PhD, has made a huge contribution to the geology of both northern and southern California during his long and illustrious career, GIP Colburn

Tags: California, Pacific Section, SEPM, SDSU, Dickinson, Aztec Sandstone, nonmember price, member price, Southern California, Donn Gorsline, AAPG, California Borderlands, Las Vegas, Mario Caputo, Steve Rowland, Pacific Sections, Valley of Fire State Park, Muddy Mountains, PS-SEPM, Ivan Colburn, Field Trip Guidebook, Wayne Henderson, Jon Schwalbach, Manager Dan Sturmer, Lifetime Achievement Award, Fall Field Trip, field trips, Kauai, Kauai Island, Stanford, St. Theresa's School, Bill Dickinson, Chuck Siemers-Blay, Waimea River, Pomona College, Professor Ganqing Jiang, the Big Island Hawaii, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Stanford Bill, Sedimentary Geology, San Joaquin Valley, Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Church, San Andreas Fault, Field Trip Guide, The Pacific Section SEPM, Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM, Pacific Sections AAPG, Jackie Dickinson, Bill Belknap, Arizona Geological Society, North American Cordillera, George Gehrels, AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages Publications, Geological Society of America, Utah Geological Association, South Pacific, the University of Arizona, Gehrels, Field Trip, William Richard Dickinson, carbonate, Kauai beaches, Professor Steve Rowland, foreland basin, Mario V. Caputo, Society for Sedimentary Geology, Pleistocene, Arizona, Hawaii
Content: volume 88, issue No. 1
FALL 2016 Pacific Sedimentologist Newsletter of Pacific Section, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) September, 2016
Valley Of Fire State Park, Muddy Mountains: Jurassic Aztec Sandstone, Arch With Large-Scale Eolian Cross-Strata Fall Field Trip JOINT PACIFIC AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN SECTIONS SEPM / AAPG / SEG CONFERENCE AND field trips, PARIS HOTEL , Las Vegas, NEVADA October 2 ­ 7, 2016
See also: Our PS-SEPM web site: www.pacificsectionsepm.org
PS-SEPM President's Message Esteemed Members of PS-SEPM, You might be wondering why you haven't heard much from PS-SEPM this year. Admittedly, this year has been slightly different: Our usual Spring Joint Meeting is in the Fall this year (Las Vegas, October 1-6, 2016) and our typical "Fall Field Trip" was absorbed by our Las Vegas Joint Meeting as well. Does this mean PS-SEPM is slowing down? Not a chance!! Our membership and fiscal health are stronger than ever, and we have an exciting agenda for the remainder of 2016 and moving into 2017! First off, the joint AAPG-PS/RMG meeting in Las Vegas (Paris Hotel) will be very busy for PS-SEPM (https://www.psaapg.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/2016-AAPG-PS-RMS-Guidebook.pdf). We are sponsoring 2 field trips, 1 short course, and a special session in honor of Donn Gorsline (USC). 1) Special Technical Session in honor of Donn Gorsline (USC): Mountains to the Abyss: The California Borderlands, chaired by Rick Behl (CSULB) and Jon Schwalbach (Aera Energy). Monday, October 3, 10:40 am - 5:00pm. 2) Field Trip #3: Trace Fossils in Relation to Eolian Stratification in the Lower Jurassic Aztec Sandstone, Valley of Fire State Park, Southern Nevada, led by Steve Rowland (UNLV) and Mario Caputo (SDSU; PS-SEPM Managing Editor), Saturday, October 1. 3) Short Course #2: Sequence Stratigraphy for Students, taught by Morgan Sullivan (Chevron), Cameron Campbell (Chevron), and Jonathan Allen (Chevron). Saturday through Sunday, October 1-2. In addition, during the PS-SEPM Awards Reception (October 3, 5:00-6:00pm) we will formally present awards for 2015 for the John C. Crowell best graduate thesis, and the Raymond V. Ingersoll best undergraduate thesis. We will also officially announce the A.E. Fritsche Lifetime Achievement Award presented to Ivan Colburn (CSULA, Emeritus). As a reminder to all Professors , don't forget to submit nominees for 2016 to PS-SEPM Awards Manager Dan Sturmer ([email protected]). Second, PS-SEPM also has a great new volume in production, entitled "From the Mountains to the Abyss: The California Borderlands as an Archive of Southern California Geologic Evolution", which will be Volume 2 in our new Studies on Pacific Region Stratigraphy series. This volume is meant to celebrate the life and scientific
achievements of the late Donn Gorsline (USC), one of the Borderland's major explorers, the 2012 recipient of the PS-SEPM A. E. Fritsche Lifetime Achievement Award, recipient of the 1983 SEPM Francis P. Shepard Medal in Marine Geology, and Emeritus Professor at USC. For more on Donn's incredible lifetime achievements, please follow this link to USC's dedication (https://news.usc.edu/82301/in-memoriam-donn-sherrin-gorsline-88/). Third, I would like to acknowledge our very successful field trip on Hawaii and Kauai, August 2-8, 2015: Sediments of a Mid-Plate Volcanic Island Complex-A Field Investigative Trip on the Islands of Hawaii and Kauai. The trip organizers and leaders, Chuck Siemers-Blay (TEOK Investigations) and PS-SEPM Managing Editor Mario Caputo (SDSU), worked tirelessly through many obstacles to put a superior field trip product together. Well done! As my two-year term as PS-SEPM President comes to a close this year, I wish to express my deepest gratitude and respect for the PS-SEPM Executive Committee: Mario Caputo(SDSU, Managing Editor), Wayne Henderson (CSUFullerton, Membership Manager), Adam Woods (CSU-Fullerton, Treasurer), Eric Hendrix (Earth Consultants International, Newsletter Editor), Tony Carrasco (SDSU, Webmaster), Dan Sturmer (Awards Manager), Ganqing Jiang (UNLV, Secretary), Russell Shapiro (CSUC, Vice President), and Ray Ingersoll (UCLA, Senior Advisor), as well as long standing advocates Rick Behl (CSULB), Tom Anderson (CSU-Sonoma, UNR), and Mara Brady (CSU-Fresno). Working with each one of these outstanding people has been a pleasure and honor and I thank you all for keeping PS-SEPM at the forefront of your priorities during these especially challenging budgetary times. Finally, thanks to our entire membership for keeping PS-SEPM strong and extremely relevant in the sedimentological community! Regards, Todd Greene PS-SEPM President 2014 - 2016 Department of Geological and environmental sciences California State University - Chico
ANNOUNCEMENT PS-SEPM 2016 Annual Fall Field Trip October 1, 2016 Valley of Fire State Park, Southern Nevada Trace Fossils in Relation to Eolian Stratification In the Lower Jurassic Aztec Sandstone Trip Leaders: Steve Rowland, PhD (UNLV) and Mario V. Caputo, PhD (SDSU) NOTE: This Field Trip Is Scheduled As Part of the Pacific Section ­ Rocky Mountain Section AAPG & SEPM Joint Conference In Las Vegas REGISTER ONLINE @ https://www.regonline.com/2016PSRMSAAPG (Registration For The Full Las Vegas Conference Is NOT Required To Attend This Field Trip! ) Valley of Fire State Park is the crown jewel of Nevada State Parks. It is famous for its spectacular exposures of red Jurassic Aztec Sandstone and panels of petroglyphs; it is preserved within the footwall of the Muddy Mountains Thrust. The Aztec Sandstone is correlative with--and was originally contiguous with--the Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah and the Nugget Sandstone of northern Utah and adjacent states; these sandstones preserve portions of a huge Early Jurassic eolian sand sea (erg) desert which occupied a portion of northwestern Pangaea. On this field trip we will examine sedimentological features of the southwestern margin of the Aztec-Navajo-Nugget erg
and the footprints of the animals that lived in this ecosystem. Recent research by University of Nevada Las Vegas paleontologists and colleagues has revealed a diversity of trace fossils, including those of theropod dinosaurs, therapsids (protomammals), and arthropods. We will see examples of trackways made by each of these groups of animals. Several sites within Valley of Fire State Park will be visited, including the Visitor Center. The trip will involve walking over irregular terrain, including one hike of roughly one mile round trip, up and down moderately steep rocky slopes. Registration Fee: $60 Participant Limit: 24 Logistical details: One-Day Trip, departs 7:30 AM from the Paris, Las Vegas Hotel. Registration fee includes guidebook, transportation, lunch, beverages, snacks, and entrance to Valley of Fire State Park
JOINT PACIFIC AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN SECTIONS SEPM / AAPG / SEG CONFERENCE AND FIELD TRIPS, PARIS HOTEL , LAS VEGAS, NEVADA October 2 ­ 7, 2016 Many thanks to Professor Steve Rowland (UNLV) and PS-SEPM Secretary and Professor Ganqing Jiang (UNLV) for representing PS-SEPM during the Las Vegas joint conference preparations, and PS-SEPM Awards Manager Dan Sturmer for serving as Field Trip Manager for this meeting! The joint AAPG-PS/RMG meeting in Las Vegas (Paris Hotel and Casino Resort) will be very busy for PS-SEPM (https://www.psaapg.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/2016-AAPG-PS-RMS-Guidebook.pdf). We are sponsoring 2 field trips, 1 short course, and a special session in honor of Donn Gorsline (USC). 1) Special Technical Session in honor of Donn Gorsline (USC): Mountains to the Abyss: The California Borderlands, chaired by Rick Behl (CSULB) and Jon Schwalbach (Aera Energy). Monday, October 3, 10:40 am - 5:00pm 2) Field Trip #3: Our Annual Fall Field Trip For 2016: Trace Fossils in Relationto Eolian Stratification in the Lower Jurassic Aztec Sandstone, Valley of Fire State Park, Southern Nevada, led by Steve Rowland (UNLV) and Mario Caputo (SDSU; PS-SEPM Managing Editor), Saturday, October 1. 3) Short Course #2: Sequence Stratigraphy for Students, taught by Morgan Sullivan (Chevron), Cameron Campbell (Chevron), and Jonathan Allen (Chevron). Saturday through Sunday, October 1-2.
