RAIG Marketing Working Group

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Content: RAIG Marketing Working Group Final Report, May 2007 Mission/Purpose Planning and coordinating a systematic ongoing user-centered plan to market our campus wide "Ask a Librarian" suite of services. Members Nikki Busch Pamela O'Donnell Amanda Werhane - member from January to April 2007 Bonnie Shucha, Chair Nancy McClements, RMT Liaison Background Although the mission of current Marketing Working Group is to promote the entire "Ask a Librarian" suite of services, it was preceded by another working group which was more limited in scope. The Virtual Reference Marketing Working Group was charged in May 2006 with the task of "market[ing] the Velaro/Trillian Virtual Reference chat service to first year students." That working group was comprised of two members, Pamela O'Donnell and Nikki Busch, both of whom remained as members of the expanded working group. Key expectations of the Virtual Reference Marketing Working Group included the following: ! Develop a strategic marketing plan, including: " Identify objectives " Establish an implementation timeline " Identify budgetary options " Identify target audience within the first-year class " Choose type of outreach/promotional materials " Test materials with sample audience " Identify measurements for success ! Meet with RSTF to approve plan June 30. ! Identify implementation resources, including additional staff to assist with implementation. ! Assess the success of the marketing plan. ! Write a mid-year report that details the plan, its implementation, and initial assessment. ! Write a final report that suggests appropriate strategies for future marketing, including new target audiences and promotional methods. ! Work to transfer the Working Group's responsibilities to a long-term management structure as approved by LSC. 1
On June 30, 2006, the VRM-WoG submitted their "Ask a Librarian Marketing Plan" to the RSTF (see Appendix A). Significantly, the plan recommended that the focus of a marketing campaign be on the varied reasons WHY one might want to ask a librarian, with a secondary emphasis on the WAYS one may ask a librarian, rather than concentrate only on the one "new" means of contact (i.e., IM/Chat). Implementation of the plan began immediately in order to meet the goal of a Welcome Week roll-out, however, the plan was not formally approved until the first week of August 2006. After repeatedly surveying both incoming and enrolled students, the marketing campaign did launch ontime with an array of snarky, snappy, taglines and complementary images in a "retro" style aimed at traditionally-aged, first-year students. New media, such as Facebook Flyers, were employed to "get the word out," along with more traditional means of communication such as promotional posters and articles in Wisconsin Week. Due to concern that the popularity of the new service might overwhelm staffing resources, several marketing recommendations (such as mass emails to freshmen, table tents in dining halls, and chalk stencils on sidewalks around campus) were temporarily put on hold. The VRM-WoG was able to implement a number of marketing activities, including: electronic bulletin board messages, student staff training on availability of the service, links throughout the libraries web site, handouts at orientation sessions, and inclusion in "Communication A" library instruction teaching scripts. In late November 2006, the Reference Management Team created the expanded Marketing Working Group to continue and build on the work of the original VRM-WoG. In addition to the expanded direction - marketing the entire "Ask a Librarian" suite of services - our target audience was also expanded to include all students, not just first year students. Assessing the Success of the "Ask a Librarian" Marketing Plan As indicated in the original marketing plan approved on Friday, August 4, 2006, assessment of the success (or failure) of the Ask a Librarian marketing plan was determined by the following three factors: 1. Increased usage statistics 2. Service / Name recognition 3. User satisfaction The tools used in this assessment were: 1. Online surveys 2. Individual Interviews 2
Usage Statistics
Usage statistics are up. As of the time of this report, the numbers for the Spring of 2007 semester are not yet available. 2,784 "calls" were received during the Fall 2006 semester, which is more than double the number of calls that came in during the Fall 2002 semester which totaled at 1,323 (under the name "Live Help").
Service / Name recognition
While 32% of interviewees recalled seeing promotional materials for this service, this figure does not take into account How the interviewee found out about IM/Chat Reference. In fact, 32% said that they had found out about the service via the Libraries Web site (LWS); 16% heard from a friend; and 47% said it was covered in their Library Session for a Class ­ all of which were featured means of Public relations recommended in the Ask a Librarian Marketing Plan (Increased accessibility/presence on internal web pages, p. 14; Interpersonal, p.15).
While these numbers indicate that those marketing recommendations carried out served their intended purpose, the process of conducting interviews in the libraries on busy study evenings also informed the interviewers that many students were still unaware of the service.
Once informed about the service by the interviewers, students were intrigued and eager to try the Chat/IM component of the Ask a Librarian IM/Chat service. This receptiveness to the surveys and signage advertising the interviews might indicate that should more of the marketing plan recommendations be realized, word or "service recognition" may well increase with additional exposure.
User satisfaction
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88% of survey respondents indicated that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the service
they'd received
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100% of interviewees said that they were satisfied with their experience using the service
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100% of interviewees also indicated that would recommend the service to a friend
But, why (you might wonder) is user satisfaction considered in the assessment of the success of the marketing of a service? The answer is because "word of mouth" messages ­ whether positive or negative ­ are one of the most significant means of public relations and were therefore included in the Marketing Plan recommendations (p. 15).
