Harvest estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery in Juneau, Alaska during 1998, B Frenette

Tags: harvest, Gastineau Hatchery, Gastineau, Chum salmon, estimates, creel survey, Creekb Gastineau Hatchery, Sheep Creek, Survey type, Onsiteb Statewidec, Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery, Chinook salmon, Pink salmon
Content: Fishery Data Series No. 99-16 Harvest Estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery Roadside Sport Fishery in Juneau, Alaska During 1998 by Brian J. Frenette
Alaska Department of Fish and Game
August 1999
Division of Sport Fish
FISHERY DATA SERIES NO. 99-16 HARVEST ESTIMATE FOR THE GASTINEAU HATCHERY ROADSIDE SPORT FISHERY IN JUNEAU, ALASKA DURING 1998 by Brian J. Frenette Division of Sport Fish, Douglas Alaska Department of Fish and Game Division of Sport Fish Anchorage, Alaska August 1999 Development of this manuscript was partially financed by the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 777-777K) under Project F-10-14, Job No. S-1-1.
The Fishery Data Series was established in 1987 for the publication of technically oriented results for a single project or group of closely related projects. Fishery Data Series reports are intended for fishery and other technical professionals. Distribution is to state and local publication distribution centers, libraries and individuals and, on request, to other libraries, agencies, and individuals. This publication has undergone editorial and peer review. Brian J. Frenette Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish P. O. Box 240020, Douglas, AK 99824-0020, USA This document should be cited as: Frenette, B. J. 1999. Harvest estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery in Juneau, Alaska during 1998. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 99-16, Anchorage. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game administers all programs and activities free from discrimination on the basis of sex, color, race, religion, national origin, age, marital status, pregnancy, parenthood, or disability. For information on alternative formats available for this and other department publications, contact the department ADA Coordinator at (voice) 907-465-4120, or (telecommunication device for the deaf) 1-800-478-3648.
Table of Contents Page LIST OF TABLES.........................................................................................................................................................ii LIST OF FIGURES .......................................................................................................................................................ii LIST OF APPENDICES ...............................................................................................................................................ii ABSTRACT ..................................................................................................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................................................. 1 OBJECTIVE.......................................................................................................................................................................... 3 METHODS............................................................................................................................................................................ 3 RESULTS.............................................................................................................................................................................. 5 DISCUSSION ....................................................................................................................................................................... 7 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS .............................................................................................................. 8 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .................................................................................................................................................. 10 LITERATURE CITED ....................................................................................................................................................... 10 APPENDIX A .................................................................................................................................................................... 13 i
LIST OF TABLES
Table
Page
1. Summary of hatchery-reared salmon smolt releases at Sheep Creek and Gastineau Hatchery since 1991 ................................................................................................................................................................. 3 2. Summary of estimated weekly angler effort and harvest of large coho, small coho, large chinook, small chinook, chum, and pink salmon at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998..........................6 3. Effort and harvest estimates by residency of small coho, large coho, large chinook, chum, and pink salmon at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998............................................................................7 4. Effort and harvest estimates by age class of small coho, large coho, large chinook, chum, and pink salmon at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998............................................................................7 5. Summary of estimated angler effort and harvest of large coho, large chinook, chum, and pink salmon from onsite creel surveys at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1990 and 1993­ 1998 ................................................................................................................................................................. 9 6. Comparison of Alaska statewide postal survey and onsite creel survey harvest estimates for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery during 1994­1997........................................................................9
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure
Page
1. Map showing location of the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery, northern Southeast Alaska...................................................................................................................................................... 2
LIST OF APPENDICES
Appendix
Page
A1. Summary of sampling results by date at Gastineau Hatchery in 1998 .......................................................14
A2. Major computer files used for data analysis of Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998...................17
ii
ABSTRACT Angler effort and sport harvests of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch, chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta, and pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha were estimated at Gastineau Hatchery from 8 June to 27 September 1998. An estimated 28,272 (SE = 701) angler-hours were expended to harvest a total of 471 (SE = 63) large chinook salmon at least 28 inches (71 cm) in total length, 86 (SE = 20) small chinook salmon (<28 inches in length), 11,722 (SE = 937) large coho salmon at least 16 inches (41 cm) in length, 1,187 (SE = 204) small coho salmon (<16 inches in length), 2,376 (SE = 280) chum salmon, and 5,653 ( SE = 414) pink salmon. Key words: creel survey, roadside, angler effort and harvest, sport fishery, hatchery, chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta, pink salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, Juneau, Gastineau Hatchery, Southeast Alaska.
INTRODUCTION Roadside sport fisheries in marine waters near Juneau, Alaska offer unique fishing opportunities for both Alaskan residents and tourists visiting the area. During 1997, anglers spent an estimated 29,361 angler-days of shoreline saltwater fishing participation on the Juneau roadside (Howe et al. 1998). This represents 55% of the total marine shoreline roadside participation (53,391 anglerdays) in Southeast Alaska and 24% of the total marine participation (123,990 angler-days) in the entire Juneau area during 1997. Demand for shoreline fishing opportunities on the Juneau roadside is increasing, as about 40% of the population of Southeast Alaska resided in the Juneau Borough in 1997, according to the 1997 State of Alaska census. The area is also visited each summer by more than 400,000 tourists (McDowell Group 1994). The Gastineau Hatchery, located about 3 miles north of Juneau (Figure 1), is a popular destination for tourists and residents alike: over 120,000 paying customers toured the facility during the 1998 season, an increase of more than 2% over the previous year (Rick Focht, Gastineau Hatchery operations manager, Juneau, Personal communication). The hatchery is owned and operated by Douglas Island Pink and Chum, Inc. (DIPAC), a private non-profit corporation. Although sport harvests for the entire Juneau road system are estimated through use of the Statewide Harvest Postal Survey (SWHS)
questionnaires mailed annually to a sample of sport anglers (Howe et al. 1998), an onsite creel survey was used to obtain detailed information on the sport fishery for terminal runs of chinook, coho, chum, and pink salmon back to Gastineau Hatchery. The sport fishery at the hatchery targets chinook, pink, and chum salmon from mid-June through August, and coho salmon in mid-August through late September or early October. In 1991, DIPAC hatchery, in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) (through the Sport Fish Partnership Program), installed a floating dock to increase access for roadside anglers. Salmon enhancement efforts at Gastineau and nearby Sheep Creek hatcheries (Figure 1) have been extensive (Table 1), including releases of chinook and coho salmon--the two species of salmon most preferred by anglers in Southeast Alaska (Jones & Stokes 1991). Since 1993, ADF&G staff have assisted the Gastineau Hatchery in developing an onsite creel survey program to estimate sport harvests at the site. Hatchery personnel conducted the survey, while ADF&G provided technical planning and analyzed the data to estimate effort and harvest. In 1997, an estimated 931 (SE = 123) large (і28І) chinook salmon, 3,507 (SE = 436) large (і16І) coho salmon, 1,605 (SE 235) chum salmon, and 2,878 (SE = 297) pink salmon were harvested between 16 June and 5 October (Frenette 1998).
