NIEHS Director Kenneth Olden, JW Drake, DP Sandler, CR Weinberg, RP DiAugustine

Tags: authors, the manuscript, Environmental Health Perspectives, manuscripts, Environmental Epidemiology, publication, references, Risk Assessment, Public Health Service, environmental issues, environmental health, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Commentaries, DHHS publication, R. Westerholm, T. W. Alexander Dr. P. O., Swenberg Claudia Thompson Gregory S. Travos Molly R. Whitworth, D. Schuetzle, Health Sciences EnvDireonmrenstaleHcealtthivs Supplements, Computer Sciences Corporation, Office of Management and Budget, Superintendent of Documents, Terri Damstra Richard P. DiAugustine, Jacobo Finkelman Margaret L. Kripke Kenneth Olden, scientific research, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Results section, manuscript, materials and methods, principal conclusions, author, American Chemical Society, Mathematical Equations, Chemical Structures, Target Organ Toxicity, Robert Langenbach Michael I. Luster H. B. Matthews, Human Services, Clarice R. Weinberg J. Carl Barrett Gary A. Boorman Leo T. Burka Colin F. Chignell, Edward M. Eddy Thorsten A. Fjellstedt Bruce A. Fowler, Kenneth Olden Gary E. R. Hook George W. Lucier, Arthur C. Upton Philip W. Albro James A. Bond, Bernard A. Schwetz Carol A. Shreffler William A. Suk Raymond W. Tennant Kenneth R. Tindall, Thomas A. Kunkel Robert E. London Ronald P. Mason James D. McKinney, U.S. Government Printing Office, research articles, Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements, Health and Human Services, Department of Health and Human Services, Ronald L. Melnick Richard M. Philpot Christopher J. Portier Jennifer M. Ratcliffe Virginia M. Sanders, Jau-Shyong Hong Anton M. Jetten Norman L. Kaplan, Bernard D. Goldstein Mortimer Mendelsohn Frederica P. Perera Martin Rodbell, National Institute ofEnvironmental Health Sciences, Robert A. Goyer Jerrold J. Heindel, Karla Pace Kimberly G. Thigpen Joy M. Crowson, Richard T. Di Giulio John W. Drake, Crenshaw Vivian Umberger Paul A. Potter Evan Patterson, Joyce A. Goldstein Philip E. Hamrick Ernest Hodgson James Huff, Michelle A. Medinsky Elizabeth Murphy James A. Popp, McClellan Donald I. McRee Scott E. Merkle Walter W. Piegorsch John B. Pritchard, Andrew Szczeklik Mary E. Vore Patricia A. Buffer Patricia K. Donohoe Philip C. Hanawalt Michel Mercier Candace B. Pert Radim J., Linda S. Birnbaum Joseph D. Brain Robert E. Chapin Ellis B. Cowling, David G. Hoel Harvey Jeffries Burke H. Judd, James W. Putney Walter J. Rogan Anne P. Sassaman, John Cairns, Jr.
Content: SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Please contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The Secretary of Health and Human Services has determined that the publication of this periodical is necessary in the transaction of the public business required by law of this Department. Use of funds for printing this periodical has been approved by the Director ofthe Office of Management and Budget. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES is a publication of the National Institute of Environmental health sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services. Opinions expressed herein, however, are not necessarily endorsed nor shared by any of the above agencies. DHHS publication No. (NIH) 93-218 Address communications to: Editor-in-Chief ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences 111 T. W. Alexander Dr. P. O. Box 12233 Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 Telephone No: (919) 541-3406 FAX No: (919) 541-0273 Print Schedule: Volume 102(Suppl. 2) will present articles from the Conference on Risk Assessment of Urban Air: Emissions, Exposure, Risk Identification and Risk Quantitation. Volume 102(Suppl. 1), January 1994 DISCRIMINATION PROHIBITED-Under the provisions of applicable public laws enacted by Congress since 1964, no person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, national origin, handicap, or age, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity (or, on the basis of sex, with respect to any education program or activity) receiving Federal financial assistance. In addition, Executive Order 1141 prohibits discrimination on the basis of age by contractors and subcontractors in the performance ofFederal contracts, and Executive Order 11246 states that no federally funded contractor may discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Therefore, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences must be operated in compliance with these laws and Executive Orders.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Service National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