As we do each year at our joint conferences, PS-SEPM will have a booth within the Main Exhibit Hall, where our publications will be available for sale. This endeavor is coordinated by our PS-SEPM Managing Editor and Publications Manager Mario Caputo. Once again, thank you for your terrific coordination efforts, Mario! In addition, during the PS-SEPM Awards Reception (Monday October 3, 5:00-6:00pm, immediately following the Gorsline technical session) we will formally present awards for 2015 for the John C. Crowell best graduate thesis, and Raymond V. Ingersoll best undergraduate thesis. We will also officially announce the A.E. Fritsche Lifetime Achievement Award, presented to Ivan Colburn (CSULA, Emeritus) (see Citation Below). Ingersoll Award: Best Undergraduate Thesis 1st place - Joan Marie Del Vecchio, Pomona College (nominated by Karl Lang) "Mechanisms for Valley Aggradation in Cow Canyon, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, CA" 2nd place - John Lawrence, CSU, Northridge, (nominated by Kathie Marsaglia) "Pottery Sherds of the Lesser Antilles Arc" 3rd place - Saint Joseph Thao, CSU, Fresno (nominated by Alain Plattner) "A Ground Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Investigation of a Subsurface Discontinuous Hardpan Due to Dynamite Blasting 50+ Years Prior" Crowell Award: Best Graduate Theses M.S. thesis 1st place - Kevin Coffey, UCLA (nominated by Ray Ingersoll) "Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance" 2nd place - Christopher Bowie, CSU, Fresno (nominated by Mara Brady) "Characterization of Discontinuity Surfaces and Microfacies in a Storm Dominated Shallow Epeiric Sea, Devonian Cedar Valley Group, Iowa" Ph.D. dissertation 1st place - Glenn Sharman, Stanford (nominated by Steve Graham) "Provenance, Paleogeography, and Mass-Movement of Deep-Water Depositional Systems in Arc-Adjacent Basins: the Cretaceous-Paleogene California Forearc and Upper Miocene Mohakatino Formation, New Zealand"
Ivan Colburn, left, with citationist Rick Blake Ivan Colburn Receives 2016 PS-SEPM Lifetime Achievement Award CITATION Geologist Ivan P. Colburn, PhD, has made a huge contribution to the geology of both northern and southern California during his long and illustrious career. Ivan is a licensed California Professional Geologist (PG) and is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Geosciences and Environment at California State University Los Angeles (CSULA), where he taught for over 40 years. He received his PhD in geology from Stanford University in 1961, after earning his MS in Geology from Claremont College and his Bachelor's degree in Geology from Pomona College, where he studied under legendary pioneering California geologist A.O. Woodford. Ivan earned his PhD by completing his dissertation entitled, "Geology and tectonic history of Mt. Diablo". His work not only laid the early groundwork for detailed understanding of the history of Mt. Diablo, but described the detailed lithologic and biostratigraphic relationships of the geology. This contribution to the local geology aided the oil and gas industry in their endeavor to find oil and natural gas deep within the Sacramento Valley. His structural correlations between the northeast and southwest sides of Mt. Diablo have been important contributions to Coast Ranges geology. At CSULA, Ivan concentrated his research and teaching in the areas of sedimentary petrology, stratigraphy, and marine geology. His geologic areas of focus have included coastal southern California, Catalina Island, and the Santa Ana and Santa Monica Mountains, Transverse/Peninsular Ranges correlations, Mojave Desert, Salton Sea, and the central Coast Ranges. Ivan has also had an acute interest
in the origin and tectonic relationships of conglomerates in northern Mexico and southern California. This interest stemmed from his undergraduate work with A.O. Woodford, and in 1989, Ivan co-edited an SEPM special volume entitled "Conglomerates and Basin Analysis: A Symposium Dedicated to A.O. Woodford". Ivan is married to Tish Colburn, his bride of 58 years, and has three sons and six grandchildren. His love for the outdoors was enhanced when he took up surfing in the 1950's, and became an early member of the San Onofre Surf Club near San Clemente, CA. Not only was Ivan an accomplished surfer, but his brother Con Colburn was a late 1950's pioneer in surfboard design and manufacturing in southern California. Ivan and his wife own homes in Pasadena and in San Clemente, and still spend time enjoying the beach at San Onofre. Ivan is an Honorary Member of the Pacific Section SEPM, has served as an SEPM officer and editor, presented numerous professional papers, produced many articles and publications, led countless field trips, and has served on several SEPM committees. Dr. Colburn has been an inspiration to me and many other geology students throughout the decades who have gone into industry "well prepared" due to his caring and enthusiastic instruction in the geological sciences. I am honored to serve as citationist for Ivan in his receipt of SEPM's A. Eugene Fritsche Lifetime Achievement Award. Richard Blake, MS, PG Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 2
2015 FIELD TRIP SUMMARY SEDIMENTS OF A MID-PLATE VOLCANIC ISLAND COMPLEX ­ A FIELD INVESTIGATIVE FIELD TRIP ON THE ISLANDS OF KAUAI AND HAWAII August 2-8, 2015 Organizers and Co-leaders: Charles T. Blay, TEOK (The Edge of Kauai) Investigations, Poipu, Kauai, Hawaii Mario V. Caputo, Department of Geological Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, California (photo at Kekaha Kai State Park, Big Island, Hawaii by Jana Blay) (NOTE: Abbreviated highlights of this field trip are described herein. For more details of this 5day sedimentologic trip to the Hawaiian Islands, the reader is directed to a more comprehensive summary with photographs posted on the PS-SEPM web site www.pacificsectionsepm.org. ) As an attempt to recruit more members into the Pacific Section SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology), our Membership Manager Wayne Henderson proposed, during an Executive Committee meeting in November, 2011, that the Society stage a field trip on the Hawaiian Islands to encourage greater participation from student and professional geoscientists there. However, in the subsequent four years, plans and preparations for a Pacific Section SEPM- hosted field trip to the Hawaiian Islands cycled through scheduling conflicts and several other logistic challenges. During the annual meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), April, 2012 in Long Beach, Mario Caputo, Secretary and Managing Editor for the Pacific Section, discovered that his friend and colleague, Chuck Siemers-Blay, ran exactly the kind of field trip that the Pacific Section sought. Chuck is a sedimentary geologist formerly with the Department of Geology at the University of Wyoming and formerly with the research laboratory of the once alive oil company, Cities Service, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Chuck now lives on the island of Kauai and is the principal of the company TEOK (The Edge of Kauai), which runs natural history field trips for visitors. Chuck was exuberant about leading such a trip for and disseminating the results of his work through Pacific Section SEPM. Since 2012, he and his wife, Jana, worked doggedly to arrange lodging, ground transportation, food and beverage, and banquet dinners, and enacted the field stops on Kauai and the Big Island, Hawaii. A new set of full- color guidebook volumes as PS-SEPM Book 118 evolved from the trip: Volume 1: Big Island of Hawaii (Blay), Volume 2: Island of Kauai (Blay), and Volume 3: Carbonate Eolianites (Caputo). It was a long time in the making, but the first run of the Hawaii sediments field trip finally happened Sunday to Saturday, August 2-8, 2015. 3
Fifteen people participated, including students from San Diego State University, Cal Poly Pomona, the University of Texas at Dallas, MacEwan University in Canada, and Gyeongsang University in Korea; professionals from the USGS in Menlo Park and Santa Cruz, from Conoco Phillips in Houston; and an instructor from Palomar Community College in San Marcos, California. A day-today highlighting of field trip activities and experiences follows. Although the field trip was staged on the Big Island of Hawaii and Kauai, emergent volcanic islands of a Pacific hotspot track, it was still an appropriate field trip for a sedimentologic society. The lessons imparted to the participants are 1) the present-day siliciclastic sediments deposited in marginal marine settings owe their origin to volcanic eruptions and weathering and erosion of resulting volcanic rocks to create volcanogenic sediment; 2) that the Pleistocene and Holocene eolianites owe their origin to biogenic activity in the nearshore marine shelf to manufacture carbonate sediment; and 3) both volcanogenic and carbonate sediments exist compatibly as a function of geologic, oceanographic, and atmospheric conditions. Field stops of the first two days of the trip on the Big Island, Hawaii included: a) Beach at Hilo Bay, Hawaii. The nature of beach sediment at this stop set the stage for stating hypotheses as to what can be expected on the beaches visited later in the day, and for comparing the source, composition, and texture at those beaches; b) Volcanoes National Park, for views of the scaled model of the Big Island and its volcanic centers, and views of the Kilauea collapsed caldera and volcanically active Halemaumau pit crater with gassy plumes of volcanic smog or "vog;" c) Kealakomo Overlook, for views of gently sloping flanks of Kilauea shield cone, the Mauna Ulu basaltic flow of the early 1970s, and distinctly steep "palis" (plural Hawaiian for "cliff"), which are back-wall scarps of normal faults; d) Punaluu Beach, the most famous of the Hawaiian black sand beaches where the jet-black beach sand owes its origin to Mauna Loa basaltic lavas that flowed into seawater, cooled abruptly, and fragmented explosively to form sand-, granule-, and pebble-sized particles; e) Papakolea "Green Sand" Beach at Puu O Mahana, where olivine and basalt clasts are weathered from Mahana Hill, a "rooted" cinder cone that had erupted on the flank of subsiding Mauna Loa volcano. Surprisingly, consolidated eolian strata comprised of basaltic sand are found near the summit; f) Mauna Kea Recreational Area for an overview discussion of the volcanic nature and history of the Big Island. Because the road to the summit of Mauna Kea was closed, field trippers were deprived of seeing striations, roches moutonnйes, moraines, and gravelly outwash surfaces, all glacial features that had developed concurrently with lava and cinder cone eruptions; and g) Kekaha Kai State Park and Kona Coast Beaches to view lithified pahoehoe and aa flows, lava ponds, lava blisters, and lava-cicles of the Huehue basalt flow, and a black sand beach composed of reworked volcanic glass fragments weathered from the Huehue basalt. Papakolea "Green Sand" Beach at Puu O Mahana 4
The morning of the third day was dedicated to air travel to Kauai from the Big Island. The afternoon was devoted to indoor presentations and group discussions to review observations made on the Big Island Hawaii and to preview what was to be seen on Kauai. The essential themes of the field trip were re-emphasized: 1) there are sediments accumulating in various depositional environments, particularly in beach systems, on the Hawaiian volcanic islands, and 2) Hawaiian beach sediments owe their texture and composition to interactions between tectonics, volcanism, climate and weather, atmospheric circulation, and the marine hydrosphere. For the last 2 days of the field trip on Kauai Island, sedimentologic lessons were gleaned from observations made at the following field stops: a) volcanogenic sand at Waimea River mouth, the most voluminous siliciclastic deposit on Kauai, subordinate to beaches dominated by carbonate sand; b) Kolao Volcanics, the weathered supplier of sediment to the Waimea River; c) Kikiaola Small Boat Harbor, which behaves like a beach groin by catching the longshore drift of sand on the updrift side, and blocking sand accumulation on the downdrift side; d) beach at St. Theresa's School, which marks the transition between volcanogenic beach sand and carbonate beach sand on the southWest Coast of Kauai; e) Kawaiele Sand Quarry to view one of few vertical sections of an older Holocene beach-eolian dune system, and the problematic source of sediment for beach nourishment on Kauai; f) Polihale Beach on Kauai's west coast has the most voluminous carbonate beach and eolian deposit of all the Hawaiian Islands; g) a weathered roadside exposure of Waimea Canyon Basalt demonstrates the low resistance to chemical weathering of Kauai volcanic rocks, and why little to no coarse detrital sediment ever reaches Kauai beaches; h) Keoneloa Beach and Makawehi Point, to examine another sedimentary anomaly: Pleistocene carbonate eolianites (eolian limestones) on a volcanic island preserved in the Mahaulepu Formation. Participants were further engaged in measuring dip directions of crossbeds. Resulting dip azimuths suggest a geometry of unusual elongate, finger-like dunes that migrated to the southwest in the Northeast Trade Wind during Pleistocene time at this location on Kauai; i) Kamala Point to view carbonate eolian dunes as modern-day analogs to the Pleistocene eolian dunes; and j) Paoo Point to see the overall geometry of the eolian sand-body and the curved geometry of crossbed foresets that further support an interpretation of elongated, finger-like lobes of the Pleistocene eolian carbonate dunes preserved in the Mahaulepu Formation on Kauai. People who participated in the 2015 Hawaii Sediments field trip. From left to right: Mario Caputo, Chan Woo Sohn, Chuck Blay, Jeong Hwan Gim, Kalie Kelley behind Joanne Smillie in front, Sean Figg, Marianna Aguilar, Stephanie Steinert, April Davis, Matt Skakun, Andy McCarlson, Rick Stanley, Helen Gibbons, Theresa Trees, Mark Trees, and Merrily Huff Guyer. Photo at beach at St. Theresa's School, Kauai Island by Jana Blay
IN MEMORIAM: William R."BILL" DICKINSON In the summer of 2015, the discipline of Sedimentary Geology lost a true giant with the passing of Bill Dickinson. The citation which follows is re-printed here with the kind permission of its author, former Dickinson student Tim Lawton, as well as the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources via Gina D'Ambrosio, Managing Editor for the New Mexico Geology Journal. William Richard Dickinson (1931 ­ 2015) A Personal Farewell Timothy F. Lawton, Centro de Geociencias Universidad Nacional Autуnoma de Mйxico, Querйtaro, 76230, Mйxico
Bill and Jackie Dickinson on an Arizona Geological Society field trip in 2010. Photo courtesy of Karen Wenrich. Introduction With the passing of Bill Dickinson in mid-July, the geologic com- munity of New Mexico, and everywhere else, lost an enduring colleague and friend. By a remarkable combination of intellect, self-confidence, engaging humility, and prodigious output of published work, he influenced and challenged (to date) three generations of geoscientists and other researchers-- sedimentary geologists, igneous petrologists, tectonicists, sandstone petrologists, archeologists and university students, to list a few categories-- around the globe. Bill looms large on the geologic landscape of western North America and surely the Big Book on Cordilleran Tectonics contains a longish chapter entitled "The Life and Times of Bill Dickinson." To summarize that chapter in a few pages might be considered foolish; if so, consider the following a momentary lapse of reason.