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"It's about delivering a level of service that's so superior that your customers go off and do your marketing for you ... No one is going to tell anybody about a mediocre experience, unless they're telling us about it from a bad experience ... Leaders need to teach their team what's expected to create this type of customer experience."1 Accomplishments for 2006-2007 Assessment - Individual Interviews on "Ask a Librarian" Virtual Reference In March 2007 members of the Marketing Working Group conducted individual interviews with nineteen self-identified users of the IM/Chat Reference Service at UW-Madison. Users were surveyed regarding their satisfaction with the service, their expectations of virtual reference, and their awareness of the marketing campaign. Those completing the survey were given a $10 gift card to the University Book Store. A copy of the survey questions is attached (See Appendix A). On Monday, March 19, Nikki Busch and Amanda Werhane surveyed students in the West Wing of Memorial Library, while on Tuesday, March 20, Pamela O'Donnell, with help from Kelli Keclik, polled students on the first floor of College Library. Of those interviewed, 68% were female and 32% were male. The breakdown by class was fairly consistent with 21% each for freshmen and sophomores, 32% juniors, and 26% seniors. Text of the notations made during the interviews is available at https://websurvey.wisc.edu (IM/Chat Reference Interviews - March 19/20, 2007). Audio files of the interviews can be found at https://mywebspace.wisc.edu/xythoswfs/webui/_xy-8641948_1 . Highlights of the interviews include: ! 74% indicated AIM was their preferred IM software ! Only 1 student (5%) used both IM and Chat options for Virtual Reference; 95% used only one method ! 72% used Velaro (Click to Chat button), 37% used Trillian (IM) ! Users preferred a quick initial response (30 secs. to 1 min.) but were willing to wait ("be put on hold") for five minutes or more ! 75% don't care to know who is answering their question; 25% would like to know the librarian's first name ! 100% of respondents were satisfied with their experience using the service ! Most of the users interviewed do not consider referral a failure, although one student bemoaned being sent on "wild-goose chases" by other university services 1 JoAnna Brandi, Marketing Consultant, quoted by Jeff Zbar in "Customer Referrals Can Help Your Small Business Build Marketing Momentum," South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Fort Lauderdale, May 15, 2006. 4
! 12 of 19 interviewees thought having virtual reference available 24/7 would be nice, although a number questioned the feasibility of such a service. ! 80% of respondents indicated that they are most likely to use the service weekday evenings beginning around midterms ! When asked how they found out about IM/Chat Reference, respondents said: " Library Web Site ­ 32% " From a Friend ­ 16% " Library Session for a Class ­ 47% " Promotional Materials ­ 5% ! 32% of respondents recalled seeing promotional materials for this service, 68% did not ! 100% would recommend this service to a friend ! When asked how to improve this service, a majority of respondents suggested promoting it more. National Library Week Tool Kits To encourage the celebration of National Library Week (April 15-21, 2007), the Marketing Working Group put together a toolkit which was shared with all recognized libraries on campus. This project was actually a scaled back version of our original plan to stage a campus-wide "Ask a Librarian Day"during National Library Week. Due to time and resource limits, it was decided to save "Ask a Librarian Day" for fall (see Future of Marketing Working Group section) and concentrate instead on the creation of the marketing toolkit. The toolkits contained the following: ! An insert explaining the toolkit (see Appendix C) ! An "Ask a Librarian" banner - one for each library (see graphic below) ! "Ask a Librarian" color changing "mood" pencils - number distributed was based on the size of the library (see graphic below) ! Alando Tucker READ posters - number distributed was based on the size of the library (see graphic below) ! Library-themed games - a crossword puzzle and word search (see Appendix D) 5
The toolkit tied in well with other campus National Library Week events, including the Edible Book Festival, pose-for-your-own READ poster photo sessions at CIMC, and lectures on the Holocaust digital library and the Library of Congress' rare book collection. "Although National Library Week ended nearly a month ago, people are still talking about its successes. It was one of the most memorable events in recent memory," according to the [email protected] newsletter (May 21, 2007) (See Appendix E). After the event, we asked for and received feedback about the toolkit from many campus libraries. It seems that the mood pencils and posters were particularly popular with students and staff. Several libraries reported that they would have liked having more. Some also commented that they would have also liked a sign or poster to explain the giveaways. Overall, everyone who responded said that they enjoyed receiving the tool kit and used at least some of the materials to celebrate National Library Week. Most indicated that they would have done little or nothing to celebrate had they not received toolkit. Tier 1 Screen Savers On January 25, 2007, the Reference Management Team (RMT) met with members of the Library Services Council and proposed using screensavers on Tier 1 machines to market campus-wide library initiatives. LTG began testing screensavers on two terminals in the Memorial Library Reference Room featuring a rotating selection of graphics from the "Ask a Librarian" campaign on February 28. Library Services Council approved a pilot project for library marketing images to appear on Tier 1 (public) workstations as screensavers. The project was implemented on May 15, and screensavers consisting of electronic versions of existing "Ask a Librarian" fliers appear after 5 minutes of inactivity and each display for 8 seconds in rotation. See the Tier 1 screen saver policy at Appendix F. 6
Although initiated by the Marketing Working Group and shepherded through the process by RMT, management of the screensaver project will eventually be handled by the Campus Libraries Marketing Committee (CLMC) - see Future of Marketing Working Group section below. If successful, a variety of campus-wide library resources and services could potentially be promoted through these screensavers. WAAL Poster Session In April 2007, Nikki Busch and Pamela O'Donnell presented a poster session at the WAAL conference entitled, "It's All About Attitude: Marketing Virtual Reference to First-Year Students." The description in the conference program read: Humor, while not often associated with academic libraries, is a powerful marketing tool. It can also make reference services a little less scary for first-year students who might otherwise be somewhat intimidated by an academic library. Using hip images, irreverent taglines, and new media (including Facebook), Nikki Busch and Pamela O'Donnell created and implemented a successful marketing plan for the new IM/Chat reference service at the University of WisconsinMadison. Specifically geared toward first-year students, these marketing efforts expanded to include the concept of "ask a librarian" ­ be it through instant messaging, email, telephone, or in-person. This poster session will showcase many of the graphics used to brand the libraries' virtual reference service, describe the test-marketing process for visuals and taglines, outline potential pitfalls in creating a marketing plan, and report on the success of the various promotional efforts. In addition, a detailed synopsis of the marketing plan will be provided. Audience response was very positive, although more people were interested in the technology used to provide virtual reference than the campaign prepared to market it. Poster session handouts included: "Ask a Librarian" Marketing Timeline (see Appendix G); Images from the "Ask a Librarian" Campaign (see Appendix H); and Marketing "Take-Aways"(see Appendix I). 7
2006/07 Budget Original Request: Revised Request: Actual Expenses:
8013.00 2000.00 1304.40
Expense Breakdown
Mood pencils (J&A Enterprises) 505.00 2500 @ $0.19 + postage
Ask A Librarian banners 55 @ approx $3.60
200.00
Mailing tubes 60
29.40
UW Bookstore gift certificates for IM/Chat interviewees* 30 @ $10
300.00
Facebook ads** 9 @ $30 (3 voided)
270.00
Photocopying***
0.00
Posters, quizzes, etc.
