2013 United States Marine Corps Professional Reading Program, L Marines

Tags: Iraq, post-traumatic stress disorder, Steven Pressfield, Marines, 1st Marine Division, American Civil War, 6th Marine Regiment, Brad Kasal, Thomas E. Ricks, Bridget C. Cantrell, Chuck Dean, 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, United States, military history, Thomas Hammes, Navy Cross, Thomas L. Friedman, Chesty Puller, Marine Corps boot camp, Sergeant Brad Kasal, Corps Ethos, 1st Marine Air Wing, the Korean War, The Warriors, war in Southeast Asia, Allan R. Millett, military education, Winston Churchill, American Intervention, World War II, Bridget Cantrell, Defeat into Victory, Robert McNamara, Eliot A. Cohen, Victor Davis Hanson, Colin S. Gray, David Ben-Gurion, Stephen Biddle, Vietnam, J. Glenn Gray, Joshua Cooper Ramo, Williamson R. Murray, Perry M. Smith, Jeremiah Workman, mental health professionals, effective leader, Clint Van Winkle, traumatic brain injury, Charles W. Hoge, Laura Hillenbrand, intuitive impressions, critical thinking, Bruce McGhie, Daniel Kahneman, soldiers at war, Gideon Rose, stress symptoms, Jonathan Shay, American officers, Richard E. Neustadt, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Commandant, battle of Gettysburg, military operations, Erich Maria Remarque, Forgotten Warriors, The Battle for Guadalcanal, Jerry Cutter, United States Marine Corps Professional Reading Program, United States Marine Corps, Paul Baumer, Warrant Officer, battle for Guadalcanal, military leader, John Basilone, United States Marine, John Keegan, the Marine Corps, Marines at war, military memoir, Ulysses S. Grant, Merril B. Twining, Choice Books, Leading Marines, U.S. Army, the Spanish American War, WWII, George Patton, German Armed Forces, William Slim, Abraham Lincoln, Georges Clemenceau, Henry Kissinger, George MacDonald Fraser, Senior Level, WWII experience, Montford Point Marines Association, Ender Wiggin, The Warrior Ethos, Victor H. Krulak, Elbert Hubbard, Corporal Ender, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, Lyndon Johnson
Content: 2013 United States Marine Corps Professional Reading Program · Commandant's Choice Books: Each Marine is required to read the Commandant's Choice Books. · Entry ­ Senior Level: Each Marine shall read a minimum of three books from the Commandant's Professional Reading List each year. All books listed at each level of rank are required. · Professional Categories: CMC recommends that Marines read books in these categories in order to expand knowledge and understanding of specific professional areas. Commandant's Choice Books A Message to Garcia by Elbert Hubbard. Story of an American soldier charged with delivering a critical message to a leader of Cuban rebel forces during the Spanish American War. He delivers the urgent missive with no questions asked, no complaining, and no hedging. The enduring and almost unbelievably simple message of the essay is this: When asked to perform a task, don't ask How...? or Why...? or Wouldn't it be better if? Just do it. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List and Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Reading List. (814 H875) Leading Marines (MCWP 6-11) The United States Marine Corps. This publication describes a leadership philosophy that reflects the traditional strengths of the Marine Corps as an institution and attempts to define the very ethos of being a Marine. It is about the inseparable relationship between the leader and the led, and is as much about the individual Marine--the bedrock upon which the Corps is built--as it is about any leader. (Available online) The Warrior Ethos by Steven Pressfield; Shawn Coyne (Editor). Do we fight by a code? If so, what is it? What is the Warrior Ethos? Where did it come from? What form does it take today? How do we (and how can we) use it and be true to it in our internal and external lives? The Warrior Ethos is intended not only for men and women in uniform, but artists, entrepreneurs and other warriors in other walks of life. The book examines the evolution of the warrior code of honor and "mental toughness." It goes back to the ancient Spartans and Athenians, to Caesar's Romans, Alexander's Macedonians and the Persians of Cyrus the Great (not excluding the Garden of Eden and the primitive hunting band). Sources include Herodotus, Thucydides, Plutarch, Xenophon, Vegetius, Arrian and Curtius--and on down to Gen. George Patton, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, and Israeli Minister of Defense, Moshe Dayan. (179.9 P935) Warfighting (MCDP-1) United States Marine Corps. This Marine Corps doctrinal publication explains the code of conduct and moral quality of a Marine. The message delivered, if taken as a how-to-book, empowers the reader to plan, fearlessly expect the unexpected and, finally, get things done. (359.960973 W274)
Enlisted Entry Level Enlisted: Recruit/Poolee Battle Cry by Leon Uris. Battle Cry follows the fortunes of a Marine outfit from boot camp to Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and elsewhere in the Pacific during World War II. Many of the events are based on the author's WWII experience with the 6th Marine Regiment. The interactions of the characters and their ability to develop "esprit de corps" are a central theme. (Fiction Uri) Corps Values by Zell Miller. The author recounts the simple but powerful lessons he learned as a United States Marine: the core values we must embrace if we are to be successful as individuals and as a nation. Only by incorporating such time-honored Marine qualities as pride, discipline, courage, brotherhood, and respect into our personal and professional lives can we meet the challenges that lie ahead. (359.960973 M652) Making the Corps by Thomas E. Ricks. This book follows the recruits of Platoon 3086 through Marine Corps boot camp in Parris Island, South Carolina, and the drill instructors who instill in them the principles of discipline, teamwork, and commitment. Ricks also examines changes in recruit training and how the Corps deals with critical social and political issues like race relations, gender equality, and sexual orientation, as well as the growing divide between the military and the rest of America. As the author follows these men from their hometowns, through boot camp and into their first year as Marines, he paints a picture not only of individual Marines but the Corps as a whole. (359.960973 R539) The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. This book is about a young soldier's experience during the American Civil War and is well known for its realistic depiction of battle. Henry Fleming, a private in the Union Army, runs away from the field of war. Afterwards, the shame he feels at this act of cowardice ignites his desire to receive an injury in combat - a red badge of courage that will redeem him. (Fiction Cra) Primary Level Enlisted: Private - Private First Class - Lance Corporal - Corporal Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. In this science fiction novel, child genius Ender Wiggin is chosen by international military forces to save the world from destruction by a deadly alien race. His skills make him a leader yet Ender suffers from isolation and rivalry from his peers, pressure from adults, and fear of the enemy. His psychological battles include loneliness and fear that he is becoming like his cruel brother. The novel's major theme is the concept of a "game" and all of the other important ideas in the novel are interpreted through this concept. Some of the important ideas in the book include: the relationship between children and adults, compassion, ruthlessness, friends and enemies, and the question of humanity: what it means to be human. (Fiction Car) Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae by Steven Pressfield. In the battle of Thermopylae (480 B.C.), 7000 Greeks led by 300 Spartans held an enormous Persian army of 200,000 at bay for several days - an army that would have changed our civilization had the Greeks not died fighting it. Never before or since has such a badly outnumbered army fought so valiantly nor effectively. (813.54 P935)
Marine! The life of Lt. Gen. Lewis B. (Chesty) Puller, USMC (Ret.) by Burke Davis. Biography of real-life hero Chesty Puller, the most decorated Marine in history. From commanding the Horse Marines in Peking to leading the Inchon landing, Puller was a legend in his own time. But his popularity added to his blunt honesty earned him many enemies in Washington, and when the war was done they no longer needed a fighter like Chesty. Winner of 5 Navy Crosses, no officer ever inspired greater courage, loyalty, and devotion from his men, pushed them harder, or served them better. (355.00924 D261) My Men Are My Heroes by Brad Kasal. Account of Marine First Sergeant Brad Kasal's courageous mission to rescue fallen comrades while under intense enemy fire during the Battle of Fallujah. During the fight, Kasal was shot seven times, almost losing his leg, and sustained 47 shrapnel wounds using his body to shield a wounded Marine from an enemy grenade. He was awarded the Navy Cross, the nation's second highest award for heroism, for his actions. (956.704 K19) Rifleman Dodd by C. S. Forester. Study of one man's commitment to duty taking precedence over his own personal survival. It shows how one man with ability, courage, and initiative can make a difference to the outcome of a war. (940.27 F717) The Last Stand of Fox Company: A True Story of U.S. Marines in Combat by Bob Drury. During the Korean War, 234 heroic Marines from Fox Company, First Division, held off a force of 10,000 Chinese soldiers in subzero weather to secure the Toktong Pass. This is their story. (951.904242 D796) The Marines of Montford Point: America's First Black Marines by Melton Alonza McLaurin. Collection of interviews with members of the Montford Point Marines Association, organized by chronology and theme. This recognizes and honors the men who desegregated the Marine Corps and loyally served their country in three major wars. It is about the first black recruits who received Marine Corps basic training at the segregated Camp Montford Point (adjacent to Camp Lejeune). Between 1942 and 1949, more than 20,000 men trained at Montford Point, most of them going on to serve in the Pacific Theatre in World War II as members of support units. (359.9 M161) Career Level Enlisted: Sergeant - Staff Sergeant First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps by Victor H. Krulak. This book examines the foundation on which the Marine Corps is built. The author, LtGen Victor "Brute" Krulak (USMC, Ret.), offers an insider's chronicle of Marines, on the battlefield and off. He takes a close look at the Marine experience during WWII, Korea, and Vietnam - wars in which he was a participant, and in doing so, helps answer the question of what it means to be a Marine, and how the Corps has maintained such an outstanding reputation. (359.96 K94) Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific by R. V. Burgin. Personal narrative of the author's experiences as a Marine during WWII in the Pacific Theater where he confronted snipers, ambushes along narrow jungle trails, abandoned corpses of hara-kiri victims, and howling banzai attacks. During his two years of service, the author rose from green Private to seasoned Sergeant, and earned a Bronze Star for his valor at Okinawa. (Playaway 940.545973 B956)
Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell. An intellectual journey through the world of "outliers" -- the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. The author challenges the reader to answer the question: What makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. (302 G542) Quartered Safe Out Here by George MacDonald Fraser. Action-packed memoir of the author's experiences in Burma during WWII. Although only 19 years old when he arrived during the war's final year, he offers a first-hand glimpse at the camaraderie, danger and satisfaction of service. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Soldiers of God: With Islamic warriors in Afghanistan and Pakistan by Robert D. Kaplan. This book is about the mujahidin -"soldiers of god" - whose unwavering devotion to Islam fueled their mission to oust the formidable Soviet invaders from Afghanistan. The thwarted Soviet invasion then gave rise to the ruthless Taliban and the defining International Conflict of the 21st century. Traveling alongside Islamic guerrilla fighters, sharing their food, observing their piety in the face of deprivation, and witnessing their determination, the author offers a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of a people and a country that are at the center of current world events. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (958.1045 K17) Storm of Steel by Ernst Junger. This book illuminates not only the horrors but also the fascination of total war, seen through the eyes of an ordinary German soldier. Leading raiding parties, defending trenches against murderous British incursions, and enduring as shells tore his comrades apart, the author was constantly tested by the Great War, which he saw not just as a war but as a personal struggle. (940.4144 J95) The Defence of Duffer's Drift by E. D. Swinton. Insightful analysis of small unit tactics in defending a strategic objective given limited communications, resources, and manpower. Although some advice is outdated, 3 of the 22 lessons learned presented are of extreme relevance to a new platoon leader: the urgency and importance of first setting security and preparing defenses, the use of cover and concealment, and the creation of clear fields of fire. (355.0218 S979) The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. Recounts the horror of WWII on the eastern front as seen through the eyes of a teenage German soldier. It depicts a desperate struggle for survival against cold, hunger, and terrifying Soviet artillery. Photos show the hardships and destructiveness of war such as troops battling through snow, mud, burned villages and rubblestrewn cities. (940.541343 S158) The Killer Angels: The Classic Novel of the Civil War by Michael Shaara. This book centers around the key battle of the American Civil War: the battle of Gettysburg. In a day-byday chronicle, the events immediately before and during the battle of Gettysburg unfold through the eyes of Confederate and Union generals and officers. The author's ability to convey the thoughts of men in war as well as their confusion-the so-called "fog of battle" is outstanding. (Fiction Sha) U.S. Constitution The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. Amendments 1-10 constitute what is known as the Bill of Rights. Several changes and additions have been made over the past 200+ years (Amendments 11-27). (Available online)
With the Old Breed at Peleliu and Okinawa by E. B. Sledge. First-person account of fighting at Peleliu and Okinawa. Eugene Sledge was part of WWII's famous 1st Marine Division, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines. It is based on notes Sledge secretly kept in a copy of the New Testament and documents what saved, threatened, and changed his life. It is also a story of how Sledge learned to hate and kill­and came to love­his fellow man. (940.54 S632) Intermediate Level Enlisted: Gunnery Sergeant - Master Sergeant - First Sergeant All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. This book is about Paul Baumer, who enlists with his classmates in the German army of WWI. They become soldiers with youthful enthusiasm. Through years of vivid horror, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principle of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other, if only he can come out of the war alive. (833.912 R384) American Spartans: A Combat History from Iwo Jima to Iraq by James Warren. Authoritative battle history of the Marines from the islands of the Pacific to Korea to the Middle East. It reveals how "the few and the proud" have drawn on their timeless precepts across six decades while reinventing themselves in the face of political change to forever remain America's finest warriors. (359.9 W289) Fields of Fire by James Webb. A novel about 3 young men from different worlds plunged into jungle warfare in the An Hoa Basin of Vietnam in 1969. The author captures the journey of one Marine platoon through a man-made hell as in the heat and horror of battle they took on new identities, took on each other, until each man found his fate. (813.54 W366) Flags of Our Fathers by James Bradley. The true story behind the immortal photograph that has come to symbolize the courage and indomitable will of America. In February 1945, the US Marines plunged into the surf at Iwo Jima - and into history. Through a hail of machine-gun and mortar fire that left the beaches strewn with comrades, they battled to the island's highest peak and raised the American flag. (940.542528 B811) Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific: A Young Marine's Stirring Account of Combat in World War II by Robert Leckie. This book follows the author's journey from basic training on Parris Island, South Carolina, to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. Recounting his service with the 1st Marine Division and the brutal action on Guadalcanal, New Britain, and Peleliu, the author spares no detail of the horrors and sacrifices of war, painting an unvarnished portrait of how real warriors are made, fight, and often die in the defense of their country. (Audiobook 940.548173 L461) On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman. Study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. It includes information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent trends in crime, suicide bombings, school shootings, and more. (355.0019 G878) The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us and What We Can Do About It by Joshua Cooper Ramo. Presents a new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, the author describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility. (973.931 R175)
The Changing Face of War: Lessons of Combat, from the Marne to Iraq by Martin Van Creveld. Examines the path that led to the impasse in Iraq, why powerful standing armies are now helpless against ill-equipped insurgents, and how the security of sovereign nations may be maintained in the future. Paying close attention to the unpredictability of the human element, the author takes the reader on a journey from the last century's clashes of massive armies to today's short, high-tech, lopsided skirmishes and frustrating quagmires. (355.40904 V217) This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History by T. R. Fehrenbach. History of the Korean War written from the perspective of those who fought it. Partly drawn from official records, operations journals, and histories, it is based largely on the compelling personal narratives of small-unit commanders and their troops. As Americans and North Koreans continue to face each other across the 38th Parallel, this book offers vital lessons for the future. (951.9 F296) U.S. Constitution The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. Amendments 1-10 constitute what is known as the Bill of Rights. Several changes and additions have been made over the past 200+ years (Amendments 11-27). (Available online) We Were Soldiers Once and Young: Ia Drang: The Battle that Changed the War in Vietnam by Harold G. Moore. This book is about a group of men persevered, sacrificed themselves for their comrades, and never gave up. In November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, fought against 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers in the Ia Drang Valley - one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. (959.704342 M822) Senior Level Enlisted: Master Gunnery Sergeant - Sergeant Major Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character by Jonathan Shay. Examines the psychological devastation of war by comparing the soldiers of Homer's Iliad with Vietnam veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Although the Iliad was written 27 centuries ago, it has much to teach about combat trauma, as do the more recent, compelling voices and experiences of Vietnam vets. (616.85 S538) Assignment: Pentagon: How to Excel in a Bureaucracy by Perry M. Smith; Daniel M. Gerstein. Essential guide for newly assigned military personnel, fresh civilians, and interested outsiders to the Pentagon's informal set of arrangements, networks, and functions that operate in the service and joint-service world. It delivers practical advice and helpful hints about surviving the pressures and problems of working in "The Building." If you've been assigned to the Pentagon or are starting work for any large company, you need to read this book. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German armed forces, 1901-1940, & the Consequences for World War II by Jцrg Muth. The United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled different paths to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before WWII. The author explores the paradox that in Germany officers came from a closed authoritarian society but received an extremely open minded military education, whereas their counterparts in the United States came from one of the most democratic societies but received an outdated military education that harnessed their minds and limited their initiative. While German officer candidates learned that in war everything is possible and a war of extermination acceptable, American officers, raised in a democracy, learned that certain boundaries could never be crossed. (355.55 M992)