August 2015, Volume 37, Number 3
New Mexico Geology
72
Career Trajectory The wide and varied path of Dickinson's career is challenging to tread even in retrospect, and impossible to have even guessed at in advance; in some phases, it seems to have followed a rational, single sequence of themes that grew upon one another in an evolutionary fashion, but further study shows that seemingly disparate, yet parallel scientific disciplines were deliberately woven together to gain new traction on unsolved problems and in the doing yielded new fields of scientific endeavor. This ability to meld unrelated disciplines constitutes the fabric of genius. It would be impossible to look at the accomplishments from a single phase of his research lifetime and predict from that phase the direction of a particular path into the future, or even to hindcast the beginnings. I divide his lifetime into the Early Years, Stanford, Arizona, and a protracted triumphant phase of hyperactive retirement. Some of these recollections are in his own words and others are as I recall the conversations. The scientific accomplishments and recognitions of them are a matter of public record. Prelude Bill was born in Nashville, Tennessee. His parents raised horses, and he learned to ride before moving, as a teenager, with the family to California. As an undergrad at Stanford, he spent every Christmas and Spring vacation packing through the western Transverse Ranges with friends, during a time when he kept a riding horse and packhorse at a ranch on the Santa Ynez River. He spent summer breaks on the Colorado Plateau, operating out of Bluff, Utah, as a participant and later a counselor at Explorer's Camp, run by Kenny Ross, who later founded a river running company called Wild Rivers. The camp was a horseback forerunner of Outward Bound, but as Bill put it, "way more hard-core." He ran some rivers during that time, and participated in the first traverse of Cataract Canyon in inflatable rafts in 1949. There is an inset photo near mile 199 of the Colorado River strip map in the first edition of Bill Belknap's Canyonlands River Guide that shows two young men with paddles, in the back of a 12-foot military inflatable, working furiously through some rough water. The caption, which reads "The Big Drop. Rapid 23 paddled by Ken Ross and Jon Lindbergh. 4 September 1949," is evidently improperly attributed, because Bill once pointed out the photo in his copy of the guide and observed, "That's Kenny and me in the boat." The river days fostered his interest in earth processes and honed his common sense. On one San Juan River trip, he was fascinated by sand waves on the lower stretch of the river, now beneath Lake Powell, downstream of the Goosenecks and so naturally he tied himself on the end of a rope, had some friends hold the line, and swam out into the current above the rapid to investigate. He drifted downstream into the haystacks and, although wearing a flotation device of some type, he jerked to a halt at the end of his rope and suddenly found himself "plastered firmly against the sandy bottom," unable to move or do anything to save himself. The guys holding the rope were similarly befuddled by his abrupt disappearance and briefly held their ground, bracing themselves against the taut line. After a moment, one of them regained enough composure to holler that they should let go of the rope. They did, Bill popped up, floated out the rest of the rapid and swam back to shore, a life saved and a lesson learned. He possessed two different voices. For one, there was Dickinson the orator and professor, a persona for which he had a full and resonant, commonly booming, voice. As an orator, he had a powerful capacity to communicate his views, a capacity that stemmed in part from articulate phrasing and an enormous vocabulary, some of it invented, in part from a willingness to discuss his thoughts, in depth, wherever and whenever, and in part from a perception among those in the discussion that their interpretations were taken seriously. He listened intently, evaluated message content, and if he demurred, was quick to point out flaws in an argument, all in real time, and in a completely relaxed manner. Second, there was Bill the raconteur. He loved to tell a tale, and he fell into another voice for story telling or for describing what he considered the interpretive dead ends of others, which were generally amusing to him. That voice was higher by an octave and raspy, and grew ever more wheezy as the story progressed and he became more amused, his face broadening into a huge grin and his eyes glittering slits as he leaned into the listener, his hands planted firmly on the desk or table, or if space permitted, his arms spread just short of full span and his fingers fully splayed. His tales were pure Huck Finn, but usually possessed plots and conclusions. Stanford Bill received three degrees from Stanford University, a B.S. in Petroleum Engineering, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Geology. As an undergraduate at Stanford, Dickinson was at the beginning a "disgruntled" engineering major, "a duck out of water," he once wrote with his life-long
penchant for re-invented metaphors. In the spring quarter of his junior year, he took a course called Geology for Engineers from Dr. Aaron Waters. His "Eureka moment" came on a class field trip to Half Moon Bay, just across the coastal hills from campus, when it struck him that "a guy might be able to make a living doing that sort of thing." He claimed to have never looked back after that day. He became an acting assistant professor at Stanford in 1958, when he began the first phase of his academic career studying the geology of active margins. A scientific revolution was newly underway as geosynclines fell to the logic of the new global tectonics, and Dickinson was immediately a proponent of the new ideas. In 1964, he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to investigate volcaniclastic sedimentation in the Neogene succession of Fiji. Scientific contributions during that time began with analysis of the genetic relations of andesites to subduction zones (Dickinson and Hatherton, 1967), and evolved quickly to the role of sedimentary basins in the gap between the trench and the magmatic arc (Dickinson, 1970b). He convened a legendary Penrose Conference on Plate Tectonics and Orogenic Belts at Asilomar, California in 1969, edited an SEPM Special Paper entitled "Tectonics and Sedimentation" (Dickinson, 1974), and devised a genetic classification of sedimentary basins according to their positions with respect to plate boundaries (Dickinson, 1976). Although much embellished, the latter scheme has been little modified in the intervening years. To the end of his days, a deliberately broken and repaired ceramic dinner plate with sig- natures of the participants from the Asilomar Conference hung on his various office walls. Years later, Eldridge Moores, another major influence in Cordilleran tectonics, recalled of the Penrose Conference (Moores, 1999): "At the meeting, the full import of the plate tectonic revolution burst upon the participants like a dam failure. Dickinson's final day summation of the relationship between active tectonic environments and sedimentation (subsequently published as Dickinson, 1971, 1972) administered what seemed at the time to be the final coup de grace to the old geosynclinal concept. I remember it as one of the most exciting scientific moments of my life!" He married Jacqueline (Jackie) Spencer in 1970, and they were inseparable traveling companions from that time on. Parallel with his research on andesites, he developed an intense interest in sandstones derived from volcanic rocks and how the general composition of sedimentary-basin fill might record plate-tectonic setting. In order to better understand how sand- stone compositions reflected the tectonic setting of a basin, and hence its geotectonic significance, he learned how to see through the complicated alteration patterns of lithic sandstones to get at original composition (Dickinson, 1970a). I learned early in our association never to use the term greywacke. He also developed a point-counting method for systematic petrographic analysis of sandstones, a technique that reduced an inherent bias introduced into count results by grain-size variation in different samples. Because an Italian petrographer independently developed a similar methodology at the same time, the counting technique is to this day known as the "GazziDickinson" method (Ingersoll et al., 1984). The compositional analysis of sandstones led to a series of papers by Bill and his graduate students, culminating in a synthesis of extant compositional data entitled "Plate Tectonics and Sandstone Composition," published in A A PG Bulletin (Dickinson and Suzcek, 1979). At the time, it was axiomatic that most sedimentary petrologists of the latter 20th Century came from established lineages, schools of thought that arose in centers of excellence in the East and Midwest and extended back to the beginning of the century, or earlier. Lacking such a pedigree, but familiar with the extant literature, and necessity being the mother of invention, Bill simply puzzled out a method to get good reproducible results, whether by a single operator, or multiple investigators working on a single project (see Graham et al., 1976). A member of one of the established academic lineages at UT Austin once asked me, completely seriously, "Where did he come from?" University of Arizona In 1979, Bill moved from Stanford to the University of Arizona in Tucson, where he and Jackie bought a small home in what was then the rural north side of town, overlooking River Road and the dry Rillito River. Together with Peter Coney, he founded the Laboratory of Geotectonics, which expanded and complemented an already-powerhouse Department of Geosciences with strengths in mining geology, structural geology, igneous petrology and paleontology. He delved enthusiastically into the regional geology of southern Arizona, and within a decade, with the help of a small army of students, had made inroads into the little-understood Bisbee Basin and
Miocene basins associated with development of the only recently elucidated core complexes. Characteristically, he referred to the Miocene gravel deposits as the "Chimichanga Conglomerates," because "Everywhere these rocks crop out, throughout their range of distribution, you can always find yourself a great chimichanga for dinner." He applied platetectonic logic to the southwestern part of Laurentia, which resulted in an influential compilation of papers under the title, "Relations of tectonics to ore deposits in the southern Cordillera," published by the Arizona Geological Society (Dickinson and Payne, 1981). At UA, Bill championed the concept of the pre-publication MS thesis, an article-length work, in lieu of the more traditional black book; consequently, the early years at UA yielded an edited volume on the Mesozoic Rocks of southern Arizona, principally containing papers authored by student advisees and their contemporary colleagues (Dickinson and Klute, 1987), as well as a monograph on Miocene sedimentation associated with the core complex of the Catalina Mountains (Dickinson, 1991). Although he once offered a rather flimsy explanation for his departure from Stanford by claiming, "I painted myself into a corner in California geology," he continued to publish syntheses on the Mesozoic evolution of California (e.g., Dickinson et al.,1982; Dickinson, 1983). In addition to a new house, the other thing Bill purchased upon arriving in Tucson was a 1978 Ford F-150 pickup. It was fire engine red, big with a white camper, had four-wheel drive and the economical, rectilinear lines characteristic of the era. During the 1980s he and Jackie became regular participants at Annual NMGS Fall Field Trips, and the Red Ford was a conspicuous component of the annual vehicle caravan. It had a bench seat with plenty of room for three people, and Jackie was always there, in the middle if there was an extra rider, which was usually the case. Over the years, the pickup traveled to more places in the western U.S. than most of us can find on Google Earth, and Bill once claimed, "It's the last truck I'll ever buy." In truth, I think it might have been his first truck as well. Then, not long after he retired, it was stolen from a UA parking garage. After several days, resigned to its loss, he put the truck title in an envelope, ready to mail it next day to the insurance company. At literally the eleventh hour, the Phoenix Police Department called to say the truck had been recovered at a local chop shop. The thieves had removed the VIN tag from the Ford's dashboard, but had overlooked an identification plate on the chassis, evidently a common oversight. His truck came home with new chrome rims, a chrome tailgate strip, and the desert pin striping gone, buffed out of the paint job. It was a brand new ride. He put stock wheels back on but kept the chrome strip. Despite his claim of undying loyalty to the Red Ford, it accumulated a lot of miles in the pursuit of so much western geology, eventually got road weary, and the Dickinsons finally showed up in a brand-new blue Ford pickup at the NMGS Chama Basin trip in 2005. That marked the end of an era, but I'm ahead of myself. At about the time he arrived in Tucson, Bill's attention returned to the Colorado Plateau. I take some credit for that, in a convoluted way: In the spring of 1978, I attended a Pacific Section SEPM meeting in Sacramento, full of talks about the paleogeography and evolution of the Sierra Nevada derived from study of stratigraphy and sedimentary basins through time. It was a tough interpretive row to hoe, in part because of intense deformation characteristic of the Sierran foothills and attendant problems determining the age of complex accretionary rocks there. Rich Schweikert, one of Bill's former students, did an impromptu chalk talk, without benefit of slides, on how the Laytonville Limestone in the Franciscan Formation might be the deposit of a volcanic atoll, traveled to the margin from somewhere far out in the Pacific, a stupendous suggestion. The meeting atmosphere was electric, charged with excitement that comes from new insights deriving from novel approaches to vexing problems. The next morning I bounded into Bill's office: "I know what we can do! We can go out behind the arc, to the east, and study the basins where they aren't all messed up. Do the sandstone petrology and all that." He gave me a brief thoughtful gaze, and said, "Great idea, Sport, but there ain't no basins out there." That was about the extent of the response, and relying on his encyclopedic knowledge of the Cordillera for instant on-site analysis, my reaction was even shorter. "Oh." I shuffled out of the office, feeling a little dejected. A couple of days later, a slip of paper appeared in my mailbox with a handwritten note su m mon i ng me back to the office, where Bill was energized. "We can study the foreland basin in Utah," he reprised the earlier short conversation. "It's not right behind the arc, but no one has looked at the sandstone composition there yet." The Upper Cretaceous of Utah it was. When I arrived in Tucson in July 1980, in the middle of the most hellacious heat humanity can possibly endure and wondering what and where I had committed to, the three of us hopped into the Red Ford and drove north to cooler weather, through Arizona, southeastern Utah, and into the thrust belt of central Utah, reading the stratigraphy all the way. I learned more regional stratigraphy in those two weeks than in any comparable interval of time since and I began to comprehend a new approach to it. I had seen
