Interactive services marketing, RP Fisk, SJ Grove, J John

Tags: Services Marketing, American Marketing Association, Mary Jo Bitner, service organizations, Chicago, Journal of Marketing, Raymond P. Fisk, competitive advantage, Mary Jo, Experiential exercises, Dramaturgy of Service Exchange, the service, Semester at Sea, Fisk, supplementary readings, Journal of Retailing, Lynn G. Shostack, Stephen J., Leonard L. Berry, Stephen W. Brown, A. Parasuraman, Journal of Service Research, Dawn Iacobucci, Teresa A. Swartz, Marketing Management, service success, Quiz, service organization, Customer Service, Service Recovery, College students, Chapter 14, services marketing strategy, FIELD ASSIGNMENTS, field assignment, service demand, unconditional guarantee, Robert F. Lusch, David E. Bowen, James H. Donnelly, Harvard Business Review, William J. Glynn, Sage Publications, Leonard L., William R. George, Stephen L., Due Day, Interactive Services Marketing, the Service Performance Berry, Gregory D. Upah, facilitating services
Content: Semester at Sea COURSE SYLLABUS Voyage: Spring 2013 Discipline: Marketing SEMS 3500-101: Services Marketing Division: Upper Division Faculty Name: Wade Lancaster, PhD Pre-requisites: None COURSE DESCRIPTION Few services trends are as significant as the globalization of the services economy. Global expansion has required service organizations to familiarize themselves with the many cultural differences that might affect their global operations. Factors such as the major religions in a country, the political parties who exert influence or control in the country as well as the amount and types of resources that are available influence the type of and level of development of the service economy in a country. This course gives students a theoretical and practical understanding of services marketing and e-marketing by commercial, as well as non-profit organizations. It presents concepts and frameworks necessary for understanding the nature of service organizations' marketing activities and how those activities differ from one country to another. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the decisions marketing managers have to make, the tools available to assist them in making those decisions, and how these tools can be applied to the solution of marketing problems faced by service organizations. COURSE OBJECTIVES Building on a set of core services marketing concepts and frameworks students will be able to analyze and evaluate various marketing related situations face by service organizations. This course will help students master such basic skills as communication, analysis, reflective thinking, ethical understanding, and multicultural understanding. It will also help with business management knowledge and skills such as, creation of value, domestic and global economic environment, and ethical responsibilities. Finally, it will help students improve on strategic decision-making for new information technology in marketing. REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS AUTHOR: Fisk, Raymond P., Grove, Stephen J., and John, Joby TITLE: Interactive Services Marketing PUBLISHER: Houghton Mifflin Company ISBN #: 13: 9780618641808 and 10: 0618641807 DATE/EDITION: 2008/3rd COST: List $174.95, Wholesale $129.25, Cengagebrain.com $139.95, Used much less 1
TOPICAL OUTLINE OF COURSE
Day 1:
Course Introduction Understanding Services Marketing: Chapter 1 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Defining services and describing their characteristics Classifying services How does services marketing differ from physical goods marketing? How do services as products differ from facilitating services? Thinking Globally: Chapter 15 (Fisk, Grove, John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Services and Culture Global trade services Export patterns of services Multilingual service systems
Field Assignment 1: (Hawaii) Due Day 4
Day 2:
Frameworks for Managing the Customer's Experience: Chapter 2 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Components of the service experience Framing the service experience Comparing service experience frameworks Raising the curtain on the services theater
Quiz: Chapter 1
Day 3:
Experiential exercises: classifying service businesses observed in Hawaii; exploring how the fundamental characteristics of those services influence their marketing.