Art design***
0.00
* 12 remain for future use ** paid by Memorial Library *** donated by all libraries
During this first year of operation we had to work through the various ordering and reimbursement procedures. The primary method was to order through Jan Behn in GLS Administration via email or through an official requisition form. She then would alert Sandra Guthrie, who supplied the appropriate fund code. The ability to pay for giveaways (gift certificates, pencils, etc) is quite restrictive and usually requires gift money plus public acknowledgement that gift funds were used. We paid for gift items with personal credit cards, with reimbursements submitted to Cathy Shapiro in GLS Administration.
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Future of Marketing Working Group Status Despite that our charge states that the Marketing WoG is a limited working group that will end in the summer of 2007 and the creation of the new Campus Libraries Marketing Committee (CLMC), we recommend that the Marketing WoG continue as a permanent committee. Both our own Marketing WoG members, as well as Lisa Saywell and Vicki Tobias of the new CLMC, feel that the focus of this group is important and distinct enough to merit its continuation. It seems that the primary role of CLMC will be to act as a marketing knowledge clearinghouse and to facilitate communication among others with an interest in library marketing. Although they will implement some projects that transcend all campus libraries and departments, they recommended that individual marketing groups, such as the RAIG Marketing WoG maintain responsibility for more focused projects. Membership If the Marketing WoG does continue, it will be in need of some new members. Both Bonnie Shucha and Nikki Busch are unable to serve again next year due to another commitments. Amanda Werhane is already no longer a member of the committee. Pamela O'Donnell, however, may wish to continue. Projects As mentioned above, the new Campus Libraries Marketing Committee (CLMC) will be taking over the Tier One Screen saver project. Although the test phase included only reference images, it is planned that campus libraries marketing images of a broader nature will be added in the future. Therefore, both the Marketing WoG and the CLMC agreed that it was a more appropriate project for CLMC. The other on-going project is "Ask a Librarian Day." As noted earlier, we had originally planned to organize this event for National Library Week this year. However, due to time and resource limits, we decided to postpone it until fall. Additionally, we felt the beginning of the school year was a better time to market reference services thereby enourgaing good research habits throughout the year. We had hoped to partner with a number of organizations on campus to help promote the event. These included the unions, the athletic department, the Dean of Students, SOAR and other new student programs, and the Writing Center. We were also planning to ask the Chancellor or Provost to officially proclaim "Ask a Librarian Day." Event ideas included having reference librarians on site at the unions and/or at athletic events to speak with people about the libraries and answer simple reference questions. We also proposed setting up a photo booth where students, faculty and staff could pose for their own READ posters, similar to what CIMC did for National Library Week. There would also be a series of contests or drawings for which we hoped to get prize donations from around campus. Ideas included a photoshoot with Bucky Badger; athletic or theater tickets; and Babcock ice cream, University Bookstore, Union, or Union Minicourse gift certificates. 9
Budget A budget amount of $1500 for the 2007/08 academic year should be sufficient.
Portfolio Contents
! Ask a Librarian Marketing Plan, June 2006 (Appendix A)
! Individual Interviews on "Ask a Librarian" Virtual Reference
" Survey questions (Appendix B)
" Responses
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Text - https://websurvey.wisc.edu [The survey is under the 'Dave Luke' account.