most of those rocks during my own river years, but the Dickinson lens provided an entirely new way of appreciating strata. That project yielded a handful of papers about the foreland depositional system, including an analysis of Cretaceous-Paleocene sediment-dispersal pathways in the foreland basin (Dickinson et al., 1986). I went off to work and he went on to other things, it seemed, but the plateau ideas fermented. On the trip to the plateau, Bill developed a third persona, this one an alter ego for which he actually had a name. He referred to this muse as "W.D. Darton," or "W. Doug Darton," or simply "Darton." This guy was a smart, yet mischievous fellow who sur- faced from time to time in stories or field events when Bill needed a historical source for which he didn't have a ready attribute, for instance, the discoverer of a small arch we encountered during the trip. The surname was no doubt inspired by the great N.H. Darton of New Mexico fame, but the source of the given names remains a mystery to me. The younger Darton turns up a few times in the acknowledgments sections of papers published in the 1980s, and elsewhere (see figure above). During his tenure at the University of Arizona, Bill served as general chair of the Annual GSA Meeting in Phoenix (1987) and was head of the Department of Geosciences from 1986 ­1991. When he began as department head, his annual salary, although not staggering by today's standards, was deemed adequately newsworthy to be published in the Arizona Daily Star. Then, in 1991, he retired from active teaching. By that time, in the span of about 30 years, he had advised some 85 graduate students, almost equally divided between M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Retirement His retirement was quickly noted by the scientific community, although somewhat atypically. In 1992, Bill was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. In 1993, he became President of the Geological Society of America. But perhaps most significantly, he teamed up with George Gehrels, a young structural geologist and geochronologist in the department, to tackle the provenance of sandstones in an entirely new way. Dickinson was smitten by the promise of a new technique for determining the ancestry of resistant zircon grains found in sandstones. The zircon grains, chemically and mechanically resistant in the sedimentary cycle, contain small amounts of uranium that permit age determination of individual grains by decay to lead. He bemoaned the lack of funding for the early work; grain analyses were performed by laborious single-grain dissolution and generally reported in numbers of thirty or fewer zircon g r a i ns R e v i e we r s , accustomed to the probability statistics of traditional petrographic provenance methods provided by counting 4 0 0 grains, balked at the proposals floated by Bill and George. They began their work on some problematic Paleozoic units in the Great Basin (Gehrels and Dickinson, 1995) and provided proof of concept: Some grain assemblages definitely came from Laurentia, whereas others in accreted rocks were difficult to attribute to known continental basement sources. Subsequent work in the Basin and Range again employed teams of students, undergraduates this time around, and generated an impressive body of data (Gehrels and Soreghan, 2000). When they eventually secured NSF funding, Bill expressed profound relief in part because it validated his decision to retire, and with the development of more rapid laserablation techniques for analyzing zircon grains, the colleagues took on the depositional systems of
the Colorado Plateau, ranging from the late Paleozoic through the Late Cretaceous. This work, probably the best known among younger geologists, resulted in a stack of papers that documented transfer of huge volumes of sand from the eastern to the western margin of Laurentia during Permian, Triassic and Jurassic time (Dickinson and Gehrels, 2008b, 2009; Gehrels et al., 2011, among others), and described evolving dispersal systems of the Cordilleran foreland from Late Jurassic through Late Cretaceous time (Dickinson and Gehrels, 2008a). Thus was born another field of endeavor. The development of better laboratory facilities and faster analytical techniques at the University of Arizona, George's forte, coupled with procedures for analyzing and interpreting the huge amounts of data that began to flow from the lab, Bill's contribution, inspired a renaissance in provenance studies and their implications for mega-paleogeography. These studies, practiced by legions of workers who would never dream of looking through a microscope at a sandstone, promise better access to ancient continent- and super- continent-scale river systems and better attendant plate reconstructions back into the Proterozoic. During this period of time, he also undertook syntheses of the North American Cordillera (Dickinson, 2004) and the Basin and Range region (Dickinson, 2006, 2011). Bill had a parallel scientific career that many of his colleagues and associates likely learned about from reading his obituaries. Beginning in 1966, complementary with his interest in orogenic andesites, he began a systematic study of sand tempers in potsherds recovered from prehistoric ceramic sites in Oceania, a region of the southwest Pacific spread across 6,500 km from Belau, Yap and the Marianas north of New Guinea to French Polynesia on the east. He examined 1558 thin sections of pottery fragments from sites on nearly 100 islands or island clusters spanning ten major island groups. By 2009, traveling to the South Pacific each summer to visit different islands, he and Jackie had visited more than 120 islands. Notably, his first publication on temper composition (Dickinson and Shutler, 1968) appeared before any of his analyses of synorogenic sandstones. This line of investigation defined groups of temper types derived from different island groups having distinctive petrologic characteristics as a result of their differing plate-tectonic settings and resulted in more than 40 publications on the composition of sherd tempers (Dickinson and Shutler, 2000 and references cited therein). He could recognize sand, for example, from Fiji, or Tonga, or the Solomon Islands. Using petrographic skills and methods devised for the study of sandstone, Bill and colleagues discerned Trade Routes of colonizing Polynesians between islands, but a key insight was that much of the pottery was indigenous, constructed of local clay and temper, and that (and I can see the wide grin as I read this passage): "Ancient potters were so resourceful in identifying and exploiting rare but readily available raw materials that it has taken investigators more than a quarter century to understand where they found their tempers. Therein may be a moral of lasting importance for future archaeological interpretation in the Pacific region, and especially for those that posit transport of materials over long distances based on the apparent lack of suitable materials locally..... "In seeking the locations of ceramic resources on Pacific islands, future investigators should credit ancient potters with a detailed knowledge of local environmental constraints at a level difficult to replicate in hindsight (Dye and Dickinson, 1996, p. 161)." His South Pacific research, which also included later analysis of the history and mechanisms of island sea-level change, resulted in a body of work impressive in its own right, for which he received the Rip Rapp Archaeological Geology Award, the Archeological Geology Division's top award, at the GSA 2014 Annual Meeting in Vancouver. He also received several other top society awards for his body of work, from the GSA Sedimentary Geology Division (Sloss Award, 1999), SEPM (Twenhofel Medal, 1999), and from GSA itself (Penrose Medal, 1991). But for all this recognition, he never stopped attending regional meetings and field trips, such as those offered by the Utah Geological Association, the Geological Society of Nevada, and the New Mexico Geological Society, because his roots lay in field geology. He participated actively in those meetings, such as on the Fall Field Conference of the Utah Geological Association in 2010, about which he wrote as he was planning to depart for the field trip: "On the UGA trip I get to spiel about DZ at that wonderful over- look of all the Navajo slick rock country just east of Escalante. I plan to start by quoting the old poem: `Breathes there the man with soul so dead Who never to himself hath said This is my own my native land' [the joy of wildlands angle], and then say `Breathes there the geologist with soul so dead Who never to himself hath said I wonder where the hell all that quartz came from'
[the fun of science angle]. The two together is the perfect formula for life." CODA Bill Dickinson has been called a giant in tectonics and sedimentation and the tectonics of the Cordilleran, but what makes a giant? Although the formula varies, intellectual influence of his caliber requires a combination of genius, strong inference, communication skills, accessibility, and productivity. Geology was Bill's profession, his pursuit, and his passion. There was nothing magical about his method: He would select a topic, drive down to the University of Arizona library for the day and read about it, then return home in the evening with a sheaf of longhand written lined pages. The analysis was copy ready, containing observations and interpretations by the authors as well as Bill's own inferences. All trips with Jackie, be they apparent vacations to the South Pacific or camping trips to the Colorado Plateau, were working field trips. He couldn't not work. As he once remarked, "Where else but the South Pacific can you be walking down the stairs from the airplane, flip open your notebook, and start writing?" The short answer is it would probably be easy for most pilgrims visiting a remote tropical island. His love for the South Pacific explains the location of his unexpected mid-summer death in Tonga, where he was conducting fieldwork with a team of archeologists. As it happens, Jackie, his constant companion of over 40 years, passed away in Tucson in May, preceding him in death by just two months. He was buried in Tonga at Mala'e Sia Cemetery in the village of Nukuleka, Tongatapu, on Sunday August 2, becoming part of an island legacy he helped to discover. In conclusion, one can't help but wonder if he deliberately picked a place just the other side of the International Date Line to get the earliest start possible on whatever adventure comes next. Acknowledgments I thank Alan Herring and Jon Spencer for some of the critical dates and locations included in the text. References Cited Dickinson, W.R., 1970a, Interpreting detrital modes of graywacke and arkose: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v. 40, pp. 695­707. Dickinson, W.R., 1970b, Relations of andesites, granites and derivative sandstone to arc-trench tectonics: Reviews of Geophysics and Space Physics, v. 8, pp. 813 ­860. Dickinson, W.R., 1971, Plate tectonic models of geosynclines: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 10, pp. 165­174. Dickinson, W.R., 1972, Evidence for plate-tectonic regimes in the rock record: American Journal of Science, v. 272, pp. 551­576. Dickinson, W.R., 1974, Plate tectonics and sedimentation, in Dickinson, W. R., ed., Tectonics and Sedimentation, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Special Publication 45, pp. 1­27. Dickinson, W.R., 1976, Plate-tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Continuing Education Course Note Series 1, 62 pp. Dickinson, W.R., 1981, Plate tectonic evolution of the southern Cordillera, in Dickinson, W. R., and Payne, W. D., eds., Relations of tectonics to ore deposits in the southern Cordillera, Volume 14, Arizona Geological Society Digest, pp. 113­135. Dickinson, W.R., 1983, Cretaceous sinistral strike slip along Nacimiento fault in coastal California: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 67, pp. 624-645. Dickinson, W.R., 2004, Evolution of the North American Cordillera: Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 32 , pp. 13 ­ 45. Dickinson, W.R., 2006, Geotectonic evolution of the Great Basin: Geosphere, v. 2, pp. 353 ­368. Dickinson, W.R., 2011, The place of the Great Basin in the Cordilleran orogen, in Steininger, R., and
Pennell, B., eds., Great Basin evolution and metallogeny: Reno, Geological Society of Nevada 2010 Symposium, pp. 419­ 436. Dickinson, W.R., and Gehrels, G.E., 2008a, Sediment delivery to the Cordilleran foreland basin: Insights from U-Pb ages of detrital zircons in Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous strata of the Colorado Plateau: American Journal of Science, v. 308, pp. 1041­1082. Dickinson, W.R., and Gehrels, G.E., 2008b, U-Pb ages of detrital zircons in relation to paleogeography: Triassic paleodrainage networks and sediment dispersal across southwest Laurentia: Journal of Sedimentary Research, v. 78, pp. 745­764. Dickinson, W.R., and Gehrels, G.E., 2009, U-Pb ages of detrital zircons in Jurassic eolian and associated sandstones of the Colorado Plateau: Evidence for transcontinental dispersal and intraregional recycling of sediment: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 121, pp. 408­ 433; doi: 410.1130/B26406.26401. Dickinson, W.R., and Hatherton, T., 1967, Andesitic volcanism and seismicity around the Pacific: Science, v. 157, pp. 801­803. Dickinson, W.R., and Klute, M.A., eds., Mesozoic rocks of southern Arizona and adjacent areas: Arizona Geological Society Digest, v. 18, 394 pp. Dickinson, W.R., and Shutler, R., Jr., 1968, Insular sand tempers of prehistoric pottery from the southwest Pacific, in Yawata, I., and Sinoto, Y. H., eds., Prehistoric culture in Oceania: Honolulu, Hawaii, Bishop Museum Press, pp. 29­37. Dickinson, W.R., and Shutler, R., Jr., 2000, Implications of petrographic temper analysis for Oceanian prehistory: Journal of World Prehistory, v. 14, pp. 203 ­266. Dickinson, W.R., and Suczek, C.A., 1979, Plate tectonics and sandstone compositions: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 63, pp. 2164 ­2182. Dickinson, W.R., Lawton, T.F., and Inman, K.I., 1986, Sandstone detrital modes, central Utah foreland region: Stratigraphic record of Cretaceous-Paleogene tectonic evolution: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v. 56, pp. 276 ­293. Dye, T.S., and Dickinson, W.R., 1996, Sources of sand tempers in prehistoric Tongan pottery: Geoarcheology: An International Journal, v. 11, pp. 141­164. Gehrels, G. E., and Dickinson, W. R., 1995, Detrital zircon provenance of Cambrian to Triassic miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal strata in Nevada: American Journal of Science, v. 295, pp. 18­ 48. Gehrels, G. E., Blakey, R., Karlstrom, K. E., Timmons, J. M., Dickinson, B., and Pecha, M., 2011, Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Paleozoic Strata in the Grand Canyon, Arizona: Lithosphere, v. 3, pp. 183 ­200. Soreghan, M. J., and Gehrels, G. E., eds., Paleozoic and Triassic paleogeography and tectonics of western Nevada and northern California, Geological Society of America Special Paper 347, 252 pp. Graham, S. A., Ingersoll, R. V., and Dickinson, W. R., 1976, Com-mon provenance for lithic grains in Carboniferous sandstones from Ouachita Mountains and Black Warrior basin: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v. 46, pp. 620 ­ 632. Ingersoll, R. V., Bullard, T. F., Ford, R. L., Grimm, J. P., Pickle, J. D., and Sares, S. W., 1984, The effect of grain size on detrital modes: A test of the Gazzi-Dickinson point-counting method: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v. 54, pp. 103 ­116. Moores, E.M., 1999, William R. Dickinson, in Moores, E.M., Sloan, D. and Stout, D.L. (eds.), Classic Cordilleran Concepts: A View From California: Geological Society of America Special Paper 338, p. 6.
