Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No 5

Tags: urban areas, Local Authority, households, Edinburgh, rural areas, Edinburgh Glasgow, classification, Glasgow, Accessible Remote, areas, geographical areas, proportion, Scotland, Scottish Executive, household population, working, Scottish Household Survey, Fife, driving licence, adult households, summary tables, Sharing accommodation, working couples, Public transport, frequent bus service, Scottish House, household member, Scottish Household Survey Bulletin, Scottish households, Scottish Executive National Statistics Publication Bulletin, local authorities, bus service, Tayside Lothians Central Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Content: 6 Bulletin · Half of adults in `the four cities' hold a full driving license rising to three-quarters (76%) in rural areas. · Adults in small towns and rural areas are much more likely than their counterparts in cities and other urban areas to say that they feel involved in their local community. · Neighbourhood problems are seen as most common in `the four cities', followed by `other urban areas' and least common in rural areas. · Households in rural areas are the most likely to have access to motor vehicles, and three out of ten have access to multiple vehicles. · Adults in small towns and rural areas are more likely than those in cities and other urban areas to rate their neighbourhood as being a `very' or `fairly good' place to live.
Bulletin 6
Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No.6 NFO System Three and MORI Scotland Scottish Executive 2001 A Scottish Executive National Statistics Publication
Bulletin 6
©Crown copyright 2001 Scottish Executive Victoria Quay Edinburgh EH6 6QQ Produced for the Scottish Executive by Astron 5/2001 (B20393) The views expressed in this Bulletin are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers First published 2001 British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN 0 7559 0116 9 ISSN 1467-7393
Bulletin 6 Contents
Contents
1 Key points
2
2 Introduction
4
3 Demographics
9
4 Local services
17
5 Neighbourhoods
20
6 Transport
30
7 Household finance
38
8 Households in Scotland - summary tables
41
9 Methodological details
44
10 A note on definitions
45
11 Scottish Executive Statistical Services
49
12 Correspondence and enquiries
50
Bulletin 6 1. Key points
1. Key points · The Scottish Household Survey is a major continuous survey funded by the Scottish Executive covering 62,000 households over its first four years. · This bulletin considers the differences and similarities between adults and households living in different geographical areas and area types. The main geographical indicators used in the analysis are an eight-fold urban/rural classification and a local authority grouping variable. · In `the four cities', the proportion of adults holding a full driving license is 55%, while in `accessible rural', `remote rural' and `very remote rural' areas, the proportions are significantly higher (76%, 76% and 77% respectively). · Households in `accessible rural' and `remote rural' areas are most likely to have access to motor vehicles, and three out of ten have access to multiple vehicles. · Fifteen per cent of adults walk to work or place of full-time education. Adults living in `very remote small towns' are more likely than those living in any other area type to walk to work (32%).
· Adults living in `the four cities' are more likely to use a bus to travel to work than adults in any other area type. Twenty-one percent of adults in `the four cities' travel to work by bus compared with 15% overall. · Children in households in `accessible rural', `remote rural' and `very remote rural' areas are more likely than children in any other area type to travel to school by bus (41%, 58% and 60% respectively compared with 23% overall). · Adults in `accessible small towns' and `accessible rural' areas are most likely to be in some form of employment (56% and 57% respectively), with adults in `the four cities' least likely (47%). Glasgow has the lowest proportion of adults in employment (39%) and the Lothians have the highest (56%). Southern Scotland has the highest proportion of adults who are `permanently retired from work' (29%). · Households in Edinburgh are more likely than households in the other Local Authority groups to say they are `managing very well' or `managing quite well' financially (48%), while households in Glasgow are least likely to say this (28%).
2
Bulletin 6 1. Key Points
· Adults in small towns and rural areas are more likely than those in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' to rate their neighbourhood as being a `very' or `fairly good' place to live. · Adults in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' are more likely to mention attributes relating to convenience - for example `good public transport' (17% in both cases) and `convenient shops/ amenities' (37% and 34% respectively) - as aspects of their neighbourhood that they particularly like. · Adults in small towns and rural areas are more likely to mention attributes relating to the appearance and character of their area - for example, `nicely landscaped/open spaces', `good outlook/view', quiet/peaceful' - as aspects of their area which they particularly like.