The name of the survey is IM/Chat Reference Interviews - March 19/20, 2007]
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Audio recording - https://mywebspace.wisc.edu/xythoswfs/webui/_xy-
8641948_1
! National Library Week toolkit
" Insert explaining toolkit (Appendix C)
" Crossword puzzle (Appendix D)
" [email protected] article (Appendix E)
! Tier One Screensavers
" Policy (Appendix F)
! WAAL Poster session
" "Ask a Librarian" Marketing Timeline (Appendix G)
" Images from the "Ask a Librarian" Campaign (Appendix H)
" Marketing "Take-Aways"(Appendix I)
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Prepared by: Nikki Busch Pamela O'Donnell
Marketing Plan June 2006
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1 Statement Undertaking a marketing initiative for the new, blended IM/Chat reference service at the UW-Madison Libraries provides both the Reference Services Task Force and library administration an excellent opportunity to test the effectiveness of marketing their services and resources. As librarians charged with preparing this plan, we firmly believe that a coordinated and sustained commitment to marketing and promotion can only benefit the libraries. That being said, we face a number of challenges in effectively reaching the many constituencies and stakeholders in this process. The primary challenge has already been addressed by members of the Reference Services Task Force (RSTF) with their decision to neither name nor brand the IM/Chat component of virtual reference, but to instead focus on branding the concept of "Ask a Librarian." This allows us to emphasize not only how a patron can contact a librarian for help, but why they should consider the possibility. Focusing our marketing efforts on a specific service with a targeted audience ­ first year students ­ does give us the opportunity to create several potential plans that may be measured for success. Conveniently, marketing efforts focused on this subset will still reach other groups, including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and staff. While we intend to concentrate our efforts on first year students, this plan effectively reaches a broad spectrum of the campus community. In considering the unique qualities of first year students, we have gathered information from readings, conferences, and our own observation. Karen E. Desotelle's presentation at the 2006 WAAL Conference, "The Bumpy Road Workshop: Journeying with Novice College Learners," was especially enlightening, as were insights gleaned from the "First Year Experience" Conference organized by Wren Singer at UW-Madison and Diane Oblinger's keynote address at the 2005 teaching and learning Symposium. Research shows that incoming freshmen are increasingly engaged with technology and, once they arrive on campus, primarily focused on making friends and constructing a social identity. Our plan takes advantage of these characteristics, building on our target audience's comfort with technology (particularly the Web) and their desire for community. We recommend differentiating the marketing for "Ask a Librarian" from the promotion for other campus services with a fun, hip, irreverent message that appeals to the sensibilities of our target audience. While not being outrageous, we think it is more effective to tweak their expectations of librarians as fussy, pedantic, cobweb-riddled antiquarians, than deliver a message so inoffensive as to be instantly forgettable. In Marketing for Dummies, Alexander Hiam discusses the effectiveness of the "Make 7-Up Yours" campaign in dramatically increasing the soft drink's market share for 12-24 year olds (10). We believe that fashioning a similar campaign, one that while snarky is not malicious, will demonstrably increase a student's willingness to "Ask a Librarian" for information. This is particularly true with virtual reference via IM/Chat, because librarians will be perceived as both approachable (casual, not `uptight') and comfortable with the mode of communication. Objectives ѕ To market the UW-Madison Libraries newly-implemented IM/Chat reference service to first year students using a variety of media and formats to promote the availability of instant, reliable information provided by a friendly professional. 12
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ѕ To employ the talents and skills of a variety of people affiliated with the UW-Madison Libraries including Library Communications (Don Johnson, Dan Joe, Sarah Johansen), reference staff, trainers, and student library workers, to promote this new service. Successful marketing of this service will involve buy-in from both students and staff. ѕ To create a plan that is both detailed and flexible, one that establishes an implementation timeline, budgetary options, and also provides opportunities for assessment. ѕ To assess the success of this marketing plan, the following factors will be analyzed: · Increased usage statistics · Service/name recognition · User satisfaction
Situation Analysis
Technology - Old Chat (aka, Live Help)
The University of Wisconsin Libraries' first virtual reference chat service was launched in the fall of 2002. The service, which ran on the now-defunct Convey Pro software, required users to download a plug-in to their computer. Additionally, the service/software worked only on PCs running Windows and using the Internet Explorer browser.
The service was staffed (and therefore available to users) during the following hours during the semester:
Sundays Monday-Wednesday Thursdays Fridays Saturdays
5 p.m. to 12 midnight 11 a.m. to 12 midnight 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. not available
Promotions for this `Live Help' brand service included color posters, placards, and "table tents." Ads for the service appeared in both the Daily Cardinal and Badger Herald. Articles describing the service were published in Madison Magazine's "Tech Watch" and in the Libraries at UWMadison newsletter. Additionally, 1/3-page flyers were printed (both black-and-white and incolor) and distributed at reference desks. `Live Help' was also regularly mentioned in the mass emails that went to staff and students via Library Communications as well as in library instruction sessions for Communication Requirement-A classes.
Technology - New Chat
In mid-July 2006, concurrent with the roll-out of the new Libraries Web site, a new and improved virtual reference IM/Chat service will become available to library users.
Information regarding this new service, as well as an online form (no longer is a down-load required), will be found at "Ask a Librarian" ­ a link from virtually all of the Libraries' Web pages.
Delivery of the service will take place via a "blending" of technologies: users will be able to contact a UW librarian via their preferred IM service or they can opt to initiate an online chat session without accessing an IM client. This software does not require the user to download 13
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any software. What is more, this blended model allows users to make contact from either a Windows or Mac platform with ease.
The "Ask a Librarian" IM/Chat will initially be staffed by librarians at the reference desks at College and Memorial libraries during the following hours:
Sundays Monday-Thursday: Fridays: Saturdays:
6 p.m. - midnight 11 a.m. - midnight 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. no service
Target Audience Who are our target users and what do we know about them as a group? Today's traditionally-aged incoming students: · Do not recognize the value of the library or the role of librarians in their academic success · Are not thinking about research assignments at the beginning of the semester · Are focused on coping and adapting to "college life" · Do have questions about the location of campus buildings and how to register or drop classes, where the closest laundromat is, etc. · Are multi-taskers · Are techno-savvy · Are online whenever and wherever possible · Go to their friends first for answers to their questions · Go to Google, Ask.com, Jeeves, TAs, RAs, Campus Information, Ask Bucky, and "411" all before considering a library or librarian as a potential source of information · Are resistant to the idea of `asking for help' particularly from a librarian who may be difficult to locate or seem less approachable · Are already inundated with promotional materials from across campus and beyond. According to the Fall 2005 online Reference Survey: · Only 40% of respondents knew of Live Help and only 6% had used it · 67% of respondents currently chat online, 87% of undergraduates use IM/Chat
Marketing Strategies Because this is the committee's first attempt to create a formal marketing plan, we have made a concerted effort to emphasize flexibility and maneuverability. Although we have consulted a variety of marketing literature, we are operating in the realm of the abstract and hypothetical. It is very exciting to have the opportunity to conceive, visualize, coordinate, and eventually assess the results of these efforts. Given our situation analysis, this committee recommends a "blended" approach to marketing the new and improved IM/Chat Reference service, utilizing both electronic and print media options.