ATTENTION PROFESSORS ! PLEASECONSIDERNOMINATING YOUR STUDENTSLUCRATIVE CASH AWARDS FOR WINNERS !! PS -SEPM ANNUAL STUDENT AWARD John D. COOPER MEMORIAL AWARD Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation @ Annual Spring Conference JOHN C. CROWELL MEMORIAL AWARD Best Graduate Thesis and Dissertation (MS and PhD.) RAYMOND V. INGERSOLL AWARD Best Undergraduate (Senior) Thesis PATRICK L. ABBOTT AWARD Best Graduate Student Poster Presentation @ Annual Spring Conference (MS and PhD.) PLEASE SUBMIT NOMINATIONS FOR THE CROWELL AND INGERSOLL AWARDS DIRECTLY TO PS-SEPM AWARDS MANAGER DANIEL STURMER ([email protected])
RANDOM NOTES FIRST NOTICE: Pacific Section & Rocky Mountain Section SEPM ­AAPG Joint Conference Save the date for our First Ever joint meeting of the SEPM and AAPG Pacific + Rocky Mountain Sections, October 2-5, 2016, at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel, Las Vegas, NV. More details to come within future Newsletters! PS-SEPM Web Site Tony Carrasco of San Diego State University occupies the role of PS-SEPM Web Master. Web page contents may be viewed at www.pacificsectionsepm.org. The web site includes details of the PS-SEPM organization, convention/meeting information, field trip information, list of PS-SEPM publications available for purchase, past field trip and convention photos, Society awards, newsletter archive, status of endeavors such as the AAPG Data Pages project (discussed below), and historical archives of the Society (past awards, past Executive Committee members, etc.; also discussed below). Tentative modifications-in-progress for the web page include the following: 1) images of front covers of documents available in our Publications List; 2) Access to Pay-Pal account for publications purchase and field trip registrations; 3) Awards and Awardees, citations and photos. The web page is continuously a work-in-progress, and will be evolving constantly to best serve the needs of our membership. Your comments and suggestions are welcomed and encouraged! Electronic Catalog Of PS-SEPM Publications: NOW AVAILABLE ! The Executive Committee contracted for the creation of electronic (PDF) availability of ALL PS-SEPM publications, via the AAPG "Data Pages" Project. The E-copies include rare, old and out-of-print publications as well as those still in print (see Publication List at rear of this newsletter). Thank you to those members who have graciously provided copies of their out-of-print and rare publications! The digitizing process is close to completion. The majority of our catalog is now available for sale via the AAPG web site: www.aapg.org. Once at the website, click the following order of links and pull-down menus: Publications, Datapages, Associated Websites, Archives, Browse Collections and Pacific Section SEPM. PS-SEPM Publications and Managing Editor Mario Caputo has worked diligently to research, collect and coordinate the scanning of these publications, interfacing with the AAPG Data Pages project
representatives to ensure successful completion of this important project. Thank you Mario for all of your efforts! Our ultimate goal is to also make E-copies available as PDF documents for sale via the PS-SEPM web site, in part to encourage sales of our entire outstanding publications catalog to universities, corporations, libraries, etc. as an added revenue stream. Marketing of the PS-SEPM catalog via the Data Pages Program is part of our contract agreement with them. More details and status updates will be provided as the project progresses. Historical Archive Of PS-SEPM We are actively seeking anyone with information regarding the history of PS-SEPM to please contact Ray Ingersoll ([email protected]) with this information, so that we may develop a comprehensive historical archive for our web site. Thus far, efforts have produced an impressive first draft of this archive...many thanks to Ray for spearheading this project! Information of interest includes a) listing of past officers; b) listing of past field trips and their leaders, and c) listing of those who have received PS-SEPM awards.
PACIFIC SECTION - SEPM MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION The Pacific Section SEPM has grown to become an international society with more than 400 members, attracting students and working professionals from the United States, mainly from California and other Pacific states including Hawaii and Alaska, and from Canada, Europe, Asia, and South America. Help maintain the vitality of the Pacific Section, SEPM by renewing your membership and recruiting new members, especially undergraduate and graduate students majoring in the geosciences. Please distribute copies of the membership form (provided on the next page) to colleagues and students who have an interest in sedimentary geology. The form is available also on the PS-SEPM website. A Lifetime Membership is also available for a one-time dues payment. See schedule below for age and payment categories. Honorary and Lifetime Members are permanent members of the Society; they are exempt, of course, from further dues payments. Please send your membership application or renewal to: Wayne Henderson, PS-SEPM Membership Manager Department of Geological Sciences California State University, Fullerton Fullerton CA 92834-6850 PLEASE PROVIDE/UPDATE YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS WHEN YOU RENEW!! (Otherwise You Will NOT Receive Future Newsletters And Announcements!) (Except As Described Below) Membership Dues Regular membership dues: $ 7.50 for a 1-year professional membership $20.00 for a 3-year professional membership $ 5.00 for a 3-year student membership (Please add $25.00 to each category if you wish to receive Hardcopy versions of the Newsletter) Lifetime membership dues: $150.00 for age group 20-40 years $100.00 for age group 40-60 years $ 50.00 for age group 60 years and older (Please add $50.00 for each category if you wish to receive Hardcopy Newsletters) Good Reasons for Joining the Pacific Section SEPM The Pacific Section SEPM is one of the premier geological societies of western North America. Members benefit from discounts on superbly done field-trip guidebooks and special publications that address sedimentologic, stratigraphic and paleogeographic aspects of the Pacific region of the United States. Your membership dues sustain the Society by helping defray costs of publications. They further help support the operation of the California Well Data Repository (for borehole logs, cores, cuttings, microfossils, and other data) in Bakersfield, California. A Society Website provides up-to-date information on officers and other members, field trips and conferences, short courses, publications, and job openings
Pacific Section ­ SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) Membership Form, 2016
CHECK ONE ( ): Renewed Membership
( ):New Membership
Last Name
Individual First Name
Middle Initial
Business Name:
Company or Corporation
Business Address Home Address
Preferred Mailing Address: Business or Home ­ PLEASE COMPLETE ONLY ONE Name of Business or Teaching Institution Street or P. O. Box #
City Street or P. O. Box #
State
City
State
Postal Code Postal Code
Business Home Cell Email Address
Telephone & Email
Highest Degree Earned Year Earned Institution Specialization
Regular Memberships (check one ) Lifetime Memberships (check one)
1-year professional 3-year professional 3-year student 20-40 years old 40-60 years old 60 years old and older CORPORATE
$ 7.50 $20.00 $ 5.00 $150.00 $100.00 $ 50.00 $500.00
Make check payable to Pacific Section SEPM & send payment and this form to: Wayne Henderson Department of Geological Sciences California State University, Fullerton P. O. Box 6850 Fullerton, CA 92834-6850
Please help increase membership in the Pacific Section SEPM by copying this form and giving it to students and colleagues who share an interest in sedimentary geology, sedimentary tectonics, stratigraphy, and paleontology
Pacific Section SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) PUBLICATIONS LIST (arranged in order by year of publication)
02-16-2016
book #
TITLE
Whittier Hills and the Type Locality of the Sycamore Canyon Formation, California; Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Lee, A. T., and Ten Eyck, R. E., leaders, 1944, 2p of maps
San Emigdio Creek, Kern County, California; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM: Kelly, R. B., and Anderson, J. Q., leaders, 1948, 2p, plus
2 oversize maps
Hollister Ranch, El Bulito Canyon, and Vicinity of Refugian Type Section, Santa Barbara County, California; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM: Dibblee, Tom, Jr., Simonson, R. R., and Hollister, Joe, leaders, 1949, 9p, plus 1 oversize map and 1 oversize column
North Mt. Diablo Monocline; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Church, C. C., Solari, Al, Cross, C. M., and Dillon, W. E., authors, 1950, 16p
Death Valley to San Fernando; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM: Clements, Thomas, leader, 1951, 3p, plus 1 oversize map and oversize column
Santa Ana Mountains, California; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM: Schoellhamer, J. E., and Yerkes, R. F., leaders, 1953, 6p, plus 1 oversize map
Devils Den ­ McLure Valley Area; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections SEPM & AAPG: Brooks, T. J., Steinmeyer, E. H., and Billman, H. G., authors, 1955, 4p, plus 4 oversize maps
Tejon Formation in Liveoak Canyon; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM: Carlson, Stanley, and Bigelow, James, 1956, 3p
Huasna Basin, San Luis Obispo County, California; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM: Rutherford, V. E., leader, 1956, 11p, plus 1 oversize map and 2 oversize cross sections
Imperial Valley; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections SEPM & AAPG: Crowell, J. C., Susuki, Takeo, and Popenoe, P. W., 1958, 13p
Big Basin Area, Santa Cruz Mountains, California; Spring Field Trip Guidebook: Brabb, E., leader, 1959, 17p