EnvDireonmrenstaleHcealtthivs Supplements Volume 102, Supplement 1, January 1994
NIEHS Director Editors-in-Chief Board of Associate Editors Editorial Review Board
Kenneth Olden
Gary E. R. Hook
George W. Lucier
Eula Bingham Molly J. Coye Bernard D. Goldstein Mortimer Mendelsohn Frederica P. Perera Martin Rodbell Andrew Szczeklik Mary E. Vore
Patricia A. Buffer Patricia K. Donohoe Philip C. Hanawalt Michel Mercier Candace B. Pert Radim J. Sram Lorenzo Tomatis Elizabeth K. Weisburger
John Cairns, Jr. Jacobo Finkelman Margaret L. Kripke Kenneth Olden David P. Rall Takashi Sugimura Arthur C. Upton
Philip W. Albro James A. Bond John R. Bucher Rajendra R. Chhabra James D. Crapo Richard T. Di Giulio John W. Drake. Edward M. Eddy Thorsten A. Fjellstedt Bruce A. Fowler Thomas Goldsworthy Joseph K. Haseman David G. Hoel Harvey Jeffries Burke H. Judd Kenneth S. Korach Joellen Lewtas Penelope K. Manasco Roger 0. McClellan Donald I. McRee Scott E. Merkle Walter W. Piegorsch John B. Pritchard Jerry A. Robinson Dale P. Sandler Bernard A. Schwetz Carol A. Shreffler William A. Suk Raymond W. Tennant Kenneth R. Tindall Clarice R. Weinberg
J. Carl Barrett Gary A. Boorman Leo T. Burka Colin F. Chignell Terri Damstra Richard P. DiAugustine June K. Dunnick Michael R. Elwell W. James Fleming Thomas J. Goehl Robert A. Goyer Jerrold J. Heindel Jau-Shyong Hong Anton M. Jetten Norman L. Kaplan Thomas A. Kunkel Robert E. London Ronald P. Mason James D. McKinney Michelle A. Medinsky Elizabeth Murphy James A. Popp James W. Putney Walter J. Rogan Anne P. Sassaman James K. Selkirk John G. Stanley James A. Swenberg Claudia Thompson Gregory S. Travos Molly R. Whitworth
Linda S. Birnbaum Joseph D. Brain Robert E. Chapin Ellis B. Cowling Theodora R. Devereux Darlene Dixon David L. Eaton Linda E. Fisher James R. Fouts Joyce A. Goldstein Philip E. Hamrick Ernest Hodgson James Huff Marian Johnson-Thompson David G. Kaufman Robert Langenbach Michael I. Luster H. B. Matthews John A. McLachlan Ronald L. Melnick Richard M. Philpot Christopher J. Portier Jennifer M. Ratcliffe Virginia M. Sanders David A. Savitz Michael D. Shelby William S. Stokes Jack A. Taylor High Tilson Usha Varanasi Errol Zeiger
Science Editor Executive Associate for Publications Publication Editors Associate News Editor Editorial Secretary Editorial Assistants Editorial Trainee Electronic Publishing Specialist Design Consultant Art Directors
Michael P. Dieter Debra G. Parrish Dorothy L. Ritter Karla Pace Kimberly G. Thigpen Joy M. Crowson Laura L. Burton Judy P. Crenshaw Vivian Umberger Paul A. Potter Evan Patterson, Computer Sciences Corporation S. Courtney Edgerton, Image Associates, Inc. Ellen W. Rogers, CSC Joseph Tart, CSC
Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements is a forum for the examination, discussion, and dissemination of information and ideas relating to issues and advances in environmental health. Accordingly, all articles published in EHP Supplements reflect the individual views ofthe authors and not official points of view held by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, any other component ofthe United States government, or the organizations with which the authors are affiliated. Neither the NIEHS nor any other component of the United States government assumes any responsibility for the completeness of the articles or other items or the accuracy of the conclusions reached therein. Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements is published bimonthly by the Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements has been deemed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to be necessary in the transaction of the public business required by law ofpublic domain; permission to reproduce any portion of its contents is, therefore, not necessary. Questions concerning submission of articles and inquiries on other editorial matters should be addressed to the Editors-in-Chief, Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements, National Institute ofEnvironmental Health Sciences, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (telephone: 919-541-3406).