1
Figure 1. ­Location of the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery, northern Southeast Alaska. 2
Table 1.­Summary of hatchery-reared salmon smolt releases (in thousands) at Sheep Creek and Gastineau Hatchery since 1991. All fish were reared at Gastineau or Sheep Creek hatcheries except as noted.
Year 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996
Release site Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery
Pink salmon 16,258 14,846 31,636 15,420 32,660 15,769 0 8,663 0 8,540 0 8,750
Chum salmon 37,874 11,327 26,586 11,959 27,002 11,891 14,635 5,870 44 674 11,825 41,240 11,474
1997 Sheep Creek Gastineau Hatchery
0 5,901
36,700 12,168
1998 Sheep Creekb Gastineau Hatchery
0 8,709
0 24,247
a Reared at Snettisham Hatchery. b Sheep Creek was discontinued as a smolt release site in 1998.
Chinook salmon 101a 44 0 192 0 208 0 257 29 159 35 64 45 172 0 212
Coho salmon 505 508 583 393 562 478 563 380 611 422 511 348 576 426 0 824
Sport harvests of chinook salmon in Southeast Alaska are limited by the King Salmon Management Plan that also requires estimates of contributions from hatchery chinook salmon stocks in addition to harvests from all other sources. In 1994, ADF&G entered into an agreement with the Gastineau Hatchery to rear chinook salmon for release at several sites in the Juneau area, including waters around the hatchery. The onsite creel survey provides information to properly evaluate the hatchery as a release site and terminal harvest area. In 1998, hatchery and ADF&G staff again cooperated to conduct the survey. OBJECTIVE The objective of the 1998 Gastineau Hatchery roadside creel survey was to estimate effort and harvests of pink, chum, coho, and chinook salmon from 8 June through 27 September, such
that estimates were within specified values 95% of the time: ±10% for angler-hours of effort, and ±25% for coho, chinook, pink, and chum salmon harvests. METHODS There are two survey sites: a non-snagging zone and a snagging zone. The non-snagging zone includes a 100-ft floating dock and 150 ft of beach adjacent to the dock, while the snagging zone is the remaining 100 yd of beach extending from the non-snagging zone boundary to a private barge landing to the north. Both locations are clearly marked and hatchery personnel enforce fishing rules. Both sites are discrete in shape and size, and easily surveyed. A stratified, two-stage roving creel survey based on expansion of sample ratios was used to estimate fishing effort and harvest from 8 June to 27 September 1998. Days were primary sampling
3
units, and anglers within days were secondary sampling units. Two sites (snagging and nonsnagging zones), 16 weekly (7-day) strata, and weekday versus weekend-holiday stratification were maintained1. Therefore, there were 64 discrete temporal/spatial strata. The sampling day was defined as beginning at early civil twilight or 0600 hours (whichever was later), and ended at late civil twilight, as computed for the midday of the sample week. This accounted for changes in the length of available daylight between June and September, and most angling at the site was expected to occur between those daylight hours. During each sampling day, anglers were counted six times within each site (snagging and non-snagging). The first count was randomly selected from the midpoint of the first, second, or last third of the first one-sixth of each sampling day. Subsequent counts occurred at intervals equal to one-sixth the length of each sampling day. When not counting anglers, survey personnel interviewed anglers completing their trip without regard to angler success (angler harvest). Interviews were conducted during one-hour periods that alternated between sites (non-snagging or snagging). The site to start interviews in each stratum was selected at random, and alternated each day sampled. During each interview, anglers were asked to report their effort and harvest at the site being sampled. In addition, technicians recorded the age class (child--under 16 years of age, adult-- 16 to 60 years, or senior--over the age of 60) and the residency (Alaska resident or nonresident) of the angler being interviewed. As many completed-trip interviews as possible were obtained during each day selected for sampling. Since hatchery technicians had other assigned duties, interviews were not conducted at some times during the day; however, sampling of anglers exiting the survey area was thought to occur roughly in proportion to the number exiting the site at different times of the day when sampling was not being conducted. 1 Weekdays = Mondays­Fridays. Weekend/holidays = Saturdays, Sundays, Independence Day (4 July), and Labor Day (7 September).
Effort was estimated by multiplying the average angler count for the day for each location by the hours available for sampling each day. The harvest per unit effort (HPUE) for each fish species was estimated from completed-trip interviews. The estimated harvest was obtained from the product of the effort and HPUE estimates. Angler effort and harvest by species along with associated variances and Standard errors were calculated by the following procedures. The harvest in each stratum (and within each specific class) was estimated by:
H^ h = Dh * H h
(1)
dh
е H^ hi
Hh
=
i =1 dh
(2)
where H$ hi is the estimated harvest in day i stratum h, dh is the number of days sampled in stratum h, and Dh is the total number of days in stratum h.