Forgotten Warriors: The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, the Corps Ethos, and the Korean War - Thomas Hammes At the outbreak of the Korean War, the Marine Corps was ordered to deploy an air-ground brigade in less than ten days, even though no such brigade existed at the time. Assembled from the woefully under strength 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Air Wing units, the Brigade shipped out only 6 days after activation, sailed directly to Korea and was in combat within 96 hours of landing. Despite these enormous handicaps and numerically superior enemy forces, the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade won every one of its engagements and helped secure the Pusan Perimeter. (951.904 H224) Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How it Can Renew America by Thomas L. Friedman. A provocative look at the biggest challenge facing us today­our hot, flat and crowded world. Climate change and rapid population growth mean that it's no longer possible for businesses (or the rest of us) to keep doing things the same old way. Things are going to have to change--and fast. The author provides a bold strategy for clean fuel, Energy Efficiency and conservation that he calls 'Code Green'. It will change everything, from what we put into our equipment and bring to battle. (363.70525 F862) Just and Unjust Wars: A Moral Argument with Historical Illustrations by Michael Walzer. Examines the moral issues surrounding military theory, war crimes, and the spoils of war. The author studies a variety of conflicts over the course of history, as well as the testimony of those who have been most directly involved--participants, decision makers, and victims. He specifically addresses the moral issues surrounding the war in and occupation of Iraq, reminding us once again that "the argument about war and justice is still a political and moral necessity." (172.42 W242) No Bended Knee: The Battle for Guadalcanal: The Memoir of Gen. Merril B. Twining USMC (Ret.) by Merril B. Twining. In this military memoir by the 1st Marine Division's operations officer during the 1942 battle for Guadalcanal, Twining gives us an appreciation for Marines at war from the strategic, operational, and tactical levels. His firsthand report details the fierce fighting and horrid conditions endured by Marines on the ground, the decision of US Navy to pull away from Guadalcanal, as well as addressing the role of the MAGTFs, conducting amphibious operations, hostility between the armed forces, and understanding joint and combined theater logistics. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) The Face of Battle by John Keegan. This book looks at military history from the battlefield and at the direct experience of individuals at the "point of maximum danger." In the author's scrupulous reassessment of 3 battles representative of 3 different time periods, he manages to convey what the experience of combat meant for the participants, whether they were facing the arrow cloud at the battle of Agincourt, the musket balls at Waterloo, or the steel rain of the Somme. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (355.409 K26) The Mask of Command by John Keegan. This book asks the reader to consider questions that are seldom asked: What makes a great military leader? Why is it that men, indeed sometimes entire nations, follow a single leader, often to victory, but with equal dedication also to defeat? Keegan applies these questions to four commanders who profoundly influenced the course of history: Alexander the Great, the Duke of Wellington, Ulysses S. Grant and Adolph Hitler. All powerful leaders, each cast in a different mold, each with diverse results. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (355.33041 K26)
Officer Entry Level Officer: Candidate/Midshipman Battle Cry by Leon Uris. Battle Cry follows the fortunes of a Marine outfit from boot camp to Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and elsewhere in the Pacific during World War II. Many of the events are based on the author's WWII experience with the 6th Marine Regiment. The interactions of the characters and their ability to develop "esprit de corps" are a central theme. (Fiction Uri) Corps Values by Zell Miller. The author recounts the simple but powerful lessons he learned as a United States Marine: the core values we must embrace if we are to be successful as individuals and as a nation. Only by incorporating such time-honored Marine qualities as pride, discipline, courage, brotherhood, and respect into our personal and professional lives can we meet the challenges that lie ahead. (359.960973 M652) I'm Staying with My Boys: The Heroic Life of Sgt. John Basilone, USMC by Jim Proser; Jerry Cutter. The only family-authorized biography of Sgt. John Basilone, the only World War II Marine to win the Medal of Honor, the Navy Cross, and a Purple Heart. The book follows Basilone from is written in the first-person, allowing the reader to experience his significant achievements at Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima as perhaps he did himself. (940.54 P966) Making the Corps by Thomas E. Ricks. This book follows the recruits of Platoon 3086 through Marine Corps boot camp in Parris Island, South Carolina, and the drill instructors who instill in them the principles of discipline, teamwork, and commitment. Ricks also examines changes in recruit training and how the Corps deals with critical social and political issues like race relations, gender equality, and sexual orientation, as well as the growing divide between the military and the rest of America. As the author follows these men from their hometowns, through boot camp and into their first year as Marines, he paints a picture not only of individual Marines but the Corps as a whole. (359.960973 R539) My Men Are My Heroes by Brad Kasal. Account of Marine First Sergeant Brad Kasal's courageous mission to rescue fallen comrades while under intense enemy fire during the Battle of Fallujah. During the fight, Kasal was shot seven times, almost losing his leg, and sustained 47 shrapnel wounds using his body to shield a wounded Marine from an enemy grenade. He was awarded the Navy Cross, the nation's second highest award for heroism, for his actions. (956.704 K19) The Killer Angels: The Classic Novel of the Civil War by Michael Shaara. This book centers around the key battle of the American Civil War: the battle of Gettysburg. In a day-byday chronicle, the events immediately before and during the battle of Gettysburg unfold through the eyes of Confederate and Union generals and officers. The author's ability to convey the thoughts of men in war as well as their confusion-the so-called "fog of battle" is outstanding. (Fiction Sha) Primary Level Officer: Warrant Officer - 2nd Lieutenant - 1st Lieutenant All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. This book is about Paul Baumer, who enlists with his classmates in the German army of WWI. They become soldiers with youthful enthusiasm. Through years of vivid horror, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principle of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other, if only he can come out of the war alive. (833.912 R384)
Battle Leadership: Some personal experiences of a Junior Officer of the German Army with Observations on Battle Tactics and the Psychological Reactions of Troops in Campaign by Adolf von Schell. Collection of lessons learned by the author, who served as a small unit infantry commander (German army) during WWI. It includes observations on tactics and psychological reactions of troops in battle. (940.4144 S322) Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae by Steven Pressfield. In the battle of Thermopylae (480 B.C.), 7000 Greeks led by 300 Spartans held an enormous Persian army of 200,000 at bay for several days - an army that would have changed our civilization had the Greeks not died fighting it. Never before or since has such a badly outnumbered army fought so valiantly nor effectively. (813.54 P935) Marine! The life of Lt. Gen. Lewis B. (Chesty) Puller, USMC (Ret.) by Burke Davis. Biography of real-life hero Chesty Puller, the most decorated Marine in history. From commanding the Horse Marines in Peking to leading the Inchon landing, Puller was a legend in his own time. But his popularity added to his blunt honesty earned him many enemies in Washington, and when the war was done they no longer needed a fighter like Chesty. Winner of 5 Navy Crosses, no officer ever inspired greater courage, loyalty, and devotion from his men, pushed them harder, or served them better. (355.00924 D261) Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War by Karl Marlantes. Story of a young Marine lieutenant and his comrades who are dropped into the mountain jungle of Vietnam as boys and forced to fight their way into manhood. Standing in their way are the North Vietnamese, monsoon rain and mud, leeches and tigers, disease and malnutrition. Almost as daunting are the obstacles they discover between each other: racial tension, competing ambitions, and duplicitous superior officers. (Fiction Mar) The Art of War by Sun Tzu. Written over 2,000 years ago, The Art of War is the first known study of the planning and conduct of military operations. In addition to military theory and strategy, the author examines relevant economic, political, and psychological factors. The timeless principles of the Art of War are often applied outside the military realm in the areas of business and management. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (355 S957) The Defence of Duffer's Drift by E. D. Swinton. Insightful analysis of small unit tactics in defending a strategic objective given limited communications, resources, and manpower. Although some advice is outdated, 3 of the 22 lessons learned presented are of extreme relevance to a new platoon leader: the urgency and importance of first setting security and preparing defenses, the use of cover and concealment, and the creation of clear fields of fire. (355.0218 S979) The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. Recounts the horror of WWII on the eastern front as seen through the eyes of a teenage German soldier. It depicts a desperate struggle for survival against cold, hunger, and terrifying Soviet artillery. Photos show the hardships and destructiveness of war such as troops battling through snow, mud, burned villages and rubblestrewn cities. (940.541343 S158) The Last Stand of Fox Company: A True Story of U.S. Marines in Combat by Bob Drury. During the Korean War, 234 heroic Marines from Fox Company, First Division, held off a force of 10,000 Chinese soldiers in subzero weather to secure the Toktong Pass. This is their story. (951.904242 D796)
