Architectural Design Studies II, SM Guide

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Content: Anglia Ruskin University Faculty of science and technology Department of the Built Environment BSc (Hons) Architecture EB230001 architectural design Studies II Architectural History Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Contents SECTION 1....................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................... 3 Contact Information ....................................................................................................... 4 Course Aims & Intended learning outcomes................................................................. 4 SECTION 2....................................................................................................................... 5 Method of Study ............................................................................................................ 5 Indicative Programme ................................................................................................... 5 SECTION 3 - ASSIGNMENTS & ASSESSMENT.............................................................. 6 Assignment S1 - Group Presentations........................................................................... 7 Assignment S2 - Illustrated Dictionary ........................................................................... 9 SECTION 5 - REFERENCING & RESOURCES ............................................................. 12 Cover image: le Corbusier, The Modulor, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1954, p. 55. 2
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 SECTION 1 This guide is intended as a supplement your Architectural Design Studies II module guide. A digital copy of this guide, background readings, and all other relevant information for this module can be found on the AtelierStudio22 website. This site will be updated regularly and you will need to check it on a regular basis to keep up to date with events and information associated with this course. Introduction Architectural History is an important element of the Architectural Design Studies II module. By studying past architecture, you will become aware that architecture is a rich and varied discipline and of the importance of context (physical and historical) in determining meaning. You shall explore the subjectivity of interpretation and form valid arguments to support your opinions. You will understand not only the forms of past and contemporary buildings but also the ideas which gave rise to these forms. While this course will focus on architectural history, it will not be restricted to an analysis of buildings. Architecture is a cultural product. The influences which are condensed and represented through art (painting, sculpture, architecture, music, poetry, Landscape Architecture, dance, etc.) come from all elements of culture, and it is these ideas that we will seek out over the course of these sessions. We need to consider that the architecture is only part of the picture, it is the result and before we can hope to understand it we need to speak its language. Understanding how previous designers have tackled challenges, and the forms they have used to represent their concepts, will help you in your own design solutions. Furthermore, the ideas that we will study in the sessions will challenge you to think in ways you might not have considered before. This increases your critical facilities and allows you to approach problems from a variety of perspectives. Doing so will open your mind to possibilities and provide you with the skills to make informed decisions in your design projects and in your architectural career. Architectural History is delivered over seven sessions divided between semesters 1 and 2. This is a very short space of time in which to consider a vast body of information, ranging, at least, from philosophy, linguistics, fine art and popular culture. Hence, students are expected to complete compulsory background readings which will be discussed in each session and made available to you on the AtelierStudio22 website. Bring your copy of the texts to the seminar sessions, and make sure you have read and made notes on each text. You will need to read each text more than once, and make use of a dictionary at times (you can access the Oxford English Dictionary online via the library database). This can sometimes be a lengthy process so you will need to devote sufficient time for it. Involvement in the seminar sessions is key to your success in this course. You are expected to ask questions, give relevant and informed opinions, to be able to discuss / debate the topic openly or in small groups, to bring examples of your research or make group presentations over the course of the sessions. Be warned, however, academic research means more than looking on Wikipedia, in the following pages you will find a 3
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 bibliography which you can use as a starting point. Use the library well, and in particular its databases, such as Jstor and Ebrary. Contact Information The course tutor is; Cliona Marrani (Part-Time Lecturer) Room Mar317, ext 3968 [email protected] Course Aims & Intended Learning outcomes At Anglia Ruskin University modules are designed so that, upon completion, students have obtained a range of learning outcomes. In this course these outcomes are examined through coursework and examination. The outcomes listed here are drawn from the MDF (Module Definition Form) which is the document upon which the ADS II module was validated. On completion and full participation in the Architectural History course students should have acquired the following knowledge / skills: knowledge and understanding Demonstrate and illustrate architectural historical styles comparatively. Understanding of the language of architecture. Explain and illustrate constructional elements of architecture. Intellectual, practical, affective and transferable skills Ability to identify and `read' architecture in the built environment. Present orally and graphically own ideas at a professional level. 4
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12
SECTION 2 Method of Study Our sessions will be divided into seminars and lectures. The first hour and a half, approximately, will be a seminar. Seminars are student led discussions and during this period group presentations will take place as well as energetic debate on the issues raised. Students are expected to do the specified background reading for each session. This will be provided in advance on the student reference pages on the AtelierStudio22 website. It is up to you to keep yourself up to date with your reading. Seminars will be followed by a short break, time permitting, and then by a 1 hr lecture which will be an introduction to a movement in the history of architecture. Lectures will all follow a similar format and students are expected to take written notes. Firstly, factual information and cultural ideas will be presented which relate to the period being discussed. This is vital to understanding the context of the architecture under examination. Key architects and / or notable buildings will then be considered. And finally, questions will be posed about each topic covered because our aim is to go beyond the physical characteristics of past architectural styles and understand the concepts behind these movements.
