Municipality, Kwa Mandlenkosi, Beaufort West Tourism Bureau, Central Karoo District Beaufort West, South African Police Service, reported crime, Government Offices, reported crimes, cent, National Government Offices
Content: UNIVERSITEIT VAN DIE VRYSTAAT UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE YUNIVESITHI YA FREISTATA CENTRE FOR DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT THE ARID AREAS PROGRAMME CASE STUDY 1: BEAUFORT WEST Deidre van Rooyen Centre for Development Support University of the Free State November 2007 A Research Project funded by the Open Society Foundation PO Box 339 (INTERNAL 100) BLOEMFONTEIN 9300 Republic of South Africa Tel: (051) 401 2423 Fax: (051) 401 3424 http://www.uovs.ac.za/cds
TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. BACKGROUND ­ BRIEF HISTORY..............................................................1 2. MUNICIPAL GOVERNANCE.........................................................................1 3. FINANCIAL CAPITAL ..................................................................................11 4. INFRASTRUCTURE CAPITAL ....................................................................16 5. human capital........................................................................................20 6. NATURAL CAPITAL ....................................................................................36 7. SOCIAL CAPITAL........................................................................................37 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................38 ii
1. BACKGROUND ­ BRIEF HISTORY
The town of Beaufort West was established in 1818 on the farm Hooyvlakkte at the request of Lord Charles, Somerset, then governor of the Cape. The town was named in honour of his father, the fifth Duke of Beaufort. Beaufort West was originally established as a service centre for rail and road transport and to a lesser degree for rural agriculture. The raison d'etre for the town's existence is however the railways. Even though both rail transport and agriculture are in decline in terms of economic opportunities, the town has managed to maintain a significant level of growth due to the high volume of passing road traffic (Beaufort West Municipality, 2006).
2. MUNICIPAL GOVERNANCE 2.1 Development Issues
Beaufort West is strategically situated approximately 450 kilometres northwest from Cape Town along the N1 route, which connects Cape Town with cities like Bloemfontein and Johannesburg. The town is also situated on the stretch of the N1 where the N12 converges with the route, adding to the town transport potentials. Beaufort West Municipality includes the towns of Beaufort West, Merweville and Nelspoort. The largest town in the district, Beaufort West, serves as the administrative centre of the district. The Beaufort Wes Municipality forms part of the Central Karoo District Municipality. The table below indicates the areas in which each of the wards fall. Table 1: Wards in the Beaufort West Municipality
Ward 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Area Hillside, central town, Hospital hill, Nood einde Nelspoort and Mervewille Essopville, Toekomrus, Barrake, Hillside 2 Kwa Mandlenkosi, The Lande Rustdene, New Town, Parra vlei Rustdene, Prince valley Kwa Mandlenkosi , Rustdene
There is a total number of 8 996 households that live in Beaufort West Municipality. Of these households, 82.2% live in urban areas with the remaining 17.8% living in rural areas (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a:2). In 2006, the Beaufort West Municipality's population reached approximately 37 598. The population is expected to grow at a rate of 0.07% between 2006 and 2010. Table 2 indicates that in 2003 the town of Beaufort West made up approximately two thirds of the population of the Beaufort West Municipality with a steady growth trend.
Table 2: Population size of Beaufort West and Beaufort West Municipality
Beaufort West
Population 2001 37107
Population Estimate 2003 40054
Population Estimate 2008 41952
1
Beaufort West Municipality
60484
62410
65136
The population is expected to grow at a rate of 0.07% between 2006 and 2010. The Beaufort West Municipality primarily comprises of three population groups - Africans, Coloureds and Whites as is shown in the graph below. The majority of the people that stay in the Beaufort West region are coloured (69.4%) (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a:2).
Figure 1: Population groups that live in Beaufort West region
80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%
69.4%
17.6%
12.8%
0.3%
African Coloured White Other
The Beaufort West Development Plan (IDP) was developed for 2002 ­ 2006. This plan was reviewed in 2004/5 and implemented in 2006. The Municipal IDP Manager is in process of developing the new plan 2007 - 2011 (Nkungwana, 2007). The following were issues raised by the community of Beaufort West during community participation Processes to develop the reviewed IDP.
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Table 3: Priorities highlighted by the community in the reviewed IDP
BEAUFORT WEST PROPOSED PROJECTS
SOCIO-
ECONOMIC
SERVICE
ECONOMIC
LEVELS
Youth facilities Mohair
Crime reduction Caravan Park
programme
into Truck stop
Accommodation
at Arts & Craft
Mandlenkosi
Jones Avenue Vegetable
Swimming Pool gardens
Library
Reviving Plaza
Post Office
Upgrade Kwa-
Mandlenkosi
Community Hall
Drainage faulty
at Smile
Avenue
Sewage smell
Lights
Mandlenkosi
road
Fire brigade
services
Maintenance of
roads
Rectify street
names and
numbers
The bridge to
the grave yard
is very small
Merweville
Clinic
Small farming
Community Hall
Mortuary
(land)
Upgrading
Play Parks
Upgrading of
(Voortrekker
Swimming Pool caravan park
Street)
Shopping
Clean
Street lights
centre
environment
Paving/sidewalks
Crime
Job creation
Prevention
Programme
TV channels
Hospital
SKILLS Development centre Youth centre
ENVIRONMENT Cleaning KwaMandlenkosi (Dump sites) Dust bins River cleaning
3
BEAUFORT WEST PROPOSED PROJECTS
SOCIO-
ECONOMIC
SERVICE
SKILLS
ENVIRONMENT
ECONOMIC
LEVELS
Nelspoort
Community Bus Regional
Service
marketing
business (SMME)
Development
Small Enterprise
Support centre
Indigenous sheep
& Pig farming
Micro-livestock
enterprise
Specialty Cheese
yoghurt & Ice
cream production
Food processing
Essential oils
cultivation &
extraction
Source: Beaufort West Municipality, IDP Review 2005/6, 2005: 14
The ISRDP Programme, which has been running since 2001, has had a significant impact on the local communities. A variety of projects have been initiated under the auspices of the programme. These project are indicated in Table 4 below.
Table 4: ISRDP projects in Beaufort West Municipality
IDP / Nodal
Project
Stakeholder Contribution
Status /
Challenges
Progress
Current / already Contribution Potential Stakeholders
Involved
Unemployment. Abattoir and Local
R0Farmers Associations, Planning
By-Products. Government, two
DBSA, DEDT, DOL,
phase
Existing Abattoirs.
CKDM, Dept of
Agriculture, Eskom, DST,
DTI, DLA, WESGRO,
ARC, Meat Board.
Unemployment. Hydroponics. Beaufort West
R2 000 000DOL, DTI, ARC,
Second
Municipality,
R2 000 000WESGRO.
phase under
DEDT, DSS,
R2 400 000
construction
DST, CSIR,
CKDM, Dept of
Agriculture,
Unemployment. Essential Oils. DST, Beaufort
DOL, DTI, ARC,
West
WESGRO, DEDT.
Municipality,
CSIR, CKDM.
4
IDP / Nodal
Project
Stakeholder Contribution
Status /
Challenges
Progress
Current / already Contribution Potential Stakeholders
Involved
Poor / lack of Karoo
DEAT, DEDT,
R2 400 000Dept of Correctional
Planning
marketing of the Tourism
CKDM, Local
Services, DMO, DTI, phase
region.
Gateway.
Municipality,
DOC.
Local Tourism
Association.
Lack of inward Springfontein Municipality,
R80 000DTI, Department of
Planning
investment and Dam
CKDM, DEAT.
Economic Development phase
Unemployment. Development.
and Tourism, Nafcoc,
Business Chambers,
Smaleda, etc.
Job creation. Health Spa Casidra,
Department of Housing,
(Nelspoort). Municipality,
Spoornet, Department of
Department of
Health, DTI, Department
Agriculture.
of Arts and Culture etc.
Unemployment Revival of Municipality,
R0Human Settlement, DTI, Planning
and Economic Business
CKDM.
Economic Development phase
Development. Plaza (Kwa-
and Tourism, Nafcoc,
Mandlenkosi).
DPLG (MIG), DEAT.