The Marines of Montford Point: America's First Black Marines by Melton Alonza McLaurin. Collection of interviews with members of the Montford Point Marines Association, organized by chronology and theme. This recognizes and honors the men who desegregated the Marine Corps and loyally served their country in three major wars. It is about the first black recruits who received Marine Corps basic training at the segregated Camp Montford Point (adjacent to Camp Lejeune). Between 1942 and 1949, more than 20,000 men trained at Montford Point, most of them going on to serve in the Pacific Theatre in World War II as members of support units. (359.9 M161) U.S. Constitution The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. Amendments 1-10 constitute what is known as the Bill of Rights. Several changes and additions have been made over the past 200+ years (Amendments 11-27). (Available online) With the Old Breed at Peleliu and Okinawa by E. B. Sledge. First-person account of fighting at Peleliu and Okinawa. Eugene Sledge was part of WWII's famous 1st Marine Division, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines. It is based on notes Sledge secretly kept in a copy of the New Testament and documents what saved, threatened, and changed his life. It is also a story of how Sledge learned to hate and kill­and came to love­his fellow man. (940.54 S632) Career Level Officer: Chief Warrant Officer 2 - Chief Warrant Officer 3 - Captain Attacks by Erwin Rommel. Reprint of Field Marshal Erwin Rommel's World War I military classic, Infanterie Greift An. In his autobiography, Rommel traces his development from a "green" Lieutenant to a confident, seasoned and singularly successful Commander. Providing keen insight into his mind and character, it is an important treatise on combat leadership and psychology, containing many valuable lessons for those who would raise and train armies. Prime among these lessons is the reminder that men are the key element in combat; that it is the will, spirit and skill of men, led by competent and courageous officers that win battles; that high morale is developed by the accomplishment of difficult tasks. (940.4143 R766) Black Hearts by Jim Frederick. Story of a small group of soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division's fabled 502nd Infantry Regiment - "the Black Heart Brigade." Deployed in late 2005 to Iraq's "Triangle of Death", the Black Hearts found themselves in the country's most dangerous location at its most dangerous time. It is a story about men in combat, the fragility of character in the savage crucible of warfare, and a warning of new dangers emerging in the way American soldiers are led on the battlefields of the twenty-first century. (956.70443 F852) First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps by Victor H. Krulak. This book examines the foundation on which the Marine Corps is built. The author, LtGen Victor "Brute" Krulak (USMC, Ret.), offers an insider's chronicle of Marines, on the battlefield and off. He takes a close look at the Marine experience during WWII, Korea, and Vietnam - wars in which he was a participant, and in doing so, helps answer the question of what it means to be a Marine, and how the Corps has maintained such an outstanding reputation. (359.96 K94) Infantry in Battle (FMFRP 12-2) by the Infantry School, Fort Benning, GA. This publication covers small unit tactic as illustrated by examples drawn from WWI. It checks the ideas acquired from peacetime instruction against the experience of battle. (Available online at Marines.mil)
Into the Tiger's Jaw: America's First Black Marine Aviator by Frank E. Petersen. Autobiography of the first black aviator in the United States Marine Corps. After earning his wings in 1952, Petersen saw combat in Korea and Vietnam where he flew over 350 missions. He commanded at the squadron, group, brigade, and Marine Aircraft levels during his career as a Marine aviator. (359.96092 P484) Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific by R. V. Burgin. Personal narrative of the author's experiences as a Marine during WWII in the Pacific Theater where he confronted snipers, ambushes along narrow jungle trails, abandoned corpses of hara-kiri victims, and howling banzai attacks. During his two years of service, the author rose from green Private to seasoned Sergeant, and earned a Bronze Star for his valor at Okinawa. (Playaway 940.545973 B956) On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman. Study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. It includes information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent trends in crime, suicide bombings, school shootings, and more. (355.0019 G878) Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell. An intellectual journey through the world of "outliers" -- the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. The author challenges the reader to answer the question: What makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. (302 G542) Quartered Safe Out Here by George MacDonald Fraser. Action-packed memoir of the author's experiences in Burma during WWII. Although only 19 years old when he arrived during the war's final year, he offers a first-hand glimpse at the camaraderie, danger and satisfaction of service. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions by Gary Klein. This book discusses the naturalistic decision making approach, which views people as inherently skilled and experienced. It is based on observations of humans acting under such real-life constraints as time pressure, high stakes, personal responsibility, and shifting conditions. The professionals studied include firefighters, critical care nurses, pilots, nuclear power plant operators, battle planners, and chess masters. (658.403 K64) The Virtues of War by Steven Pressfield. A novel in which Alexander the Great recounts with a warrior's unflinching eye for detail the blood, terror and tactics of his greatest battlefield victories. He never denies the hard realities of the code by which he lives: The Virtues of War. As much as he is feared by his enemies, he is loved and revered by his friends, generals, and the men who follow him into battle. Alexander conquered every enemy the world stood against him­except the one he never saw coming. (938.07 P935) U.S. Constitution The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. Amendments 1-10 constitute what is known as the Bill of Rights. Several changes and additions have been made over the past 200+ years (Amendments 11-27). (Available online)
War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today by Max Boot. Focuses on four revolutions in military affairs and describes how inventions ranging from gunpowder to GPS-guided air strikes have remade the field of battle and shaped the rise and fall of empires. The author argues that even as cutting-edge technologies have made America the greatest military power in World History, advanced communications systems have allowed decentralized irregular forces to become an increasingly significant threat. (355.020903 B725) Intermediate Level Officer: Chief Warrant Officer 4 - Chief Warrant Officer 5 - Major Lieutenant Colonel Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era by James M. McPherson. Recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the American Civil War, is a chronicle of the war itself, and includes the author's view on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union's victory. (973.73 M172) Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell. This is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? It reveals that great decision makers are not those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of "thin-slicing"--filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables. (153.44 G149) Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War by Robert Coram. John Boyd, considered by many to be the greatest U.S. fighter pilot ever, is the man who, in simulated airto-air combat, defeated every challenger in less than forty seconds. His manual of fighter tactics changed the way every Air Force in the world flies and fights. Boyd was a rebel who cared not for his reputation or fortune but for his country. (358.43 C787) Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, U.S. Marine by Robert Coram. Biography of LtGen Victor "Brute" Krulak (USMC, Ret.). He went on daring spy missions, was badly wounded, pioneered the use of amphibious vehicles and use of helicopters in warfare, and masterminded the invasion of Okinawa. In Vietnam, he developed a holistic military strategy in stark contrast to the Army's "Search and Destroy" methods. Yet it can be argued that all of these accomplishments pale in comparison to what he did after WWII and again after Korea: he almost single-handedly stopped the U.S. government from abolishing the Marine Corps. (Playaway and Audiobook 355.0092 C787) Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power by Victor Hanson. Examines 9 landmark battles from ancient to modern times from Salamis, where outnumbered Greeks devastated the slave army of Xerxes, to Cortes's conquest of Mexico to the Tet offensive. Looking beyond popular explanations such as geography or superior technology, the author argues that it is in fact Western culture and values­the tradition of dissent, the value placed on inventiveness and adaptation, the concept of citizenship­which have consistently produced superior arms and soldiers. (904.7 H251)
Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, & the Consequences for World War II by Jцrg Muth. The United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled different paths to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before WWII. The author explores the paradox that in Germany officers came from a closed authoritarian society but received an extremely open minded military education, whereas their counterparts in the United States came from one of the most democratic societies but received an outdated military education that harnessed their minds and limited their initiative. While German officer candidates learned that in war everything is possible and a war of extermination acceptable, American officers, raised in a democracy, learned that certain boundaries could never be crossed. (355.55 M992) Defeat into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942-1945 by William Slim. This detailed autobiography by British Field Marshal Viscount Slim (1891-1970) is a first-person account of the retaking of Burma during World War II. In this book, Slim honestly examines his decisions as a leader and consequences of those decisions, both good and bad. Defeat into Victory is widely regarded as a classic memoir of high command. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (940.5425 S633) Forgotten Warriors: The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, the Corps Ethos, and the Korean War - Thomas Hammes At the outbreak of the Korean War, the Marine Corps was ordered to deploy an air-ground brigade in less than ten days, even though no such brigade existed at the time. Assembled from the woefully under strength 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Air Wing units, the Brigade shipped out only 6 days after activation, sailed directly to Korea and was in combat within 96 hours of landing. Despite these enormous handicaps and numerically superior enemy forces, the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade won every one of its engagements and helped secure the Pusan Perimeter. (951.904 H224) Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How it Can Renew America by Thomas L. Friedman. A provocative look at the biggest challenge facing us today­our hot, flat and crowded world. Climate change and rapid population growth mean that it's no longer possible for businesses (or the rest of us) to keep doing things the same old way. Things are going to have to change--and fast. The author provides a bold strategy for clean fuel, energy efficiency and conservation that he calls 'Code Green'. It will change everything, from what we put into our equipment and bring to battle. (363.70525 F862) Just and Unjust Wars: A Moral Argument with Historical Illustrations by Michael Walzer. Examines the moral issues surrounding military theory, war crimes, and the spoils of war. The author studies a variety of conflicts over the course of history, as well as the testimony of those who have been most directly involved--participants, decision makers, and victims. He specifically addresses the moral issues surrounding the war in and occupation of Iraq, reminding us once again that "the argument about war and justice is still a political and moral necessity." (172.42 W242) Military Innovation in the Interwar Period by Williamson R. Murray (Editor); Allan R. Millett (Editor). This volume of comparative essays studies major military innovations in the 1920s and 1930s and explores differences in innovating exploitation by the seven major military powers. It investigates how and why innovation occurred or did not occur, and explains much of the strategic and operative performance of the Axis and Allies in WWII. (355.0209 M655)