Indicative Programme
Session Week number Session 1 Week 4 Session 2 Week 7 Session 3 Week 10 Session 4 Week 14 Session 5 Week 17 Session 6 Week 20 Session 7 Week 22
Seminar Topic (1.5 hrs) General Introduction and outline of module
Group
presentation,
aspects arising from
previous lecture and
texts. Discussion.
Group
presentation,
aspects arising from
previous lecture and
texts. Discussion.
Group
presentation,
aspects arising from
previous lecture and
texts. Discussion.
Group
presentation,
aspects arising from
previous lecture and
texts. Tutorials on
coursework
project.
Discussion.
Group
presentation,
Exam revision.
Submission and review of coursework. Exam
Lecture
(1 hr)
The language of
architecture. Classical
Architecture
Early
Christian
architecture,
Romanesque & Gothic
Early
Renaissance,
(Brunelleschi, Alberti)
High
Renaissance,
(Palladio, Michelangelo,
Mannerism, Baroque)
Neo-Classicism & the 18th Century, Revivals & the 19th Century
Modernism I - America Modernism II - Europe
After modernism, postmodernism, high-tech, computer age Examination
Private Study (9.5 hrs) Background research assignments Background research assignments
reading, and reading, and
Background research assignments
reading, and
Background research assignments
reading, and
Background reading. Prepare draft submission of coursework project
Background research assignments
reading, and
5
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12
SECTION 3 - ASSIGNMENTS & ASSESSMENT
This element of your Architectural Design Studies II module comprises of 30% of your overall result. This is further divided into two assignments, group presentation (10% of your overall ADS mark) and individual project (10% of your overall ADS mark) and an examination. These elements are detailed as follows:
Submission Task
S1
Group
Presentations
S2
Coursework
project
S3
Exam
Team Individual Team Individual Individual
/ Deadline Varies Week 22 Week 22
% of total ADS III module mark 10% 10% 10%
All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published deadline. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be submitted ­ ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or nonsubmission.
Failure to submit your coursework project or participate in your group presentation will mean that you fail that element of the course unless you obtain in writing a formal extension agreed with the Student Advisor. This will normally only be granted in exceptional circumstances and for a strictly limited time. You should also advise and confirm your request with the course leader / tutor. Any late assignment will not be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in question.
You are requested to keep a copy of your work.
If there are reasons why your performance in assignment(s) has been impaired you must fill in a Mitigating Circumstances form and advise the module / course leader / tutor accordingly.
Please see your ADS II module guide for information relating to assessment criteria and student feedback.
6
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Assignment S1 - Group Presentations Each week in the seminar session 1 group will present research on a specified topic to their peers and tutors. The topic will be the lecture topic from the previous session. Every student will present one time only during the course. This assignment is compulsory, non participation (not turning up on your allotted day) will be treated as a non submission. Teams will typically comprise of 3 students (depending on numbers), however, greater or lesser numbers may be agreed depending on the complexity of the topic, but this is subject to approval from teaching staff. If you already have an idea of people you would like to work with or topics that interest you, inform Cliona by week 5, otherwise teams and dates will be allocated for you. Teams will be finalised prior to session two. You will receive immediate feedback for your presentation from your tutor, and at times other members of staff will be invited to provide additional feedback. The mark for this assignment is 10% of your overall module result. A mark is allocated to the team and shared by all members of that team. Generally, it is found that better results are achieved when working as part of a team than when working individually. However, this does not mean that you should take a back seat! You have a responsibility to other members of your team, so make sure you participate fully! The purpose of these presentations is to open the debate in the seminar session. What we are aiming for is an exploration of different ways to think about architecture rather than hard and fixed answers, however you are expected to be critical of your subject matter and provide your own well researched opinions. Teams will organise themselves and allocate one member to each of the following research areas (on the topic in question): An analysis of one of the texts for that session. Questions to be considered, include but are not limited to, who wrote it, when it was written (and any relevant details about this time period), where it was published. What the main points of the text are, and any thoughts, and opinions that you have on it. You will be expected to be able to support your argument with reference to built examples drawn from the text (where appropriate). Include images of the author and for some / all of the art / architectural references made in the text. A key building from the period being discussed. You will need to research the building, give factual information about it and its designer. Outline why the building was built, for what functional purpose, and an analysis of its conceptual message. Analyse it, in terms of its style, language, context, form, entrance and circulation pattern. Compare the building with other contemporary buildings built for the same purpose, and in the previous architectural period. Make conclusions on the building supporting your argument where possible. 7
