Lithic technology: measures of production, use, and curation

Tags: William Andrefsky Frontmatter, Cambridge University Press, Lithic Technology, Washington State University, anthropology, Harvard University, American Antiquity, technological organization, Organization of Prehistoric Communities, Northwestern North America, University of Montana, University of Utah Press, Australian National University, research interests focus, Cultural Resource Analysts, Inc., evolutionary anthropology, CONTRIBUTORS Social Organization, Arizona State University, research interests, Texas Tech University, George Frison, Curation, Lithic Core, lithic reduction, National Science Foundation, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Eastern Washington University, Barrett, the Honors College, Archaeological and Historical Services, northern Great Basin, Columbia Plateau, prehistoric sites, British Academy, Western State College Colorado, University of Pittsburgh, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Simon Fraser University, archaeological research, National Endowments for the Humanities, William Andrefsky, Jr., Westview Press, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Lithic Materials, Reading University, the University of Tennessee, AltaMira Press, Southern Methodist University, Journal of Archaeological Research, Lithic Technology, Journal of Archaeological Science, Journal of Middle Atlantic Archaeology, New York University, eastern North America, European Paleolithic, Archaeology, WILLIAM ANDREFSKY, William Andrefsky, Jr, Independent Measures, Upper Paleolithic, Southwestern France, Journal of World Prehistory, Blackwell Publishing, Delaware Department of Transportation, Society for American Archaeology
Content: Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information LITHIC TECHNOLOGY: MEASURES OF PRODUCTION, USE, AND CURATION The life history of stone tools is intimately linked to tool production, use, and maintenance. These are important processes in the organization of lithic technology, or the manner in which lithic technology is embedded within human organizational strategies of land use and subsistence practices. This volume brings together essays that measure the life history of stone tools relative to retouch values, raw material constraints, and evolutionary processes. Collectively, they explore the association of technological organization with facets of tool form such as reduction sequences, tool production effort, artifact curation processes, and retouch measurement. Data sets cover a broad geographic and temporal span, including examples from France during the Paleolithic, the Near East during the Neolithic, and other regions such as Mongolia, Australia, and Italy. North American examples are derived from Paleoindian times to historic period aboriginal populations throughout the United States and Canada. William Andrefsky, Jr., is a professor of anthropology at Washington State University. He is the author of more than 100 articles and books, including Lithics: Macroscopic Approaches to Analysis.
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information LITHIC TECHNOLOGY: MEASURES OF PRODUCTION, USE, AND CURATION Edited by WILLIAM ANDREFSKY, JR. Washington State University
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information
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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Cataloging in Publication Data
Lithic technology: Measures of production, use, and curation / edited by William
Andrefsky, Jr.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
isbn 978-0-521-88827-1 (hardback)
1. Stone implements ­ History. 2. Tools, Prehistoric.
3. Stone implements ­ Analysis. 4.Tools, Prehistoric ­ Analysis.
5. Technology ­ Social aspects ­ History. 6. Land use ­ History.
7. Subsistence economy ­ History. 8. Social archaeology.
I. Andrefsky, William, 1955­ II. Title.
cc79.5.s76l58 2008
930.1028­dc22
2008001390
isbn 978-0-521-88827-1 hardback
Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of urls for external or third-party Internet Web sites referred to in this publication and does not guarantee that any content on such Web sites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information In memory of Yukiko Akama Andrefsky
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information CONTENTS
Preface and Acknowledgments List of Contributors PART I: INTRODUCTION, BACKGROUND, AND REVIEW 1 An Introduction to Stone Tool Life History and Technological Organization william andrefsky, jr. 2 Lithic Reduction, Its Measurement, and Implications: Comments on the Volume michael j. shott and margaret c. nelson PART II: PRODUCTION, REDUCTION, AND RETOUCH 3 Comparing and Synthesizing Unifacial Stone Tool Reduction Indices metin i. eren and mary e. prendergast 4 Exploring Retouch on Bifaces: Unpacking Production, Resharpening, and Hammer Type jennifer wilson and william andrefsky, jr. 5 The Construction of Morphological Diversity: A Study of Mousterian Implement Retouching at Combe Grenal peter hiscock and chris clarkson
page xi xiii 3 23 49 86 106
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information viii CONTENTS
6 Reduction and Retouch as Independent Measures
of Intensity
136
brooke blades
7 Perforation with Stone Tools and Retouch
Intensity: A Neolithic Case Study
150
colin patrick quinn, william andrefsky, jr., ian
kuijt, and bill finlayson
8 Exploring the Dart and Arrow Dilemma:
Retouch Indices as Functional Determinants
175
cheryl harper and william andrefsky, jr.