The variance of the harvest in each stratum (and within each specific class) was estimated by:
d h
е (H^ hi - H h ) 2
v[ H^
h
]
=
(1
-
f
hi
)D
2 h
i =1 d h (d h
- 1)
(3)
dh
е +
f
-1 h
v^ [H^ hi ]
i =1
where f h = d h / D h . Harvest for each sampling day was estimated by:
H$ hi
=
E$ hi
* HPUE hi
(4)
where HPUE*hi is the jackknife estimate of mean HPUE during stratum h day i, and E$ hi is the fishing effort in angler-hours during the same time. Angler effort in each day was estimated by:
4
E$ hi = Th xhi
(5)
where Th is the number of hours in a sampling day
and xhi is the average number of anglers counted
in day i stratum h. If xhi = 0 and anglers were interviewed, then H$ hi in equation (4) was set equal
to the observed harvest. In contrast, if xhi > 0 and
no anglers were interviewed, then HPUE*hi in
equation
(4)
was
set
equal
to
the
mean
* HPUE hi
for
the stratum.
The variance of Ehi was estimated by the method of Wolter (1985):
rhi
е (X hij - X hi (j-1) )2
v[E^ hi ] = Th2
j= 2 2 * rhi (rhi
- 1)
(6)
where rhi is the number of times anglers were counted in day i.
The variance of the harvest H hij in a period was estimated by the method of Goodman (1960):
v[H^ hi
]
=
v[E^ hi
*2 ]HPUE hi
+
* v[HPUE hi
]E^
2 hi
(7)
-
v[E^ hi
* ]v[HPUE hi
]
The HPUE*hi and its variance were calculated
according to procedures in Efron (1982). The
inherent
correctable
bias
of
m-2 hi
(the
number
of
interviews in a sampling period) of jackknife
estimates were removed according to the
procedure in Efron (1982, p. 6).
Harvest and effort (and their variances) for the entire season were the sums of the estimates for each strata. Relative precision (RP) of the estimates for the 95% level of precision was calculated as:
й кл
(SE
* 1.96) N^
щ ъы
*
100
(8)
where SE is the square root of the sums of all the variances of each stratum estimate for [H^ hi] and [E^ hi] stated in equations (6) and (7), respectively, over the sampling season. RESULTS Detailed sampling information, including angler counts and numbers of completed interviews for overall estimates, is presented in Appendix A1. Appendix A2 contains a listing of the final data sets used for the analysis. During the 1998 fishing season at Gastineau Hatchery, 3,404 interviews were conducted and nearly 8,000 anglers counted. Effort for pink, chum, coho, and chinook salmon totaled 28,272 (SE = 701, RP = 5%) anglerhours, with the highest levels of effort expended during the coho salmon fishery (Table 2). The relative precision of effort and harvest estimates for chinook, coho, chum and pink salmon were within or near those specified values stated in the objective. An estimated 11,722 (SE = 937, RP = 16%) large coho at least 16 inches (41 cm) in length, 2,376 (SE = 280, RP = 23%) chum, 5,653 (SE = 414, RP = 14%) pink, and 471 (SE = 63, RP = 26%) large chinook salmon at least 28 inches (71 cm) in length were harvested at Gastineau Hatchery from 8 June to 27 September. In addition, 86 (SE = 20) small chinook salmon <28 inches (71 cm) and 1,187 (SE = 204) small coho salmon <16 inches (41 cm) in length were harvested. Anglers harvested most chinook salmon from mid-June through July, although small numbers were taken through the first week in September. Most of the chum salmon harvest occurred in July and August, whereas most of the pink salmon harvest took place in August. Harvests of large coho salmon (і16І) began in early August, and were strong from late August through the end of the survey in late September. Residency and age class data were collected at the time of interview by creel technicians allowed for class specific estimates of effort and harvest.
5
Table 2.­Summary of estimated weekly angler effort and harvest of large (і16І) coho, small (<16І) coho, large (і28І) chinook, small (<28І) chinook, chum, and pink salmon at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998.
Weekly period
Angler effort
Large (і16І) coho salmon
Hours
SEa Harvest SEa
6/08-6/14 306
66
0
0
6/15-6/21 614
82
0
0
6/22-6/28 1,598
210
0
0
6/29-7/05 1,484
156
0
0
7/06-7/12 2,068
187
0
0
7/13-7/19 1,510
104
0
0
7/20-7/26 2,117
275
0
0
7/27-8/02 1,774
117
0
0
8/03-8/09 1,611
175
6
4
8/10-8/16 2,230
210
86
23
8/17-8/23 2,593
240 399
116
8/24-8/30 1,943
199 881
112
8/31-9/06 2,660
193 2,920
303
9/07-9/13 2,324
163 3,183
735
9/14-9/20 2,374
183 3,210
450
9/21-9/27 1,066
86 1,037
130
Small (<16І) coho salmon Harvest SEa
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
24
13
3
3
0
0
25
12
141
41
688
172
303
101
Large (і28І) chinook salmon Harvest SEa
3
3
11
7
100
34
37
13
132
39
62
21
48
16
15
10
15
7
37
14
0
0
8
5
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total 28,272
701 11,722
937 1,187
204
471
63
a Standard error of effort or harvest estimate.