The long
Multi-Purpose Dept Social
R2 000 000Public Works, Labour, Phases 1 and
distance to be Centre (Phase Development,
R800 000Dept. of Justice, NGO's 2 completed
travelled to 3).
Municipality,
R845 000and DPLG.
access
ESKOM, GCIS,
government
Home Affairs,
services.
Southern Cape
College.
Source: Beaufort West Municipality, IDP Review 2005/6, 2005: 8
2.2 Municipal organogram A total number of 301 employees are in the service of the Beaufort West Municipality. Certain positions are from time to time filled on a temporary basis and a total number of 34 employees are temporary (See Figure 3 for the organogram).
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Figure 2: Basic organogram of the Beaufort West Municipality
Director: Financial Services
MMUuNnIiCciIpPAL
MANalAGER
IDP / LED Manager
manag er Mana
Internal Audit
Director Electrical ger Services
labour relations Officer
Director Engineering Services
Director Corporate Services
Source: Beaufort West Municipality Annual Report 2005/6, 2007a:4
Director Community Services
The management structure consists of six employees. Furthermore, the Engineering Department employs 170 employees, while 25 members of staff work for Financial Services. Community services host 51 people, Corporate Services 21, Municipal Manager 3 and Electrical Services has 25 employees. The challenge that faces the Beaufort West Municipality is that most of the applications are received from designated groups in terms of race and gender of which the municipality has an over representation. Table 5 gives an indication of the breakdown for the employees in each department in terms of the population group and gender.
Table 5: Number of municipal employees in terms of population group as well as gender
Department Financial Services Engineering Services Electro technical Services Community Services Corporate Services Office of the Municipal Manager
Black
Male Female
2
4
Coloured
Male Female
6
4
White
Male Female
2
8
Total 26
38
1
120
2
8
2
171
5
1
15
1
4
0
26
9
0
36
3
1
3
52
3
1
5
9
1
3
22
1
0
1
0
1
1
4
58
7
183
19
17
17
301
The Department of Corporate Services consists of management (2 employees), administrative services (9), human resources (1) and libraries (10), bringing the total number of employees to 22. The Community Services department includes management (1 employee), housing (3), traffic (17) and waste management (32), bringing the total
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number of employees in the directorate to 52. A total of 26 employees work in the Electrical Services department, namely management (3), distribution (15), street lights (2), administration (2) as well as meter readers (4). Altogether 171 people work in the Engineering Services department, i.e. management and support (8), mechanical workshop (7), roads & storm water (43), water and sewerage maintenance (22), water treatment and sewerage works (20), building maintenance (17), parks and recreation (36), building control (2), Merweville satellite office (8) and Nelspoort satellite office (8). The staff complement in the Financial Services department of 26 is made up of management (4), expenditure (6), income (9), administration (6) and financial administration (1) (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 4).
2.3 Municipal Revenue and Expenditure The income and expenditure for the Beaufort West Municipality is by indicating an actual amount for the previous year as well an actual and a budgeted amount for 2006 in this case. The following is a table of the income and expenditure for the Beaufort West Municipality indicating the actual as well as the budgeted figures for 2006. Table 6: Municipal Income and Expenditure
ANALYSIS OF OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2006
Actual 2005
INCOME
Actual 2006
5,069,830 3,898,797 791,033 380,000
Grants and subsidies National Government Provincial Government District Municipality
7,341,456 7,251,774 89,682 0
51,981,032 10,652,830 17,069,949 7,233,701 17,024,552
Operating income Assessment rates Sale of electricity Sale of water Other service charges
54,680,284 11,124,469 18,478,320 8,084,100 16,993,395
57,050,862 TOTAL INCOME
62,021,740
22,459,048 23,751,201 8,532,822 93,267 15,125,112 4,028,262 3,357,779
EXPENDITURE Salaries, wages and allowances General expenses: - Purchase of electricity - Purchase of water - Other general expenses Repairs and maintenance Capital charges
25,483,873 27,685,295 8,870,032 379,743 18,435,520 6,311,214 3,248,563
Budget 2006 5,160,200 5,145,000 15,200 0 52,553,052 9,987,230 18,253,091 7,779,274 16,533,457 57,713,252 24,229,010 24,553,343 8,904,800 425,600 15,222,943 5,846,237 3,086,492
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331,605 1,797,504 55,725,399 -1,356,432 54,368,967
Contributions to fixed assets Contributions Gross expenditure Less: Amounts charged out NET EXPENDITURE
685,419 90,000 63,504,364 -1,770,705 61,733,659
1,295,805 1,190,000 60,200,887 -2,504,273 57,696,614
Source: Beaufort West Municipality Annual Report 2005/6, 2007a: 40
From Table 6, it can be highlighted that the operating income the Beaufort West Municipality generates is R54 680 284. The total operating expenditure for the year amounted to R 61 733 659, which is 6.99% more than the budgeted expenditure. The actual income amounting to R 62 021 740 has however increased by 7.45% resulting in a surplus for the year of R 288 801 (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 39). Table 7 indicates the government grants and subsidies received by the Beaufort West Municipality. A total amount of R30 560 187 was received, compared to R23 110 351 received in 2005. The money was also received and used in often contrasting ways Iin each of the years. Most of the money was received for low cost housing from the Provincial Government of the Western Cape. For the Consolidated Municipal Infrastructure Programme (CMIP) the Beaufort West Municipality upgraded sports grounds, streets, buildings and water as well as electricity networks. The R734 000 from the Municipal Systems Improvement Programme Grant (MSIG) was used for Project Consolidate (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 39). Table 7: Government Grants and Subsidies received by Beaufort West Municipality
GOVERNMENT GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES
2006
2005
Equitable share
7,251,774
3,893,797
Consolidated Municipal Infrastructure Programme (CMIP)
1,640,205
3,814,660
PAWC : asset management
1,845,669
1,784,432
PAWC : Housing
8,613,761
2,719,098
PAWC : Department of Transport
4,679,669
2,078,000
National Lottery
991,908
949,928
Department Mineral & Energy
4,040,000
0
PAWC : social services
130,000
630,000
PAWC : Department of Sport & Culture
400,000
490,000
Municipal Systems Improvement Programme Grant (MSIG)
734,000
844,257
PAWC : Department of Environmental Affairs
150,000
425,000
PAWC : Department of Human rights
70,000
0
Central Karoo District Municipality
7,000
659,449
PAWC : Proclaimed roads
6,201
0
National Department of Sport
0
1,289,000
PAWC : Department of Economic Development & Tourism
0
300,000
PAWC : Department of local government
0
3,232,730
Source: Beaufort West Municipality Annual Report 2005/6, 2007a
8
The equitable share received almost doubled from 2005 to 2006. All consumers with a household income of up to R 1 640 are regarded as indigent households and qualify for free basic electricity (50 kWh per month) and free basic water (6 kl per month). In addition, they are also subsidised on rates and services based on the household income (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 48). Table 8 indicates the number of indigent subsidies as well as the amount that was spent in 2006.
Table 8: Indigent subsidies in Beaufort West Municipality
Electricity Water Sewerage Refuse Rates TOTAL
FREE BASIC SERVICES AND INDIGENT SUBSIDY
Service
Number
Amount
3 403
R 885 117
3 279
R 1 623 663
2 562
R 882 574
743
R 161 579
492
R 33 669
R 3 586 602 Source: Beaufort West Municipality Annual Report 2005/6, 2007a: 40
A list of tariff rates was collected from the municipality. Table 9 below underlines some of these tariffs.
Table 9: Tariffs for the Beaufort West Municipality
CEMETRY Goue Akker ELECTRICITY WATER REFUSE REMOVAL TAXES SANITATION COMMONAGE
Details
Tariff
VAT included 2006/2007
Single grave (bought after death)
R20
Reserved plot
R32
Grave for still born baby
R72
Digging of grave
R40
Covering of grave
R12
User deposit (per month)
R44.08
Basic Tariff (per month)
R35.35
Unit ­ per amp (Household meters)
R7.90
User deposit (per month)
R31.17
Basic tariff (per month)
R31.17
Unit tariff
(0-6 kl)
R2.75
(7-20kl)
R3.15
(21-50 kl)
R3.45
(51+ kl)
R3.75
At least 2 removals per week per year
R300.00
Tariff per R of value
2.58 c
Private facilities (per flush toilet /
R521.40
urinal) (per year)
Hire of commonage South of N1 and
R3.72
West of Loxton Road (per small
stock)
Source:Beaufort West Municipality, 2005
9
2.4 Social/economic projects The socio/economic projects for the Beaufort West Municipality for 2005 / 2006 are highlighted in the table below. Table 10 highlights the project details with the donor as well as where the status and the area for the proposed project.