Type Panoche, Panoche Hills Area, Fresno County, California; Spring Field Trip Guidebook: Payne, M. B., leader, 1960, 14p
Geology & Paleontology of the Southern Border of the San Joaquin Valley,
Kern County, California; Guidebook for Pacific Sections SEPM, SEG, & AAPG & SJGS Spring Field Trip: Dibblee, T. W., leader, 1961, 43p plus map
Geology of Carrizo Plains and San Andreas Fault; Field Trip Guidebook for SJGS & Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Hackel, Otto, Fletcher, G. L., Cross,
R. K., and Dibblee, T. W., leaders, 1962, 52p, plus 1 oversize map
Geology of Salinas Valley and the San Andreas Fault; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Gribi, E. A., Jr., and Thorup, R. R., leaders, 1963, 168p, plus 10 unnumbered foldout plates and 1 oversize map in pocket
Geology of Salinas Valley and the San Andreas Fault; Field Trip Guidebook
for Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Gribi, E. A., Jr., and Thorup, R. R., leaders, 1963, 168p, plus 10 unnumbered foldout plates and 1 oversize map in
pocket
The San Andreas Fault Zone from the Temblor Mountains to Antelope Valley, Southern California; Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM, & SJGS: Crowell, J. C., leader, 1964, 51p
AVAILABILITY AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages
book #
TITLE
Geology of Southeastern San Joaquin Valley, California: Kern River to
Grapevine Canyon; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG, SEPM, & SEG: Addicott, W. O., Bruer, W. G., Dibblee, T. W., Jr., Hackel, Otto, Rudell, C. H., and Warne, A. H., leaders, 1965, 40 p,, plus 2 oversized maps
Western Santa Ynez Mountains, Santa Barbara County, California; Field
Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section SEPM & CGS: Weaver, D. W., & Dibblee,
T. W., Jr., leaders, 1965, 52p, plus 1 oversize map and 3 oversized columns
A Tour of the Coastal Oil Fields of the Los Basin in and Adjacent to San
Pedro Bay, California; Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG SEG SEPM: Bauer, W. E., et al., 1966, 9p with map and chart
Central Santa Monica Mountains Stratigraphy and Structure; Guidebook No. 7 for Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM: Sullwold, H. H., Campbell, R. H., and Yerkes, R. F., leaders, 1967, 13p
Structural Complexities, Eastern Ventura Basin; Guidebook No. 8 for Pacific
Sections AAPG & SEPM: Corey, W. H., leader, 1967, 17p, plus 3 oversize maps
Field Trip Guide to Baldwin Hills & Palos Verdes Hills, Los Angeles, preconvention field trip no. 6, Annual Mtg AAPG SEPM: Pipkin, B. W., Nash,
K. W., leaders, 1967, 22p
Field Trip Guide to Baldwin Hills & Palos Verdes Hills, Los Angeles, preconvention field trip no. 6, Annual Mtg AAPG SEPM: Pipkin, B. W., Nash,
K. W., leaders, 1967, 22p
Gabilan Range & Adjacent San Andreas Fault; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Section AAPG & SEPM: Durham, D L., Forrest, L. C., Pierce, R L.,
Polugar, M., eds., 1967, 110p, 6 plates, 1 geologic map, 1 correlation chart
Geology and Oilfields, West Side Southern San Joaquin Valley; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG, SEPM, & SEG: Karp, S. E., editor,
1968, 144p, plus 1 oversize map
Geology & Oilfields of Coastal Areas, Ventura & Los Angeles Basins, California; Guidebook for Annual Meeting Pacific Sections AAPG, SEG, SEPM: 1969, 61p, with foldouts & geologic map
Geologic Setting of Upper Miocene Gypsum & Phophorite Deposits, Upper Sespe Creek & Pine Mountain, Ventura County, California: Dickinson, W.
R., ed., 1969, 97p
Southeastern Rim of the Los Angeles Basin, Orange County, California; Newport Lagoon-San Joaquin Hills, Santa Ana Mountains: Vernon, J. W.,
Warren A. D., leaders, 1970, 61p
1
Pacific Slope Geology of Northern Baja California and Adjacent Alta California (Guidebook): Allison, E. C., and others, eds., 1970, 160p
Geologic Guide Book Newport Lagoon to San Clemente, California ­ Coastal Exposures of Miocene & Early Pliocene Rocks: Bergen, F. W., et al., 1971, 88p
Central Santa Ynez Mountains, Santa Barbara County, California (Spring Field Trip Guidebook): Weaver, D. W., leader, 1972, 84p, with geologic map
and 2 charts
Cretaceous of the Coalinga Area (Fall Field Trip Guidebook): Steinert, R. E.,
ed., 1972, 66p with 2 geologic maps and cross sections
Guidebook ­ Geology and Oil Fields, West Side Central San Joaquin Valley: Pacific Sections AAPG-SEG-SEPM 47th Annual Meeting, 1972, 104 p. plus geologic map.
2
Turbidites and Deep-Water Sedimentation (Short Course Notes): Middleton, G V., Bouma, A. H., eds., 1973 157p. ISBN: 1-878861-60-3
Miocene Sedimentary Environments and Biofacies, Southeastern Los
Angeles Basin, SEPM Field Trip 1, Guidebook prepared for 1973 Annual
Meeting of Pacific Sections AAPG, SEPM, & SEG: Ingle, J. C., Wornardt, W. W., Yeats, R. S., Stuart, C. J., Warren, A. D., Normark, W. R., and Bartow, J. A.,
leaders, 1973, 75p
AVAILABILITY AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages
book #
TITLE
Sedimentary Facies Changes in Tertiary Rocks ­ Southern California
Transverse and Southern Coast Ranges, SEPM Field Trip 2, Guidebook
prepared for 1973 Annual Meeting of Pacific Sections AAPG, SEPM, &
SEG, 1973, 60 p.
A Guidebook to The Geology of Peninsular California: Pacific Sections AAPG-SEPM-SEG, 49th Annual Meeting, 1974, 138 p.
The Paleogene of Panoche Creek-Cantua Creek Area, California: Payne, M.,
FT chair, 1974, 152 p plus 9 plates
Eastern Santa Maria Basin; Geologic Field Guide for Pacific Section SEPM:
Redwine, Lowell, leader, 1975, 26p
The Neogene Symposium: Fritsche, A. E., Ter Best, H., Wornardt, W. W., eds.,
1976, 160p
Pacific Coast Paleogeography Field Guide #1: Depositional Environments of
11 Lower Paleozoic Rocks in the White-Inyo Mountains, Inyo County, California: Moore, J. N., Fritsche, A. E., eds., 1976, 69p
Pacific Coast Paleogeography Symposium I ­ Paleozoic Paleogeography of
7 the Western United States: Stewart, J H., Stevens, C. H., Fritsche, A. E., eds.,
1977, 502p. ISBN: 1-878861-59-X
Late Miocene Geology and New Oil Fields of the Southern San Joaquin
Valley; Field Trip Guidebook for Pacific Sections AAPG, SEPM, & SEG:
Bazeley, Bill, ed., 1977, 88p, plus 1 oversize map
PACIFIC COAST PALEOGEOGRAPHY FIELD GUIDE #2: Cretaceous
12 Geology of the California Coast Ranges, West of the San Andreas Fault:
Howell, D. G., Vedder, J. G., McDougall, K., eds., 1977, 109p.
Pacific Coast Paleogeography Symposium 2 ­ Mesozoic Paleogeography of
8 the Western United States: Howell, D. G., McDougall, K., eds., 1978, 573p.
ISBN: 1-878861-58-1
3
Symposium in Geochemistry: Low Temperature Metamorphism of Kerogen & Clay Minerals: Oltz, D. F., ed., 1978, 101p.
Pacific Coast Paleogeography Field Guide #3: Depositional Environments of 13 Tertiary Rocks Along Sespe Creek, Ventura County, California: Fritsche, A. E., ed., 1978, 81p.
PACIFIC COAST PALEOGEOGRAPHY SYMPOSIUM 3: Cenozoic
9 Paleogeography of the Western United States: Armentrout, J. M., Cole M. R.,
TerBest, H., eds., 1979, 335p.
PACIFIC COAST PALEOGEOGRAPHY FIELD GUIDE #4: Tertiary &
14
Quaternary Geology of Salinas Valley & Santa Lucia Range, Monterey County, California: Graham, S. A., ed., 1979, 148p.
ISBN: 1-878861-55-7
4
Eocene Depositional Systems, San Diego: Abbott, P. L., ed., 1979, 126p. ISBN: 1-878861-61-1
A Guidebook to Miocene Lithofacies & Depositional Environments, Coastal
5 Southern California & Northwestern Baja California: Stuart, C. J., ed. 1979,
138p.
PACIFIC COAST PALEOGEOGRAPHY SYMPOSIUM 4: Quaternary
10 Depositional Environments of the Pacific Coast: Field, M. E., Bouma, A. H.,
Colburn, I. P., Douglas, R. G., Ingles, J. C., eds., 1980, 355 p.
6
Neogene Biostratigraphy of the Northern La Panza Range, San Luis Obispo County, California (Field Trip Guidebook): Blake, G. H., ed., 1980, 44p.
Monterey Symposium: Monterey Formation and Related Siliceous Rocks of
15 California: Garrison, R. E., Douglas, R. G., eds., 1981, 327p.
ISBN: 1-878861-54-9
16
Depositional Systems of Active Continental Margin Basins (Short Course Notes): Douglas, R. G., Colburn, I. P., Gorsline, D. S., eds., 1981, 165p.
AVAILABILITY AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages
Publications with marked nonmember/member prices are still available in hardcopy.
book #
TITLE
AVAILABILITY
17
Modern and Ancient Biogenic Structures, Bodega Bay, California (Field Trip Guidebook): Frizzell, V., ed., 1981, 31p.
nonmember price 4.00
member price 2.00
indicate quantity
Upper Mesozoic Franciscan Rocks and Great Valley Sequence, Central 18 Coast Ranges, California (Field Trip Guidebook): Frizzell, V., ed., 1981, 43p.
AAPG Datapages
19
Geology of the Central and Northern Diablo Range, California (Field Trip Guidebook): Nilsen, T. H., ed., 1981, 112p.
AAPG Datapages
Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene Turbidites, Central California Coast 20 (Field Trip Guidebook): Frizzell, V., ed., 1981, 117p. ISBN: 1-878861-52-2
AAPG Datapages
21
Simi Hills Cretaceous Turbidites, Southern California (volume with guidebook): Link, M. H., Squires, R. L., Colburn, I. P., eds., 1981, 134p.
22
Geologic History of Ridge Basin, Southern California: Crowell, J. C., and Link, M. H., eds., 1982, 304 p plus maps
AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages
23
Cenozoic Nonmarine Deposits of California and Arizona: Ingersoll, R. V., Woodburne, M. O., eds., 1982, 122p.
AAPG Datapages
Late Cretaceous Depositional Environments and Paleogeography, Santa 24 Ana Mountains, Southern California: Bottjer, D. J., Colburn, I. P., Cooper, J. D., eds., 1982 121p. ISBN: 1-878861-48-4
AAPG Datapages
Monterey Formation and Associated Coarse Clastic Rocks, Central San 25 Joaquin Basin, California: Williams, L. A., Graham, S. A., eds., 1982, 95p. ISBN: 1-878861-47-6
AAPG Datapages
Neotectonics in Southern California (GSA Field Trip Guide): Yeats, R. S., 26 Keller, E. A., Lajoie, K. R., Rockwell, T. K., Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M., Yerkes, R. F., eds., 1982, 134p.