Small (<28І) chinook salmon Harvest SEa
0
0
0
0
15
9
12
8
23
10
8
5
18
11
0
0
2
2
8
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
86
20
Chum salmon Harvest SEa
0
0
0
0
127
60
37
23
291
55
398 153
457
96
207
68
114
30
583 162
149
81
0
0
13
13
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,376 280
Pink salmon Harvest SEa
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
39
15
124
40
116
29
246
50
979 139
1,728 227
2,032 297
327
80
59
28
0
0
0
0
0
0
5,653 414
6
10
Class specific estimates of effort and harvest showed that Alaska residents accounted for 74% of the effort, and 82% of the chinook, 83% of both the large and small coho, 72% of the chum, and 71% of the pink salmon harvested (Table 3). Age class specific estimates showed that adults accounted for about 61% of the effort, and 80% of the chinook, 79% of the large coho, 48% of the small coho, 82% of the chum, and 66% of the pink salmon harvests (Table 4). Children accounted for 30% of the effort, and 11% each of the chinook, large coho, and chum salmon, 24% of the small coho, and 25% of the pink salmon harvests. Seniors accounted for only 9% of the effort, and 10% of the large chinook and coho, 28% of the small coho, 7% of the chum, and 9% of the pink salmon harvests. DISCUSSION The 1998 sport fishing season at Gastineau Hatchery marked high points in history at the site in a number of ways. Effort at the site was the highest on record at 40% above the prior 5-year average and 26% over the prior year (Table 5). The substantial increase in effort accounted for a sizeable increase in the harvest of coho salmon since the bulk of the increased angler effort occurred during that fishery. The chinook salmon harvest declined from 1997 nearly 50%, but was still 19% above the 5-year average and the third
highest on record. Coho salmon returns to Gastineau Hatchery were very strong in 1998, resulting in a record harvest of nearly 12,000 fish. The coho harvest was nearly 3.5 times larger than that in 1997 (when weak returns were characteristic of the Southeast region), and nearly 2 times larger than the last record harvest in 1993. Chum salmon harvests were also a bit above the highest on record, and were up nearly 50% from both the 1997 and 5-year average harvests. Pink salmon harvests during 1998 were the second highest on record at the site; nearly 2 times greater than that of 1997, and over 1.5 times higher than the 5-year. Residency information collected during 1998 indicated that the vast majority of use at the site is by resident anglers. How numbers compare to prior years is not known since 1998 was the first year this type of information was recorded. Harvest estimates from the onsite survey and the SWHS have been compared for 1994 to 1997 (Table 6). Estimates were considered to be different if 95% confidence levels did not overlap. Chinook salmon estimates were not used in the comparison because starting dates for the onsite survey resulted in the early portion of the chinook fishery being missed. The SWHS estimates have often underestimated the harvests taking place at Gastineau Hatchery, and that trend was apparent once again in 1997. Angler
Table 3.­Effort and harvest estimates by residency of small (<16") coho, large (і16І) coho, large (і28І) chinook, chum, and pink salmon at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998.
Residency Resident Nonresident Totalb
Angler effort Hours SEa 21,011 562 7,257 370 28,268 673
Small (<16") coho salmon Harvest SEa 982 178 206 61 1,188 189
Large (і16І) coho salmon Harvest SEa
Large (і28І) chinook salmon Harvest SEa
9,722 890
388 58
1,999 262
83 20
11,721 928
471 61
Chum salmon Harvest SEa 1,721 222 655 148 2,376 267
Pink salmon Harvest SEa 4,004 365 1,649 190 5,653 412
a Standard error of the effort and harvest estimates. b Totals for hours and harvests may differ slightly from overall estimates because of rounding error. Totals for standard errors will not equal the overall estimate standard errors because they are not independent estimates across angler types.
7
Table 4.­Effort and harvest estimates by age class of small (<16") coho, large (і16І) coho, large (і28І) chinook, chum, and pink salmon at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998.
Age class Adult Child Senior Totalb
Angler effort Hours SEa 17,364 502 8,387 398 2,516 199 28,267 671
Small (<16") coho salmon Harvest SEa 570 110 286 94 332 85 1,188 168
Large (і16І) coho salmon Harvest SEa 9,243 838 1,270 166 1,209 206 11,722 879
Large (і28І) chinook salmon Harvest SEa 376 59 50 17 45 19 471 65
Chum salmon Harvest SEa 1,945 265 259 61 172 43 2,376 276
Pink salmon Harvest SEa 3,752 329 1,418 92 483 111 5,653 359
a Standard error of the effort and harvest estimates. b Totals for hours and harvests may differ slightly from overall estimates because of rounding error. Totals for standard errors will not equal the overall estimate standard errors because they are not independent estimates across angler types.
age class data collected in 1998 will be used to analyze these differences in 1999 when the SWHS results become available and will be presented in the 1999 Gastineau Hatchery report. Age class information collected in 1998 may prove useful when comparing the onsite estimates to the estimates in the SWHS since estimate comparisons for the various species have often been different. For example, harvests by children should be accounted for in the SWHS estimate by the head of household--but only if another member of the child's household had purchased a fishing license. One of our prior assumptions was that when large numbers of jack coho, pink, and chum salmon congregate near terminal sites they are relatively easy to catch and thereby harvested in large numbers by children. In 1998, we were able to determine that children accounted for almost 25% each of the small coho salmon (<16 inches), and pink salmon harvested--a number of which may not be reported in the SWHS. This assumption will be further investigated with the use of 1998 class specific estimates when 1998 SWHS estimates become available. It is possible that anglers harvesting large numbers of pink or other "less desirable" species of salmon have poor recall when completing the postal survey and therefore underestimate the total number of fish they actually harvested. For some anglers, the harvest of small coho (<16 inches), pink and chum salmon may not be
significant or important compared to harvesting a large coho or chinook salmon. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS As the highest-use roadside sport fishery in the Juneau area, Gastineau Hatchery plays an important role in providing fishing opportunities to urban anglers and tourists who may not have the time or economic resources to participate in remote roadside or marine boat fisheries. Also, pressure on local wild stocks of salmon on the Juneau road system by local roadside anglers is likely lessened due to opportunities provided at the hatchery. Documentation of class specific harvests at the site through onsite creel surveys can be used to supplement harvest and effort information for the Juneau area provided by the SWHS. Results of the 1998 creel survey show that roadside anglers again benefited from enhancement efforts at Gastineau Hatchery. Marine boat anglers in the Juneau area also benefited greatly from these enhancement activities: an additional 1,050 (SE = 151) chinook salmon and 3,267 (SE = 346) coho salmon reared at Gastineau Hatchery (Hubartt et al. In prep.) were taken in 1998 by marine boat anglers. Also, 53% of the chinook salmon and 28% of the coho salmon harvested during the 1998 Juneau Golden North Salmon
8
Table 5.­Summary of estimated angler effort and harvest of large coho, large chinook, chum, and pink salmon from onsite creel surveys at the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1990 and 1993­1998.