Table 10: Socio/economic projects for 2005/2006 of the Beaufort West Municipality
Project
Amount
Donor
Status
Area
1. Composting 2. Abattoir 3. industrial development Strategy 4. Essential Oils 5. Tourism Gate Way 6. Economic Development Potential 7. Economic Viability Study 8. Policy (tourism signs) 9. Feasibility Study CBD 10. LED Committee
R350 000.00 R10m R50 000.00 R500 000.00 R2.4m R136 126.00 R100 000.00 R35 000.00 R150 000.00 R5 000.00
PAWC No donor No donor DST DEAT DEAT No donor DEAT DEAT Own funds
Planning Planning Search for Funding
Beaufort West Industrial Area Beaufort West
Planning Planning Planning
Beaufort West Beaufort West Merweville
Search for Funding Beaufort West
Planning
Beaufort West
Planning
Beaufort West
Process
Beaufort West
Source: Beaufort West unicipality, IDP Review 2005/6, 2005
Based on the economic potentials, the following key projects are being planned, or have been initiated in the municipal area (Beaufort West Municipality, 2005: 6-8). Beaufort West Hydroponics is a Section 21 Company trading in herbs in Beaufort West. Some of the herbs are grown hydroponically (without soil) for the fresh produce markets while other are grown in soil for the essential oils market. In 2003 the Department of Science and Technology, approved funding for the establishment of an Essential Oils Pilot Project in Beaufort West. Launch Date: 1 January 2004 ; Project Cost: R800 000 In 2003 the Department of Science and Technology, in conjunction with the Provincial Government of the Western Cape, approved funding for the expansion of the (pilot) hydroponics facility into a fully-fledged business. An 18-month pilot project has already been completed. This has proven both the technical and commercial viability of growing herbs hydroponically in Beaufort West. The expansion project is aimed at transferring a full-scale technology-rich solution into an economically depressed area in order to address a market opportunity, thereby creating at least 80 additional sustainable jobs. Launching Date: June 2003; Project Cost: R5 000 000. The abattoir and by-product project is designed as an anchor that has a multipurpose nature that incorporates an abattoir, tannery and leather production. It is anticipated that the abattoir would feed some of its by-products to the tannery and leather projects with raw material for processing and manufacturing of products. The abattoir would be specifically geared for small stock slaughter as well as pigs,
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cattle, ostriches and various game and should provide employment directly as well as through an additional pre-packaging unit. It is expected that such a facility could achieve premium prices on its meat because of the reputation already built up for Karoo quality mutton and lamb. The Construction and operation of a multi purpose abattoir would "process" approximately 80 ostriches, 250 livestock and 400 game 100 heads of game per day. By-products would be processed and marketed as a value-adding component to the business. It is estimated that the project would create 60 direct sustainable employment and 25 indirect employment opportunities. Launching Date: May 2005 ; Project Cost: R7 065 000 Subsequent to the CSIR's continuous interactions with communities, leather projects have been established in North West and Kwa-Zulu Natal Provinces. During a Rapid Review of selected towns in the Western Cape the CSIR identified the opportunity to establish manufacturing of leather-based products in the Central Karoo.. Utilising existing and currently planned structures such as the 'Arts and Crafts Centres' will provide significant local sales outlets for the products. Launching Date: March 2004 ; Project Cost: R4 000 000.
3. FINANCIAL CAPITAL 3.1 Number of social grants An alarming feature of the socio-economic conditions in the Beaufort West Municipality is the low average household income. According to the CSIR (Rapid Review, 2002) 43% of all households in Beaufort West have an income of less than R1000-00 per month (compared to R800 per month used by Statistics SA as the yardstick for measuring poverty). Based on the CSIR information it would seem that 27% of the adult population receive some form of welfare grant (excluding the equitable share grants for households) and in total just more than R3.5 million per month is paid in grants to residents in the Beaufort West. Social Grants are paid out once a month in Beaufort West by SASSA (South African Social Security Agency) around the 15th of every month. The grantees can receive their money through the All Pay system (at the Department of Social Development) or receive the money in their bank account which they can access through the ATM in town (Meyer, 2007). Table 11 indicates that there is approximately 13 000 social grants processed every month ­ the majority being child support and disability grants. There are also four war veterans receiving a grant monthly.
Table 11: Number and type of social grants in Beaufort West: October 2006 to March 2007
Grant Type Old Age War Veterans Disability Grant Foster Grant Care Combination
March 2367 4 3828 600 10
February 2364 4 3861 579 10
January 2366 4 3896 579 10
December 2385 4 3873 646 10
November 2375 4 3862 640 10
October 2393 4 3926 650 10
11
Care Dependency Child Support TOTAL
103 6483 13395
106 6510 13434
106 5476 13437
111 6491 13520
112
112
6465
6494
13468
13626
Source: All Pay, 2007
3.2 Banks and ATMs All the Commercial Banks have a branch in Beaufort West ­ First National, ABSA, Standard, Nedbank. They each have at least one ATM outside of the bank. These banks are all in the main road of the town and therefore also very accessible to the tourists driving through. There is also a branch of the African Bank as well as the Land Bank regional office.
3.3 Business Types There are two malls being constructed in Beaufort West, therefore the business structures could expand. Several of the small town residents around Beaufort West use the town as a base for schooling for the children, shopping for groceries and clothing and many other facilities. Beaufort West is a large town and therefore there are several basic business types. Therefore, Table 12 indicates the number of each of the categories with a few examples. The informal businesses as well as those businesses that do not appear in the telephone book are not reported, therefore the number of business may be fewer than expected.
Table 12: Types and number of businesses in Beaufort West
Category Accommodation
Examples Beaufort Manor, Central Overnight flats, Donkin Country House, Formula 1 Hotel, Hotel Royal Lodge, Karoo National Park, La Paix Selfsorg, Wagon Wheel Country Lodge, Olive Grove Guest Farm, KoKA Tsara Bush Camp
Number of businesses 27
Beads and Gifts, Sonneblom Bloemiste, Central Karoo
7
Arts & Crafts
Leather Products, Crafty Kids
Bank
Standard, ABSA, FNB, African, Land, Nedbank
6
Book shop,
Boeke Depot, Courier Printing, Stationery.com, Bargain
5
Stationery &
Books
Printing
Bookkeeping
Augustyn Jannie & Kie, Smit, Vlok en Kie
3
Mostert, Alrika,Moderna Meisies, Sovounir, Perfect
7
Boutique & Salons Bodies
Greater Karoo Butchery, Karoo Lam, Koup Vleis,
12
Primavleis, Goldfinger
Butchery & Biltong
Cash Loans
Easy Cash Loans, Flash cash
3
Computers
JP Computers, Beaufort Wes Rekenaardienste
2
Couriers &
NPS Courier, Beaufort Wes Verspreiders
2
12
Distribution
Employment
Ikaheng Human Resources
1
Agency
Engineering
GJA, Precision Motots
2
Top DVD, Museum, Toeriste Inligting, Beaufort West
6
Entertainment
Gholf Course
Estate Agents
CZ, Crawford, SEEF
5
Farmer services
Co-op, Karoo besproeing, Pienaar Wol Fabriek, Melkery
6
Fresh Fruit &
Alles Vars, Beaufort Wes Groente Mark
3
Vegetables
Funeral services
AVBOB, Little Woods, Karee N, Nationwide, Booysen
9
Furniture & Second Oxford, rand vir Rand, OK Furnishers
3
Hand Shop
Garage & Service Toyota, HB Motors, AA Towing & Workshop, Donkin
28
Centre (Cars &
Motors
Trucks)
Old Mutual, Capitec, Jo-Henry Belegers, Beaufort West
13
Insurance Brokers Brokers
Jewelers
Philtin's Jeweliers & Horlosie makers
1
Legal
Crawford, Protect a lamb, Beaufort West legal Advisers
6
A&J Liquors, Star Bottle, Beaufort Liquors, Tulbagh
8
Liquor store
Wynkelders
Van der Westhuizen, Senekal, Le Roux, Virtual Care
10
Medical
Apteek
Nursery
Matchbox
1
Restaurants &
Pizza World, Steers, Wimpy, Mac Young Restaurant,
22
Take Aways
Pop In, Oppi Dek
Ackermans, JET, PEP Stores, Russels, Truworths,
32
Retail Stores
Checkers
Security
Beaufort Alarms, Leondale, Stears Sekuriteit
4
E-paints, B&B Welding, De Jagers Plumbing, WG
12
Technical services Elektries, Radio & Satellite
Transport
Hattingh Vervoer, De Klerk Busdiens
3
Wholesalers
Essop Town Cafй, SSS Powersave, Protea Superstore
15
Gordan Kemp Gas, African Wildlife Taxidermist, Central
8
OTHERS
Cycles, Car Mon Bakery
3.4 Tourism Although most people only drive through Beaufort West or use it as a half way stop between Cape Town and Johannesburg, there are several tourist attractions in this typical "platteland" town. There is a small tourism bureau in the main road with various brochures, pamphlets and a lot of information on the available accommodation and activities in the surrounding area. The accommodation in Beaufort West varies from R100 to R400 per person. There is four hotels, five guest houses, two game lodges, four guest farms, two overnight rooms, six bed and breakfast and four self catering facilities on the list provided by the Tourism Bureau in Beaufort West (Tourism Bureau in Beaufort West, 2006). As seen in Table 12, there are 22 restaurants and take away facilities in Beaufort West. The majority of the guest houses and hotels also provide a good meal for the traveller.