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think by Victor Davis Hanson. The effects of war refuse to remain local: they persist through the centuries, sometimes in unlikely ways far removed from the military arena. The author explains how the Athenian defeat at Delium in 424 BC brought tactical innovations to infantry fighting; it also assured the influence of the philosophy of Socrates, who fought well in the battle. Perhaps most resonant for our time, the book discusses how the agony of Okinawa spurred the Japanese toward state-sanctioned suicide missions. (355.02 H251) The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us and What We Can Do About It by Joshua Cooper Ramo. Presents a new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, the author describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility. (973.931 R175) The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle by J. Glenn Gray. A philosophical meditation on what warfare does to us and an examination of the reasons soldiers act as they do. The author explains the attractions of battle--the adrenaline rush, the esprit de corps--and analyzes the many rationalizations made by combat troops to justify their actions. The author notes that "War reveals dimensions of human nature both above and below the acceptable standards for humanity." (Library Does Not Have at this Time) This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History by T. R. Fehrenbach. History of the Korean War written from the perspective of those who fought it. Partly drawn from official records, operations journals, and histories, it is based largely on the compelling personal narratives of small-unit commanders and their troops. As Americans and North Koreans continue to face each other across the 38th Parallel, this book offers vital lessons for the future. (951.9 F296) Senior Level Officer: Colonel - General Another Bloody Century: Future Warfare by Colin Gray. This book looks into the future to provide some intriguing answers about the ways Western armed forces--which have traditionally been trained to fight conventional, not guerrilla, warfare--may need to evolve. (909.83 G778) Assignment: Pentagon: How to Excel in a Bureaucracy by Perry M. Smith; Daniel M. Gerstein. Essential guide for newly assigned military personnel, fresh civilians, and interested outsiders to the Pentagon's informal set of arrangements, networks, and functions that operate in the service and joint-service world. It delivers practical advice and helpful hints about surviving the pressures and problems of working in "The Building." If you've been assigned to the Pentagon or are starting work for any large company, you need to read this book. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies that Led to Vietnam by H. R. McMaster. Analysis of how and why the United States became involved in an all-out war in Southeast Asia. Based on transcripts and personal accounts of crucial meetings, confrontations and decisions, it re-creates what happened and why. The book focuses on: President Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, General Maxwell Taylor, McGeorge Bundy and other top officials. (959.7043373 M167)
Diplomacy by Henry Kissinger. Overview of the history and an account of Henry Kissinger's negotiations with world leaders. The author describes how the art of diplomacy has created the world in which we live, and how America's approach to foreign affairs has always differed vastly from that of other nations. (327.73 K61) How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle: A History of American Intervention from World War I to Afghanistan by Gideon Rose. This book recreates the choices that presidents and their advisers have confronted during the final stages of each major conflict from WWI through Iraq. The author "puts readers in the room" with U.S. officials as they make decisions that affect millions of lives and shape the modern world--seeing what they saw, hearing what they heard, feeling what they felt. He argues that American leaders have repeatedly ignored the need for careful postwar planning, but can (and must) do a better job in order to create a stable and sustainable political outcome once the "real" military work is over. (355.00973 R796) Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle by Stephen Biddle. Systematic account of force employment's role and how this account holds up under rigorous, multi-method testing. The results challenge a wide variety of standard views, from current expectations for a revolution in military affairs, to mainstream scholarship in international relations, and orthodox interpretations of modern military history. The author argues that force employment is central to modern war, and has become increasingly important since 1900 as the key to surviving ever more lethal weaponry. Technological change produces opposite effects depending on how forces are employed; to focus only on materiel is thus to risk major error-- with serious consequences for both policy and scholarship. (355.02 B584) Modern Strategy by Colin S. Gray. The book is a major contribution to the general theory of strategy; it makes sense of the strategic history of the twentieth century, and provides understanding of what that strategic history implies for the century to come. (355.4 G778) Supreme Command: Soldiers, Statesmen, and Leadership in Wartime by Eliot A. Cohen. This book offers compelling proof that, as Clemenceau put it, "War is too important to leave to the generals." By examining the shared leadership traits of four politicians (Abraham Lincoln, Georges Clemenceau, Winston Churchill, and David Ben-Gurion) who triumphed in extraordinarily varied military campaigns, the author argues that active statesmen make the best wartime leaders, pushing their military subordinates to succeed where they might have failed if left to their own devices. (322.5 C678) Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Biography of Abraham Lincoln, centered on his mastery of men and how it shaped the most significant presidency in the nation's history. Throughout the turbulent 1850s, each of his "rivals" energetically sought the presidency as the conflict over slavery was leading inexorably to secession and civil war. Lincoln's understanding of human behavior and motivation enabled him to bring his disgruntled opponents together, create the most unusual cabinet in history, and marshal their talents to the task of preserving the Union and winning the war. (973.7092 G656) The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton; James Madison; John Jay; Garry Wills (Introduction by, Editor). This book explains the complexities of a constitutional government-- its political structure and principles based on the inherent rights of man. Scholars have long regarded this work as a milestone in political science and a classic of American political theory. It is commonly referred to the third "sacred writing" of American political history, behind the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. (Audiobook 342.733 H217 and Available Online)
The Guns of August by Barbara W. Tuchman. This book brings to life the people and events that led up to WWI. The author clearly articulates just how the war started, why, and why it could have been stopped, but wasn't. (940.4144 T888) The Landmark Thucydides: A Comprehensive Guide to the Peloponnesian War by Robert B. Strassler (Editor). Comprehensive guide to the Peloponnesian War. It includes several maps, brief informative appendices by classical scholars, explanatory marginal notes on each page, an index of unprecedented subtlety, and numerous other useful features. (938.05 T532) The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past by John Lewis Gaddis. A look at the historian's craft as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today. For example: What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? This book is a "historical method" for beginners, a reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a challenge to social scientists, and essential for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history. (901 G123) The Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World by Greg Ip. From inflation to the Federal Reserve, taxes to the budget deficit, the author walks us through how the economy really works and its role in our everyday life. Contains plain-English explanations of important economic terms, concepts, events, Historical Figures and major players. (330 I64) The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells As about Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate by Robert D. Kaplan. This book offers a new prism through which to view global upheavals and to understand what may lie ahead for continents and countries around the world. The author builds on the insights, discoveries, and theories of great geographers and geopolitical thinkers of the past to look back at critical points in history, and then to look forward at the evolving global scene. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Professional Categories Aviation 1912-2012, 100 Years of Marine Corps Aviation: an Illustrated History by Roxanne M. Kaufman; John Glenn (Foreword by); Marine Corps (U.S.) (Editor). This book is a commemorative work that offers the reader a snapshot view of the people, aircraft, and events that comprise the first century of Marine aviation. Showcases the achievements of Marine aviation through seldom seen photographs and accounts of pivotal battles and events. Displays the innovation and adaptability of Marine Corps aviation, including its overall importance to the vital posture of the Marine Corps as a balanced air-ground-logistics team. Intended as a "museum in a book," it includes an overview for each time period in Marine aviation, chapter introductions, feature articles, and a running timeline. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Hammer from Above: Marine Air Combat over Iraq by Jay A. Stout. Reveals how pilots and their machines were tested during Operation Iraqi Freedom to the limits of endurance, venturing well beyond what they were trained and designed to do. The author takes us into the cockpits, revealing what it was like to fly these intense combat operations for up to eighteen hours at a time and to face incredible volumes of fire that literally shredded aircraft in midair during battles like that over An Nasiriyah. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Marine Air: The History of the Flying Leathernecks in Words and Photos by Robert F. Dorr. The U.S. Marine Air Wing began in 1917 with only five officers and 30 enlisted men. This book is the first illustrated oral history of these "Flying Leathernecks" and their unwavering commitment to protecting their comrades and the country that they have never let down - no matter what the odds. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War over Vietnam by John B. Nichols; Barrett Tillman; Stephen Coonts. This book takes a candid look at U.S. naval airpower in the Vietnam War. The author makes full use of his extensive knowledge of the subject to detail the ways in which airpower was employed in the years prior to the fall of Saigon. Confronting the conventional belief that airpower failed in Vietnam, they show that when applied correctly, airpower was effective, but because it was often misunderstood and misapplied, the end results were catastrophic. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) The Art of Air Power by Sanu Kainikara. This book explains Sun Tzu's paradigms in a contemporary military context taking into account the changed nature of security and conflict in the twenty first century. It relates the military strategy derived from this analysis to the application of air power at the strategic and operational level within the contemporary conflict arena. Although Sun Tzu wrote his treatise at a time when air power was not even a dream, it contains certain universal truths about the application of all military power that transcend time and operating dimensions. (Available online) The Naval Air War in Korea by Richard P. Hallion. This book is about Naval Aviation's role during the Korean War. In particular, it covers how during this period Naval Aviation transitioned from piston to jet-propelled combat aircraft. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) US Marine Corps Aviation Since 1912 by Peter Mersky. This book describes Marine Air development and training, as well as combat deployments during WWI and in Central America, WWII and Korea, Vietnam, the Balkans, and Southwest Asia. It includes first-person accounts and comments from many participants, aviators and air crew alike (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Counterinsurgency Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam: Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife by John A. Nagl. This book considers the crucial question of how armies adapt to changing circumstances during the course of conflicts for which they are initially unprepared. Through the use of archival sources and interviews with participants in both engagements, the author compares the development of counterinsurgency doctrine and practice in the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960 with what developed in the Vietnam War from 1950 to 1975. (959.504 N149) Counterinsurgency Warfare: Theory and Practice by David Galula. Defines the laws of insurgency and outlines the strategy and tactics to combat such threats. Drawn from the observations of a French officer (David Galula) who witnessed guerrilla warfare on three continents, this book remains relevant today as American policymakers, military analysts, and members of the public look to the counterinsurgency era of the 1960s for lessons to apply to the current situation in Iraq and Afghanistan.(355.425 G181) Street Without Joy by Bernard Fall. Description of what American forces would face in the jungles of Southeast Asia: a costly and protracted revolutionary war fought without fronts against a mobile enemy. In harrowing detail, the author describes the brutality and frustrations of the Indochina War, the savage eight-year conflict-ending in 1954 after the fall of Dien Bien Phu, in which French forces suffered a staggering defeat at the hands of Communist-led Vietnamese nationalists. (959.7 F194s) The Accidental Guerrilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One by David Kilcullen. Places the reader "on the ground" to uncover the face of modern warfare, illuminating both the big global war (the "War on Terrorism") and its relation to the associated "small wars" across the globe: Iraq, Afghanistan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Chechnya, Pakistan and North Africa. The author sees today's conflicts as a complex pairing of contrasting trends: local social networks and worldwide movements; traditional and postmodern culture; local insurgencies seeking autonomy and a broader pan-Islamic campaign. He warns that America's actions in the war on terrorism have tended to conflate these trends, blurring the distinction between local and global struggles and thus enormously complicating our challenges. (355.4 K48) The Village by Bing West. The story of 15 resolute young Americans matched against two hundred Viet Cong; how a "Combined Action Platoon" (CAP) lived, fought and died, and why the villagers remember them to this day. Few American battles have been so extended, savage and personal. A handful of Americans volunteered to live among six thousand Vietnamese, training farmers to defend their village. Such CAPs are now a lost footnote about how the war could have been fought; only the villagers remain to bear witness. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (959.70443 W516) War Comes to Long An: Revolutionary Conflict in a Vietnamese Province by Jeffrey Race. A study of the Vietnamese conflict examined through the lenses of the revolutionary and counter-revolutionary movements in the rural province of Long An up until American intervention in the area. It offers a human, balanced, penetrating account of war. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Leadership Developing the Leaders Around You: How to Help Others Reach their Full Potential by John C. Maxwell. Why do some people achieve great personal success, yet never succeed in building a business or making an impact in their organization? John C. Maxwell knows the answer. "The greatest leadership principle that I have ever learned in over twenty-five years of leadership," says Maxwell, "is that those closest to the leader will determine the success level of that leader." It's not enough for a leader to have vision, energy, drive, and conviction. If you want to see your dream come to fruition, you must learn how to develop the leaders around you. Whether you're the leader of a non-profit organization, small business, or Fortune 500 company, Developing the Leaders Around You can help you to take others to the limits of their potential and your organization to a whole new level. (658.4092 M465b) Heroic Leadership: Best practices from a 450-year-old Company that Changed the World by Chris Lowney. Leadership makes great companies, but few of us truly understand how to turn ourselves and others into great leaders. One company--the Jesuits--pioneered a unique formula for molding leaders and in the process have successfully grappled with challenges that test great companies-forging seamless multinational teams, motivating performance, being open to change and staying adaptable. The author reveals the leadership principles that have guided the Jesuits for more than 450 years: the 4 core values of selfawareness (reflection), ingenuity (embracing change), love (positive attitudes toward others) and heroism (energizing ambitions). (658.4092 L919) Leadership and the New Science: Discovering Order in a Chaotic World by Margaret J. Wheatley. This pioneering work shows how revolutionary discoveries in quantum physics, chaos theory, and biology provide powerful insights for transforming how we organize work, people and life. (500 W557) Lincoln on Leadership: Executive Strategies for Tough Times by Donald T. Phillips. Based on the strategies of Abraham Lincoln, this book focuses on the President's most difficult decisions during the Civil War, offering lessons based on his experiences for today's leaders. It is the first book to examine Abraham Lincoln's diverse leadership abilities and how they can be applied to today's complex world. (973.7092 P558) Once A Marine: An Iraq War Tank Commander's Inspirational Memoir of Combat, Courage, and Recovery by Nick Popaditch. This autobiography of retired Marine GySgt made invalid from wounds received in Iraq is a portrayal of a committed warrior. Popaditch wanted to be a Marine more than anything else in the world, and tried to stay in even after being hit in the head with a rocket. During his 15-year career, he specialized in armor, and in this book sheds a good deal of light on the Marines who fight in tanks. The book provides rare exposure of how the Corps looks from the perspective of a non-commissioned officer whose loyalty to it doesn't blind him to its vices and limitations. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (956.7044 P825)
Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action by Simon Sinek. Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty from customers and employees alike? Even among the successful, why are so few able to repeat their success over and over? Drawing on a wide range of real-life stories, Sinek weaves together a clear vision of what it truly takes to lead and inspire. In studying the leaders who've had the greatest influence in the world, he discovered that they all think, act, and communicate in the exact same way -- and it's the complete opposite of what everyone else does. Sinek calls this powerful idea The Golden Circle, and it provides a framework upon which organizations can be built, movements can be lead, and people can be inspired. (658.4 S616) The Power of Communication: Skills to Build Trust, Inspire Loyalty, and Lead Effectively by Helio Fred Garcia. This book builds on the U.S. Marine Corps' legendary publication Warfighting, showing how to apply the Corps' proven leadership and strategy doctrine to all forms of public communication -- and achieve extraordinary results. Communication is the absolutely indispensable leadership discipline. But, too often, leaders and professional communicators get mired in tactics, and fail to influence public attitudes in the ways that would help them the most. World-renowned leadership communications expert, consultant, and speaker Helio Fred Garcia reveals how to orient on audiences, recognizing their centers of gravity and most critical concerns. You'll learn how to integrate and succeed with all three levels of communication: strategic, operational, and tactical. Garcia shows how to take the initiative and control the agenda... respond to events with speed and focus... use the power of maneuver... prepare and plan... and put it all together, becoming a "habitually strategic" communicator. (658.45 G216) The Starfish and the Spider by Ori Brafman; Rod A. Beckstrom. If you cut off a spider's head, it dies; if you cut off a starfish's leg it grows a new one, and that leg can grow into an entirely new starfish. Traditional top-down organizations are like spiders, but now starfish organizations are changing the face of business and the world. What's the hidden power behind the success of Wikipedia, craigslist, and Skype? What do eBay and General Electric have in common with the abolitionist and women's rights movements? What fundamental choice put General Motors and Toyota on vastly different paths? This book explores what happens when starfish take on spiders and reveals how established companies and institutions, from IBM to Intuit to the U.S. government, are also learning how to incorporate starfish principles to achieve success. (302.35 B812) Logistics Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army by Donald W. Engels. Careful analyses of terrain, climate, and supply requirements that helped account for Alexander the Great's strategic decision making in the light of options open to him. This book brings an ancient army to life as it really was and moved: the hours it took for simple operations of washing and cooking and feeding animals, to the train of noncombatants moving with the army. This book will set the reader thinking. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Clockspeed: Winning Industry Control in the Age of Temporary Advantage by Charles H. Fine. Introduces a new vocabulary for understanding the forces of competition and making strategic decisions that will determine the destiny of a given company, as well as a given industry. The author argues that each industry has its own evolutionary life cycle or "clockspeed" measured by the rate at which it introduces new products, processes, and organizational structures. Just as geneticists study the fruit fly to gain insight into the evolutionary paths of all animals, managers in any industry can learn from the industrial fruit flies-such as Internet services, personal computers, and multimedia entertainment-which evolve through new generations at breakneck speed. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Feeding Mars: Logistics in Western Warfare from the Middle Ages to the Present by John A. Lynn (Editor). Tools of war demand huge quantities of fodder, fuel, ammunition, and food. All these must be produced, transported, and distributed to contending forces in the field. No one can doubt the importance of feeding the god of war (Mars) in warfare, and it takes no great effort to recognize that logistics has always been a major aspect of large-scale armed struggle. This book makes a major contribution to military history, shedding light on an important, but too often overlooked, aspect of warfare -- logistics. (355.411 F295) Keep from All Thoughtful Men by Jim Lacey. Refutes the long-accepted notion that the avalanche of munitions which poured forth from American factories defeated Axis powers during WWII. The author argues that manpower and the capacity to produce more munitions gave out long before the money did, and how revolutions in statistics and finance during this period forever changed the nature of war, overturning three millennia of the making of grand strategy. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Recurring Logistic Problems as I Have Observed Them by Carter Bowie Magruder. A study of the logistical aspects of war, this book outlines basic problems that tend to recur in logistics. Despite the transformation in equipment and supplies that separate today's military from that entered by the author in 1917, the principles that guided the technical services of his day apply equally to those who serve in combat service support assignments today. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Supplying War: Logistics from Wallenstein to Patton by Martin van Creveld. Examines the "nuts and bolts" of war. The author considers formidable problems of movement and supply, transportation and administration, often mentioned (but rarely explored) by the vast majority of books on military history. By concentrating on logistics rather than on the more traditional tactics and strategy, the author is able to offer an original reinterpretation of military history. (355.41 V222) Pacific Express: The Critical Role of Military Logistics in World War II by William L. McGee (Editor); Sandra McGee (Editor). Vol. III of the Amphibious Operations in the South Pacific in WWII series. This book is dedicated to the men and women--military and civilian-- who served in logistical support roles for the front line combat personnel in WWII. The story of the vital logistics services supporting the U.S. Armed Forces operating in the Pacific is told -- proof positive that warfare is not all blazing combat. While victory is won or lost in battle, all military history shows that adequate logistics support is essential to the winning of the battle. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Regional & Cultural Studies Angry Wind: Through Muslim Black Africa by Truck, Bus, Boat, and Camel by Jeffrey Tayler. In this travelogue, the author puts himself in situations of great discomfort, cultural alienation, and physical danger in poor and unstable developing-world regions, then depicts the ensuing misadventures with animated detail. Recurring themes include the importance of Islam in the region and the population's general dislike for the current U.S. administration, though this does not prevent Tayler from striking up friendships everywhere he goes or from benefiting from acts of generosity. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Eastward to Tartary: Travels in the Balkans, the Middle East, and the Caucasus by Robert D. Kaplan. This book journeys into the heart of a volatile region through dramatic stories of unforgettable characters. Kaplan illuminates the tragic history of this unstable area he describes as the "new fault line" between East and West and interprets present-day politics through the lens of "national character" and historical simile. The numerous historic, geographic and cultural cross-references will enhance the reader's understanding of current events in some of today's most strategic hot spots. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power by Robert D. Kaplan. Focuses on the Indian Ocean region of countries - India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Burma, Oman, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Tanzania. The authors believes it is here that the fight for democracy, energy independence, and religious freedom will be lost or won, and it is here that American foreign policy must concentrate if the United States is to remain relevant in an ever-changing world. Kaplan exposes the effects of population growth, climate change, and extremist politics on this unstable region, demonstrating why Americans can no longer afford to ignore this important area of the world. (327.73 K17) Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea by Barbara Demick. This book is based on interviews with real people who defected from North Korea. Following the lives of six North Koreans over fifteen years, from the rise to power of Kim Jong Il and the devastation of a famine that killed one-fifth of the population, the author illustrates what it means to live under the most repressive totalitarian regime today. (306.095193 D378) The Great Arab Conquests by Hugh Kennedy. Examines the history of the great Islamic expansion, reveals how the Arab armies were able to overcome almost everything in their path, and brings to light the unique characteristics of Islamic settlement in new lands and the conversion to Islam of vast populations. This book helps explain many of the current borders of the Muslim world and also provides the early context for religious ideas that continue to motivate believers. (909.09767 K35) Understanding Arabs: A Contemporary Guide to Arab Society by Margaret K. Nydell. With the Arab Spring causing ripple effects throughout the world, a solid understanding of Arab history, culture, and practices has never been more important. For over twenty years, top diplomats, scholars, and business people have relied on Understanding Arabs as the essential guide to comprehending an immensely varied culture. Covering all aspects of Arab life - from religion and society to social norms and communication styles - this all-encompassing guide reveals what the often misunderstood culture is really like. (909.04927 N993)
What Went Wrong? The Clash Between Islam and Modernity in the Middle East by Bernard Lewis. The author, a renowned authority an Islamic affairs, examines the anguished reaction of the Islamic world as it tried to make sense of how it had been overtaken, overshadowed, and dominated by the West. In a fascinating portrait of a culture in turmoil, Lewis shows how the Middle East turned its attention to understanding European weaponry, industry, government, education, and culture. He also describes how some Middle Easterners fastened blame on a series of scapegoats, while others asked not "Who did this to us?" but rather "Where did we go wrong?" (956.015 L673) Roots of Maneuver Warfare Air Power and Maneuver Warfare by Martin van Creveld. This book clarifies the relationship between air power and maneuver warfare since 1939, a subject that derives its importance from the fact that maneuver warfare has been the U.S. Army's official doctrine since the early eighties and remains so to the present day. It contains an analysis of Air University's military doctrine on the same subjects. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Assault from the Sea: Essays on the History of Amphibious Warfare by Merrill L. Bartlett. This collection of 51 essays provides a history of amphibious landings that include European, Asian, and American operations. It describes in detail some of history's most significant amphibious assaults, as well as planned attacks that were never carried out. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Maneuver Warfare: An Anthology by Richard Hooker (Editor). A collection of articles exploring the idea of maneuver-based warfare, getting to the heart of the issues and engaging in an energetic and lively debate with each essay making an independent contribution. The question provides the basis for this important book is: Can a small, maneuver-oriented military establishment actually serve us better? This question may indeed serve as the foundation for American military doctrine in the 21st century. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Maneuver Warfare Handbook by William S. Lind. Develops and explains the theory of maneuver warfare and offers specific tactical, operational, and organizational recommendations for improving ground combat forces. The author translates concepts -- too often vaguely stated by maneuver warfare advocates -- into concrete doctrine. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) The U.S. Marines and Amphibious War: Its Theory, and Its Practice in the Pacific by Jeter A. Isely and Philip A. Crowl. Discusses the evolution of U.S. Marines and amphibious doctrine 1901-1934 and training for amphibious war 1934-1942. It includes discussion of Guadalcanal, Solomons, Tarawa, the Philippines, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Strategic Thinking Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life by Richard W. Paul; Linda B. Elder. Critical Thinking is about becoming a better thinker in every aspect of your life: in your career, and as a consumer, citizen, friend, parent, and lover. Presents the core skills needed for effective thinking; analysis of thought processes, identifying weaknesses, and overcoming them. Effective thinking translates into better decisions, less frustration, more wealth and above all, greater confidence to pursue and achieve your most important goals in life. (153.42 P324) General System Theory: Foundations, Development, Applications by Ludwig Von Bertalanffy. An attempt to formulate common laws that apply to virtually every scientific field, this conceptual approach has had a profound impact on such widely diverse disciplines as biology, economics, psychology, and demography. (501 B536) Harnessing Complexity: Organizational Implications of a Scientific Frontier by Robert Axelrod; Michael D. Cohen. This book is informative to anyone who wants to better comprehend how people and organizations can adapt effectively in the information age. Stepby-step guide to understanding the processes of variation, interaction, and selection that are at work in all organizations. The authors show how to use their own paradigm of "bottom up" management, the Complex Adaptive System-applicable to science, public policy, or private commerce. This simple model of how people work together will change forever how we think about getting things done in a group. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Rethinking the Principles of War by Anthony D. McIvor (Editor). In these 29 essays contributors from the national security community analyze a range of vital issues relevant to how wars are conducted, including whom to recruit, what to acquire, when to train, how to fight, and why. They cover the American way of war as a principle, the operational arts of conventional warfare and how they relate to what the US does now and in the near future, the operational arts of irregular warfare and the "small war," principles of post-conflict and stability operations, and the future of intelligence. (355.0201 R438) The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb. This book examines the role of the unexpected and discusses why improbable events are not anticipated or understood properly. The author explores how humans rationalize the "black swan phenomenon" to make it appear less random. (003.54 T143a) The Copernican Revolution by Thomas S. Kuhn. This is a book for any reader interested in the evolution of ideas and, in particular, in the curious interplay of hypothesis and experiment which is the essence of modern science. Few episodes in the development of scientific theory show so clearly how the solution to a highly technical problem can alter our basic thought processes and attitudes. Understanding the processes which underlay the Copernican Revolution gives us a perspective, in this scientific age, from which to evaluate our own beliefs more intelligently. The Copernican Revolution was simultaneously an episode in the internal development of astronomy, a critical turning point in the evolution of scientific thought, and a crisis in Western man's concept of his relation to the universe and to God. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-makers by Richard E. Neustadt; Ernest R. May. Examines what constitutes critical thinking and decision making of effective leaders and suggests methods for improvement in evaluating information. The authors, both professors of government, analyze both political disasters and successes of the past century to provide telling lessons on how to use history to improve decision-making. A dozen case studies are drawn in detail, both from the official record and from backstage information gained from top officials. Whether to make critical business or political decisions or simply better understand the world around us, applying historical knowledge intelligently and responsibly can make one a more effective leader. (355.007 N496) Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. In this book, the author takes us on a tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think and the way we make choices. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. He exposes the extraordinary capabilities, and also the faults and biases, of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives, and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Kahneman received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making. His work has transformed cognitive psychology and launched the new fields of behavioral economics and happiness studies. (153.42 K12) Wounded Warrior Ascent: How One Quadriplegic Fought for a Full Life and Soared by Bruce McGhie. Personal memoir of Bruce McGhie, who was critically injured after an Air Force training accident at age 22. He not only overcame the obstacles of recovering from a spinal cord injury but went on to achieve a virtually normal life. McGhie strived for the extraordinary, succeeding in such endeavors as building up a successful business consultancy and becoming the first spinal cordinjured person in the world to be licensed as a glider pilot, using hand controls he helped develop. The book helps to defuse the fear and awkwardness others may feel in the presence of the disabled, while simultaneously inspiring every person to make the most out of his or her life. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Courage After Fire: Coping Strategies for Troops Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and Their Families by Suzanne Best; Paula Domenici; et al. The bravery displayed by our soldiers at war is commonly recognized. However, often forgotten is the courage required by veterans when they return home and suddenly face reintegration into their families, workplaces, and communities. Authored by three mental health professionals with many years of experience counseling veterans, this book provides strategies and techniques for this challenging journey home. It offers soldiers and their families a comprehensive guide to dealing with the all-too-common repercussions of combat duty, including post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. It details state-of-the-art treatments for these difficulties and outlines specific ways to improve couple and family relationships. The book also offers tips on areas such as rejoining the workforce and reconnecting with children. This book is also on the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Reading List. (616.85 A736)
Down Range to Iraq and Back by Bridget C. Cantrell; Chuck Dean. Down Range is a timely book dedicated to bringing the troops home and addressing the challenges of the reintegration process from combatant to civilian. Bridget Cantrell, Ph.D., and Vietnam veteran Chuck Dean have joined forces to present this vital information and resource manual for both returning troops and their loved ones. Here you will find answers, explanations, and insights as to why so many combat veterans suffer from flashbacks, depression, fits of rage, nightmares, anxiety, emotional numbing, and other troubling aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder. (Playaway 616.85 C233) Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming by Jonathan Shay. In this ambitious follow-up to Achilles in Vietnam, Dr. Jonathan Shay uses the Odyssey, the classic Greek story of a soldier's homecoming, to illuminate the pitfalls that trap many veterans on the road back to civilian life. The author combines important psychological work and literary interpretation with an impassioned plea to renovate American military institutions. Shay deepens our understanding of both the combat veteran's experience and one of the world's greatest classics. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Once a Warrior, Always a Warrior: Navigating the Transition from Combat to Home - Including Combat Stress, PTSD, and mTBI by Charles W. Hoge. War changes people in ways only other warriors may fully understand. The author, a retired Army physician, addresses the psychological problems returning combat veterans face and the social stigma attached to seeking mental health care. This book is intended for the community of veterans and their families, helping family members to gain greater understanding of ways they can help their loved ones navigate the "PTSD paradox" while also helping veterans cope with combat stress and PTSD through a set of specific skills. (Playaway 616.85 H715) Once a Warrior: Wired for Life by Bridget C. Cantrell; Chuck Dean. Once a Warrior: And Wired For Life illustrates how to address the process of coming home when your tour of duty is over. Written by the same authors of Down Range: to Iraq and Back, Dr. Bridget Cantrell and Vietnam Veteran Chuck Dean, this book shows returning warriors how to turn negatives into positives and assists highly trained military personnel in utilizing their tremendous potential in achieving success and happiness after their release from military service. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Overcoming Post-Deployment Syndrome: A Six-Step Mission to Health by David X. Cifu; Cory Blake. Guide for service members dealing with the repercussions of combat duty, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, chronic pain and musculoskeletal injury, and substance abuse. The book provides personal stories of servicemembers who are going through the process of successfully reintegrating into their families, workplaces, and communities; a twelve-week basic training in self-directed healing arts; community and government resources, tips, and suggestions; the means to integrate traditional and complementary medicine techniques to treat common symptoms. (Library Does Not Have at this Time)
Shadow of the Sword by Jeremiah Workman. Memoir by Marine Corps veteran SSgt Jeremiah Workman tells a story of his service in Iraq and of the emotional wars that continue to rage long after our fighting men come home. Workman candidly reveals the ordeal of posttraumatic stress disorder: the therapy and drug treatments that deadened his mind even as they eased his pain, the overwhelming stress that pushed his marriage to the brink, and the confrontations with anger and self-blame that he had internalized for years. (956.7044345092 W926) Soft Spots: A Marine's Memoir of Combat and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder by Clint Van Winkle. A powerful memoir of a Marine in Iraq -- and his struggle with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a system trying to hide the damage done. This book recounts the author's experiences as a Marine sergeant in the Iraq War, the horrors of the memories of combat, and his battles with alcoholism and post-traumatic stress disorder after returning to the United States. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared--Lt. Louis Zamperini. Captured by the Japanese and driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor. (940.54 H651) War and the Soul by Edward Tick. The New England Journal of Medicine reports that 16 percent (one in eight) of returning Iraq veterans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder to the extent that they can't hold jobs, are incapable of intimacy, creative work, and self-realization. In war's overwhelming violence, the soul--the true self--flees and can become lost for life. The author believes the key to healing lies in how we understand PTSD and shows how to make the wounded soul whole again. When this work is achieved, PTSD vanishes and the veteran can truly return home. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) Warrior Mindset: Mental Toughness Skills for a Nation's Defenders by Michael J. Asken, Dave Grossman, Loren W. Christensen. This book is about developing mental toughness for combat. Written in a technical/scientific manner and applying principles of military psychology, the authors guide the reader through self-evaluation of fitness for duty, mental toughness, dealing with fear ­ developing a mental attack plan, strategic vision, how to conduct personal psy-ops and briefings. (Library Does Not Have at this Time) What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. In this narrative, the author weaves accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination, and his readings from Homer to the Mahabharata to Jung. He talks frankly about how he is haunted by his wartime experiences and how he finally finds a way to make peace with his past. He discusses the daily contradictions that warriors face in the grind of war, where each battle requires them to take life or spare life. He also underscores the need for returning veterans to be counseled properly. (959.70434 M347)

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