AAPG Datapages
27
Geologic Excursions in the California Desert (GSA Field Trip): Dokka, R. K., Glazner, A. F., eds., 1982, 159p.
AAPG Datapages
28
Cenozoic Marine Sedimentation, Pacific Margin, U. S. A.: Larue, D. K., Steel, R. J., eds., 1983, 247p. ISBN: 1-878861-44-1
AAPG Datapages
29
Geology and Sedimentology of the Southwestern Sacramento Basin and East Bay Hills: Cherven, V. B., Graham. S. A., eds., 1983, 136p.
AAPG Datapages
30
Tectonics and Sedimentation Along Faults of the San Andreas System: Andersen, D. W., Rymer, M. J., eds., 1983, 120p. ISBN: 1-878861-42-5
AAPG Datapages
31
Tectonic Transect of Sierran Paleozoic Through Jurassic Accreted Belts: Schwieckert, R. A., Bogen, N. L., authors, 1983, 22p.
AAPG Datapages
nonmember member indicate
32
Pre-Jurassic Rocks in Western North American Suspect Terranes: Stevens, C. H., ed., 1983, 142p. ISBN: 1-878861-40-9
price
price
quantity
8.00
6.00
Guidebook to the Stony Creek Formation, Great Valley Group, Sacramento nonmember member indicate
34 Valley, California: Bertucci, P. F., Ingersoll, R. V., eds., 1983, 32p.
price
price
quantity
ISBN: 1-878861-38-7
6.00
4.00
35
Cenozoic Geology of the Simi valley Area, Southern California (Volume and Field Trip Guidebook): Squires, R L, Filewicz, M. V., eds., 1983, 266p.
AAPG Datapages
36
Upper Cretaceous Depositional Systems ­ Southern California-Northern Baja California: Abbott, P. L, ed., 1984, 140p.
37
Kreyenhagen Formation and Related Rocks: Blueford, J. E., ed., 1984, 98p. ISBN: 1-878861-35-2
AAPG Datapages AAPG Datapages
38
Tectonics & Sedimentation Along the California Margin: Crouch, J. E., Bachman, S. B., eds., 1984, 188p. ISBN: 1-878861-34-4
AAPG Datapages
39
Geology of the Baja California Peninsula: Frizzell, V. A., ed., 1984, 272p. ISBN: 1-878861-33-6
40
The Imperial Basin-Tectonics, Sedimentation, and Thermal Aspects: Rigsby, C. A., ed., 1984, 95p.
nonmember price 10.00
member price 8.00
indicate quantity
AAPG Datapages
Publications with marked nonmember/member prices are still available in hardcopy.
book #
TITLE
AVAILABILITY
Dolomites of the Monterey Formation and Other Organic-Rich Units:
41 Garrison, R. E., Kastner, M., Zenger, D. H., eds., 1984, 215p.
AAPG Datapages
ISBN: 1-878861-31-X
Geology of the Upper Cretaceous Hornbrook Formation, Oregon and
42 California (maps included): Nilsen, T. H., ed., 1984, 257p.
AAPG Datapages
ISBN: 1-878861-30-1
43
Franciscan Geology of Northern California: Blake, M. C., ed., 1984, 254p. ISBN: 1-878861-29-8
nonmember price 10.00
member price 8.00
indicate quantity
44
Geology of the Temblor Formation, Western San Joaquin Basin, California: Graham, S. A., ed., 1985, 202p. ISBN: 1-878861-28-X
AAPG Datapages
Siliceous Microfossils and Microplankton Studies of the Monterey
45 Formation and Modern Analogs: Casey, R. R., ed., 1986, 154p.
AAPG Datapages
ISBN: 1-878861-27-1
46
Cretaceous Stratigraphy Western North America: Abbott, P. L., ed., 1986, 233p. ISBN: 1-878861-26-3
nonmember price 10.00
member price 8.00
indicate quantity
nonmember member indicate
47
Middle Tertiary Depositional Systems of the San Emigdio Range, Southern California: Decelles, P. G., 1986, 36 p.
price 4.00
price 2.00
quantity
Geologic Transect Across the Western Transverse Ranges: Davis, T. L., 48 Namson, J. S., eds., 1986, 74p. ISBN: 1-878861-24-7
nonmember price 8.00
member price 6.00
indicate quantity
48A
Structural Evolution of the Western Transverse Ranges: Davis, T. L., Namson, J. S., eds., 1987, 156p. ISBN: 1-878861-23-9
nonmember price 10.00
member price 8.00
indicate quantity
Geology of the Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Rocks Near Lake 49 Nacimiento, California: Grove, K, Graham, S. A., eds., 1986, 63p.
nonmember price
member price
indicate quantity
ISBN: 1-878861-22-0
8.00
6.00
50
Alaskan North Slope Geology, v. 1 & 2: Tailleur, L., Weimer, P., eds., 1987, 874p. ISBN: 1-878861-21-2
AAPG Datapages
51
Sedimentary Facies, Tectonic Relations, & Hydrocarbon Significance in Ridge Basin, California: Link, M. H., ed., 1987, 63p.
AAPG Datapages
New Concepts in the Use of Biogenic Sedimentary Structures for 52 Paleoenvironmental Interpretation: Bottjer, D. J., ed., 1987, 65p. ISBN: 1-878861-17-4
AAPG Datapages
Guide to Coastal Outcrops of the Monterey Formation of Western Santa
53 Barbara County, California: Dunham, J. B., ed., 1987, 117p.
AAPG Datapages
ISBN: 1-878861-16-6
54
Depositional Systems in Active Margin Basins: Gorsline, D. S., ed., 1987, 117p. ISBN: 1-878861-15-8
AAPG Datapages
55
Geology of the Palos Verdes Peninsula & San Pedro Bay: Fischer, P. J., ed., 1987, 178p.
AAPG Datapages
Geologic Guide to the Mineral King Area, Sequoia National Park, 56 California: Busby-Spera, C., Saleeby, J., eds., 1987, 44p. ISBN: 1-878861-13-1
AAPG Datapages
Basin Analysis and Paleontology of the Paleocene and Eocene Goler 57 Formation, El Paso Mountains, California: Cox, B. E., ed., 1987, 67p. ISBN: 1-878861-12-3
nonmember price 6.00
member price 4.00
indicate quantity
58
Paleogene Stratigraphy, West Coast of North America: Filewicz, M. V., Squires, R. L., eds., 1988, 281p. ISBN: 1-878861-11-5
nonmember price 14.00
member price 10.00
indicate quantity
Tertiary Tectonics and Sedimentation in the Cuyama Basin, San Luis
59 Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California:
AAPG Datapages
Bazeley, W. J. M., ed., 1988, 351p. ISBN: 1-878861-10-7
Publications with marked nonmember/member prices are still available in hardcopy.
book # 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78
TITLE Studies of the Geology of the San Joaquin Basin: Graham, S. A., Olson, H. C., ed., 1988, 351p. ISBN: 1-878861-09-3 Cavalcade of Carbonates: Cooper, J. D., ed., 1989, 144p. ISBN: 1-878861-08-5 Conglomerates in Basin Analysis: A Symposium Dedicated to A. O. Woodford: Colburn, I. P., Abbott, P. L., Minch, J., ed., 1989, 312 p. ISBN: 1-878861-07-7 Geologic Studies in Baja California: Abbott, P. L., ed., 1989, 140p. ISBN: 1-878861-06-0 Structure, Stratigraphy, Hydrocarbon Occurrences of the San Joaquin Basin, California: Kuespert, J. G., Reid, S. A., eds., 1990, 366p. (also as PS-AAPG Guidebook 65) ISBN: 1-878861-05-0 Sacramento Valley Symposium and Guidebook: Ingersoll, R. V., Nilsen, T. H., eds., 1990, 215p. ISBN: 1-878861-04-2 Deep Marine Sedimentation Depositional Models and Case Histories in Hydrocarbon Exploration and Development: Brown, G. C., Gorsline, D. S., Schweller, W. J., eds., 1990, 326p. ISBN: 1-878861-00-X Paleozoic Paleogeography of the Western United States-II, vols. 1 & 2: Cooper, J. D., Stevens, C. H., eds., 1991, p. 463-872. ISBN: 1-878861-03-4 Eocene Geologic History, San Diego Region: Abbott, P. L., May, J. A., eds., 1991, 229p. ISBN: 1-878861-61-1 Paleozoic Shelf-to-Basin Transition in Owens Valley, California: Stevens, C. H., ed., 1991, 58p. ISBN: 1-878861-62-X Sequence Stratigraphy in Fine-Grained Rocks: Examples From the Monterey Formation: Schwalbach, J. R., Bohacs, K. M., eds., 1992, 80p. ISBN: 1-878861-63-8 Mesozoic Paleogeography of the Western United States-II: Dunne, G. C., McDougall, K. A., eds., 1993, 494p. ISBN: 1-878861-64-6 Depositional and Volcanic Environments of the Middle Tertiary Rocks in the Santa Monica Mountains, Southern California: Weigand, P. W., Fritsche, A. E., Davis, G. E., eds., 1993, 135p. ISBN: 1-878861-65-4 Advances in the Sedimentary Geology of the Great Valley Group, Sacramento Valley, California: Graham, S. A., Lowe, D. R., eds., 1993, 66p. ISBN: 1-878861-66-2 Sedimentology and Paleontology of Eocene Rocks in the Sespe Creek Area, Ventura County, California: Fritsche, A. E., ed., 1994, 106p. ISBN: 1-878861-67-0 Cenozoic Paleogeography of the Western United States-II: Fritsche, A. E., ed., 1995, 309p., with geologic & paleogeographic maps of west-central California (plates 1-4). ISBN: 1-878861-68-9 Recent Geologic Studies in the San Francisco Bay Area: Sangines, E. M., Andersen, D. W., Buising, A. V., eds., 1995, 278p. ISBN: 1-878861-69-7 Ordovician Odyssey: Short Papers for the Seventh international symposium on the Ordovician System, Las Vegas, Nevada: Cooper, J. D., Droser, M. L., Finney, S. C., eds., 1995, 498p. ISBN: 1-878861-70-0 Ordovician of the Great Basin: Fieldtrip Guidebook and Volume for the Seventh International Symposium on the Ordovician System, Las Vegas, Nevada: Cooper, J. D., ed., 1995, 151p. ISBN: 1-878861-71-9
AVAILABILITY
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price 12.00
member price 10.00
indicate quantity
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price
member price
indicate quantity
12.00 nonmember price
10.00 member price
indicate quantity
8.00
6.00
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price 10.00 nonmember price 12.00
member price 8.00 member price 10.00
indicate quantity indicate quantity
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price 16.00 nonmember price 20.00 nonmember price 14.00
member price 14.00 member price 18.00 member price 12.00
indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity
Publications with marked nonmember/member prices are still available in hardcopy.