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The Tourist Bureau also provides a list of 34 national museums and places of interest in Beaufort West. Some of these places are highlighted below. The best way to experience Beaufort West is to stroll through the streets viewing the various architecturally interesting buildings. A very good stating point would be the MUSEUM, founded in 1818 and proclaimed the first municipality of the old Cape Colony on February 3, 1837. The museum complex consists of three buildings, namely the OLD DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH and PARSONAGE and the old town hall that once housed the municipal offices. Figure 4 illustrates all the other historic buildings and places of interest that can be seen in Beaufort West. On the outskirts of Beaufort West lies the 75 000 ha Karoo National Park. Here two of South Africa's most highly Endangered Species, the riverine rabbit and the black rhinoceros, have been successfully resettled. The park is also home to a wide variety of indigenous buck, mountain zebra, wild ostrich and five tortoise species, the most in any conservation area in the world. The park has Cape Dutch style chalets, several have been adapted for people with mobility problems. There is a caravan and camping site. The Park has a fully licensed a la carte restaurant, a curio shop, and information centre (Beaufort West Tourism Bureau, 2006). 14
De Jager Pass Molteno Pass N1 to Johannesburg
Springfontein Dam
ROYAL LODGE
JAIL ANGLICAN CHURCH CLYDE HOUSE
MEINTJIES STREET
R a iN lE
* BEAUFORT WEST CLUB * LITTLE GREEN WORLD * OASIS HOTEL * PITCHARD HOUSE
wW
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T SR tE
* KAROO LODGE (Maonic Hotel)
a E * POST OFFICE tT
T * FUNCHAL CAFЙ
o * TRAVELLERS METHODIST
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CHURCH * GOOD HOPE CAFЙ * DUTCH REFORMED MOTHER CHURCH
Km
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B u
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CHURCH STREET
Ru
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* MUSEUM
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* MISSION CHURCH
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* BARNARD HOUSE
* War Memorial Voortrekker Park
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VOORTREKKER STREET
o
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N1 to
Cape Town
Matopo Inn
B
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Police station
R
D
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T
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* Ellis Cycle Shop
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T
* Roman Catholic Church
TO Karoo National Park Figure 3: The Historic Core of Beaufort West
111 Bird Street Post Coach House Source: Beaufort West Tourism Bureau, 2006
15
4. INFRASTRUCTURE CAPITAL 4.1 Recreational Facilities In Beaufort West there are five sporting stadiums. Three are in Kwa Mandlenkosi, Rustdene and New Town. The sport disciplines that are accommodated are soccer, rugby, cricket, athletics, tennis, badminton, volleyball, karate, netball, squash, basketball, hockey, golf and bowls (Smit, 2007). Sport facilities are leased to the different Sport Councils who manage the different sport facilities except the rugby/athletics facility in Voortrekker Sport Centre are managed by the municipality. Though these stadiums are of modern times their limitation is that they are under utilized in terms of a variety of sporting activities (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b: 10). Rustdene stadium is earmarked as a regional stadium which would be development so it be used as one of the offside venues for the word cup soccer world cup. The challenge is to widen the scope of these fields and optimally use them to combat amongst other things crime through sport. Beaufort West has two swimming pools which are used by the public, public schools and local clubs (Smit, 2007). The swimming pools are also available to the public after hours for social occasions. The Bird Street (main public pool) swimming pool accommodates approximately 8 656 visitors during the year (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 12).
4.2 Services Available
According to the Local Government Medium Term Expenditure Committee reports 2006/07, this municipality has the lowest backlog in electricity provision at 6,8 per cent compared to other municipalities in that Central Karoo District whose backlogs range between 27,4 per cent and 52,0 per cent. Electricity is the largest contributor to own revenue in Beaufort West Municipality (40,0%) and is budgeted at R20,6 million. This represents a growth rate of 11, 8 per cent for 2005/06 (Provincial Government of the Western Cape, 2006: 88).
Table 13: Electricity Statistics for Beaufort West
Number of users
7,222
Units bought
50,101,638
Units sold
45,992,823
Cost per unit bought
34.68c
Cost per unit sold
41.05c
Source: Beaufort West Municipality Annual Report 2005/6, 2007a: 52
Water supply to Beaufort West is obtained from the conjunctive use of surface water from Gamka dam and groundwater from 19 boreholes and 2 springs (Smit, 2007). The Beaufort West waste water treatment works is designed to operate at an average dry weather flow of 4 656 kl/day. Due to the limited water resources a capacity of 1 871 000 m3 final affluent is permitted for irrigation of sport field and the golf course (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 12). Beaufort West Municipality had a water backlog of 0,8 per cent in 2001. However, according to the Local Government Medium Term Expenditure
16
Committee report for 2006/07 water backlog in this region increased to 2,9 per cent although this is considered low when compared to other local municipalities in the Central Karoo District. Approximately R8,9 million has been allocated to this category. Water charges contributed 17 per cent of total revenue in 2006/07 (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b: 28).
Table 14: Water Statistics for Beaufort West
Number of users Units bought / purified Units sold Cost per unit bought Cost per unit sold
7,171 2,400,879 1,934,693 R 2.65 R 4.34 Source: Beaufort West Municipality Annual Report 2005/6, 2007a: 52
A total number of 23 660 m2 of streets have been resealed. A storm water construction contract of 890m has been completed during the year while 3810m of streets were paved in Beaufort West. A total of 124 new connections were constructed by the municipality while 513 new connections (including distribution pipes) were constructed by a private contractor (Smit, 2007). Sixty five sewerage pipelines have been repaired while sewerage blockages are unblocked on a 24 hour basis (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 52).
On average about 9 100 (household and businesses) removal service points are serviced weekly, which makes up an estimated total of 26.3 tons of solid waste per day. The municipality is offering a door to door removal service to its local community (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 12). There are no more buckets in terms of sewerage systems and only 570 vacuum tank loads.
Beaufort West has a total of 194kilometers of road - 94km tarred, 59km gravel and 41km of commonage road (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a: 12).