AnglerYear (survey period) hours SEa
1990 (5 May­11 Nov)b
5,207 477
1993 (5 Jul­17 Oct)c
15,825 584
Large (і16І) coho salmon Harvest SEa
69
35
7,057d
520
Large (і28І) chinook salmon Harvest SEa
0
­­
118d
34
Chum salmon Harvest SEa
118
45
1,515
310
1994 (4 Jul­9 Oct) e 1995 (3 Jul­25 Sep) f 1996 (21 Jun­23 Sep) g 1997 (16 Jun­5 Oct)h
24,192 905 21,546 555 19,189 555 22,385 654
3,509 317 2,212 303 2,860 285 3,507 436
70
17
157
36
695
73
931 123
593
66
2,047
254
2,274
250
1,605
235
1998 (8 Jun­27 Sep)
28,273 701
11,722 937
471
63
2,376
280
a Standard error (SE) of effort and harvest. b Estimates from Suchanek and Bingham (1991). c Estimates from Beers and Marshall (1994). d Includes both large and small fish.
e Estimates from Beers (1995). f Estimates from Beers (1996). g Estimates from Beers (1997). h Estimates from Frenette (1998).
Pink salmon Harvest SEa 4,225 961 713 95 9,197 560 3,421 250 1,039 135 2,878 297 5,653 414
Table 6.­Comparison of Alaska statewide postal survey and onsite creel survey harvest estimates for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery during 1994­1997. Statistics in bold have confidence levels which do not overlap.
Coho Year Survey type salmona
95% CI
Pink salmon
95% CI
1994
Onsiteb Statewidec
3,520 2,935
2,899­4,141 1,665­4,414
9,197 3,227
8,099­10,295 1,875­4,745
1995
Onsited Statewidee
2,634 1,721
2,007­3,261 718­3,259
3,421 1,115
2,931­3,911 636­1,708
1996
Onsitef Statewideg
3,625 1,272
3,010­4,240 604­2,006
1,039 272
774­1,304 86­518
1997
Onsiteh Statewidei
5,108 2,072
4,087­6,129 1,238­3,116
a Combined large (і16") and small (<16") coho salmon. b Beers (1995). c Howe et al. (1995). d Beers (1996). e Howe et al. (1996).
2,878 1,897
2,296­3,460 1,171­2,745
f Beers (1997). g Howe et al. (1997). h Frenette (1998). i Howe et al. (1998).
Chum salmon 593 413 2,047 790 2,274 536 1,605 807
95% CI 464­722 117­812 1,549­2,545 477­1,159 1,784­2,764 286­845 1,144­2,066 421­1,318
9
Derby in late August were of Gastineau Hatchery origin. The success and continuation of the Gastineau Hatchery coho, pink, and chum salmon fisheries is directly tied to the hatchery's ability to meet production goals. Chinook salmon enhancement at the facility is accomplished through a cooperative agreement with ADF&G; therefore, continued monitoring of harvests at the site will help to evaluate the success of both these programs. The goal set forth in the Operational Plan was achieved during the 1998 sampling season. Gastineau Hatchery creel survey staff proved to be effective in collecting as many completed trip interviews as possible with an 80% increase over the prior year. This contributed greatly to the final results of this project. In recent years, chinook returns at the site have generated higher levels of effort earlier in the survey. Even though the survey was started one week earlier in 1998, there was little gained from earlier sampling to justify its cost. Although sampling was scheduled to continue until 11 October, it was discontinued after 27 September because of a drop in observed fishing effort and poor weather. Harvests did appear to be dropping off, but not to a point that would have indicated the coho run was at an end. Therefore, it is suggested that 1999 sampling exclude the early start in June (actual startup date would be June 14), and continue until the first or second week in October of 1999 (contingent upon funding, returns of coho salmon, and observed participation at the site). ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank the Gastineau Hatchery creel survey staff of Kristine Kiernan, Eugene Bourdukofsky, Bryce Mander and Patrick New for their valuable data collection efforts, and Diana Tersteeg for data editing, entry, and reduction. Hatchery manager Rick Focht supervised the Gastineau Hatchery data collection effort. Paul Suchanek provided additional editorial comment.
LITERATURE CITED Beers, D. E. 1995. Harvest estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery in Juneau, Alaska during 1994. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 95-25. Beers, D. E. 1996. Harvest estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery in Juneau, Alaska during 1995. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 9627. Beers, D. E. 1997. Harvest estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fishery in Juneau, Alaska during 1996. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 9732. Beers, D. E, and R. P. Marshall. 1994. Harvest estimate for the Picnic Cove and Gastineau Hatchery roadside sport fisheries in Juneau, Alaska during 1993. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 94-31. Efron, B. 1982. The jackknife, the bootstrap and other resampling plans. Society for Industrial and applied mathematics, CBMS-NSF Monograph 38, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Frenette, Brian J. 1998. Harvest estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in Juneau, Alaska during 1997. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 98-16, Anchorage. Goodman, L. A. 1960. On the exact variance of products. Journal of the American Statistical Association 55:708-713. Howe, A. L., G. Fidler, and M. J. Mills. 1995. Harvest, catch, and participation in Alaska sport fisheries during 1994. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 95-24, Anchorage. Howe, A. L., G. Fidler, A. E. Bingham, and M. J. Mills. 1996. Harvest, catch, and participation in Alaska sport fisheries during 1995. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 96-32, Anchorage. Howe, A. L., G. Fidler, C. Olnes, A. E. Bingham, and M. J. Mills. 1997. Harvest, catch, and participation in Alaska sport fisheries during 1996. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 97-29, Anchorage.