· Neighbourhood problems are seen as most common in `the four cities', followed by `other urban areas' and then `small accessible towns'. · Adults in small towns and rural areas are much more likely than their counterparts in `the four cities and `other urban areas' to say that they feel involved in their local community. Thirty eight percent of adults in `remote rural' areas say they are involved in their local community, compared with 22% in ` the four cities'. · In general, there would appear to be high levels of social contact in all areas. `Speaking with relatives on the phone' is the most common type of contact (83% of adults saying they have done this in the last two weeks).
3
Bulletin 6 2. Introduction
2. Introduction This is the sixth bulletin of findings from the Scottish Household Survey (SHS); a major survey of the Scottish population funded by the Scottish Executive. The aim of the SHS is to provide information on the characteristics, composition and behaviour of Scottish households and the adult population. The survey covers a wide range of topics and by bringing this range of topics together in one survey, allows analysis of issues in ways that have not previously been possible in Scotland. This bulletin considers the differences and similarities between adults and households living in different geographical areas and area types. The main geographical indicators used in the analysis are an urban/rural classification and a Local Authority grouping variable. Often analysis is based on all rural areas together, which does not provide any details on the potentially different characteristics of different types of rural areas. The eight-fold urban/rural classification has been selected to enable a detailed analysis of households and adults in different types of rural areas. The Local Authority grouping classification enables analysis of different areas, and, where possible, data for individual local authorities are used. The analysis in this bulletin is based on data collected from 30,157 households and 28,277 individuals during 1999 and 2000.
Further methodological details of the survey and a note on definitions are provided at the end of this bulletin. Urban/rural classification For the purposes of this Bulletin, an eight-fold urban/rural classification of Scotland has been adopted, based on settlement size and remoteness (measured by drive times). This classification differs from the sixfold classification adopted in previous SHS publications, to allow more detailed geographical analysis to be conducted given the larger sample size. The eight-fold classification divides the previous `remote' classifications into two, adding a `remote' and a `very remote' category to both the previous `remote small towns' and `remote rural' area categories (see section 10 for further details). Using respondents' home postcodes, households have been classified as follows: The four cities - households in Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Dundee, and Glasgow (settlements over 125,000 population). Other urban areas - households in settlements of 10,000 to 125,000 people. Accessible small towns - households in settlements of between 3,000 and 10,000 people and within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
4
Bulletin 6 2. Introduction
Remote small towns - small towns (between 3,000 and 10,000 people) within a drive time of between 30 and 60 minutes of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
Very remote small towns - small towns (between 3,000 and 10,000 people) over 60 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
Accessible rural - households in settlements of less than 3,000 people and within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
Remote rural - households in settlements of less than 3,000 people and within a drive time of between 30 and 60 minutes of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
Very remote rural - households in settlements of less than 3,000 people, over 60 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
Isolated houses and hamlets are included in settlements of less than 3,000 people.
Table I shows the percentage of households in each area type. The eight-fold urban/rural classification is also illustrated in Map 1.
Table I: Urban/rural classification
Percentages
Base
The four cities
38
Other urban areas
31
Accessible small towns
10
Remote small towns
2
Very remote small towns
2
Accessible rural
13
Remote rural
3
Very remote rural
3
Total
100
10,125 9,354 2,903 508 906 3,818 743 1,789 30,146
Local Authority grouping The SHS has been designed to provide results for each of the 32 Scottish local authorities at the end of each twoyear sampling period. Although this Bulletin is based on two years of data, in some analyses the sample sizes remain small. Thus, for the purpose of this bulletin, local authorities have been combined into larger groups to provide more reliable results. In the analysis to follow, the City of Edinburgh, City of Glasgow, Fife, North Lanarkshire and South Lanarkshire councils are each considered separately. The remaining local authorities have been grouped as follows: Highlands and Islands - Eilean Siar, Argyll and Bute, Highland, Moray, Orkney and Shetland. Grampian - City of Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire. Tayside - Angus, Dundee City and Perth and Kinross. Central - Stirling, Clackmannanshire and Falkirk. Dunbartonshire - East and West Dunbartonshire. Renfrewshire and Inverclyde - East Renfrewshire, Renfrewshire and Inverclyde. Ayrshire - South, East, and North Ayrshire. Lothians - West Lothian, East Lothian and Midlothian.