4.4 Schools Beaufort West municipality has 17 secondary and primary schools, representing 65, 4 per cent of schools in the Central Karoo District. In Beaufort West, 32 per cent of the population over 14 years has had less than 7 years of formal education, compared to an alarming 37,0 per cent of the district. This is coupled with an educator-learner ratio of 36. Both education levels and workload needs attention (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 89). The average number of people in the Beaufort West municipality had some level of secondary education (33, 4%), which is higher than the average for the Central Karoo District (30, 5%). The percentage of people with higher education in the Beaufort West is 5, 3 per cent compared to Central Karoo District with 5, and 9 per cent. But in terms of occupational skills Beaufort West has a proportion of 17, 1 per cent compared to Central Karoo District with 14, and 2 per cent (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 89). There are also five other educational facilities - Karoo Resources Centre; Karoo Association for Pre-School Training; Beaufort West Community Learning Centre(ABET);
17
South Cape College; National Computer College (Duimpies, 2007; Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b: 6). 4.5 Transport Modalities The state of infrastructure development creates an enabling environment for economic growth. Road infrastructure is one of the major contributors to Beaufort West's economic development as the N1 national road is an important link that provides access to Northern Province, Gauteng, Free State and the Western Cape (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 78). Within Beaufort West the N1 links the region to Leeu-Gamka, Laingsburg and Matsjiesfontein. The other important routes are N12 that connects Beaufort West to Oudtshoorn, George and the Southern Cape. From the N1 there is also a link to the R61 that goes to Graaff-Reinet and to the north of Victoria West in the Northern Cape. The other important route is the R407 that connects Prince Albert via the N1; this road also connects commercial farms that are on the N12 to manufacturers and markets. In addition to the N1 there is a railway line that runs parallel to the N1 through Beaufort West, linking the municipality to Cape Town and Johannesburg. The railway way is currently used for transporting passengers and goods. Passing transport remains one of the most important markets of the Beaufort West Local Municipality. There are approximately 7 000 vehicles passing through Beaufort West per day during off peak holiday and this figure doubles during peak holiday. The largest percentage of these is large trucks (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 78). 4.6 Communication The cell phone reception for all the cellular networks is good in Beaufort West. There are no communication support services such as internet cafes, office facilities such as faxing, copying etc. The services of Telkom are also available from the Post Office. 4.7 Housing There were various housing projects since 1994. Between 1998 and 2002 1172 houses were built in Rustdene (Phase I = 1088 and Phase II = 84) A second group of 430 houses were built in Beaufort West. Since 2004 there were two housing projects launched where 156 houses built in Toekomsrust. Currently 513 houses are being built in Hillside and there is another project being planned to continue building 598 in Hillside (Phase II). Therefore, since 1998, a total of 2115 houses have been supplied to the people of Beaufort West. All these houses have been linked to a project subsidy (Nkondo, 2007). The houses were not built according to the People's Housing Process. There have been various attempts to initiate this programme but there were numerous complications. One of these projects was the Sakumzi Project where 28 houses were built by the people themselves. But "ons bou tien huise saam ­ as ons begin met my huis sleep ek dan voete as my huis klaar is en dan wil ek jou nie help om jou huis klaar te bou nie (we are 18
going to build ten houses together, if we have completed my house, I will not put all my effort in to complete the other nine houses. I do not want to assist the other people who are part of the project to build their houses once mine has been completed!)" (Nkondo, 2007). Instead there is a project leader that facilitates the building of the houses. There is also a committee in the municipality that measure the erfs and comment on the housing process. The contractor that received the tender of 513 houses is ASLA, specifically Elred Smith (021 845 8552 (f), 021 845 8335 (t), 084 444 3736, [email protected] Groups of people apply to build the houses as sub-contractors. The municipality also inspects the houses once they have been completed before handing the houses over to the people. The municipality receives money from the Western Cape Province to build the houses, but it is the responsibility of the municipality to complete the project. There are only approximately 40 shacks in the outskirts of Kwa Mandlenkosi (Nkondo, 2007). There is a community tap for them to obtain water and there have been mobile toilets erected to assist in sanitation but there is no electricity available. There is an area of Kwa Mandlekosi that are still the "paaltjie huise" (XhoXha) where the houses are bigger that those being built currently but they were built with mesh and then stones and rubbish filled in the middle of the mesh. There houses were plastered with clay and therefore they are currently crumbling apart. The state houses built in the late 1970s and early 1980s are in the process of being privatised. The process of the Extended Benefit Discount Scheme (EEDBSS) was used to transfer these houses onto the owners names. This is a long process because the house has to be transferred onto the original owner's name. People are responding very slowly (Nkondo, 2007). Very few of the original owners live in these houses because they are working in the Cape. The tenants living in the house now also want the house transferred onto their names.
Table 15: Rental housing stock achievements until June 2006
Rental housing stock achievements as of 30 June 2006
Rental Housing stock
Houses sold transferred
1 430
637
Housing waiting list 3 200
In 2000 there were 3 000 names on the waiting list for a house. According to Census data in 2001, Beaufort West municipality had a housing backlog of 23,0 per cent (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 78). The number of people on the housing waiting list as at 30 June 2006 amounts to 3200 (Nkondo, 2007).
This seems to be a problem because "the list is growing faster than what it is shrinking". The beneficiaries are those people moving from the surrounding farms, from small towns as well as those living in the backyards of other people. The criterion to qualify to be placed on the waiting list is that the person has to have dependents (children). There are old and young people on the waiting list. The beneficiaries are mostly women that have Young children and no husband. They complete a form and then they are listed according to the date. People are then selected by the date they have been entered. Some of the people that are on the list work in the Cape and are therefore difficult to get hold of (Nkondo, 2007). They often lose their chance in the row. It is recommended that the beneficiaries go to the housing office periodically to check where they are featuring on the list and whether their current contact details are correct.
19
The amount allocated to land and housing over the period 2006/07 amounts to R14,2 million. Additionally, R3,1 million has been allocated for upgrading 160 houses in Beaufort West municipality (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 78). The municipality is currently awaiting approval by the Provincial Department of Housing for the building of 634 houses in Hillside Phase II to commence in the 2007/08 financial year (Makendlana, 2007). The beneficiaries often complain about the quality of the houses once they have been handed over to them "die huise is nie so lekker nie ­ baie gatte" (Nkondo, 2007). The houses are not always livable because there are already cracks in the walls, the floor is very uneven and the roof is not always secured because when the wind blows the roof sometimes blows off. These complaints are listed and the municipality attends to it on their own time. The new houses each have flush toilets and running water in the house. The electricity is also connected to each house (Nkondo, 2007). The roads to and between the houses are sand and gravel with no storm water facilities planned. When it rains the roads are washed away and deep trenches are formed. These houses are built according to the provincial recommendation of 30m2. All the materials used are purchased in Beaufort West by the contractors. The relationship between the municipality and the Western Cape Province is very good. "When we push their buttons, they are here and respond very quickly" (Makendlana, 2007). The feedback from the province is speedily. Sometimes it is a little frustrating because the processes take a long time to get approval. Currently, an average price for a Karoo House (3 bedroom) in town would be R350 000. In the more affluent areas (Hospital Heuwel), a house fetches approximately R500 000. The best houses in town are selling for R700 000 which would have been outrageous two to three years ago. In the coloured area (just out of town), there is a good 3 bedroom houses for sale at R250 000 (Foster, 2007). Currently, there are approximately 50 houses in the market in Beaufort West. 5. HUMAN CAPITAL 5.1 Orphans There are not really any `orphan homes' or places of safety in the Beaufort West area for children where both parents are deceased (Meyer, 2007). Children are usually placed with the extended family when this occurs. The data for these children have been noted in Table 16 that explains the children in alternative care in Beaufort West area in terms of orphans, abandonment and misuse. 20
Table 16: Children in alternative care in Beaufort West
Month Jan-06 Feb-06 Mar-06 Apr-06 May-06 Jun-06 Jul-06 Aug-06 Sep-06 Oct-06 Nov-06 Dec-06 TOTAL 2006 Jan-07 Feb-07 TOTAL 2007
Orphans 0 2 12 5 4 2 1 14 4 4 2 10 60 12 11 23
Abandonment 0 1 3 3 0 0 3 4 1 1 1 1 18 0 4 4
Misuse 0 1 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 1 11 6 0 6
Total 0 4 18 8 4 2 6 19 5 7 4 12 89 18 15 33
5.2 Government Offices
NATIONAL
There are three National Government Offices in Beaufort West ­ the Post Office, the South African Police Service (SAPS) and a Magistrate's Court. Beaufort West has a regional office for the South African Revenue Services to assist the local surrounding areas. Beaufort West municipality has 4 police stations, which represent 44, 4 per cent of all police stations in the Central Karoo District (9). The total number of reported crimes increased between 2002/2003 and2004/2005, with drug related crime increasing sharply from 94 to 283 during this period (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 90). The number of murders and the neglect and ill treatment of children showed increasing trends, while the number of reported rapes declined.