Symposium on Risk Assessment of Urban Air: Emissions, Exposure,
p
Risk Identification and Risk Quantitation
Future research needs associated with the assessment of potential human health risks from exposure to toxic ambient air pollutants L. Moller, D. Schuetzle, and H. Autrup The relationship between gasoline composition and vehicle hydrocarbon emissions-a review of current studies and future research needs D. Schuetzle, W. 0. Siegl, T. E. Jensen, M. A. Dearth, E. W. Kaiser, R. Gorse, W. Kreucher and E. Kulik Exhaust emissions from light- and heavy-duty vehicles: chemical composition, impact of exhaust after treat- ment and fuel parameters R. Westerholm and K-E. Egeback A perspective on the potential development of environmentally acceptable light-duty diesel vehicles R.. Hammerle, D. Schuetzle, and W. Adams Air Pollution measurements in traffic tunnels R. De Fre, P. Bruynseraede, and J. G. Kretzschmar Human exposure to urban air pollution C-E.. Bostrom, J. Almen, B. Steen, and R. Westerholm Urban air pollution by carcinogenic and genotoxic polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the former USSR A. Y. Khesina The air quality in Danish urban areas F. P. Jensen and J. Fenger Ambient air pollutants in Upper Silesia: partial chemical composition and biological activity M. Chorazy, J. Szeliga, M. Strozyk, and B. Cimander Chemical and mutagenic patterns of airborne particulate matter: collected in 17 Italian towns R. Barale, L. Giromini, S. Del Ry, B. Barnini, M. Bulleri, L Barrai, F. Valerio, M. Pala, and J. He Exposure and risk from ambient particle-bound pollution in an airshed dominated by residential wood combus- tion and mobile sources L. T. Cupitt, W. G. Glen, and J. Lewtas Chemical analysis and biological testing of a polar fraction of ambient air particulate extracts in relation to diesel and gasoline vehicle exhausts M. Strandell, S. Zakrisson, T. Alsberg, R. Westerholm, and L. Winquist Atmospheric pollution due to mobile sources and effects on human health in Japan J. Kagawa Physiologically-based assessment of human exposure to urban air pollutants and its significance for public health risk evaluation J. J. Vostal Mutagenic and carcinogenic significance and the possible induction of lung cancer by nitro aromatic hydrocarbons in particulate pollutants H. Tokiwa, N. Sera, A. Nakashima, K. Nakashima, Y. Nakanishi, and N. Shigematu Dioxin receptor ligands in urban air and vehicle exhaust G. G. F. Mason Atmospheric chemistry of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon: formation of atmospheric mutagens R. Atkinson and J. Arey Induction of mutation spectra by complex mixtures: approaches, problems and possibilities D. M. DeMarini Monitoring of human populations at risk by different cytogenetic end points W. A. Anwar Mutations induced in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase gene by three urban air pollutants: acetyldehyde, benzo(a)pyrene diolexpoxide and ethylene oxide B. Lambert, B. Andersson, T. Bastlova, S-M. Hou, D. Hellgren, and A. Kolman In vivo metabolism and genotoxic effects of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons L. Moller Effects of induction and age dependent enzyme expression on lung bioavailability, metabolism, and DNA-bind- ing of urban air particulate adsorbed benzo(a)pyrene, 2-nitrofluorene and 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyridol-(4,3)- indole J-P. Gotze, C. Nyberg, P. Lindeskog, J. Gabrielsson, R. Toftgard, and S. Tornquist Is ambient ethene a cancer-risk factor? M. Tornqvist Stimulatory effects of sulfur and nitrogen oxides on carcinogen activation in human polymorphonuclear leuko- cytes
D. Constantin, K. Mehrotra, A. Rahimtula, P. Moldeus, and B. Jernstrom Toxicological and epidemiological evidence for health risks from inhaled engine emissions J. L. Mauderly On cancer risk: estimation of urban air pollution M. Tornqvist and L. Ehrenberg The use of quantitative epidemiologic data in regulatory approaches to air pollution J. Wahrendorf Cancer risk of air pollution: epidemiological evidence K. Hemminki and G. Pershagen
THE INTERNATIONAL BIOSTATISTICS CONFERENCE ON THE STUDY OF TOXICOLOGY May 23-25, 1991 Tokyo, Japan Sponsors Biometric Society, Japanese Region Environmental Mutagen Society of Japan Japanese Society for Biopharmaceutical Statistics National Institute of Hygienic Sciences, Japan National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Organizers Akira Sakuma David G. Hoel Makoto Hayashi Takashi Yanagawa Isao Yoshimura
CONTRIBUTED ARTICLES
Editorial Policy
Environmental Health Perspectives, the journal of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), was first published in April 1972. At that time, the Institute was in its infancy, and the science of environmental health was little more than an off-shoot of toxicology. The journal was designed for the rapid dissemination of information on environmental health issues. For 20 years the journal has published mainly monographs resulting from conferences, symposia, and workshops. The journal has been restructured to provide a forum for examining, discussing, and disseminating information about advances and issues in the environmental health sciences. Volume 100 was the last issue of the original Environmental Health Perspectives. The Institute and the journal have, to a large extent, focused on issues related to human health. The mandate of NIEHS has demanded that human health be a central theme of its research programs; however, the interests of the journal have become considerably broader. Problems with human health and problems within the environment are, in most cases, so intertwined as to be inseparable. Problems within the environment may not become apparent until many years after their initiation or until human health is affected. The resolution of these problems requires an understanding of the relationships between individual components of the environment. In other words, there is a need to encompass the totality of environmental health so that human health issues may be recognized before major health problems become established. Only when the totality of environmental health is considered can the interdependence of the environment and human life be clearly recognized. Environmental Health Perspectives is engaged in reporting the study of the total environment. Solutions to environmental problems are not only a goal of the research laboratory but are also