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4 Media Electronic Because IM/Chat are computer-based technologies, it makes sense to promote "Ask a Librarian" as much as possible on the Web. In an effort to take advantage of the first year student's desire to fit-in and belong, we recommend purchasing advertising on Facebook, an incredibly popular Social Networking Web site. A "flyer" (an animated ad approximately 1ј" x 2Ѕ") costs as little as $5 a day and is directed solely at UW-Madison students. We envision two separate ad campaigns, an introductory flyer during the first full week of school when thousands of students, particularly freshmen, will be pouring over pages in an effort to identify classmates, and a separate ad during the week of October 22 when research efforts typically begin. External (off-campus) sites which we recommend promoting our service include: · Facebook Additionally, there are a number of internal Web pages that can also be used to promote reference interactions. Internal pages that could feature promotional material include: · lap-top check-out · group-study room reservations · info-lab home pages · "What's New" section of the Libraries' home page · "Ask a Librarian" link on library Web site · MadCat suggestion when getting "zero results" Emails generated by Library Communications/Don Johnson · Mass email to faculty and instructors · Mass email to students · Mass email to freshmen students (week 7) Print While, admittedly our target audience is techno-savvy, the importance of print advertising cannot be underestimated. Print items such as posters, table-tents, etc., can generate awareness of services and have the ability to reach students when they are not online. We recommend pursuing the following print items: · table tents (for campus cafeterias and the student unions) · posters (info-labs, residence halls, libraries) free-standing counter-top signs (for in-library use) [as indicated by RSTF report that a substantial number of "Live Help" sessions were generated by patrons located inside a library] · handouts for Freshmen Orientation (LILI Office) · flyers ­ to promote either the service or the giveaways · sidewalk stencils 15
5 Press releases could potentially generate articles in: · Wisconsin Week ­ Library Supplement · Badger Herald · Daily Cardinal Interpersonal "It's about delivering a level of service that's so superior that your customers go off and do your marketing for you ... No one is going to tell anybody about a mediocre experience, unless they're telling us about it from a bad experience ... Leaders need to teach their team what's expected to create this type of customer experience. It's discretionary effort. You can't mandate that. It has to come from your heart." JoAnna Brandi, Marketing Consultant, quoted by Zbar This quotation highlights an important aspect of any marketing effort, and one of the most effective ­ word-of-mouth communication. As Jeff Zbar notes in his newspaper article on marketing momentum, "providing a product or service that encourages customers to tell others about the experience evokes a perceived objectivity that highlights a company's attention to its customers." In that same article, JoAnna Brandi emphasizes the importance of teaching staff how to provide a level of customer service that generates positive buzz about the interaction. In creating this marketing plan, we believe that in addition to teaching the mechanics of the new IM/Chat technology, trainers must also emphasize the importance of customer service. Given the number of student workers in campus libraries, this committee also believes that spending 5-10 minutes in training and orientation programs on this new service would be one way to reach those information gatekeepers who have substantial interaction with our target audience. We recommend preparing a brief script and possibly a presentation using PowerPoint or Captivate that could be shown during library training. Of course, one of the more profound interactions students have with librarians during their freshmen year is taking a Com Req A course. Undoubtedly, nearly 4,000 freshmen will be exposed to the concept of "Ask a Librarian" and the various means to do so during their instruction session. This message will also be reiterated in CLUE. Premiums (i.e., Giveaways) A premium is any product with a marketing message somewhere on it that you give away (Hiam, 205). The committee undertook an informal market survey regarding giveaways. Since students are inundated with promotional items from a variety of campus services, we asked seven undergraduates what they kept, what was most appealing, and what kind of promotional item they would recommend. Unanimously, students indicated that they would only keep an item if it had perceived functional value. Highlighters and ID holders were the items most often recommended, although one student made a valid point about advertising on the libraries print/debit cards. This opportunity may yet be worth exploring. We've looked into the cost of pre-printed highlighters (Plan C), but they are an expensive option at nearly $4,500. Having met with Don Johnson, he pointed out that can be difficult to track the 16