Table 17: Beaufort West, crime statistics, 2002-2005
Crime measures (reported crime) Murder Rape Neglect and ill-treatment of children Drug related crime Total number of reported crimes
2002/2003 24 74 7 94 4154
2003/2004 30 70 6 150 4504
2004/2005 32 62 11 283 4443
21
Source: Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 90 PROVINCIAL There are regional district offices for the majority of the Western Cape provincial departments in Beaufort West. These include Agriculture, internal affairs, Correctional Services, Education, Land Affairs, Justice, Labour and Social Development. There are also regional provincial administration offices for library services, environmental health services, School Health Services and traffic. In terms of correctional services, the Beaufort West jail is in the centre of Donkin Road in entering Beaufort West from the north. Prisons are not imprisoned for long periods (less than two years). The crimes are "petty" and the prisoners are all from surrounding areas. Social services have eight staff members only concentrating their attention on the Beaufort West community including probation offices, welfare planners, field workers, community development workers and social workers. The Beaufort West Hospital is considered a provincial hospital and covers all the critical cases in the area. This hospital also services the road accidents on a large part of the N1. 5.3 Health services Central Karoo District expenditure review reported that there are 3 mobile clinics, 5 clinics and 1 Community health care centre in Beaufort West Municipality (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 90). Health indicators revealed that the proportion of children under the age of 1 year with first measles immunization was 93 per cent (above the national target of 90%), Tuberculosis prevalence stood at 950 for every 100 000 people, with a cure rate of 74 per cent. The national target for tuberculosis cure rate of 85 per cent has not been met. The patient nurse ratio was 31, lower than the national target of 34 (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b: 11). Meanwhile, HIV prevalence in the municipality is projected to increase from 1,9 per cent in 2001 to2,9 per cent in 2005 and by 3,6 per cent in 2010. AIDS related deaths are projected to increase from 24 in 2001, to 43 in 2005 and 67 in 2010. As a proportion of total deaths, it increases from 7, 4 to 11, 8 to 16, and 7 per cent between 2001, 2005 and 2010 respectively (Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 90). There is one provincial hospital in Beaufort West, a day hospital and five clinics (Kwa Mandlenkosi, Konstitusie, Nieuveldpark, Correctional Services and Old Age Home) spread across the 7 wards (Du Plooy, 2007). There are critical problems in terms of the capacity of these facilities in terms of dealing with the health challenge of the municipality. In terms of the patient / doctor/nurse ratio, human resource is seriously a problem and moving forward the logical thing would be to increase personnel in hospitals and clinics (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b: 11). The Beaufort West Provincial Hospital has 57 beds available with an occupancy rate of approximately 70%. A total of 117 staff members work at the hospital that includes six doctors, 46 nursing staff, 12 administrative staff and 18 blue collar workers. The hospital owns 17 vehicles, of which 2 are ambulances. The hospital has a 24 hour emergency facility because they also accommodate all the accidents along the N1. The hospital accommodate 22
Table 18 displays some of the basic health indicators for Beaufort West and gives a comparison between Beaufort West and the national health targets.
Table 18: Beaufort West Health Indicators
Proportion under 1 with 1st measles immunisation Percentage births under 2,5kg TB prevalence per 100 000 TB Cure rate Patient ­ nurse workload per day HIV/AIDS prevalence rate (2005) Number of HIV/AIDS deaths (2005)
Beaufort National health targets
West
93%
90%
21%
<10%
950
74%
85%
31
34
2.9 HIV/AIDS prevalence rate
3.6
(2010)
43
Number of HIV/AIDS deaths
67
(2010)
Source: Provincial Government Western Cape, 2006: 90
An annual primary health care report is done for each district in the Western Cape and the latest data available for the Central Karoo district is 2004-2005 (Jooste, 2006). A few of these indicators are elaborated on below. The abbreviations in each of the figures indicating the clinics in the Beaufort West area are as follows: · KSK = Konstitusie Clinic · CHC = Complementary Health Centre · NVP = Nieuveld Park Clinic · KMK = Kwa Manlenkosi Clinic
Utilization rate (indicated in Figure 5) is the rate at which services are utilised by the target population, represented as the average number of visits per person per year in the target population.
23
Figure 4: Utilization rate per health facility in Beaufort West, 2004 - 2005 Central Karoo District Beaufort West Utilisation Rate per Health Facility 2004 - 2005
6
5.5
5
4.5
4
3.5
2.7
3
2.5
2.1
2
1.5
1
0.5
0 KSK
5.4 5.1
2.6
2.8
4.1 3.8
CHC 2004
KMK 2005
NVP
According to Figure 5 the utilization of health services at 50% of health facilities in Beaufort West is higher than the National Indicator of 2,9. Average utilization rate for health facilities in Beaufort West during 2004 and 2005 was 3,5 and 3,7 respectively (Jooste, 2006). This over utilization of health facilities indicates that facilities are accessible to the community. Figure 6 indicates that the utilization rate under 5 years is significantly higher at CHC and NVP, compared to the other 2 health facilities (Jooste, 2006). The high utilization rate of children under 5 at CHC could be due to specialised services (ex. Paediatrician) rendered at CHC for whole Central Karoo District.
24
Figure 5: Utilization rate under 5 years, per health facility in Beaufort West, 2004 2005 Central Karoo District Beaufort West Utilisation Rate under 5 years, per Health Facility 2004 - 2005
9.0
8.5
8.0
7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0 2.5
2.4
2.2
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
KSK
8.4 6.7
3.5
3.6
CHC 2004
KMK 2005
7.6 7.1 NVP
Immunisation coverage is the percentage of all children under one year in the target area who complete their course of immunisation. From Figure 7 it is clear that only Nieuveldpark Clinic reached their annual immunisation coverage target, while the immunisation coverage. Although the other three health facilities showed an increase in immunisation coverage, it was only Constitution Street that came close to the national target of 90% during 2005. The average Immunisation coverage for 2004 and 2005 was 72% and 84% respectively. There was thus a 12% increase in immunisation coverage, but is still short of the national target of 90% (Jooste, 2006).
25
Figure 6: Immunisation coverage of clinics in Beaufort West 2004-2005
130% 120% 110% 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
88% 65% KSK
Central Karoo District Beaufort West Immunisation Coverage 2004 - 2005 National Indicator
Average Immunisation Coverage for Health Facilities in Beuafort West 2004: 72% 2005: 84%
112%
122%
54%
56%
69% 57%
CHC 2004
KMK
NVP
2005
Antenatal coverage is the percentage of pregnant women coming for at least one antenatal visit. The denominator, "expected deliveries in target population", is estimated using Census data.
26
Figure 7: Antenatal coverage of clinics in Beaufort West, 2004-2005 Central Karoo District Beaufort West Antenatal Coverage per Facility 2004 - 2005
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
81% 55% KSK
National Indicator
68%
66%
49%
35%
CHC 2004
KMK 2005
88%
76%
NVP
Figure 8 indicates that the average antenatal coverage for 2004 and 2005 in Beaufort West was 65% for both years, which is consistently lower than the national indicator of 80%. Antenatal coverage for Constitution Street Clinic (2005) and Nieuveldpark Clinic (2004 and 2005) met or came close to the national target of 80% (Jooste, 2006). The other two health facilities needs to facilitate an awareness campaign targeting pregnant women in their population. Chronic care case load is the percentage of clients attending the clinic for chronic conditions. Figures 9 and 10 prove that hypertension is obviously a major problem in the population of Beaufort West. The average prevalence of hypertension for 2004 and 2005 was 66% and 65% respectively. This is a major health problem in Beaufort West and needs urgent attention. Figures 9 and 10 illustrate that all four health facilities have basically the same distribution of chronic cases. Kwa Mandlenkosi Clinic has slightly less hypertension patients (57%) and Constitution Street and Nieuveldpark Clinics the highest incidence of hypertension patients.