5
6
Bulletin 6 2. Introduction
Bulletin 6 2. Introduction
Southern Scotland - Borders and Dumfries and Galloway. Table II shows the percentage of households in each of the Local Authority group areas. The areas are also illustrated in Map 2. Where sample sizes permit, some results are also presented for individual local authorities. For ease of reference, groupings of local authorities are indicated in italics, and individual local authorities are indicated in standard typeface. A detailed breakdown of results by individual local authorities will be published in the second SHS Annual Report in Autumn 2001.
Table II: Local authority grouping
Percentages
Base
Edinburgh
9
Glasgow
13
Fife
7
North Lanarkshire
6
South Lanarkshire
6
Highlands and Islands
9
Grampian
9
Tayside
8
Central
5
Dunbartonshire
4
Renfrewshire and Inverclyde
7
Ayrshire
7
Lothians
6
Southern Scotland
5
Total
100
2,479 3,116 1,890 1,614 1,593 4,095 2,408 2,189 2,018 1,121 1,980 2,159 2,014 1,481 30,157
7
8
Bulletin 6 2. Introduction
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
3. Demographics Introduction This section examines differences in the key characteristics of households, properties and adults by the urban/rural classification and the Local Authority grouping. It examines property type, tenure, household composition, income, economic activity and industrial sector of employment. Properties and households Table 1 shows the distribution of property types by the urban/rural classification. Households in `the four cities' are most likely to live in a flat or
maisonette (57%). Households in `very remote rural' areas are more likely than those in any other area types to live in a detached house (64%). In terms of Local Authority groupings, households in Glasgow are most likely to live in a flat or maisonette (72%) and households in Highlands and Islands (15%) and Southern Scotland (17%) are least likely (Table 2). At the individual local authority level, households in the City of Glasgow are the most likely to live in a flat or maisonette (72%), while those in Eilean Siar are the most likely to live in a detached house (69%) (No table).
Table 1: Property type by urban/rural classification
The four cities
Detached house
9
Semi-detached house 18
Terraced house
16
Flat/maisonette
57
Other
1
Base
10,125
Other urban areas 15 24 30 30 0 9,354
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
22
23
27
24
27
36
24
17
0
0
2,903
508
Very remote small towns 22 27 20 30 1
Accessible rural 43 27 18 11 1
Column percentages Households
Remote rural 53 25 14 8 0
Very Remote rural 64 24 7 5 1
Total 20 22 21 36 1
906 3,818
743 1,789 30,146
Table 2: Property type by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyuvrnensfrrbhcilearryetwdsoehnisrehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Detached house
13
3 19
9 18 42 27 25 23 21 15 20 19 31
20
Semi-detached house 14 13 23 22 25 27 25 23 29 28 23 25 26 25
22
Terraced house
14 12 29 33 28 16 16 18 24 18 21 29 32 27
21
Flat/maisonette
59 72 28 34 29 15 31 33 24 33 41 27 22 17
36
Other
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
Base
2,479 3,116 1,890 1,614 1,593 4,095 2,408 2,189 2,018 1,121 1,980 2,159 2,014 1,481 30,157
9
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
Table 3 shows how tenure varies by the urban/rural classification. Overall, 62% of households are in owneroccupation, 31% rent their property from a social landlord, and 5% rent from a private landlord. Owneroccupation is most common in `accessible rural' and `very remote rural' areas and least common in `the four cities' (70%, 72% and 57% respectively). Social renting is most common in `the four cities' (35%), `other urban areas' (34%) and `remote
small towns' (33%) and least common in the three different types of rural area (19%, 20% and 17%). In terms of Local Authority grouping (Table 4), owner-occupation is most common in Edinburgh, South Lanarkshire and the Highlands and Islands (69% in each case) and least common in Glasgow (46%). Glasgow has the highest level of social renting across the different Local Authority groups (47%).