6 effectiveness of marketing with premiums. Often, he reports, the items are more appreciated by staff because they have the opportunity to give an item of perceived value away to patrons. You can make your premium stand out by simply selecting an item of higher-than-usual quality (Hiam, 209). The option this committee recommends involves purchasing items of higher value and creating awareness for the new virtual reference IM/Chat service with drawings for items such as i-Pod Nanos or flash drives. Entries, potentially, could be submitted at College, Memorial, Steenbock and Wendt libraries ­ we chose libraries used by the largest number of freshmen patrons ­ with drawings generating interest in the new service and a rabid desire to win cool prizes. We contemplated having a contest where the first fifty people to use "Ask a Librarian" via IM/Chat were automatically entered into a drawing, but this seemed potentially disastrous ­ staff could be overwhelmed, IMs bounced, patrons dissatisfied with the experience, etc. Giving away highly desirable techie items like i-Pods and/or flash drive also reinforces the `subliminal' message that libraries are cool, hip, and relevant to today's undergraduate. "Ask a Librarian" Day If it's good enough for the governor, than it's good enough for the chancellor. ­ Nikki Busch Another option to consider is actually making "Ask a Librarian" an event of campus-wide proportions. This would involve having Chancellor Wiley declare a specific day in honor of campus libraries. Each of the individual libraries could hold open houses, give tours, or offer giveaways. We even envision an online quiz that matches students and libraries: Do you like to nap in public? - Your best library match may be College Library or the Kohler Art Library. Do you need quick access to Babcock ice cream? - Try Steenbock, Wendt or Memorial libraries It would be a fun way to honor the efforts of all campus libraries and to really emphasize the approachability of Library Staff. This would again, perhaps subconsciously, reinforce the message that it is always possible, and perhaps even desirable, to "Ask a Librarian." One considerable drawback to this plan is the amount of coordination and effort it would take ­ logistically and politically ­ to undertake an event of this magnitude. A much larger committee would need to be formed, however, as Hiam advises in Marketing for Dummies, "combine premiums with "impact scenarios" for the most return on your effort (205-207). Further Recommendations From our readings, it became apparent early on that consistent availability is a hallmark of a successful virtual reference service. In Going Live: Starting & Running a Virtual Reference Service, Steve Coffman writes, There is no point in spending large amounts of money and time trying to attract patrons if they are likely to find your service closed when they get there. ...if you cannot manage a 17
7 24/7 service, try to keep the service open as many hours as you can and make those hours as predictable as possible (77). In marketing this service, this committee highly recommends establishing consistent hours, ideally each day from 11 a.m. to 12 midnight. If this proves impossible, and we recognize the challenges, having an alert on the "Ask a Librarian" page indicating whether or not someone is available to chat would be an acceptable alternative. Assessment Success will be gauged by three factors: · Increased usage statistics · Service/name recognition · User satisfaction (both staff and patrons) Tools for assessment: · Online survey · Focus groups Online Survey We recommend that following a reference chat session, a library representative would include a link to our online survey, complete with invitation to participate, should they choose to do so. A brief script could be kept on the desk top and then copied and pasted in a signature sign-off. Wording would be something like: Thank you for contacting "Ask a Librarian." If you have a moment, please consider taking a brief survey about this service at: https://websurvey.wisc.edu/survey/TakeSurvey.asp The survey would consist of three questions: 1. How did you learn about the Ask a Librarian IM/Chat service? 2. How would satisfied are you with your service today? (With one being "Not at all" and five being "Very satisfied") 3. Please check all of the following that apply: o I am a first-year undergrad o I am a second-year undergrad o I am a 3rd and beyond undergrad o I am a grad student o I am faculty or staff o I am not affiliated with the University of Wisconsin Focus Groups From the list of buddy names acquired by Trillian and any contact information kept by Velaro, an IM would be generated at the beginning of the spring semester inviting students to participate in a focus group. This group, made up of approximately 10-12 undergraduates, would then meet for hour to discuss the benefits and/or drawbacks of IM/Chat reference and the effectiveness of the marketing campaign. Pizza would be provided. 18
8 References Coffman, Steve. Going Live: Starting & Running a Virtual Reference Service, Chicago, IL: American Library Association, 2003 Hiam, Alexander. Marketing for Dummies, 2nd edition, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Publishing, Inc., 2004. Zbar, Jeff. "Customer Referrals Can Help Your Small Business Build Marketing Momentum," South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Fort Lauderdale, May 15, 2006. 19
Interview Questions · IM/Chat Reference
First name: ____________________________________ Major/Field of Study: ___________________________
Affiliation: freshman junior 5+ staff
sophomore senior graduate student faculty
Gender: female male other Preferred IM: AIM MSN Yahoo other How many IM/Chat reference interactions (estimated)?
1. When using chat reference have you used the "Click to chat online button"? yes no 2. When using chat reference have you used Instant Messaging? yes no
3. Have you used both methods? yes no
3a. If so, why did you choose one over the other?
3b. If you've used both, did you notice any difference in service between the two?