PART III: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON LITHIC RAW MATERIAL AND TECHNOLOGY
9 Projectile Point Provisioning Strategies and
Human Land Use
195
william andrefsky, jr.
10 The Role of Lithic Raw Material Availability and
Quality in Determining Tool Kit Size, Tool
Function, and Degree of Retouch: A Case Study
from Skink Rockshelter (46NI445), West Virginia
216
douglas h. macdonald
11 Raw Material and Retouched Flakes
233
andrew p. bradbury, philip j. carr, and
d. randall cooper
PART IV: EVOLUTIONARY APPROACHES TO LITHIC TECHNOLOGIES
12 Lithic Technological Organization in an
Evolutionary Framework: Examples from North
America's Pacific Northwest Region
257
anna marie prentiss and david s. clarke
13 Changing Reduction Intensity, Settlement, and
Subsistence in Wardaman Country, Northern
Australia
286
chris clarkson
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information
CONTENTS
ix
14 Lithic Core Reduction Techniques: Modeling
Expected Diversity
317
nathan b. goodale, ian kuijt, shane j. macfarlan,
curtis osterhoudt, and bill finlayson
Index
337
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
In 1968 George Frison introduced the notion of artifact transformations as a result of use and resharpening. This "Frison Effect," as it has come to be called, on stone tools can be viewed as the life histories of individual tools. Such life histories are intimately linked to tool production, use, and maintenance. This collection of chapters grew from presentations at a symposium entitled "Artifact Life-Cycle and the Organization of Lithic Technologies" that took place at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in 2006. The focus of that symposium and this volume is upon the relationship between the manner in which humans organize their lithic technology and the life history of lithic tools. Researchers interested in lithic technological organization realize the importance of artifact life histories in understanding the intricacies of tool form and shape as they relate to production strategies for those tools. In an effort to better understand those relationships, lithic analysts (including contributors to this volume) have explored lithic reduction sequences, cha^ine opeґratoire, tool curation, tool production effects, retouch measurements, and the role of lithic raw material as these relate to lithic technological organization and stone tool life history. A great deal of imaginative and compelling research has occurred since the Frison Effect was first recognized, and this collection of papers provides a fresh new look at all of these topics from both a methodological and a theoretical perspective. I would like to thank all of the participants of the original symposium for their participation. For various reasons, not all symposium xi
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information xii PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS participant chapters are included in this volume. Also, as chapters were reviewed, revised, and adjusted, some chapters gained authors and some authors contributed different written research. This blend of chapters captures opinions and ideas about lithic technology from some of the most respected scholars in the field today, but it also includes research from many young new researchers who will one day guide the field of lithic technology. It was a joy to bring this group together under a single cover. My best wishes go to all volume contributors and symposium participants. I must also thank the team of editors and production staff from Cambridge University Press and their associated collaborators. In particular I thank Publishing Director Beatrice Rehl and her editorial assistant Tracy Steel for managing this book project. The production manager for Aptara, Inc., Maggie Meitzler, helped me navigate through the technical challenges of today's high-tech world of publishing. William Stoddard was a fabulous copy editor. Lastly, I thank the Cambridge University Press peer reviewers for making important comments on the original draft.