Table 3: Tenure by urban/rural classification
The four cities
Owned outright
20
Buying with help of
loan/mortgage
37
Rent - Local Authority/
Scottish Homes
27
Rent -
Housing Association
8
Rent - Private Landlord 7
Other
1
Base
10,125
Other urban areas 21
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
25
27
41
41
35
30
27
29
4
3
4
3
3
3
1
1
2
9,354 2,903
508
Very remote small towns 32
Accessible rural 30
Column percentages Households
Remote rural 34
Very Remote rural 46
Total 24
29
40
25
26
38
27
17
16
15
26
5
2
6
7
2
4
906 3,818
4
2
5
12
7
5
8
5
2
743 1,789 30,146
Table 4: Tenure by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyuvrnensfrrbhcilearryetwdsoehnisrehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Owned outright
27 14 25 15 23 36 24 26 23 22 23 25 20 30
24
Buying with help of
loan/mortgage
42 32 39 39 46 33 40 35 37 45 43 37 44 32
38
Rent - Local Authority/
Scottish Homes
14 34 29 38 27 20 24 22 30 25 25 32 27 20
26
Rent - Housing Association
5 13
3
4
1
3
3
6
4
5
5
2
5
6
5
Rent - Private Landlord 11
6
4
1
2
7
7
9
3
2
2
3
3
8
5
Other
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
2
0
1
1
1
4
2
Base
2,479 3,116 1,890 1,614 1,593 4,095 2,408 2,189 2,018 1,121 1,980 2,159 2,014 1,481 30,157
10
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
However, there exist variations within some of the Local Authority groupings regarding tenure. For example, when analysis is conducted at the individual local authority level, owneroccupation is most common in East Dumbartonshire and East Renfrewshire (84% in each case), yet remains least common in the City of Glasgow (46%). Renting from a private landlord is most common in the City of Edinburgh (11%) and least common in West Lothian, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire and North Lanarkshire (1% each). (No table) Tables 5 and 6 show the age distribution of household members by urban/rural classification and local authority grouping.
Urban areas have slightly higher proportions of adults aged 16 to 24 years than rural areas. For example, 13% of those living in `the four cities' are in this age group, compared with 8% of those living in `remote rural areas'. Conversely, rural areas have higher proportions of people aged 60 years and over, with 25% of `the four cities' adult population in this age group compared with 34% of the adult population in `very remote rural areas' (Table 5). In terms of local authority groupings, Highlands and Islands and Southern Scotland have the lowest proportions of adults aged 16 to 24 years (9% and 8% respectively) (Table 6).
Table 5: Banded age by urban/rural classification
16-24 25-34 35-44 45-59 60-74 75+ Base
The four cities 13 17 19 23 19 9 9,454
Other urban areas 11 17 19 26 19 8 8,748
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
10
9
15
18
21
20
27
24
20
20
7
9
2,735
488
Very remote small towns 10 15 19 24 24 8
Accessible rural 8 14 21 39 30 8
Column percentages Adults
Remote rural 8 13 20 28 22 9
Very Remote rural 7 13 19 27 33 11
Total 11 16 19 25 20 8
866 3,559
700 1,667 28,227
Table 6: Banded age by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyuvrnensfrrbhcilearryetwdsoehnisrehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
16-24 25-34 35-44 45-59 60-74 75+ Base
14 13 10 12 11
9 12 10 10 13 10 11 10
8
11
18 19 17 18 16 15 16 13 14 15 17 17 17 14
16
19 19 18 19 20 19 21 19 21 20 20 19 20 18
19
23 21 27 26 26 28 25 27 28 25 24 25 27 27
25
18 19 20 18 21 21 18 22 19 21 21 20 19 23
20
9
9
8
6
7
9
9
9
8
7
8
8
7 10
8
2,329 2,912 1,803 1,495 1,490 3,837 2,226 2,063 1,886 1,023 1,861 2,035 1,857 1,410 28,227
11
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
Table 7 shows the distribution of household types (see section 10 for definition) across different urban/rural classification areas. Although the patterns of distribution are broadly similar, `single adult' households are more common in `the four cities' (20%) than in `remote towns' (11%) and in the three different types of rural area (10%, 9% and 11%). Households in `remote small towns' and `accessible rural' areas are most likely to be `family' households (28% and 26% respectively).