a major societal goal. Over the last 20 years the complexity of environmental health issues has increased both at the scientific and social levels. As the resolution of societal problems most often begins with education, the need for communication between the laboratory and the informed public has also enormously increased. The redesigned Environmental Health Perspectives is aimed at both the scientific community and the informed public, whereby it may contribute to the resolution of some of the environmental health issues that confront this and future generations. EDITORIAL POLICY During the last 20 years we have published many monographs resulting from symposia, Conference Proceedings, or workshops dedicated to some aspect of environmental health. We have also published many unsolicited manuscripts that were either of a review nature or original research. Requests for publication of symposia proceedings and individual manuscripts have come from all over the world. Beginning with Volume 101, the scope of the journal has been expanded. The journal is intended to be a forum for the discussion of issues in environmental health, and several formats have been devised for that purpose. In addition, several new formats are available for the publication of scientific articles and scientific discussion. All scientific articles will continue to be subject to peer review. The sole criteria for publication has been and will continue to be environmental significance and scientific quality. Environmental Science is made up of many fields, and therefore we are prepared to consider scientific progress in all of them. Cross-fertilization and serendipity have proven to be extremely important processes in the advance of science in general, and this must hold true for the science of environmental health. We will consider for publication articles ranging from the most basic molecular biology to environmental engineering. We particularly encourage those researchers concerned with mechanisms of toxic action and new approaches for detecting and/or remedying environmental damage. Opinions and ideas based on scientific observation and argument are welcome. While the expression of opinions may lead to debate and disagreement, such reactions are healthy and can lead to new research and discoveries. Presentations of ideas
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more rapid and efficient methods for dean-up of hazardous wastes, and methods for early detection of environmental damage and environmentally mediated diseases. MEETING REPORTS are summaries of conferences, symposia, or workshops in which the scientific objectives and achievements of a meeting are described. ENVIRONEWS The news section provides up-to-date information on important issues in environmental health covering a variety of areas induding policy, legislative, and regulatory actions; innovative technological and conceptual research advances; conference and meeting summaries; and emerging environmental problems. The news section consists of several components: FORUM articles are brief reports on matters of poten- tial environmental health significance such as chemical spills and contamination episodes. Brief reviews of recent scientific advances will also be included. NIEHS NEWS summarizes significant activities or accomplishments at NIEHS and the National Toxicology Program. FOCUS articles are substantive news items about important issues in environmental health. Examples include reports on risk assessment, risk management dilemmas, women's health initiatives, environmental equity, relevance of animal models to toxicity testing, and structure-activity approaches to toxicity evaluation. SPHERES OF INFLUENCE is a legal/regulatory column that presents reports on significant events and decisions involving the executive branch, Congress, and regulatory agencies. Examples include new directions of White House policies, impact of Clean Air Act legislation, and coverage of congressional hearings on environmental health issues. ANNOUNCEMENTS includes a calendar of upcoming events such as conferences, workshops, and public hearings. Appropriate listings are made for industrial, academic, regulatory, and legal activities. This section also includes listings of new books, fellowship and grant announcements, and positions available. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PEC KES SUPPL nMNS During the last 20 years, we have focused on the development of a series of monographs that have generally arisen from symposium or conference proceedings. We continue to publish monographs, but they now appear as supplements to the main journal. Six to eight supplements are published per year. Four to six of these consist of conference, workshop, or symposium proceedings, and two issues are dedicated to the publication of solicited and unsolicited comprehensive reviews on environmental health. All articles published in the supplements, regardless of their source, are peer reviewed. Each Supplement resulting from a conference, symposium, or workshop should address a specific problem, an area of concern, a research problem, or a particular scientific issue. Supplements will, in general, be dedicated to scientific issues and not programmatic themes. It is intended that each collection of manuscripts form a landmark statement for a particular subject. Each supplement must be an up-to-date, balanced source of reference material for researchers, teachers, legislators, and the informed public. Publication of conference proceedings in Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements requires the submission of a proposal as described in "Instructions to Authors". SUPPLEMENT ARTICLES from conferences are generally the result of research investigations, reviews, or a combination of both; however, brief reports and commentaries are also appropriate. PERSPECTIVE REVIEWS are targeted to the one or two specific issues of Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements set aside for the publication of reviews in environmental health sciences. Perspective reviews are indepth, comprehensive review articles that address developments in specific scientific areas. Perspective reviews must not be simply a compilation of the literature. Perspective reviews should be scholarly, landmark statements offering a complete and balanced perspective as well as insight into the environmental significance of the research.