Day 4:
Leveraging the People Factor: Chapter 6 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Services employees and their behavior Empowering service employees Costuming service employees Maximizing service employee productivity
Quiz: Chapter 2 Field Assignment 2: (Japan) Due Day 7
2
Day 5:
Managing the Customer Mix: Chapter 7 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Service customers and their behavior Customer-to-customer interactions Customer-to employee interactions Selecting and training customers Managing customer rage
Quiz: Chapter 6 Field Assignment 3: (China) Due Day 8
Day 6:
Discuss Hawaii field assignment Experiential exercises: Preparing for Japan Identifying service organizations known for empowering employees; Observing service workers who are wearing a costume or uniform; Describing service encounters in which the service personnel exhibited maximum discretionary effort, and those that reflected a minimum effort; Monitoring the number of occasions when the behavior of other customers influences the mood of others in service setting; Observing customer behavior in restaurants
Day 7:
Designing the Service Setting: Chapter 5 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) What is a service setting? Key considerations in designing the service setting The service setting as a marketing tool Cyberspace as a service setting
Quiz: Chapter 7 FIELD LAB Assignment: (Shanghai) Due Day 9
Day 8:
Planning and Producing the Service Performance: Chapter 4 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) The service performance Supplementing the basic performance Differentiating the service performance Customizing the service performance Scripting the service performance Blueprinting the service performance The internet and service performance
Quiz: Chapter 5 Field Assignment 4: (Viet Nam) Due Day 10
3
Day 9:
Discuss Japan and China field assignments and Shanghai field lab. Experiential exercises: Preparing for Viet Nam, Singapore, and Myanmar Consider the service encounter that occurred when visiting a bank in either Japan or China to exchange U.S. dollars for local currency, develop a o Service script, and a o Simple blueprint Think about your service experience in this shipboard classroom, list as many factors as you can that affect that experience. After comparing your list with other class members, determine which factors are most obvious, least obvious, and most likely to be the result of backstage activities.
Day 10: Plugging into the Information Age: Chapter 3 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Services and the information age Empowering employees through technology Empowering the customer Enabling the interactive experience Capturing customer information Coping with negative impacts of services technology Challenges of using technology to manage customer interfaces
Quiz: Chapter 4 Field Assignment 5: (Singapore/Myanmar) Due Day 11
Day 11: Setting a Price for the Service Rendered: Chapter 8 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Why do service prices vary? Yield management in services Pricing objectives and approaches The relationship between service price and value Calculating service costs Price bundling Additional pricing considerations
Quiz: Chapter 3 Field Assignment 6: (India) Due Day 13
4
Day 12: Discuss Viet Nam, Singapore, Myanmar field assignments. Experiential exercises: Preparing for India Identify a service experience that ineffective service technology made more difficult. Describe the service encounter in detail to highlight the role of technology. What could the service organization do to improve the service technology? Identify examples of organizations encountered since the beginning of this voyage that use price bundling and construct the various combinations of service features by which prices vary. What market segments are attracted to the bundle rather than to the individual service features? Day 13: Promoting the Interactive Service Experience: Chapter 9 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Services and integrated marketing communications Marketing communications and services The promotional mix Advertising the service Sales promotions and services Personal selling and services Publicity and services Promoting on the internet Quiz: Chapter 8 Day 14: Delivering Service Quality and Guaranteeing Services: Chapter 10 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) What is service quality? How customers evaluate service quality Why and when to guarantee a service How to design a service guarantee What makes an extraordinary service guarantee? Quiz: Chapter 9 Day 15: Discuss India field assignment. Experiential exercises: Preparing for Africa Choose a service organization's marketing communications activities and analyze what it communicates to its customers through each of the various services marketing mix variables. Does it do a good job of integrating its marketing communications? Consider the concept of gap theory. Cite an example for each of the first five gaps encountered on this voyage. 5