27
Figure 8: Chronic care case load per health facility in Beaufort West, 2004 Central Karoo District Beaufort West Chronic Care Case Load per Health Facility 2004
80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
76%
63%
13%
9%
8%
3%
KSK Diabetes Mellitus
17% 12% CHC Hypertension
57%
68%
11%
21% 11%
13% 11% 7%
KMK Epilepsy
NVP Other chronic conditions
Figure 9: Chronic care case load per health facility, 2005 Central Karoo District Beaufort West Chronic Care Case Load per Health Facility 2005
80%
70%
67%
64%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
16%
10%
8% 9%
17% 11% 8%
0% KSK
CHC
Diabetes Mellitus
Hypertension
69% 61%
13%
13% 12%
12% 11% 8%
KMK Epilepsy
NVP Other chronic conditions
28
Figure 10: Incidence of tuberculosis in Beaufort West, 2004 - 2005
Central Karoo District
Beaufort West
TB Incidence
1050
2004 - 2005
1037
1000
950
per 100 000
900 875 850
800
750
2004
2005
Figure 11: Incidence of sexually transmitted infections = treated (new episodes), 2004 - 2005
Central Karoo District
Beaufort West
Incidence of STI Treated - new episodes
3.0%
2004 - 2005
2.7%
2.5%
2.4%
2.1%
2.0%
1.7%
1.5%
1.0% 0.5%
0.4%
0.9%
0.6%
0.8%
0.0%
KSK
CHC 2004
KMK 2005
NVP
As seen in Figure 11, there are many more reported cases of tuberculosis in 2005 than in 2004. At least in 2005, on average there were less new episodes of STI treated patients, except for the Konstitusie Clinic.
29
Figure 12: Voluntary Counseling and Testing for HIV in 2004
Central Karoo District
Beaufort West
120%
VCT Coverage per Health Facility
2004
100%
80%
60% 40% 20% 0%
73%
54%
27% KSK
46% BWH % Male Clients counselled (2004)
73%
70%
27% CHC
30% KMK
% Female Clients counselled (2004)
68% 32% NVP
Figure 13: Voluntary Counseling and Testing for HIV in 2005
Central Karoo District
Beaufort West
120%
VCT Coverage per Health Facility
2005
100%
80%
60% 40% 20% 0%
64%
51%
36% KSK
49% BWH % Male Clients counselled (2005)
71%
64%
29% CHC
36% KMK
% Female Clients counselled (2005)
64% 36% NVP
Figures 13 and 14 illustrate that two thirds of people receiving HIV pre counselling at the four health facilities are women, with the exception of Beaufort West Hospital. The reason for the higher counselling session for men at BWH could be attributed to the higher incidence of medical referrals in the hospital (Jooste, 2006). Although there was a 5% increase in male clients receiving HIV pre counselling, it is still much lower than that of women. Average VCT counselling for all the clinics in Beaufort West during 2004
30
and 2005 was 7% and 6% respectively. Self referrals for HIV testing are much higher at Nieuveldpark, Kwa Mandlenkosi and Constitution Street Clinics than what was experienced at the Community Health Centre and Beaufort West Hospital. This occurrence could be attributed to the fact that during 2004 no Medical Officer rendered a service at the above mentioned clinics, but only attend sessions at the Community Health Centre and the hospital (Jooste, 2006). There is a slight increase in medical referrals versus self referrals (Jooste, 2006).
According to Figure 15, an average of 13.1% and 10% (2004 and 2005 respectively) of people tested HIV positive, with the highest incidence of new HIV positive cases at Kwa Mandlenkosi Clinic (19%), and the lowest at Nieuveldpark Clinic (6.3%) during 2004. During 2005 the highest incidence of new HIV positive cases was diagnosed at Community Health Centre (13.2%) and the lowest at Constitution Street Clinic (6.6%) (Jooste, 2006).
Figure 14: Percentage of new HIV+ cases in Beaufort West, 2004-2005
20.0% 19.0% 18.0% 17.0% 16.0% 15.0% 14.0% 13.0% 12.0% 11.0% 10.0% 9.0% 8.0% 7.0% 6.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0%
9.4% 6.6% KSK
Central Karoo District Beaufort West % of new HIV + cases per Health Facility 2004 - 2005
15.5% 11.5% BWH
15.3% 13.2%
CHC
2004
2005
19.0% 11.8% KMK
Average: 2004 Average: 2005 6.3% 6.7% NVP
A high positive rate at Beaufort West Hospital (15.5% and 11.5%) is because of medical referrals and illnesses. As seen in Figures 16 and 17, of the people testing HIV positive, 11% and 17% (2004 and 2005 respectively) were pregnant women taking part in the Prevention of Mother To Child Transmission programme, 5.9% and 7.5% (2004 and 2005 respectively) were tuberculosis patients, and 66% and 75% (2004 and 2005 respectively) falls into the "other" category (Jooste, 2006).
31
Figure 15: Percentage of HIV+ cases in 2004 in PMTCT and TB programme
Central Karoo District
Beaufort West
120.0%
% of new HIV + cases per Health Facility
2004
100.0%
80.0% 60.0% 40.0%
83.7%
97.1%
73.3%
72.6%
71.0%
20.0%
0.0%
16.3% 0.0% KSK
1.4% 1.4%
BWH
% TB positive
14.2% 12.5% CHC % MTCT positive
21.7% 5.7% KMK % Other positive
19.4% 9.7% NVP
Figure 16: Percentage of HIV+ cases in 2005 in PMTCT an TB programme
Central Karoo District
Beaufort West
120%
% of new HIV + cases per Health Facility
2005
100%
80% 60% 40%
82%
97%
72%
20% 0%
15% 3% KSK
2% 2%
BWH
% TB positive
14% 14% CHC % MTCT positive
68% 29% 3% KMK % Other positive
57% 27% 16% NVP
Figures 16 and 17 also illustrates that Kwa Mandlenkosi Clinic experienced the highest HIV + rate, with more than a fifth (21,7% and 29%) of pregnant women testing positive, with Nieuveldpark Clinic close behind at 19,4% and 16% (2004 and 2005 respectively) (Jooste, 2006). On average 5.9% and 7.5% (2004 and 2005 respectively) of people 32
taking part in the VCT Program are TB patients. This figure presents 36.8% of the TB Case Findings for 2004, of which 19.7% tested HIV positive. During 2005 this figure presents 27.1% of the TB Case Findings, of which 20.6% tested HIV positive (Jooste, 2006).
5.4 Mortality The Beaufort West Municiaplaity has a total of 12 cemetries under its control and 8 cemetries which are allocated to different church groups. Only 5 of the cemetries under the control of the municipality have burial sites available while the sites of the other 7 are either occupied or have been reserved. A total of 5 034 burial plots are available in Beaufort West cemetry which are adequate for at least the next nine years. A total of 472 burials too place during 2005/06 (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007a). 5.5 Education The majority of residents in Beaufort West have at least a primary or secondary education (72%) but there are still 21% that have no education (Figure 18). Figure 17: Level of education
45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%
39% 33% 21% 3% 4%
No education Primary education Secondary education tertiary education Other
There are nine pre-primary facilities in Beaufort West with a total of 810 Grade R pupils. Belinda (228), Khanyisa (154) and Lighuis (120) have the most children (See Figure 19).
33
Figure 18: Distribution of pre-primary pupils in the different facilities
Immanuel
Khanyisa
Kleuterland St John
Lighuis
Belinda
Ebulumko Sonstraaltjie
Klawervlei and Layton are two farm schools catering for Grade 1 until Grade 7 pupils. They have a total of 78 and 49 pupils respectively (Duimpies, 2007). Beaufort West has seven primary and four secondary schools. There are a total of 4944 primary and 3044 secondary school pupils in Beaufort West. According to Table 19 the teacher/pupil ratio is approximately 1:35. There are four Afrikaans and three dual medium (2 English/Afrikaans and 1Xhosa/ English) primary schools.