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
william andrefsky, jr., is professor and chair of anthropology at Washington State University. His interests include hunter­gatherer land use and technological strategies, archaeological ethics, and the Neolithic transition. He is currently the president of the Register of Professional Archaeologists. Some of his research has been published by Journal of Archaeological Science, American Antiquity, Geoarchaeology, Journal of Archaeological Research, Lithic Technology, Journal of Middle Atlantic Archaeology, North American Archaeologist, Journal of Field Archaeology, and Cambridge University Press, University of Utah Press, Elsevier, Blackwell Publishing, AltaMira Press, Westview Press, and Cambridge Scholars Publishing. brooke blades received his doctorate in anthropology with a specialization in the European Upper Paleolithic from New York University in 1997. He has undertaken archaeological excavations or research in France, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Northern Ireland, and eastern North America. His research interests focus on lithic material procurement and reduction in the European Paleolithic and in hunter­gatherer societies in eastern North America. He was the author of Aurignacian Lithic Economy: Ecological Perspectives from Southwestern France (Kluwer Academic/Plenum 2001) and is the co-editor, with Brian Adams, of Lithic Materials and Paleolithic Societies (Blackwell forthcoming). andrew p. bradbury received his M.A. from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 1994. He is currently a principal investigator xiii
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information xiv LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS and lithic analyst with Cultural Resource Analysts, Inc., in Lexington, Kentucky. His research interests include southeastern U.S. prehistory, lithic technology, and evolutionary theory. philip j. carr is Associate Director of the Center for Archaeological Studies and specializes in the prehistory of the southeastern United States and lithic analysis. Since joining the University of South Alabama faculty, he has engaged in the study of the rich cultural heritage of the Gulf Coast. Recent publications include the co-edited volume with Dr. Jon Gibson, Signs of Power: The Rise of Cultural Complexity in the Southeast, and he edited the volume The Organization of North American Chipped Stone Tool Technologies. david s. clarke earned his B.A. in anthropology from Mercyhurst College and his M.A. from the University of Montana. Currently he is an archaeologist for the Delaware Department of Transportation. His research interests include lithic technology, evolutionary theory, Pacific Northwest hunter­gatherers, and the peopling of the Americas. He has contributed to articles in American Antiquity and Journal of World Prehistory. chris clarkson received his Ph.D. from the Australian National University in 2004 on long-term technological change in the Northern Territory of Australia. He has since held positions at the University of Cambridge and the Australian National University. He is currently employed in the School of Social Science at the University of Queensland, where he continues research into the lithic technology of Australia, India, France, and Africa. He is the author of Lithics in the Land of the Lightning Brothers (ANU E-Press) and the editor of Lithics Down Under (BAR). d. randall cooper is a staff archaeologist at Cultural Resource Analysts, Inc., in Lexington, Kentucky. He has a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Tennessee, where he developed an interest in lithic technology beginning in 1983. He has since analyzed lithic assemblages from North Dakota, coastal Alaska, the Tahoe National Forest, the Mojave Desert, and several regions of Kentucky. Other interests include relational database design and Appalachian folk culture.
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS xv metin i. eren holds degrees in anthropology from Harvard University (A.B.) and Southern Methodist University (M.A.) and is currently pursuing an M.A. degree in experimental archaeology from the University of Exeter. He has participated in fieldwork in Ohio, Colorado, Turkey, the Georgian Republic, Tanzania, and China. His recent awards include a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the 2006 Society for American Archaeology Student Paper Award (with Mary Prendergast). bill finlayson is the Director of the Council for British Research in the Levant and a visiting professor at the Department of Archaeology, Reading University. His undergraduate and postgraduate degrees were in prehistoric archaeology at the University of Edinburgh. He is a director of two major PPNA projects in Jordan, at Dhra' and in Wadi Faynan, and editor and author of the recent volume The Early Prehistory of Wadi Faynan, Southern Jordan. nathan b. goodale is currently a visiting instructor in anthropology at Hamilton College. He received his B.A. from Western State College and his M.A. from the University of Montana and is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Washington State University. He has published articles in American Antiquity, Paleґorient, Archaeology in Montana, JONA, and Levant, as well as a chapter in the edited volume Complex Hunter­ Gatherers. He is interested in using evolutionary theory to explain technological invention and its relationship to population dynamics during the transition to agriculture. cheryl harper is a graduate student in anthropology at Washington State University and an archaeologist with the U.S. Forest Service. Her research interests focus on understanding landscape use by Archaic populations in the American Southwest. peter hiscock is a reader at the Australian National University. His work has concentrated on ancient technology, both in Paleolithic Europe and in Australia. His latest book is The Archaeology of Ancient Australia (Routledge). ian kuijt specializes in the archaeology of the Near East, Ireland, and Western North America. Completing his doctoral work at Harvard University, he is the editor of Life in Neolithic Farming Communities:
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information xvi LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS Social Organization, Identity, and Differentiation (2000) and the co-editor of Complex Hunter­Gatherers: Evolution and Organization of Prehistoric Communities on the Plateau of Northwestern North America (2004). His research has been supported by the National Endowments for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the British Academy. douglas h. macdonald is an assistant professor at the University of Montana, but worked at GAI Consultants in Pittsburgh during the Skink Rockshelter project. Influenced by his graduate work at Washington State University, he studies lithic technological organization at prehistoric sites in the North American Plains, Rockies, and mid-Atlantic. shane j. macfarlan is a Ph.D. student in evolutionary anthropology at Washington State University. He has an M.A. in museum science (Texas Tech University 2003) and a dual B.A. in anthropology and history (University of Pittsburgh 1998). He is currently performing ethnographic research on the island of Dominica and archaeological research in Baja California Sur. His interests are human behavioral ecology, economic reasoning, and cooperation. margaret c. nelson is a professor in the School of Human Evolution and social change and Vice Dean of Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University. Her research examines technology and land use in small-scale Puebloan societies in the U.S. Southwest. Her recent book, Mimbres During the Twelfth Century: Abandonment, Continuity, and Reorganization, examines the continuities and changes in social and subsistence organization in the Mimbres region of southwest New Mexico from A.D. 1000 to 1250. She has published in numerous journals and books on the organization of prehistoric stone technology. curtis osterhoudt received a dual B.A. in mathematics and physics at Western State College Colorado and a Ph.D. in physics at Washington State University. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory, focusing on physical acoustics and
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS xvii its uses for measuring various qualities and features of systems. Other academic interests include statistical mechanics and its applications to disparate fields, including archaeology. mary e. prendergast is a doctoral candidate in anthropology at Harvard University, where she has been studying terminal Pleistocene and Holocene hunter­gatherers and transitions to food production. She conducts fieldwork and faunal analyses in China, Kenya, and Tanzania and has published research on Middle Stone Age through Pastoral Neolithic sites in East Africa. anna marie prentiss earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees in anthropology at the University of South Florida. She completed her Ph.D. in archaeology at Simon Fraser University and is currently associate professor of anthropology at the University of Montana. Her research interests include Pacific Northwest hunter­gatherers, evolutionary theory, and lithic technology. She edited (with Ian Kuijt) Complex Hunter-Gatherers: Evolution and Organization of Prehistoric Communities on the Plateau of Northwestern North America (University of Utah Press) and has published articles in a wide range of journals, including American Antiquity, Current Anthropology, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, and Journal of World Prehistory. colin patrick quinn is a graduate student at the University of Michigan and has acquired degrees from the University of Notre Dame (B.A.) and Washington State University (M.A.). His research interests include stone tool production and use, experimental techniques, personal adornment production and use, and costly signaling theory in small-scale and middle-range societies in the Near East, western Europe, and northwestern North America. michael j. shott teaches archaeology at the University of Akron. His interests include hunter­gatherers, how the archaeological record formed, and lithic analysis. He has written or edited six books and about 80 articles. He works chiefly in the North American Midwest and Great Basin but also has worked in Mexico and Argentina. jennifer wilson received her M.A. from Washington State University in May 2007. Her thesis focused on technological organization and
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Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-88827-1 - Lithic Technology: Measures of Production, Use, and Curation Edited by William Andrefsky Frontmatter More information xviii LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS measuring tool curation from a chert quarry assemblage in the northern Great Basin. Currently, she is employed with Archaeological and Historical Services at Eastern Washington University, and her Research Focuses on hunter­gatherer organization and lithic technology in the Columbia Plateau and the northern Great Basin.
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