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DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Cell Proliferation, 14-16 1992, Research Triangle Park, NC. New York:Xavier, 1993;35-44. Government report 9. Melvin DM, Brooke MM. Laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of intestinal parasites. Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control; 1974. US Dept of Health and Human Services publication 75-8282. L4RCpublications 6. IARC. Asbestos. In: IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risk of chemicals to man, vol. 14, Lyon:International Agency for Research on Cancer, 1977;93-96. 7. Spiegelhalder B, Preussmann R Nitrosamines and rubber. In: NNitroso compounds: occurrence and biological effects (Bartsch H, O'Neill IK, Castegnaro M, Okada M), IARC Scientific Publications No. 41, Lyon: International Agency for Research on Cancer, 1982;231-243. Abbreviate journal names according to Index Medicus or Serial Sourcesfor the BIOSIS Previews Database. List all authors; do not use et al. in the bibliography. Include the title of the journal article or book chapter and inclusive pagination. References to papers that have been accepted for publication but have not yet been published should be cited in the same manner as other references, with the name of the journal followed by "in press." Personal communications, unpublished observations, manuscripts in preparation, and submitted manuscripts should not be listed in the bibliography. They are to be inserted at appropriate places in the text, in parentheses, without a reference number. Figures and Legends. Four sets of publication-quality figures are required. Graphs and figures should be submitted as original drawings in black India ink, laserprinted computer drawings, or as glossy photographs. Dot matrix computer drawings are not acceptable as original art. Graphs and other drawn figures will be reproduced as submitted and will not be
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Envirometa Healyh Petspectives Subscription Information Environmental Health Perspectives consists of a monthly journal together with a series of supplements. EHP publishes cutting-edge research artides and in addition is a forum for the discussion of environmental issues and the presentation of news. Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements publishes conferences, workshops, symposium proceedings, and in-depth reviews. EHP Supplments are published 6 to 8 times per year. Environmental Health Perspectives and Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements may be obtained by subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, U.SA. All inquiries about purchase of subscriptions or depository libraries should be directed to the Government Printing Office (telephone: 202/512-2303).