book # 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96
TITLE The Paleocene Stratigraphic Successions in the Northern Peninsular Ranges, Orange and Riverside Counties, California: Colburn, I. P., Ramirez, P. C., eds., 1995, 74p. ISBN: 1-878861-72-7 Field Conference Guidebook and Volume for AAPG/SEPM Annual Convention, San Diego, California: Abbott, P. L., Cooper, J. D., 1996, 476p. ISBN: 1-878861-75-3 The Northern Sierra Terrane and Associated Mesozoic Magmatic Units: Implications for the Tectonic History of the Western Cordillera: Girty, G. H., Hanson, R. E., Schweickert, R. A.., Harwood, D. S., eds., 1996, 92p. ISBN: 1-878861-74-3 Geology of the Western Cordillera: Perspectives From Undergraduate Research: Girty, G. H., Cooper, J. D., eds., 1997, 135p. ISBN: 1-878861-75-1 Diagenesis, Deformation, and Fluid Flow in the Miocene Monterey Formation, Eichhubl, P., ed., 1998, 98p. ISBN: 1-878861-76-X Geology and Tectonics of the Gualala Block, Northern California, Elder, W. P., ed., 1998, 222p. ISBN: 1-878861-77-8 Rifting, Transpression, and Neotectonics in the Central Mecca Hills, Salton Trough: Sylvester, A. G., 1999, 52 p. ISBN: 1-878861-78-6 Field Guide to the Geology of the Neogene Santa Maria Basin: From Rift to Uplift: Behl, R. J., ed., 2000, 56p. ISBN: 1-878861-79-4 Tectonic Controls on Facies Distribution and Stacking Patterns, Ridge Basin, Southern California (with color fold-outs and stratigraphic sections): Ehman, K. D., Sullivan, M. D., May, S. R., eds., 2000, 50p. ISBN: 10878861-80-8 Geologic Excursions in the California Deserts and Adjacent Transverse Ranges: Dunne, G., and Cooper, J., eds., 2001, 126p. ISBN: 1-878861-81-6 Geologic Excursions in Southwestern California: Dunne, G., Cooper, J., eds., 2001, 185p. ISBN: 1-878861-82-4 Modern and Ancient Barrier, Lagoonal, and Marine Environments, Ventura County, California: Prothero, D. R., ed., 2001, 54p. ISBN: 1-878861-83-2 Magnetic Stratigraphy of the Pacific Coast Cenozoic: Prothero, D. R., ed., 2001, 394p. ISBN: 1-878861-84-0 Alaska North Slope Core Workshop: Houseknecht, D. W., ed., 2002, 64p. ISBN: 1-878861-85-9 Proterozoic-Cambrian of the Great Basin and Beyond: Corsetti, F. A., ed., 2002, 186p. ISBN: 1-878861-86-7 Reservoir Characterization and Sequence Stratigraphy of the Domingine Formation, Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, Northern California: Sullivan, M. D., Sullivan, R., Waters, J., eds., 2003, 51p. ISBN: 1-878861-87-5 Geology of the San Andreas Fault in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California: Stoffer, P. W., 2004, 77p. ISBN: 1-878861-88-3 Mesozoic Assembly of California (fieldtrip guidebook & volume for joint mtg, Cordilleran GSA, PS-AAPG): Stevens, C., Cooper, J., eds., 2005, 64p. ISBN: 1-878861-81-6
AVAILABILITY
nonmember price
member price
indicate quantity
10.00 nonmember price
8.00 member price
indicate quantity
16.00 nonmember price
14.00 member price
indicate quantity
6.00 nonmember price 8.00 nonmember price 12.00 nonmember price 12.00 nonmember price 14.00 nonmember price 8.00 nonmember price
4.00 member price 6.00 member price 10.00 member price 10.00 member price 12.00 member price 6.00 member price
indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity
40.00 nonmember price 16.00 nonmember price 16.00 nonmember price 6.00 nonmember price 12.00 nonmember price 8.00 nonmember price 20.00
38.00 member price 14.00 member price 14.00 member price 4.00 member price 10.00 member price 6.00 member price 18.00
indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
Publications with marked nonmember/member prices are still available in hardcopy.
book # 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104
TITLE Cenozoic Deformation in the Central Coast Ranges, California (fieldtrip guidebook & volume for joint mtg, Cordilleran GSA, PS-AAPG): Stevens, C., Cooper, J., eds., 2005, 89 p. ISBN: 1-878861-90-5 Late Neogene Transition From Transform to Subduction Margin East of the San Andreas Fault in the Wine Country of the Northern San Francisco Bay Area, California (fieldtrip guidebook & volume for joint mtg, Cordilleran GSA, PS-AAPG): Stevens, C., Cooper, J., eds., 2005, 112 p. ISBN: 1-878861-92-1 Western Great Basin Geology (fieldtrip guidebook & volume for joint mtg, Cordilleran GSA, PS-AAPG): Stevens, C., Cooper, J., eds., 2005, 107p. ISBN: 1-878861-91-3 Architecture and Lithofacies of the Capistrano Formation (MiocenePliocene), San Clemente, California (with color fold-outs): Campion, K. M., Sprague, A. R., Sullivan, M. D., 2005, 44p (revised 2011) ISBN: 1-878861-93-X Using Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and Geochemistry to Unravel the Geologic History of the Southwestern Cordillera: A Volume in Honor of Patrick L. Abbott: Girty, G. H., Cooper, J. D., eds., 2006, 328p (50 in color). ISBN: 1-878861-94-8 A Day on the Palos Verdes Peninsula: Fieldtrip Guidebook to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Publication of Geology and Paleontology of Palos Verdes Hills, California: Brown, A. R., Cooper, J. D., eds., 2006, 57p (full color). ISBN: 1-878861-95-6 Geology and Paleontology of Palos Verdes Hills, California: A 60th Anniversary Revisit to Commemorate the 1946 Publication of U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 207: Brown, A. R., Shlemon, R. J., Cooper, J. D., eds., 2007, 326p (color) plus Appendices on disc. ISBN: 1-878861-96-4 Geologic Field Guidebook of Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: Ehman, K. D., Witebsky, S., authors (with contributions from others), 2007, 60p (full color). ISBN: 1-878861-97-2
105
Conglomeratic Submarine Canyon Fill, Point Lobos State Reserve: Clifton, H. E., author, 2007, 84p (full color)
Geology of Orange County, California and the Irvine Ranch National 106 Natural Landmark: Fritsche, A. E., Behl, R. J., eds., 2008, 184p (full color). ISBN: 1-878861-99-9
107
Geologic Guidebook to Santa Cruz Island, Southern California: Boles, J. R., ed., 2009, 45p (color). ISBN: 978-0-9842302-0-4
Geologic Excursions in California and Nevada: Tectonics, Stratigraphy,
and Hydrogeology (volume for joint meeting of Pacific Sections AAPG &
108 SEPM, Pacific Coast Section SEG, Cordilleran GSA, Western N. Am.
Region SPE, & LABGS: Clifton, H. E., Ingersoll, R. V., eds., 2010, 348p
(color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-1-1
The Late Paleozoic Section at Arrow Canyon, Nevada: Facies, Cyclicity,
109
and the Far-Field Record of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age: Clapham, M. E., compiler and field trip leader, 2010, 42p (color)
ISBN: 978-0-9842302-2-8
AVAILABILITY
nonmember price
member price
indicate quantity
12.00
10.00
AAPG Datapages
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price 40.00 nonmember price 46.00
member price 36.00 member price 40.00
indicate quantity indicate quantity
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price 42.00
member price 38.00
indicate quantity
nonmember price 26.00 nonmember price 46.00 nonmember price 56.00 nonmember price 26.00 nonmember price
member price 24.00 member price 44.00 member price 50.00 member price 24.00 member price
indicate quantity under revision indicate quantity revised as Book 117 indicate quantity
50.00
46.00
nonmember price 26.00
member price 22.00
indicate quantity
Publications with marked nonmember/member prices are still available in hardcopy.
book # 110 111 112 113 114 115 116
TITLE Late Paleozoic Basins, Tectonism, and Resources of North-Central Nevada: Sturmer, D. M., Trexler, J. H., Cashman, P. H., Dolbier, R., and Anderson, T., 2011, 35p (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-3-5 The Miocene Monterey Formation of the Pismo Basin, California ­ A Collection of New Papers and New Ideas: Bohacs, K. M., Keller, M. A., and Schwalbach, J. R., 2011, 40p. (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-4-2 Sequence Stratigraphic Framework of Upper Pliocene to Holocene Deposits, Los Angeles Basin, California: Implications for Aquifer Architecture (Studies on Pacific Region Stratigraphy): Ehman, K. D., and Edwards, B. D., 2014, 47p. plus 21 sheets on disc. (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-5-9 Field Trip to Ridge Basin, Southern California: Studies in Deltaic Accommodation: Larue, D. K., and Allen, J. P., 2012, 82p (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-6-6 The Salinas Basin Petroleum System and Its Outcrop Expression, Central California: Menotti, T., and Graham, S. A., 2012, 28p (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-4-2 Devonian Carbonate Platform of Nevada and the Alamo Anomaly: Facies, Surfaces, Reefs, and Bolide Breccia: Warme, J. E., and Brady, M. E., 102 p. including 2 reprints (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-8-0 Continental Extension Old and New at the Edge of the Mojave: Shapiro, R., Greene, T. J., and Dehler, C., 49 p. (color) ISBN: 978-0-9842302-9-7
Santa Cruz Island Tour-A Field Trip Guidebook Prepared for the Joint
117
Annual Meeting of Pacific Sections AAPG & SEPM, & Pacific Coast Section SEG, May 3-5, 2015, Oxnard, California: Boles, J. R., 49 p. (color)
ISBN: 978-0-9962896-0-3
Sediments of a Mid-plate Volcanic Island Complex ­ A Field Investigative
Trip on the Islands of Hawaii and Kauai, Volume 1: Big Island of Hawaii:
Blay, C. T., (color)
ISBN: 978-0-9962896-1-0
Sediments of a Mid-plate Volcanic Island Complex ­ A Field Investigative
118
Trip on the Islands of Hawaii and Kauai, Volume 2: Big Island of Kauai: Blay, C. T., (color)
ISBN: 978-0-9962896-2-7
Sediments of a Mid-plate Volcanic Island Complex ­ A Field Investigative
Trip on the Islands of Hawaii and Kauai, Volume 3: Carbonate Eolianites:
Caputo, M. V., 74 p. (color)
ISBN: 978-0-9962896-3-4
AVAILABILITY
nonmember price
member price
indicate quantity
30.00
26.00
AAPG Datapages
nonmember price
member price
indicate quantity
46.00
40.00
nonmember price 46.00 nonmember price 22.00 nonmember price 46.00 nonmember price 46.00 nonmember price 25.00 nonmember price 65.00 nonmember price 65.00 nonmember price 30.00 nonmember price
member price 42.00 member price 18.00 member price 40.00 member price 40.00 member price 20.00 member price 50.00 member price 50.00 member price 25.00 member price
indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity indicate quantity
Out-of-print books and individual papers from those books can be purchased from the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) through its Datapages program at: www.aapg.org. Once at the website, click the order of the following links and pull-down menus: Publications, Datapages, Associated Websites, Archives, Browse Collections and seek Pacific Section SEPM. Once the entire catalog of publications for the Pacific Section SEPM has been digitized, the original publications will be available for purchase in PDF and as a collection on disc from Pacific Section SEPM.
PS-SEPM PUBLICATIONS ORDERING AND PAYMENT
(Please use the preceding pages to indicate the quantity of books desired, and member/nonmember pricing)
ORDER SUBTOTAL:
____________
POSTAGE: (domestic rate - 10% of total book cost; $3.00 minimum):
____________
TOTAL REMITTANCE: ___________ PAYMENT: Make check payable to Pacific Section SEPM Please mail only the pages from the preceding Publications List on which the desired publications, member/nonmember price, and quantity have been indicated. Send payment, marked publications list, and this Ordering and Payment form to: Mario V. Caputo 1674 Maywood Avenue Upland, CA 91784 Attn: PS-SEPM Publications MAILING ADDRESS - Please print CLEARLY: Name: Address:
Telephone #: Email address:
PLEASE ALLOW 6 WEEKS or more FOR DELIVERY KEEP A COPY OF THIS ORDER FORM FOR YOUR RECORDS

GIP Colburn

File: phd-has-made-a-huge-contribution-to-the-geology-of-both-northern.pdf
Title: Pacific
Author: GIP Colburn
Author: Mario V. Caputo
Published: Wed Sep 28 23:12:09 2016
Pages: 36
File size: 1.6 Mb


, pages, 0 Mb
Copyright © 2018 doc.uments.com