Day 16: Regaining Customer Confidence Through Customer Service and Service Recovery Chapter 11 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) The need for service recovery The steps to service recovery Quiz: Chapter 10 Field Assignment 7: (Africa) Due Day 18 Day 17: Researching Service Success and Failure: Chapter 12 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Why is researching service success and failure necessary? Why is service success so difficult to achieve? Research methods for services Creating a service quality information system Quiz: Chapter 11 Day 18: Experiential exercises: An ocean front resort is concerned about their guests getting along together. college students, families with small children, and senior citizens all use the resort. Conflicts often occur. Outline a compatibility management program to manage and reduce conflicts. A commercial window washing service is concerned because their defections rate has reached 15%. Outline a service recovery program they should use with business customers who call them to cancel their service. Semester at Sea has decided to install an unconditional guarantee as part of their defections management program. Write an unconditional guarantee that meets all of the tests of a good guarantee. Design a mystery shopper observation report form for visiting a restaurant. Propose how management can use the information obtained. Design a customer feedback card for a service encountered during this voyage. Explain the rationale behind the questions. Conduct a moment of truth impact analysis for a service encounter you have had on this voyage. Based on this analysis, provide some recommendations for service improvements. 6
Day 19: Developing Marketing Strategies for Services: Chapter 13 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Overview of marketing strategy in service organizations Scanning the environment Planning the services marketing strategy Positioning and service segmentation Marketing mix strategy Strategic challenges for services Service strategies for competitive advantage Quiz: Chapter 12 Day 20: Coping with Fluctuating Demand for Services: Chapter 14 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Why is services demand a problem? The nature of service demand Chasing demand with service capacity Smoothing demand to fill service capacity Quiz: Chapter 13 Day 21: Discuss Africa field assignment. Experiential exercises: Using Semester at Sea (SAS): o Specify a sustainable competitive advantage o What barriers to imitation prevent the competitive advantage from being copied? o Identify the stage of the SLC within which SAS operates. o Discuss the pros and cons of each strategy that is available to SAS o Recommend a strategy o Develop a positioning map for SAS Consider a visit to a service organization that occurred during this voyage that required you to wait a long time before being served, and the principles of waiting presented in Chapter 14. o How long did you wait? o How did you feel during the wait and why? o How did the wait make you feel about the organization? o What do you think could have been done to make the wait more pleasant? o Did the organization do anything to alleviate the tedium of your wait? 7
Day 22: Thinking Globally: Chapter 15 (Fisk, Grove, and John); and supplementary readings (see attached list) Entry strategies for global service markets Standardization versus adaptation of global services Technology and global services Quiz: Chapter 14 Day 23: Quiz: Chapter 15 FIELD WORK FIELD LAB The proposed field lab for this course will take place in Shanghai. Students will have an opportunity to meet and interact with marketing executives representing two different service organizations. The focus of this field lab will be the service organization's physical setting, which is the most controllable of all the elements contributing to the customer's experience. Students will learn from these executives how: o they ensure the setting performs well operationally and symbolically; o the physical environment impacts the service workers; o the setting establishes a competitive advantage; o the setting facilitates the service delivery process; o it is used to appeal to new or different target audiences. Students will write a paper, not to exceed 5 double spaced typed pages, that addresses the five issues listed above. FIELD ASSIGNMENTS Students will complete 7 field assignments at the following ports of call: Hawaii, Japan, China, Viet Nam, Singapore/Myanmar, India, and Africa. The field assignments will consist of maintaining a reflective journal in which they will record their observations regarding a fixed set of criteria relating to service settings, service workers, and customers. An additional sub-set of varying observations related to the current class topics will be addressed for each assignment. Students will write a short briefing paper, not to exceed two double spaced typed pages, as well as sharing their observations as appropriate in class. METHODS OF EVALUATION / GRADING RUBRIC University of Virginia policy applies to the meaning and quantification of letter grades. The following tasks in this course total 100% of the final course grade: fifteen (15) quizzes; twentythree (23) Class participation days, plus one 8 hour field lab requiring attendance, participation, and a written a paper, not to exceed five (5) double spaced typed pages; seven (7) field assignments, requiring the maintenance of a reflective journal, and a briefing paper, not to exceed two (2) double spaced typed pages for each field assignment. 8
Quizzes (20 points each)
300
Class Participation (10 points each)
250
Field Lab
200
Field Assignments (7)
250
Hawaii
30
Japan
30
China
30
Viet Nam
40
Singapore/Myalaysia
40
India
40
South Africa
40
Guidelines for written assignments will be discussed in class. All written assignments will be judged on one or more of the following criteria: compliance with instructions, accuracy, insight, completeness, originality, creativity, quality of content, quality of delivery, and appropriateness of application of course terms, concepts, processes, and strategies, appropriateness of evaluation and recommendations, good business and ethical conduct. Other criteria may be employed as deemed appropriate.