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Review-Perspective Artides
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Chlorinated Dibenzodioxins and Dibenzofurans
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Workshop on the Evaluation of Chemical Mutagenicity Data in Relation to Population Risk
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Low Level Lead Toxicity and the Environmental Impact of Cadmium
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Rewiew-Perspective Aeticles
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Asbestos
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Mobile Air Emission
Biometerological Hazards
Abstracts on Heavy Metals in the Environment, Conference II
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Components of Plastics Manufacture
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Heavy Metals in the Environment
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US-USSR Environmental Health Conference
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Human Health Effects of New Approaches to Insect Pest Control
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Target Organ Toxicity: Liver and Kidney
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Target Organ Toxicity: Lung
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WHO/NIEHS Symposium on Plastics Manufacture
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Target Organ Toxicity: Development
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Environmental Arsenic and Lead
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Proceedings of the Second NIEHS Task Force
NIEHS Science Seminar
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Vinyl Chloride Related Compounds
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Air Pollution and Human Health
Extrapolation From Animal to Man
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Aspects of Polybrominated Biphenyls
24
Target Organ Toxicity: Gonads
PCBs
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Factors Influencing Metal Toxicity
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Target Organ Toxicity: Cardiovascular System,
Nervous System
27
Higher Plants as Monitors of Environmental Mutagens
Hazardous Solid Wastes and their Disposal
28
Cadmium
29
Pollutants and High Risk Groups
30
USA/USSR Cooperative Research
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Aneuploidy
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JAPAN/USA Biosdtatistics
Statistics and the Environment
33
Target Organ Toxicity: Intestines
Effects of Increased Coal Utilization
NIEHS Science Seminar
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Aquatic Toxicology
Biological Effects of Mineral Fibers and Particulates
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Experimental Models for Pulmonary Research
36
Application of Negative Ion Spectrometry
37
Pollen Systems
38
Target Organ Toxicity: Endocrine Systems
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Target Organ Toxicity: Blood
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Role of Metals in Carcinogenicity
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Polyvinyl Chloride
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Environmental Epidemiology
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Target Organ Toxicity: Immune System
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Target Organ Toxicity: Eye, Ear, and Other Special Senses
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VoL/SuppL Subject
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Phthalate Esters
46
Drinking Water Disinfectants
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Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity ofAir Pollutants
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Health Effects ofToxic Wastes
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AL-Substituted Aryl Compounds
50
Tumor Promotion
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In Vitro Effects of Mineral Dusts
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Environmental Epidemiology
Air Quality Control
NIEHS Science Seminar
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Asbestos
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Metallothionein and Cadmium Nephrotoxicity
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Monograph of Pulmonary Toxicology
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Methods in Pulmonary Toxicology
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Glycol Ethers
Mechanisms of Cell Injury
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Carcinogenic Potency Database
Formaldehyde
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PCBs: Japan-U.S. Symposium
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PCBs: U.S. Symposium
Finland-U.S. Symposium
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Monograph on Structure-Activity and molecular mechanisms
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DNA Adducts
Environmental Epidemiology
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Health Effects ofAcid Precipitation
Environmental Risk Assessment
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Monograph on Free Radicals
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Metal-Binding Proteins
Phthalic Acid Esters
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Cotton and Grain Dusts
67
Dietary Mutagens
68
SENCAR Mouse
Author and Subject Indices, Volume 41-60
69
Drinking Water Disinfectants
70
Airborne Pollutants and Respiratory Cancer
Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology
71
Aquatic Toxicology
72
Methyl Isocyanate
73
Ovarian Pathology
Nitrogen Oxide
74
Biomarkers in Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology
75
NIEHS 20th Anniversary
76
Basic Research in Risk Assessment
77
Male Reproductive System
78
Lead-Blood Pressure Relationships
Author and Subject Indices, Volumes 61-73
79
Health Effects ofAcid Aerosols
80
Monograph on Regulation of Differentiation in Eukaryotic Cell Systems
81
Scientific Advances in Environmental Health
82
Benzene Metabolism, Toxicity and Carcinogenesis
83
Monograph on Groundwater Quality
84
Calcium Messenger Systems
85
Chemicals and Lung Toxicity
Upper Respiratory System
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Butadiene
Environmental Health in the 21st Century
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Published Volumes of EHP Supplements, continued
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Biostatistics in Human Cancer
Structure-Activity
88
Risk Factors and Mechanisms in Carcinogenesis
89
Advances in Lead Research
90
Contaminated Aquatic Food Resources
Quantitative Risk Assessment
91
Lead in Bone
92
Chromium
93
Target Genes in Chemical Carcinogenesis
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Environmental Epidemiology
95
Indoor Air Quality
96
Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity Databases
Global Warming
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Particle Clearance by Alveolar Macrophages
98
Biomarkers in Human Cancer-Part I.
Predisposition and Use in Risk Assessment
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Biomarkers in Human Cancer-Part II.
Exposure Monitoring and Molecular Dosimetry
100
Twenty Years of Environmental Health Research
101/1
NTP Abstracts, 1976-1992
101/2
Environment and Reproductive Health
101/3
Environmental Mutagenesis in Human Populations
101/4
Environmental Epidemiology
101/5
Cell Proliferation and Chemical Carciogenesis
101/6
Health Effects of Gasoline
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Biostatistics in the Study of Toxicology
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Available: freesix months after publication date from NIEHS-EHP, P. 0. Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Subscription: from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402.
US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health
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JW Drake, DP Sandler, CR Weinberg, RP DiAugustine

File: niehs-director-kenneth-olden.pdf
Author: JW Drake, DP Sandler, CR Weinberg, RP DiAugustine
Published: Wed May 17 19:08:06 2006
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