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 A key architect from the period or a contemporary architect working in that style. Research the biographical details for the architect, including: nationality, religion, education, profession (if applicable). Present examples of some of the more important buildings by your chosen architect. Compare these buildings (use images / drawings and words), highlighting similarities and differences between them. Research and comment on the theoretical concerns of the architect and the language used to articulate these ideas. Within each of the areas highlighted here there is flexibility for your individual research. This is to allow you to pursue an area that is of interest to you, but if you have any questions please ask a tutor. The Presentation: Each team will present for approximately 30 minutes. Each member of the team is to present their own area of research. Presentations are to be in PowerPoint format and should consist primarily of images (photographs / sketches etc.) with spoken comments. A PDF copy of your presentation is to be submitted on disc, or via USB to be uploaded onto the University system at the time of your presentation. This file should be named in the following way: H2 S1 Team X (where X is the sequence number of your team, 1, 2, 3 etc.) Each team shall decide the order in which each member presents; this should be decided in advance of the seminar session. Teams should coordinate themselves and if possible, highlight any cross references between individual research areas. Doing this will add coherence to your presentation making it more professional. The information that you present as part of your team is not supposed to be a rehash of the lecture from the previous session. While you may rely on your notes, you will also have to go to the library and use the databases to do your own research. Learning outcomes: For this assignment the learning outcomes can be detailed as follows: Ability to work as part of a team. Carry out academic research. Research background information to set the framework for interpreting your chosen topic, ability to `read' and be critical of information sourced. Confidence to form and support your own opinions. Preparation and presentation (visual and verbal) of information to a group. Answering questions from peers / tutors. Appraisal of topic from a variety of perspectives. 8
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Assignment S2 - Illustrated Dictionary For this assignment you will prepare your own illustrated dictionary of architecture. It is an ongoing assignment and you are expected to add to it each week. The amount of entries will depend on the depth of each entry but a general rule of thumb would be 2 to 3 entries per teaching session. The mark for this assignment is 10% of your total ADS II module mark. Please read the section entitled Assessment for more details about deadlines etc. Your chosen entries will vary upon your area of interest, and may be architectural terminology (words), architects or architectural styles or periods, (but do not restrict yourself to one category). You should not include individual buildings. Each week a new topic will be presented in the lecture, from this, or from your background reading, you should choose the terms which you will include in your dictionary. By the end of the course therefore, you should have entries which relate to the wide variety of topics covered in the Lecture Series. Suggestions of possible entries will be given for each teaching session and posted on the AtelierStudio22 website. However, feel free to use other related terms, but check with a tutor first. The following guidance is provided for you, but please ask a tutor if you have any further queries. For each entry: Explain your chosen term or information about your chosen architect in your own words. Each entry should be described in a minimum of 250 words. Provide images, including your own sketches to support your explanation. Note: All images should be captioned. Include images of the term in context if appropriate. For example, if the term relates to a part of a building show examples of it in different buildings from the period you are studying, and in buildings from other periods. Make comments outlining the differences / similarities. Where appropriate use your own photographs of local buildings or other buildings that you are familiar with as illustrations. This demonstrates that you are beginning to use your observation skills in your normal environment thereby raising your critical awareness of architecture in general. Your entry should demonstrate your understanding of other obvious related terms, for example, for a column, you would need to include (at the very least) an indication of your understanding of the terms base and capital. If your entry relates to an architect you will need to give several examples of work by that architect, and compare it to work by other architects around the same time. Say who they are / were similar to, and who they were / are different from. Mention earlier architects or styles which influenced the architect you are researching and provide illustrations. Include captions and comments on all of the images you include. Use academic research to access resource material through the library and online (see Resource section for more details). Make use of academic references (and include a bibliography for your sources at the end of each entry) and avoid plagiarism at all costs. 9