Attendance and Absenteeism: Semester at Sea and the University of Virginia regard student participation in class as essential to the learning process, therefore, regular classroom attendance is required of all students. It should be understood that absence does not excuse the student from course work and the responsibility to complete assignments on time. The instructor is not required to give make-up quizzes or accept class work missed as a result of an absence.
Class Participation: Learning is an active behavior, with greater levels of activity resulting in more learning. Students are encouraged to actively participate by making meaningful contributions. This means that each student should come to class prepared for the scheduled activities, which includes having the textbook, reading the assigned chapter and other related materials, and completing required assignments.
Classroom Conduct: In order to facilitate an appropriate classroom learning environment, the following rules of conduct will be enforced:
Cell phones, pagers, PDAs, MP3 players and similar electronic devices are to be turned off and stowed during class. Respect for the person who is speaking. This applies equally to everyone in the class. There will be ample opportunity to be heard, especially when responding to a question posed by either the professor or another student, when asking a question, when volunteering useful information, and during Group activities. Please do not talk while the professor is conducting class; when students are 9
contributing to class discussion; when guest speakers are visiting; during videos; and at times when talking can disturb others in the classroom. Disruptive chatter or buzz will not be tolerated. ELECTRONIC COURSE MATERIALS The attached supplementary readings will be located in the course folder housed on the ship's intranet. Students may access them from their own computers or from the ship's computer lab. HONOR CODE Semester at Sea students enroll in an academic program administered by the University of Virginia, and thus bind themselves to the University's honor code. The code prohibits all acts of lying, cheating, and stealing. Please consult the Voyager's Handbook for further explanation of what constitutes an honor offense. Each written assignment for this course must be pledged by the student as follows: "On my honor as a student, I pledge that I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment." The pledge must be signed, or, in the case of an electronic file, signed "[signed]." 10
Supplemental Readings The following readings will be used to supplement the textbook. Chapter 1: Understanding Services Marketing Berry, Leonard L., Edwin E. Lefkowith, and Terry Clark (1988), "In Services, What's in a Name?" Harvard Business Review, 88 (September-October), 28-30. Berry, Leonard L. and A. Parasuraman (1993), "Building a New Academic Field-the Case of Services Marketing," Journal of Retailing, 69 (Spring), 13-60. Fisk, Raymond P., Stephen W. Brown, and Mary Jo Bitner (1993), "The Evolution of the Services marketing literature," Journal of Retailing, 69 (Spring), 61-103. Lovelock, Christopher H. (1983), "Classifying Services to Gain Strategic Marketing Insights," Journal of Marketing, 47 (Summer), 9-20. Lovelock, Christopher and Evert Gummesson (2004), "Whither Services Marketing? In Search of a New Paradigm and Fresh Perspectives," Journal of Service Research, 7 (1), 20-41. Rathmell, John M. (1966), "What Is Meant by Services?" Journal of Marketing, 30 (October), 3236. Shostack, G. Lynn (1977), "Breaking Free from Product Marketing," Journal of Marketing, 41 (April), 73-80. Vargo, Stephen L. and Robert F. Lusch (2004), "Evolving to a new Dominant Logic for Marketing," Journal of Marketing, 68 (January), 1-17. Vargo, Stephen L. and Robert F. Lusch (2004), "The Four Service Marketing Myths: Remnants of a Goods-Based Manufacturing Model," Journal of Service Research, 6(4), 324-335. Chapter 2: Frameworks for Managing