10
Howe, A. L., G. Fidler, C. Olnes, A. E. Bingham, and M. J. Mills. 1998. Harvest, catch, and participation in Alaska sport fisheries during 1997. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 98-25, Anchorage. Hubartt, D. J., A. E. Bingham, and P. M. Suchanek. 1998. Harvest estimates for selected marine sport fisheries in Southeast Alaska during 1997. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 98-20, Anchorage. Hubartt, D. J., A. E. Bingham, and P. M. Suchanek. In Prep. Harvest estimates for selected marine sport fisheries in Southeast Alaska during 1998. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 99- , Anchorage. Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc. 1991. Southeast Alaska sport fishing economic study. Final Research Report. December 1991. (JSA 88-028.) Sacramento, California. Prepared for Alaska
Department of Fish and Game, Sport Fish Division, Research and Technical Services Section, Anchorage. McDowell Group, Inc. 1994. Alaska visitor patterns, opinions and planning. Alaska Visitor Statistics Program. Summer 1993. Prepared for Department of Commerce & economic development, Alaska Division of Tourism, Juneau. Mills, M. J. 1994. Harvest, catch, and participation in Alaska sport fisheries during 1993. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fishery Data Series No. 94-28, Anchorage. Suchanek, P. M., and A. E. Bingham. 1991. Harvest estimates for selected roadside fisheries near Juneau, Alaska during 1990. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Fishery Data Series No. 91-29. Anchorage. Wolter, K. M. 1985. Introduction to variance estimation. Springer-Verlag, New York.
11
12
APPENDIX A 13
Appendix A1.­Summary of sampling results by date at Gastineau Hatchery in 1998.
Week 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/8-6/14 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/15-6/21 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/22-6/28 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 6/29-7/05 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/06-7/12 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/13-7/19 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26
Stratuma Date
Site
WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H
08Jun 08Jun 09Jun 09Jun 12Jun 12Jun 13Jun 13Jun 14Jun 14Jun 15Jun 15Jun 16Jun 16Jun 18Jun 18Jun 20Jun 20Jun 21Jun 21Jun 22Jun 22Jun 24Jun 24Jun 26Jun 26Jun 27Jun 27Jun 28Jun 28Jun 29Jun 29Jun 30Jun 30Jun 02Jul 02Jul 04Jul 04Jul 05Jul 05Jul 07Jul 07Jul 08Jul 08Jul 10Jul 10Jul 11Jul 11Jul 12Jul 12Jul 13Jul 13Jul 15Jul 15Jul 17Jul 17Jul 18Jul 18Jul 19Jul 19Jul 20Jul 20Jul 21Jul 21Jul 23Jul 23Jul 25Jul 25Jul
NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING
INTERVIEW SAMPLING INFORMATION
ANGLER COUNTS
Large Small Large Small chinook chinook coho coho Pink Chum
No. Mean SD No. Effort harvest harvest harvest harvest harvest harvest
6
1.33
2.16
9 16.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.83
2.04
2 2.50
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
2.50
2.88 21 36.25
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.67
1.63
0 0.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
1.50
1.76 13 15.75
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.17
0.41
2 2.25
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
3.20
4.55 22 24.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0.00
0.00
0 0.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
2.50
2.43
8 14.50
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.33
0.82
2 1.50
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
3.00
2.76 25 45.25
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.33
0.52
1 1.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
2.83
3.76 26 46.50
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
1.17
1.60
3 4.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
5.67
2.58 20 27.75
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.33
0.82
5 9.00
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
7.00
4.69 19 32.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
1.75
2.22
1 1.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
3.67
3.01 23 35.50
2
0
0
0
0
0
6
0.67
1.21
9 11.50
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
5.17
5.78 22 28.75
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
2.50
2.43 11 38.00
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
8.00
7.00 18 45.00
2
0
0
0
0
0
5
6.20
5.07 10 24.50
0
0
0
0
0
2
6 10.17
9.22 20 71.50
5
2
0
0
0
2
6
5.17
6.52
8 12.00
3
0
0
0
0
6
6
9.17
15.8 30 94.25
1
0
0
0
0
3
6
6.50
9.03 23 48.00
7
3
0
0
0
10
6
5.83
5.00 38 105.50
2
0
0
0
0
1
6
8.33
7.03 14 29.00
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
7.00
5.66 36 98.75
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
3.67
3.14
2 2.50
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
7.60
4.83 36 79.50
3
0
0
0
0
0
5
6.40
10.7 10 23.00
0
1
0
0
0
2
6
9.67
3.98 33 92.25
2
0
0
0
0
0
6
2.83
2.23
9 24.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
9.50
7.23 29 90.25
2
1
0
0
0
1
6
3.50
4.28
3 7.00
1
0
0
0
0
2
6
7.33
4.46 56 125.50
3
2
0
0
0
0
6
3.50
2.88 18 36.75
5
0
0
0
2
1
6
9.50
5.86 34 93.25
0
2
0
0
0
4
6
4.67
5.28 15 20.75
0
0
0
0
0
9
6 14.50
12.5 26 61.00
2
1
0
0
1
3
6
6.17
4.58 23 37.25
10
1
0
0
0
5
6
9.83
7.14 56 111.50
4
0
0
0
3
9
6
5.50
6.35 15 35.00
4
1
0
0
3
13
6
9.67
11.4 37 92.00
1
1
0
0
4
1
6 10.67
9.20 11 37.50
9
0
0
0
1
18
6 10.00
8.72 37 69.50
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
7.00
5.40
4 22.00
0
0
0
0
0
2
6
6.50
3.67 27 86.33
1
0
0
0
2
1
6
5.00
4.20
5 10.25
1
0
0
0
2
0
6
6.50
4.64 31 76.25
0
0
0
0
2
1
6
4.67
4.84 13 28.25
2
0
0
0
0
17
6
8.17
4.07 16 28.00
2
0
0
0
4
24
6
5.17
5.78 19 55.00
1
1
0
0
11
9
6
9.00
5.87 17 43.25
2
1
0
0
2
2
6
5.17
7.14 16 38.50
2
0
0
0
7
17
6
8.50
3.94 54 80.50
4
1
0
0
3
3
6
6.67
3.44 28 66.25
0
0
0
0
0
22
6 11.50
6.98 48 125.50
0
0
0
0
1
5
6
4.83
2.48 17 30.25
0
0
0
0
1
14
6
4.33
3.20
9 23.50
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
3.17
1.47
7 18.00
1
0
0
0
2
12
6 11.83
11.20 29 83.50
1
0
0
0
5
4
6
8.33
8.87 19 45.00
3
0
0
0
5
24
6 13.67
10.10 33 88.00
5
2
0
0
13
3
6
8.67
10.00
8 22.00
0
1
0
0
3
7
-continued-
14
Appendix A1.­Page 2 of 3.