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Layout / General Contents You should think about your document as a Design Product and make it personal. Entries can be completed entirely by hand, however, you will need to digitise them to adhere to the digital submission requirements. Entries should be on A4 pages. Each entry will typically take up more than one page. Start each new entry on a new page. Consider the layout of your pages and try to make them consistent. At the end of the year you will have a collection of pages which you will have bound for your final submission. Your bound document should include an acetate cover and card back or similar. Each page should include the following information (don't forget to do a check list of this at the end). Items 3, 4 and 5 should be located in the `footer' area of the A4 page. 1. Entry title (i.e. the architect Norman Foster) 2. Subject Area from lecture topic (i.e. Renaissance, Neo-Classical etc.) 3. Student Name and Number 4. Module title and code 5. Page number Your A4 bound dictionary should have also have a front cover and a contents page. The front cover should include: 1. Module title and code 2. Your student name and number 3. An illustration of your choosing 4. Date In addition, you are requested to include a short reflection on the assignment (and the course) as part of a conclusion. Say how you found the task, any problems you faced, how you managed your time, and if you have gained anything from completing the assignment. A digital copy in (PDF format) of your work should be included on disc and attached, in a plastic self-adhesive cover, to the inside back cover of your document. This file should be named H2 S2 2011 XX (where XX relates to your allocated student number for this course). This is part of your submission requirements, so please be aware that your submission is incomplete without it. Submission of Illustrated Dictionary: It is important that you add to your dictionary every week rather than leaving it until the end. Firstly because it will be much easier for you to manage your time that way, but more importantly, your work will develop as the weeks go on and it is important that your document demonstrates your increasing level of understanding. There will be an opportunity to discuss your draft dictionary in week 17 where you will have the opportunity to get feedback on your work to date. More details of this will follow. The deadline for final submission is week 22. Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in question. 10
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Learning outcomes: Academic research and report writing. Use of academic referencing methods. Development of visual and written modes of communication. Increased understanding of the history of architecture through individual research and engagement with the topics presented. Raises critical awareness and provides skills that can be applied to the everyday built environment and students' own design work. Effective use of time management skills to work in a continuous manner and meet interim and final deadlines. Encourages consideration of the history of architecture that is not limited to focusing on physical characteristics. 11
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 SECTION 5 - REFERENCING & RESOURCES You will be expected to make full use of the university library for your research and your assignments. Aside from the library resources, on-line sources may be accessed but you need to use good judgement when using the internet. You must ensure that your sources are credible in terms of their authorship. Much of what is posted on the web has not been refereed by other academics and is much more variable in quality than anything published in journals or books (which have been reviewed by academics). However, whatever you read, on the web or in journals and books, always try to read critically and form your own opinions about the material. Beware! Wikipedia is not an academic resource; you will not get any credit in this course for using it. Referencing Part of the aim of this course is developing your research skills so that you can continue to develop your critical skills as a practicing architect. Your ADS II module guide and the library website provides you with information about academic offences and you will need to read it carefully and understand it before you do your coursework. To avoid academic offences you need to use a citation system to reference all the sources you use for your research. There are several different systems used by academics but the preferred one at Anglia Ruskin University is the Harvard System of referencing. A basic rule of thumb for referencing is that the reader of your work should be provided with enough information by you to quickly find the original source of your information. That means, for example, if you need to provide the full details, page number etc. for all the ideas which you quote in your writing. A full guide is provided on the University library website, at http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm. Bibliography Some useful books for this course are listed as follows, with library codes indicated in brackets where applicable. You can request the library for copies of books that they do not currently hold. Requests from other Anglia Ruskin libraries take just a few days, are free and can be completed online. Please let me know if you find the library holdings lacking in any particular area of research as we are trying to update the collection in the subject area. General Introduction to Theory: Berger, John, Ways of Seeing, London, Penguin Classics, 2008. (759.94 BER) Very easy book, mostly of pictures. It accompanies a BBC tv series from the 70s, (clips are available on youtube). It is mostly about art and looking at art, but has relevance to this module as it discusses how context can influence meaning. 12