the Customer's Experience Booms, Bernard H. and Mary Jo Bitner (1981), "Marketing Strategies and Organizational Structures for Service Firms," in Marketing of Services, James H. Donnelly and William R. George, eds., Chicago: American Marketing Association, 47-51. Grove, Stephen J. and Raymond P. Fisk (1983), "The Dramaturgy of Service Exchange: An Analytical Framework for Services Marketing," in Emerging Perspectives on Services Marketing, Leonard L. Berry, Lynn G. Shostack, and Gregory D. Upah, eds., Chicago: American Marketing Association, 45-49. Grove, Stephen J., Raymond P. Fisk, and Joby John (2000), "Services as Theater: Guidelines and Implications," in Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, Teresa A. Swartz and Dawn Iacobucci, eds., Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications Inc., 21-36. 11
Chapter 3: Plugging into the Information Age Barnes, James G., Peter A. Dunne, and William J. Glynn (2000), "Self-Service and Technology: Unanticipated and Unintended Effects on Customer Relationships," in Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, Teresa A. Swartz and Dawn Iacobucci, eds., Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 89-102. Bitner, Mary Jo (2001), "Self-Service Technologies: What Do Customers Expect," Marketing Management, 10 (Spring), 10-11. Dabholkar, Pratibha A. (2000), "Technology in Service Delivery: Implications for Self-Service and Service Support," in Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, Teresa A. Swartz and Dawn Iacobucci, eds., Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 103-110. Glynn, William J. (1997), "Building Future Relationships," Marketing Management, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 6 (Fall), 34-36. Kasper, Hans (1997), "Remote Service Delivery," Marketing Management, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 6 (Fall), 38-39. McKenna, Regis (1991a), "Marketing Is Everything," Harvard Business Review, 69 (JanuaryFebruary), 65-79. Meuter, Matthew L., Amy L. Ostrom, Robert I. Roundtree, and Mary Jo Bitner (2000), "SelfService Technologies: Understanding customer satisfaction With Technology-Based Service Encounters," Journal of Marketing, 64 (July), 50-64. Parasuraman, A. (2000), "Technology Readiness Index (TRI): A Multiple-item Scale to Measure Readiness to Embrace New Technologies," Journal of Service Research, 2 (4), 307-320. Rust, Roland T. (1997), "The Dawn of Computer Behavior," Marketing Management, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 6 (Fall), 31-33. Stauss, Bernd (1997), "Global Word of Mouth," Marketing Management, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 6 (Fall), 28-30. Chapter 4: Planning and Producing the Service Performance Berry, Leonard L., Kathleen Seiders, and Dhruv Grewal (2002), "Understanding Service Convenience," Journal of Marketing, 66 (3), 1-17. * Grove, Stephen J. and Raymond P. Fisk (1983), "The Dramaturgy of Service Exchange: An Analytical Framework for Services Marketing," in Emerging Perspectives on Services Marketing, Leonard L. Berry, Lynn G. Shostack, and Gregory D. Upah, eds., Chicago: American Marketing Association, 45-49. (Also Chapter 2) Grove, Stephen J., Raymond P. Fisk, and Mary Jo Bitner (1992), "Dramatizing the Service Experience: A Managerial Approach," in Advances in Services Marketing, and Management: 12
Research and Practice, vol. 1, Teresa A. Swartz, David E. Bowen, and Stephen W. Brown, eds., Greenwich, CT: JAI Press Inc., 91-121. Grove, Stephen J., Raymond P. Fisk and Joby John (1999), "Services as Theater: Guidelines and Implications," in Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, Teresa Swartz and Dawn Iacobucci, eds., Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 21-36. Levitt, Theodore (1981), "Marketing Intangible Products and Product Intangibles," Harvard Business Review, 59 (May-June), 94-102. Shostack, G. Lynn (1984), "Designing Services That Deliver," Harvard Business Review, 62 (January-February), 133-139. Shostack, G. Lynn (1987), "Service Positioning Through structural change," Journal of Marketing, 51 (January), 34-43. Chapter 5: Designing the Service Setting Bitner, Mary Jo (1992), "Servicescapes: The Impact of Physical Surroundings on Customers and Employees," Journal of Marketing, 56 (April), 57-71. Kotler, Philip (1973), "Atmospherics as a Marketing Tool," Journal of Retailing, 49 (4), 48-64. * Shostack, G. Lynn (1977), "Breaking Free from Product Marketing," Journal of Marketing, 41 (April), 73-80. (Also Chapter 1) Zeithaml, Valarie A., A. Parasuraman, and Arvind Malhotra (2002), "Service Quality Delivery through Websites: A Critical Review of Extant Knowledge," Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 30 (4), 362-375. Chapter 6: Leveraging the People Factor Berry, Leonard L. (1981), "The Employee as Customer," Journal of Retail Banking, 3 (1), 33-40. Bowen, David E. and Edward L. Lawler III (1992), "The Empowerment of Service Workers: What, Why, How, and When." Sloan Management Review, 33 (Spring), 31-39. Bowen, David E. and Edward E. Lawler (1995), "Empowering Service Employees," Sloan Management Review, 36 (Summer), 73-84. Bowen, David E. and Benjamin Schneider (1985), "Boundary-Spanning-Role Employees and the Service Encounter: Some Guidelines for Management and Research," in The Service Encounter: Managing Employee/Customer Interaction in Service Businesses, John A. Czepiel, Michael R. Solomon, and Carol F. Surprenant, eds., Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 127-148. Grцnroos, Christian (1981), "Internal Marketing-An Integral Part of Marketing Theory," in Marketing of Services, James H. Donnelly and William R. George, eds., Chicago: American Marketing Association, 236-238. Grove, Stephen J., Raymond P. Fisk, and Mary C. La Forge (2004), "Developing the impression management Skills of the Service Worker," Services Industries Journal, 24, (2), 1-14. 13
John, Joby, Stephen J. Grove, and Raymond P. Fisk (2007), "Improvisations and Service Performances: Lessons from Jazz," Managing Service Quality, 16, (3), 247-268. Solomon, Michael R. (1985), "Packaging the Service Provider," Service Industries Journal, 5 (March), 64-72. Stauss, Bernd (1995), "Internal Services: Classification and Quality Management," International Journal of Service Industry Management, 6 (2), 62-78. Chapter 7: Managing the Customer Mix Bitner, Mary Jo, Bernard H. Booms, and Mary Stanfield Tetreault (1990), "The Service Encounter: Diagnosing Favorable and Unfavorable Incidents," Journal of Marketing, 54 (January), 71-84. Clark, Terry and Charles L. Martin (1994), "Customer-to-Customer: The Forgotten Relationship in Relationship Marketing," in Relationship Marketing: Theory, Methods, and Applications, Jagdish N. Sheth and Atul Parvatiyar (eds.), Atlanta, GA: Emory University, 1-10. Cronin Jr., Joseph J. and Steven A. Taylor (1992), "Measuring Service Quality: A Reexamination and Extension," Journal of Marketing, 56 (July), 55-68. Grove, Stephen J. and Raymond P. Fisk (1992), "The Service Experience as Theater," in Advances in Consumer Research, vol. 19, John Sherry and Brian Sternthal (eds.), Provo, UT: Association for Consumer Research, 455-461. Grove, Stephen J. and Raymond P. Fisk (1997), "The Impact of Other Customers upon Service Experiences: A Critical Incident Examination of 'Getting Along'," Journal of Retailing, 73 (1), 6385. Grove, Stephen J., Raymond P. Fisk, and Joby John (2004), "Surviving in the Age of Rage," Marketing Management, (March/April), 41-46. Hui, Michael K. and John E. G. Bateson (1991), "Perceived Control and the Effects of Crowding and Consumer Choice on the Service Experience," Journal of Consumer Research, 18 (2), 174184. Martin, Charles L. and Charles A. Pranter (1989), "Compatibility Management: Customer-toCustomer Relationships in Service Environments," Journal of Services Marketing, 3 (Summer), 615. Parasuraman, A., Leonard L. Berry, and Valarie A. Zeithaml (1991), "Refinement and Reassessment of the SERVQUAL Scale," Journal of Retailing, 67 (Winter), 420-450. Parasuraman, A., Leonard L. Berry, and Valarie A. Zeithaml (1993), "Research Note: More on Improving Service Quality Measurement," Journal of Retailing, 69 (Spring), 140-147. Parasuraman, A., Leonard L. Berry, and Valarie Zeithaml (1988), "SERVQUAL: A Multiple-Item Scale for Measuring Consumer Perceptions of Service Quality," Journal of Retailing, 64 (Spring), 12-37. 14