In relation to the Local Authority groupings, the most notable differences are that Edinburgh and Glasgow have the highest proportion of `single adult' households (22% in each case compared with 15% overall) and that Southern Scotland has the highest proportion of `older smaller' households (19% compared with 14% overall) (Table 8). At the individual local authority level, `single parent' households are most common in the City of Glasgow and
Table 7: Household type by urban/rural classification
Single adult Small adult Single parent Small family Large family Large adult Older smaller Single pensioner
The four cities 20 16 6 13 7 9 13 17
Other urban areas 13 17 6 16 7 11 14 15
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
13
11
16
15
5
7
17
19
8
9
11
9
16
15
15
15
Very remote small towns 16 16 6 15 8 8 14 17
Accessible rural 10 20 3 17 9 12 16 13
Column percentages Households
Remote rural 9 20 4 15 9 10 19 15
Very Remote rural 11 18 4 13 10 9 18 17
Total 15 17 6 15 8 10 14 16
Base
10,125 9,354 2,903
508
906 3,818
743 1,789 30,146
Table 8: Household type by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyuvrnensfrrbhcilearryetwdsoehnisrehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Single adult Small adult Single parent Small family Large family Large adult Older smaller Single pensioner Base
22 22 13 13 13 13 17 14 12 12 13 14 11 11
15
17 15 19 15 14 19 17 18 19 14 16 16 19 17
17
5
8
5
7
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
6
12 11 16 17 15 15 16 12 16 15 16 14 19 15
15
6
7
7
9
8
8
7
7
8
9
7
7
7
8
8
10
7 10 12 13
9 11
9 11 15 10 11 11 10
10
12 11 14 12 15 16 14 16 14 15 15 14 14 19
14
15 20 15 14 16 15 14 18 14 14 17 17 13 17
16
2,479 3,116 1,890 1,614 1,593 4,095 2,408 2,189 2,018 1,121 1,980 2,159 2,014 1,481 30,157
12
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
Dundee City (8%), while the Scottish Borders, Dumfries and Galloway and Perth and Kinross are the most likely to consist of `older smaller' or `single pensioner' households (35%) (No table).
Households in `accessible rural' areas are the most likely to comprise of `working couples' (35%), while those in `remote rural' areas are the most likely to comprise of `couples where neither works' (20%).
Table 9 shows the variation in household working status by the urban/rural classification. `The four cities' have the highest proportion of non-working single adult households (34%).
Looking at household working status by Local Authority grouping (Table 10) shows that households in Edinburgh are more likely than households in other areas to be `single working adult' households (22%).
`Accessible rural' and `remote rural' areas have lower proportions of households who are either `single working adult' (12% and 10% respectively) or `non-working single adult' households (20% and 21% respectively) than in other area types.
Glasgow has a higher proportion of `non-working single adult' households than any other area (43%). Households in the Lothians are most likely to be `working couple' households (36%) and the least likely to comprise `non-working single adult' households (21%).