Week 7/20-7/26 7/20-7/26 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 7/27-8/02 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/03-8/09 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/10-8/16 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/17-8/23 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/24-8/30 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 8/31-9/06 9/07-9/13 9/07-9/13 9/07-9/13 9/07-9/13 9/07-9/13 9/07-9/13 9/07-9/13
Stratuma Date
Site
WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WD WD WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WE/H WD WD WD WD WE/H
26Jul 26Jul 27Jul 27Jul 28Jul 28Jul 31Jul 31Jul 01Aug 01Aug 02Aug 02Aug 04Aug 04Aug 06Aug 06Aug 07Aug 07Aug 08Aug 08Aug 09Aug 09Aug 10Aug 10Aug 11Aug 11Aug 13Aug 13Aug 15Aug 15Aug 16Aug 16Aug 17Aug 17Aug 18Aug 18Aug 19Aug 19Aug 22Aug 22Aug 23Aug 23Aug 25Aug 25Aug 27Aug 27Aug 28Aug 28Aug 29Aug 29Aug 30Aug 30Aug 02Sep 02Sep 03Sep 03Sep 04Sep 04Sep 05Sep 05Sep 06Sep 06Sep 07Sep 07Sep 08Sep 08Sep 09Sep 09Sep 12Sep
NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG SNAGGING NONSNAG
INTERVIEW SAMPLING INFORMATION
ANGLER COUNTS
Large Small Large Small chinook chinook coho coho Pink Chum
No. Mean SD No. Effort harvest harvest harvest harvest harvest harvest
6 23.83
31.00 42 116.50
3
2
0
0
0
0
6
8.00
7.40
6 7.00
0
0
0
0
0
7
6
9.33
7.61 26 55.50
0
0
0
0
2
1
6
4.67
3.67
6 6.50
0
0
0
0
0
3
6 11.33
7.47 39 74.00
3
0
0
0
8
5
6
3.67
4.03
4 4.00
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
7.50
5.21 37 87.75
1
0
0
0
19
5
6
3.83
4.92 30 62.50
0
0
0
0
17
14
6 12.83
8.23 27 56.00
0
0
0
0
10
0
6 10.50
7.26 17 33.75
0
0
0
0
14
12
6 10.17
6.97 32 65.50
0
0
0
0
5
1
6
6.17
6.49 20 17.75
0
0
0
0
1
3
6
9.50
6.12 35 63.00
0
0
0
0
20
4
6
6.00
5.02 10 12.00
0
0
0
0
4
1
6
8.00
6.60 33 65.50
0
0
0
0
12
0
6
4.67
6.47 13 22.50
1
0
0
0
14
4
6
3.17
3.87 25 64.75
0
0
2
0
30
0
6
3.50
3.02
6 11.00
0
0
0
0
15
2
6 14.17
12.20 45 104.25
4
1
0
0
99
8
6
9.50
10.70 14 33.50
0
0
0
0
42
3
6 10.33
12.40 24 51.25
0
0
1
1
41
2
6
5.00
5.22
7 11.50
0
0
0
0
0
1
5
8.80
8.64 22 38.00
0
0
1
0
28
0
5
5.20
5.54
9 9.00
0
0
0
0
13
12
6 16.00
11.70 39 54.75
0
0
0
1
27
5
6
7.00
8.29 13 17.50
0
0
0
0
5
18
6
9.83
5.38 51 110.25
4
1
0
5
55
0
6
3.67
4.80 10 24.50
2
1
0
1
29
6
6
9.67
6.71 42 92.00
3
1
3
0
40
1
6 11.33
8.41 24 45.00
0
0
7
0
62
8
6 15.17
9.47 46 111.00
2
0
6
0
64
3
6 14.00
12.70 25 52.00
2
0
7
0
76
20
6 10.00
4.56 28 80.25
0
0
5
0
15
1
5
6.80
5.22 15 25.50
0
0
0
0
42
3
6 13.50
7.18 33 87.50
0
0
0
0
58
0
5 15.80
5.93 15 29.00
0
0
11
0
19
0
6 12.50
10.70 47 144.25
0
0
0
0
28
0
6
7.83
7.33 10 18.50
0
0
5
0
42
8
6 10.00
7.67 28 77.00
0
0
8
0
13
0
6 10.17
12.20 16 40.50
0
0
10
0
56
4
6 13.33
14.00 32 82.00
0
0
8
1
51
1
6 12.00
13.40 12 26.50
0
0
11
0
26
2
6 14.33
13.20 36 70.75
0
0
5
0
10
0
6
4.00
3.16
5 5.50
0
0
2
0
3
0
5
6.80
3.96 25 50.25
0
0
7
0
2
0
5
6.00
6.63 18 27.25
0
0
14
0
13
0
6
5.50
6.77 17 45.50
0
0
27
0
0
0
6
4.50
4.09 21 41.00
0
0
42
0
16
0
6 13.83
5.00 27 76.75
0
0
4
0
13
0
6 13.50
4.72 13 29.50
0
0
46
0
2
0
6 15.83
5.98 29 83.25
3
0
19
0
2
0
6 15.17
8.93 15 36.00
0
0
22
0
4
0
5
6.80
4.97 20 50.50
1
0
16
1
6
0
5 10.20
10.20 15 32.50
0
0
42
0
3
0
6 10.17
5.23 14 37.50
0
0
15
0
0
2
6 11.17
11.20
7 16.50
0
0
12
0
1
0
5 13.80
6.87 22 90.50
0
0
62
2
1
0
5 14.20
12.20 22 75.50
0
0
105
0
0
0
6 14.50
7.50 34 134.00
0
0
47
4
1
0
6 23.00
20.00 22 56.00
0
0
113
0
0
0
6 11.50
6.66 25 83.50
0
0
42
4
0
0
6 22.67
16.20 27 65.50
0
0
145
0
0
0
6
7.33
3.72 16 28.50
0
0
3
1
0
0
6 13.67
6.68 21 51.00
0
0
67
1
0
0
6
5.67
2.34 10 24.00
0
0
11
1
0
0
6 14.00
10.10 26 68.25
0
0
52
3
0
0
6
7.83
4.71 23 55.75
0
0
30
10
0
0
6 19.50
13.80 16 31.00
0
0
72
0
0
0
6
9.50
2.81 32 76.00
0
0
20
30
0
0
-continued-
15
Appendix A1.­Page 3 of 3.