4. How quickly do you expect a librarian to respond? (both initially and at each reply) 5. How long are you willing to wait for a response? (both initially and at each reply) 6. Do you mind not knowing who is responding? 6a. Is it important for you to know the librarian's first name? Full name? 7. If you've used the IM service, are the IM names (askuwlibrary, askuwlibrary2, etc.) easy to identify and use? yes no 8. If no one takes your call and you are provided with an email or phone option, are you likely to use it? Why or why not? 20
9. Were you satisfied with the experience? Why or why not. 9a. If you are referred to another librarian or department, do you consider that a failure? 9b. What method of referral do you prefer (phone, chat, email, etc.)? 10. Would you expect this service to be available 24/7? 10a. When are you most likely to use it? (time of day, time of week, time of the semester) 11. How did you find out about the IM/Chat reference service? 11a. Do you recall seeing promotions for the IM/Chat reference service? yes no 11b. If yes, please describe. 12. Please look at this suite of promotional images and give me your first impression. 13. Do you have any suggestions on how we should promote this service? 14. Would you recommend the IM/Chat Reference service to a friend? yes no 15. If available, would you "ask a librarian" via text messaging? voice-over IP ? video chat? 16. How can we improve this service? 21
Celebrate National Library Week At the UW Madison Libraries April 15-21. 2007 To help you celebrate, enclosed are the following: · An "Ask a Librarian" banner to display in your library · "Ask a Librarian" mood pencils to give away--They change color when you hold them! · Alando Tucker READ posters to distribute-- If you run out, request more at [email protected] · Library-themed games--Award your own prizes or simply hand-out for patrons to enjoy During National Library Week, the UW Madison Libraries will host a number of programs, activities, lectures and exhibits. For more information, see http:// www.library.wisc.edu/news/releases/2007/20070329National_Library_Week.html Enjoy! Reference Advisory & Implementation Group Marketing WoG Questions? Contact Bonnie Shucha at [email protected] 22
Libraries in the Movies These movies all have a library connection. Can you identify them all? 1 2 3
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Created with EclipseCrossword -- www.eclipsecrossword.com Across ­ Insert spaces in between words 3. This 1985 film features a host of "Brat Pack" actors serving a term of detention in a High School library. (2 words) 4. In this 1995 movie, Mary is a free-spirited young woman living the champagne life on a beer budget. She calls her godmother, a librarian, for bail money after being arrested. To repay the loan she begins working as a library clerk. (2 words) 6. Noah Wyle plays a perpetual graduate student who suddenly becomes The Librarian at the Metropolitan Public Library. Finding himself guardian of the world's greatest treasures, he must search for a stolen section of the spear that pierced side of Christ. (6 words) 7. Efficiency expert, Spencer Tracy, clashes with librarian, Katharine Hepburn, over the installation of a new "electronic brain" named EMMARAC in the Reference Department of a TV network. (2 words) 8. In this 1976 movie, a clerk at the Library of Congress (Jayne Stewart) gives circulation records to reporters (Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman) working on the Watergate story. (4 words) Down ­ Insert spaces in between words 1. When two 1990s teenagers are transported to the 1950s, one of the oddities they notice is that all the books at the library consist of blank pages. When the teens tell the plot of a missing text, the book fills itself in. (1 word) 2. In this 1975 film set in the future, James Caan uses the public library to seek information about the infamous game of which he is the star. Because the information there is restricted, he goes to the great central computer in Switzerland that has all the information in the world. (1 word) 5. Three odd-ball scientists get kicked out of their cushy positions at a University in NY City where they studied the occult. They decide to set up shop in an old firehouse and trap pesky spirits for money. Their first job is at the New York Public Library. (2 words) 9. Rachel Weisz plays a fiesty, young librarian in Cairo in the 1920s who becomes involved in an adventure to kill a creature that has returned to take his revenge on the world. (2 words) Created by Bonnie Shucha ­ UW Law Library Source: Librarians in the Movies: An Annotated Filmography 23
Libraries in the Movies
These movies all have a library connection. Can you identify them all?
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M U M M Y Created with EclipseCrossword -- www.eclipsecrossword.com
Across ­ Insert spaces in between words 3. This 1985 film features a host of "Brat Pack" actors serving a term of detention in a high school library. (2 words) 4. In this 1995 movie, Mary is a free-spirited young woman living the champagne life on a beer budget. She calls her godmother, a librarian, for bail money after being arrested. To repay the loan she begins working as a library clerk. (2 words) 6. Noah Wyle plays a perpetual graduate student who suddenly becomes The Librarian at the Metropolitan Public Library. Finding himself guardian of the world's greatest treasures, he must search for a stolen section of the spear that pierced side of Christ. (6 words) 7. Efficiency expert, Spencer Tracy, clashes with librarian, Katharine Hepburn, over the installation of a new "electronic brain" named EMMARAC in the Reference Department of a TV network. (2 words) 8. In this 1976 movie, a clerk at the Library of Congress (Jayne Stewart) gives circulation records to reporters (Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman) working on the Watergate story. (4 words) Down ­ Insert spaces in between words 1. When two 1990s teenagers are transported to the 1950s, one of the oddities they notice is that all the books at the library consist of blank pages. When the teens tell the plot of a missing text, the book fills itself in. (1 word) 2. In this 1975 film set in the future, James Caan uses the public library to seek information about the infamous game of which he is the star. Because the information there is restricted, he goes to the great central computer in Switzerland that has all the information in the world. (1 word) 5. Three odd-ball scientists get kicked out of their cushy positions at a University in NY City where they studied the occult. They decide to set up shop in an old firehouse and trap pesky spirits for money. Their first job is at the New York Public Library. (2 words) 9. Rachel Weisz plays a fiesty, young librarian in Cairo in the 1920s who becomes involved in an adventure to kill a creature that has returned to take his revenge on the world. (2 words) Created by Bonnie Shucha ­ UW Law Library Source: Librarians in the Movies: An Annotated Filmography
24
Campus Libraries