Table 19: Names and types of schools in Beaufort West, 2007
Name AH Barnard Bastiaanse Beaufort West Beaufort West
Type Primary Secondar y Primary Secondar y
Learner s 1049 1108 208 1127
Capacit y 1599 1320 507 1089
Staff 27 33 6 34
HM Dlikidla
Primary
870
936
25
John D
Crawford
Primary
967
975
30
Secondar
Mandlenkosi y
452
627
13
Niko Brummer Primary
242
780
6
Secondar
Sentraal
y
361
693
11
St. Matthews Primary
862
1248
22
Teske Gedenk Primary
742
975
19
Rati o 1:38 1:33 1:34 1:33 1:34
Grades Gr 1-7 Gr 8-12 Gr R-3 Gr 8-12 Gr R-7
Language Afrikaans Afrikaans Afr/Eng Afrikaans Xhosa/En g
1:32 Gr 1- 7 Afrikaans 1:34 Gr 8-12 English 1:40 Gr 4-7 Afr/Eng 1:32 Gr 8-12 Afr/Eng 1:39 Gr R-7 Afrikaans 1:39 Gr R-6 Afrikaans
34
Figure 19: Distribution of pupils in each of the primary schools in Beaufort West
AH Barnard 200 Beaufort West
HM Dlikidla
180
John D Crawford
Niko Brummer
160
St. Matthews
Teske Gedenk
140
Number of pupils
120
100
80
60
40
20
0 Grade R
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade
Grade 5
Grade 6
Grade 7
According to Figure 20, Barnard and Crawford Primary have the most children in each standard (approximately 125 each). AH Barnard has a class of 17 children with special needs. Similarly, in Figure 20 Beaufort West and Bastiaanse Secondary Schools have the majority of pupils in each grade (±227).
Figure 20: Distribution of pupils in secondary schools in Beaufort West
35
Number of pupils
400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0
Grade 8
Bastiaanse Beaufort West Mandlenkosi Sentraal
Grade 9
Grade 10 Grade
Grade 11
Grade 12
6. NATURAL CAPITAL 6.1 Commercial farming The district has approximately 1 651 894ha of farmland (Theron, 2007). There are a total of 262 farmers in the area, the majority farming with sheep but there are a few moving over to game farming. The agriculture sector contributes nearly 8 per cent of total regional GDP of the Beaufort West Municipal region, with sheep- (wool and mutton), goat- (mohair and meat), game- (venison) and ostrich farming being the main activities. Each of the commercial farms are approximately 5 000ha with around 150 000 dorpers (meat) or 50 000 merino (wool) sheep or even 60 000 angora goats on it. The cost per hectare for each of the farms ranges from R700 to R1700 in the better areas (Theron, 2007). There are three abattoirs in Beaufort West servicing the surrounding areas. 6.2 Commonage and Emergent farmers The town of Beaufort West has a large municipal commonage. A number of municipal facilities including the solid waste site, waste treatment works and municipal golf course are situated on the commonage. The commonage is also used by small farmers for grazing goats, sheep and donkeys. Problems are experienced with farmers exceeding their quotas for numbers of live stock which has resulted in overgrazing of the commonage. Even though camps are rotated, and despite average annual rainfalls in the recent years, the quality of the veld deteriorated significantly as a result of overgrazing (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b). There are currently three farms being handed over to groups in terms of the Land and Rural Agricultral Development Programme (LRAD) (De Jager, 2007). The government will be helping them with infrastructure to establish their farm in the Beaufort West area. Eight farms have already been handed over and five farms are still in process (Theron, 36
2007). These farms are usually 40-50km out of town and are on average 2500 ­ 3000ha. All these farms are run by the trustees (family groups). There is no advertising necessary, people from the area place their names on a waiting list and if they can make a contribution and work together with a few other families the farmland is granted to them (de Jager, 2007). Unfortunately, there is not that much land available that can be purchased by the government for this purpose.
7. SOCIAL CAPITAL 7.1 Churches Religion plays a very important role in a small community and therefore most of the residents belong to a certain church denomination. There are approximately 100 different churches in Beaufort West (Beaufort West, 2007b). Some of these include the Dutch Reformed, Methodist, Anglican, 7th Day Adventist, Ethiopian, Evangelist, African Mission and Assembly of God. The Beaufort West Municipality has a mailing list of all these churches and usually keep the churches up to date with the important information for the community and therefore this information is filtered through to the people quite well.
7.2 Political parties
Beaufort West has an Independent Electoral Commission that serves the surrounding areas. Table 19 shows changes in political governance between 2000 and 2006. A newly formed party, Independent Civic Organisation of South Africa (ICOSA), is made up of defectors from different parties. In 2006, the African National Congress (ANC) tied with ICOSA with 5 seats each. Democratic Alliance (DA) won two seats in Beaufort West Municipality while in Central Karoo District Municipality ANC won 3 seats in 2006 with ICOSA winning 2 seats and DA 1 seat (Beaufort West Municipality, 2007b).
Table 20: Changes in political governance, 2000 and 2006
TOTAL PARTY ANC DA ICOSA ID TOTAL
BEAUFORT WEST
2006
2000
5
5
2
2
5
0
1
0
13
7
CENTRAL KAROO DM
2006
2000
3
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
6
1
In the 2006 local government elections, 18 906 voters were registered in the Beaufort West Municipality. Only 11 506 of these votes were valid (321 spoilt votes) ­ an average of 62.36% turnout for each of the wards.
37
7.3 NGOs There are a total of 12 Non-Government Organisations in the Beaufort West District. These include BADISA, Association for Physically Disabled, NICRO, AIDS Action Group, Karoo Resource Centre and Multi Purpose Centre. Social Work services are provided by the NGOs, correctional services, and the social workers in SAPD. All these organisations meet regularly to provide the best services to the community possible (Meyer, 2007). REFERENCES All Pay. 2007. Western Cape: Regional Monthly Grant Totals. All Pay: Beaufort West. Beaufort West Municipality. 2005. Integrated Development Plan Review 2004/2005 for Implementation 2005/2006. Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West. Beaufort West Municipality. 2006. Beaufort West Municipality. 2007a. Beaufort West Annual Report 2005/6. Beaufort West Municipality: Beaufort West. Beaufort West Municipality. 2007b. Integrated Development Plan 2007 ­ 2011. Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West. Beaufort West Tourism Bureau. 2006. Welcome to Beaufort West Accommodation and places of interest. Beaufort West. CSIR. 2002. Rapid Review of Beaufort West. CSIR: Beaufort West. De Jager, G. 2007. Personal Interview: Land Reform Officer: Land Affairs Western Cape, Central Karoo District, 6 March 2007. Duimpies, A. 2007. Personal Interview: Manager: Education Western Cape, Central Karoo Disrict, 8 March 2007. Foster, A. 2007. Personal Interview: Lawyer, Crawford House, Beaufort West, 8 March 2007. Jooste, A. 2006. Annual Primary Health Care Health Report 2004-2005. Central Karoo District: Beaufort West. Louw, D. 2007. Personal Interview: Chief Financial Officer, Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West, 6 March 2007. Makendlana, A. 2007. Personal Interview: Director: Community Services, Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West, 7 March 2007. 38
Meyer, E. 2007. Personal Interview: Regional Manager, Department of Social Development, Western Cape: Beaufort West, 5 March 2007. Nkondo, D. 2007. Personal Interview: Housing Official, Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West, 7 March 2007. Nkugwana, V. 2007. Personal Interview: IDP Manager, Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West, 7 March 2007. Provincial Government of Western Cape. 2006. Socio-economic profile: Central Karoo District. Provincial Treasury: Cape Town. Smit, J.C.L. 2007. Personal Interview: Director: Engineering, Beaufort West Municipality, Beaufort West, 7 March 2007. Theron, S. 2007. Personal Interview: Manager: Central District Western Cape Agriculture, Beaufort West, 5 March 2007. 39

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