Week Stratuma Date
Site
INTERVIEW SAMPLING INFORMATION
ANGLER COUNTS
Large Small Large Small chinook chinook coho coho Pink Chum
No. Mean SD No. Effort harvest harvest harvest harvest harvest harvest
9/07-9/13
WE/H 12Sep SNAGGING
6 17.00
8.79 21 38.50
0
0
104
0
0
0
9/07-9/13
WE/H 13Sep NONSNAG
6
8.50
6.50 24 56.00
0
0
26
8
0
0
9/07-9/13
WE/H 13Sep SNAGGING
6 13.67
8.64 28 67.00
0
0
140
0
0
0
9/14-9/20
WD 14Sep NONSNAG
6
8.17
2.64 20 39.50
0
0
19
23
0
0
9/14-9/20
WD 14Sep SNAGGING
6 13.83
9.11 33 74.75
0
0
109
5
0
0
9/14-9/20
WD 15Sep NONSNAG
6
7.17
3.19 29 61.45
0
0
29
29
0
0
9/14-9/20
WD 15Sep SNAGGING
6 13.33
7.53 23 44.75
0
0
78
0
0
0
9/14-9/20
WD 16Sep NONSNAG
6 11.00
2.68 35 83.00
0
0
53
100
0
0
9/14-9/20
WD 16Sep SNAGGING
6 22.33
9.11 26 52.00
0
0
111
0
0
0
9/14-9/20
WE/H 19Sep NONSNAG
6 11.00
8.12 40 98.00
0
0
17
79
0
0
9/14-9/20
WE/H 19Sep SNAGGING
6 13.33
7.97 20 40.50
0
0
93
0
0
0
9/14-9/20
WE/H 20Sep NONSNAG
6
9.83
3.71 32 65.00
0
0
10
24
0
0
9/14-9/20
WE/H 20Sep SNAGGING
5 10.20
8.35 22 42.50
0
0
90
0
0
0
9/21-9/27
WD 21Sep NONSNAG
5
6.80
3.49 21 47.50
0
0
11
40
0
0
9/21-9/27
WD 21Sep SNAGGING
5
7.20
5.63 14 25.00
0
0
43
0
0
0
9/21-9/27
WD 24Sep NONSNAG
6
6.67
3.78 24 70.00
0
0
27
56
0
0
9/21-9/27
WD 24Sep SNAGGING
6
4.00
1.90 17 24.50
0
0
29
0
0
0
9/21-9/27
WD 25Sep NONSNAG
6
4.33
3.72 22 44.50
0
0
19
1
0
0
9/21-9/27
WD 25Sep SNAGGING
6
4.83
4.07 13 28.50
0
0
49
0
0
0
9/21-9/27
WE/H 26Sep NONSNAG
6
4.67
3.67 24 50.50
0
0
7
38
0
0
9/21-9/27
WE/H 26Sep SNAGGING
6
8.17
5.34 17 35.00
0
0
79
0
0
0
9/21-9/27
WE/H 27Sep NONSNAG
6
4.67
4.27 21 41.50
0
0
8
7
0
0
9/21-9/27
WE/H 27Sep SNAGGING
6
5.67
5.24 14 29.00
0
0
27
0
0
0
a WD = weekdays (Mondays­Fridays, except 7 Sept.); WE/H = weekend/holidays (Saturdays, Sundays, and 7 Sept.).
16
Appendix A2.­Major computer files used for data analysis of Gastineau Hatchery roadside fishery in 1998. Custodian of data files listed below are the author and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Research and Technical Services, Anchorage, Alaska. File archive name is "dipac_98.zip."
File name CREEL DIPAC98 DIPAC98A DIPAC98 BOWDEN8A DIPAC98Age_eff DIPAC98Resid_eff
File type TXT DTA SAS SSD SAS SAS SAS
File Description Raw ASCII data file of interviews and angler counts Final edited ASCII data set SAS program to reformat ASCII file Summary subset SAS data file: count and interview data SAS program to estimate overall effort, harvests, and associated variances SAS program to estimate effort, harvest, and associated variances by age class (A, C, S) SAS program to estimate effort, harvest, and associated variances by residency (R and N)
17

B Frenette

File: harvest-estimate-for-the-gastineau-hatchery-roadside-sport-fishery.pdf
Title: Harvest Estimate for the Gastineau Hatchery Roadside Sport Fishery in Juneau, Alaska During 1998
Author: B Frenette
Author: Frenette, B. J.
Keywords: Fds99-16
Published: Mon Jun 17 21:10:03 2002
Pages: 23
File size: 0.32 Mb


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