Chapter 8: Setting a Price for the Service Rendered Desiraju, Ramarao and Steven M. Shugan (1999), "Strategic Service Pricing and Yield Management," Journal of Marketing, 63 (1), 44-56. Guiltinan, Joseph (1987), "The Price Bundling of Services: A Normative Framework," Journal of Marketing, 51 (2), 74-85. Zeithaml, Valarie (1981), "How Consumer Evaluation Processes Differ Between Goods and Services," in Donnelly, J. H. and W. R. George, (eds.) Marketing of Services, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 186-90. Chapter 9: Promoting the Interactive Service Experience George, William R., J. Patrick Kelly, and Claudia E. Marshall (1983), "Personal Selling of Services," in Emerging Perspectives on Services Marketing, L. L. Berry, G. L Shostack, and G. D. Upah (eds.), Chicago: American Marketing Association, 65-67. George, William R. and Leonard L. Berry (1981), "Guidelines for Advertising of Services," Business Horizons, 24 (July/August), 52-56. Grove, Stephen J., Les Carlson, and Michael J. Dorsch (2007), "Comparing the Application of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) in Magazine Ads Across Product Type and Time," Journal of Advertising, 36, (Spring), 37-55. Grove, Stephen J., Gregory M. Pickett, and David N. Laband (1995), "An Empirical Examination of Factual Information Content Among Service Advertisements," Services Industries Journal, 15, (2), 216-233. Legg, Donna and Julie Baker (1987), "Advertising Strategies for Service Firms," in Add Value to Your Service, C. Surprenant, ed., Chicago: American Marketing Association, 163-168. * Shostack, G. Lynn (1977), "Breaking Free from Product Marketing," Journal of Marketing, 41 (April), 73-80. (Also Chapter 1 and 5) Stafford, Marla Royne (2005), "International Services Advertising (ISA)," Journal of Advertising, 34, (Spring), 65-86. Vollmer, Christopher, John Frelinghuysen, and Randall Rothenberg (2006), "The Future of Advertising Is Now," Strategy + Business, 43, (Summer), 38-51. Chapter 10: Delivering Service Quality and Guaranteeing Services Brown, Stephen W. (2000), "The Move to Solution Providers," Marketing Management, 9 (1), 1011. Hart, Christopher (1988), "The Power of Unconditional Service Guarantees," Harvard Business Review, 66 (July-August), 54-62. 15
Heskett, James L., Thomas O. Jones, Gary W. Loveman, W. Earl Sasser Jr., and Leonard Schlesinger (1994), "Putting the Service-Profit Chain to Work," Harvard Business Review, 72, (March-April), 25-36. John, Joby (1991), "Improving Quality Through Patient-Provider Communication," Journal of health care Marketing, 11 (December), 51-60. Lemon, Katherine N., Roland T. Rust, and Valarie A. Zeithaml (2001), "What Drives Customer Equity," Marketing Management, (Spring), 20-25. * Parasuraman, A., Leonard L. Berry, and Valarie Zeithaml (1988), "SERVQUAL: A Multiple-Item Scale for Measuring Consumer Perceptions of Service Quality," Journal of Retailing, 64 (Spring), 12-37. (Also Chapter 7) Parasuraman, A., Valarie Zeithaml, and Leonard L. Berry (1985), "A Conceptual Model of Service Quality and Its Implications for Future Research," Journal of Marketing, 49, (Fall), 41-50. Reichheld, Frederick and Earl Sasser (1990), "Zero Defections: Quality Comes to Services," Harvard Business Review, 68 (September-October), 105-111. Reinartz, Werner and V. Kumar (2002), "The Mismanagement of Loyalty," Harvard Business Review, 80 (July-August), 5-12. Rust, Roland T., Anthony J. Zahorik and Timothy L. Keiningham, (1995), "Return on Quality (ROQ): Making Service Quality Financially Accountable," Journal of Marketing, 59 (April), 58-70. Chapter 11: Regaining Customer Confidence Through Customer Service and Service Recovery *Bitner, Mary Jo, Bernard H. Booms, and Mary Stanfield Tetreault (1990), "The Service Encounter: Diagnosing Favorable and Unfavorable Incidents," Journal of Marketing, 54 (January), 71-84. (Also Chapter 7) *Bowen, David E. and Edward L. Lawler III (1992), "The Empowerment of Service Workers: What, Why, How, and When." Sloan Management Review, 33 (Spring), 31-39. (Also Chapter 6) Brown, Stephen W. (1997), "Service Recovery Through IT," Marketing Management, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 6 (Fall), 25-27. Hogan, John E., Katherine N. Lemon, and Barak Libai (2003), "What is the True Value of a Lost Customer?" Journal of Service Research, 5 (3), 196-208. McColl-Kennedy, Janet R. and Beverley A. Sparks (2003), "Application of Fairness Theory to Service Failures and Service Recovery," Journal of Service Research, 5 (3), 251-266. Pickett, Gregory M., Marko Grunhagen, and Stephen J. Grove (2001), "Signal Detection Theory: A Tool to Enhance Retail Service Quality," Enhancing Knowledge Development in Marketing, Vol. 12, Greg W. Marshall and Stephen J. Grove, eds., Chicago: American Marketing Association, 379-380. 16
Reichheld, Frederick H. (1996), "Learning from Customer Defections," Harvard Business Review, 74 (March-April), 56-69. Tax, Stephen S. and Stephen W. Brown (1998), "Recovering and learning from service failure," Sloan Management Review, 40 (Fall), 75-88. 17
Chapter 12: Researching Service Success and Failure Berry, Leonard L. and A. Parasuraman, (1997), "Listening to the Customer-The Concept of a Service-Quality Information System," Sloan Management Review, 38 (Spring), 65-76. Gremler, Dwayne D. (2004), "The Critical Incident Technique in Service Research," Journal of Service Research, 7 (August), 65-89. Grove, Stephen J., and Raymond P. Fisk (1992), "Observational data collection Methods for Services Marketing: An Overview," Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 20, (Summer), 217-224. Chapter 13: Developing Marketing Strategies for Services *Grove, Stephen J., Raymond P. Fisk and Joby John (1999), "Services as Theater: Guidelines and Implications," in Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, Teresa Swartz and Dawn Iacobucci, eds., Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 21-36. (Also Chapter 4) Hamel, Gary and C. K. Prahalad, (1994), "Competing for the Future," Harvard Business Review, 72 (July/August), 122-128. *John, Joby, Stephen J. Grove, and Raymond P. Fisk (2007), "Improvisations and Service Performances: Lessons from Jazz," Managing Service Quality, 16, (3), 247-268. (Also Chapter 6) Chapter 14: Coping with Fluctuating Demand for Services Haynes, Paula J. (1990), "Hating to Wait: Managing the Final Service Encounter," Journal of Services Marketing, 4 (4), 20-26. Pine II, B. Joseph, Don Peppers, and Martha Rogers (1995), "Do You Want to Keep Your Customers Forever?" Harvard Business Review, 73 (March-April), 103-108. Chapter 15: Thinking Globally Alexander, Nicholas and Andrew Lockwood (1996), "Internationalisation: A Comparison of Hotel and Retail Sectors," Service Industries Journal, 16 (October), 458-473. John, Joby (1994), "The Nature of the Service Encounter: A Cross-Cultural Perspective" in Proceedings of the 3rd International Research Seminar in Service Management," (June), 403418. John, Joby (1996), "A Dramaturgical View of the Health Care Service Encounter: cultural valueBased Impression Management Guidelines for Medical Professional Behavior," European Journal of Marketing, 30 (9), 60-74. 18

RP Fisk, SJ Grove, J John

File: interactive-services-marketing.pdf
Title: SEMESTER AT SEA COURSE SYLLABUS
Author: RP Fisk, SJ Grove, J John
Author: aseid
Published: Fri Aug 31 12:41:06 2012
Pages: 18
File size: 0.21 Mb

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