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AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES ARBORETUM BIOLOGY BUSINESS CENTER FOR DEMOGRAPHY AND ECOLOGY CHEMISTRY CHICANO AND LATINO STUDIES CIMC COLLEGE COOPERATIVE CHILDRENS BOOK CENTER DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICES CENTER EBLING HEALTH SCIENCES FRANKS SOCIAL WORK GEOGRAPHY GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS HERBARIUM Historical Society INNOVATION CENTER JACOBSEN PRIMATE CENTER
JOURNALISM READING ROOM KLEENE MATH KOHLER ART LAW LEARNING SUPPORT SERVICES LGBT CAMPUS CENTER LIBRARY AND INFORMATION STUDIES LIMNOLOGY MAX KADE INSTITUTE FOR GERMAN-AMERICAN STUDIES MEMORIAL MUSIC PHYSICS PLANT PATHOLOGY ROBINSON MAP LIBRARY RUTH KETTERER HARRIS TEXTILES AND DESIGN
SCHWERDTFEGER SPACE SCIENCE SOMERS social science SPECIAL COLLECTIONS STEENBOCK MEMORIAL TORGERSON COOPERATIVE UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES VETERINARY MEDICINE READING ROOM water resources WENDT ENGINEERING WISCONSIN CENTER FOR FILM AND THEATRE RESEARCH WOMENS STUDIES LIBRARIANS OFFICE WOODMAN ASTRONOMY
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library.wisc.edu/ask
[email protected] » Blog Archive » National Library Week please... Library Communications
http://devweb.library.wisc.edu/newsletter/?p=61
News for Staff of UW-Madison Libraries « Return to Issue 57 National Library Week pleases librarians, students and faculty May 21, 2007 Although National Library Week ended nearly a month ago, people are still talking about its successes. It was one of the most memorable events in recent memory. Wisconsin Week, The Wisconsin State Journal, The Daily Cardinal and The Badger Herald all covered the event. Besides the Edible Book Festival and various lectures, individual libraries also celebrated the week. For instance, there was a law or library-related contest open to law School students, faculty and staff each day at the Law Library. Goodies such as radios, picture frames and DC/DVD holders were also given away. [email protected] is written by the staff of Library Communications. Managing Editor: Laura-Claire Corson. Please send questions, comments or story ideas to: Don Johnson or Laura-Claire Corson
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Tier 1 Screensaver Policy DRAFT 4/16/07 ­ Reference Management Team CONTENT Tier 1 screensavers will only include library services that appeal to a broad campus audience. Examples include: · Find It · Ask-a-Librarian · Library Express · Photos of all libraries · Friends of the Library events SUBMISSIONS The Campus Libraries Marketing Committee (CLMC)* is responsible for approving content for placement on the campus library tier 1 computers. CLMC is not responsible for content creation. If a person or group wishes to place content on the Tier 1 computers, they must provide a finished electronic product to CLMC at least 2 weeks before the desired posting date. Submissions should be sent to [email protected] Items will be reviewed for consideration at least twice per month. CLMC will send approved images to LTG for addition, as well as notify LTG when deletions are necessary. They should be sent to [email protected] LTG requires the finished product one week before the posting date. OPERATION Screensavers will appear after 5 minutes of inactivity. Items will rotate on a regular basis. All Tier 1 computers will have the same rotating items, and each image will display for 8 seconds. Screens will be changed as new content warrants it and as dated items are removed. TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS · Each image must be tested by the submitter at two resolutions: 1024 x 768 and 1280 x 1024. The images do not need to be these sizes, but should display properly on both screen resolutions. · The item must be able to convey its message within the 8 seconds that the image is displayed on the screen. * Reference Management Team during the pilot period, Spring 2007. 27
May 30 Weeks 1 ­ 2 Week 3 Week 4 June 30 Weeks 5 ­ 7 Week 8 August 2 Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Weeks 11 ­ 15 Month 3, Week1 Month 3, Week 2 Month 6 Month 7 Month 10 Month 12
"Ask a Librarian" Marketing Timeline May 30 Receive charge: Market new and improved IM/Chat service to first year students Brainstorm: ideas and approaches Research marketing methodology in and outside of libraries examples of successful and less-than-successful marketing plans costs of implementation Construct means and message Draw up draft of marketing plan
Test market concept of IM-ing a Librarian at incoming freshman orientation
Shift from marketing "IM only" to marketing suite of "Ask a Librarian" services (i.e. IM, Chat, Telephone, Email and In-person reference) Integrate feedback and finalize marketing plan
Pitch plan to oversight committee
Jun
Brainstorm: taglines
30
User-test taglines
Integrate feedback and hone taglines
Take plan and feedback to graphic artist for visual elements/graphic components Submit recommendations to committee Selected taglines approved Combine taglines with images
New IM/Chat service launched with new UW-Madison Libraries Web site
Marketing plan officially approved Selected image mockups approved
User test image mockups Submit final ad recommendations to oversight committee
Polish advertisements for various media
1st Post-chat online user survey
Launch Campaign
Aug
28
1st Round of "Facebook Flyers"
2nd Round of "Facebook Flyers"
2nd Post-chat online user survey
User testing via one-on-one recorded interviews Prepare first year report 28
29
Marketing "Take-Aways"
Situation
Challenge
Lesson
Marketing Group charge: "Market the Velaro/Trillian Virtual Reference chat service to first year students."
First year students did not know WHY they would want to ask a librarian anything at all.
Market all forms of reference service (chat, IM, email, phone, and in-person) focusing on benefits of "Ask(ing) a Librarian."
Marketing materials developed for one Match marketing message, means,
audience was ultimately expected to and materials to each specific
apply to all audiences.
audience.
Concern over discrepancy between demand for new service and available staff resources to meet that demand.
Marketing plan temporarily put on hold. Plan for success (and failure). Remain
Staff resources not enough to meet
flexible and adjust efforts accordingly.
potential demand.
Period of major change in reference service coordination at campus level; parent body in flux.
Funding sources and budget unclear at Establish funding sources and budget
time of plan's approval and during the prior to planning and/or the plan's
first half of implementation.
approval.
Initial decisions made did not match final expectations.
Provide well-defined, consistent reporting structure.
Plan included a prize drawing for three UWSA policy on prize giveaways: video iPods as part of "Ask a Librarian value of a prize cannot exceed $200. Day" festivities.
Investigate all relevant university or library policies in advance.
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