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Mallgrave, Harry Francis (ed.), Architectural Theory Vol. 1: Vitruvius to 1870, Oxford, Blackwell, 2006 (720.1 ARC) General Introductory Texts: Honour, Hugh (et al.), The Penguin Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Great Britain, Penguin, 2004. (720.3 FLE) Jordan , R Furneaux, A Concise History of Western Architecture, London, Thames and Hudson, 1969 (720.94 JOR) Kostof, Spiro, A History of Architecture, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010 (on order in library) Markus, Thomas A, Buildings And Power: Freedom And Control In The Origin Of Modern Building Types, London, Routledge, 1993 (724 MAR) Pevsner, Nikolaus, A History Of Building Types, London, Thames and Hudson, 1976 (an old book but useful starting point into Historical Research in particular building genres) Watkin, David, A History of Western Architecture, Great Britain, Laurence King, 2011 (720.9 WAT) Background Reading (specific subject areas): Classical: Chitham, Robert, The Classical Orders of Architecture, Publisher: Architectural Press, 2004 (e-book and hard copies on shelf) Fletcher, Banister, A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method for the Student, Craftsman and Amateur, (various publishers). (720.9 FLE) Porphyrios, Demetri, Classical Architecture, Great Britain, Academy Editions, 1991 Schutz, Herbert , The Carolingians in Central Europe, their history, arts, and architecture a cultural history of Central Europe, 750-900, Boston, Brill (e-book) Stierlin, Henri, Greece: From Mycenae to the Parthenon, Taschen, 2004 Summerson, J. The Classical Language of Architecture, Great Britain, Thames & Hudson, 1980 (720.9 SUM) Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999 (on order) Wilkinson, Richard, The Complete Temples of Ancient Egypt, Great Britain, Thames and Hudson, 2000 Romanesque and Gothic: Barral i Altet, Xavier, The Romanesque: Towns, Cathedrals, Monasteries, London, Taschen, 2001 13
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Frankl, Paul, Gothic Architecture, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 2001 (on order) Prina, Francesca, The Story of Romanesque Architecture, Prestel (on order) Schutz, Herbert, Romanesque architecture and its artistry in Central Europe, 9001300, Newcastle, Cambridge Scholars, 2011 (on order) Toman, Rolf, Romanesque: Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, Konemann, 2007 (on order) Wilson, Christopher, The Gothic cathedral: the architecture of the Great Church, 11301530, London, Thames & Hudson, 1992 (726.6 WIL) Renaissance: Alberti, Leon Battista, The Ten Books of Architecture, New York, Dover Publications, 1987 (on order) Burckhart, Jacob, The Architecture of the Italian Renaissance, London, Penguin Books, 1987 18th Century: Campbell, Colen, Vitruvius Britannicus: The Classic of Eighteenth-Century British Architecture, Great Britain, Dover Publications, 2007 Lewis, Michael, The Gothic Revival, London, Thames and Hudson, 2002 Modernism: Blundell Jones, Peter and Canniffe, Eamonn, Modern architecture through case studies, 1945-1990, Amsterdam, London, Architectural, 2007. (724.6 BLU) Colquhoun, Alan, Modern Architecture, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2002 (on order) Curtis, William, Modern Architecture Since 1900, New York, Phaidon, 1996 (722.08 CUR) Frampton, Kenneth, Modern Architecture: A Critical History, London, Thames and Hudson, 2007 (724.6 FRA) Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture, BN Publishing, 2008 (720 LEC) Samuel, Flora, Le Corbusier and the Architectural Promenade, Basel, Birkhдuser, 2010 Samuel, Flora, Le Corbusier in detail, London, Architectural, 2007 (720.92 SAM) Tzonis, Alexander, Le Corbusier: The Poetics of Machine and Metaphor, Great Britain, Thames and Hudson, 2001 Postmodernism: Farrell, Terry , Paternoster Square and the new classical tradition, Architectural Design, 1992 (720.94212 PAT) 14
EB230001 Architectural Design Studies II Architectural History, Supplementary Module Guide 2011/12 Ghirardo, Diane, Architecture after Modernism, Great Britain, Thames and Hudson, 1996 Jencks, Charles & Kropf, Karl (eds.), Theories and Manifestos of contemporary architecture, Great Britain, John Wiley & Sons, 2005 Jencks, Charles, The language of post-modern architecture, London, Academy Editions, 1991 (724.6 JEN) Venturi, Scott, Brown, Architecture as Sign and Systems, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2004 Web Resources RIBA website http://www.architecture.com/ A useful database for preliminary information about architecture. www.archinform.net Google Books and Amazon offer previews on many books which are a quick and useful way of browsing publications on la topic. www.sacred-destinations.com (useful resource for religious architecture) 15

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