Table 9: Household working status by urban/rural classification
Column percentages
Households
Very
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
remote
small Accessible Remote
towns rural
rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Single working adult 18
15
15
15
17
12
10
15
16
Non-working single 34
27
24
23
26
20
21
24
28
Working couple
23
30
32
29
28
35
30
30
28
Couple, one works 11
14
14
17
13
18
19
16
13
Couple, neither work 13
15
15
16
15
15
20
16
15
Base
10,124 9,354 2,900
508
906 3,818
743 1,789 30,142
Table 10: Household working status by local authority groupings
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyuvrnensfrrbhcilearryetwdsoehnisrehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Single working adult 22 18 13 16 14 15 18 15 14 16 14 14 14 13
16
Non-working single 29 43 26 28 26 24 23 29 25 25 29 30 21 24
28
Working couple
27 17 31 27 30 30 32 28 30 29 27 27 36 31
28
Couple, one works
10
9 14 14 13 15 15 13 16 15 16 13 15 14
13
Couple, neither work 12 14 15 14 16 16 12 15 16 15 14 15 14 17
15
Base
2,479 3,115 1,890 1,614 1,593 4,095 2,408 2,189 2,018 1,121 1,980 2,159 2,011 1,481 30,153
13
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
Economic Activity Turning from households to adults, Table 11 shows the variation in adults' self-reported economic status in the different area types and is based on all adults aged 16 or over (not solely those of working age). Adults in `accessible small towns' and `accessible rural' areas are most likely to be in some form of employment (56% and 57% respectively) and adults in `the four cities' are the least likely (47%). Self-employment is most common in `accessible rural', `remote rural' and `very remote rural' areas (8%, 9%, and 14% respectively) and least common in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' (4% and 3% respectively). The proportion of adults stating that they are unemployed is reasonably consistent throughout Scotland (4% overall), although
slightly higher than average in `the four cities' and `very remote small towns' (5% in both cases). Those in `the four cities' are the most likely to be in higher or further education (6%). Table 12 shows the variation in economic status by Local Authority grouping. Adults in Edinburgh, the Lothians and Grampian are more likely than those in other areas to be in some form of employment (55%, 56% and 56% respectively). Glasgow has the lowest proportion of adults in employment (39%) and the highest proportion of adults who are unemployed and actively seeking work (8%). Southern Scotland has the highest proportion of adults who are `permanently retired from work' (29%).
Table 11: Economic status by urban/rural classification
The four cities
Self employed
4
Full time employment 33
Part time employment 10
Looking after
home/family
9
Permanently retired
from work
25
Unemployed and
seeking work
5
At school
1
Higher/further
education
6
Government work/
training scheme
0
Permanently sick
or disabled
6
Unable to work due to short term ill-health 1
Other
1
Other urban areas 3 37 11
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
6
7
38
35
12
11
Very remote small towns 5 31 14
8
7
12
9
24
24
22
25
4
4
4
5
2
1
1
2
3
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
6
4
5
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
Accessible rural 8 37 12 10 23 3 2 2 0 3 0 0
Column percentages Adults
Remote rural 9 30 11
Very Remote rural 14 29 11
Total 5 35 11
11
8
9
27
28
24
4
4
4
1
1
1
2
1
4
0
0
0
4
2
5
1
1
1
0
1
1
Base
9,476 8,760 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,671 28,267
14
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
Table 12: Economic status by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyuvrnensfrrbhcilearryetwdsoehnisrehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Self employed
6
3
4
3
4
8
5
6
4
4
4
5
3
8
5
Full time employment 37 29 39 39 39 32 39 33 35 36 37 35 40 32
35
Part time employment 12
7 11
9
8 13 12 11 13 11 10
9 13 13
11
Looking after home/family
7 11
8
9
9
9
9 10
8
8
8
9
9
8
9
Permanently retired
from work
23 25 25 21 24 26 22 26 25 24 24 25 23 29
24
Unemployed and seeking work
3
8
4
4
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
At school
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
Higher/further education
8
5
3
3
3
1
4
3
3
5
2
3
1
2
4
Government work/
training scheme
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Permanently sick or
disabled
3
8
4
9
5
3
4
4
5
5
5
6
4
3
5
Unable to work due
short term ill-health
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Other
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
2
1
1
0
1
Base
2,339 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,844 2,228 2,067 1,887 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,859 1,413 28,277
Table 13 shows the industries in which people work. Across Scotland as a whole, the industries in which the highest proportions of adults work are `manufacturing' (15%), `health and social work' (13%), `wholesale and retail' (12%), and `real estate, renting and business activities' (12%). Adults in rural areas are more likely than those in urban areas to be employed in `agriculture, hunting and forestry'. Fifteen percent of those in `remote rural' areas and 10% in `very remote rural' areas work in these industries compared to 2% overall.
Looking at the variation in industries by Local Authority grouping, Fife, North Lanarkshire, and Ayrshire have the highest proportions of adults employed in `manufacturing' (21%, 21% and 23% respectively). Employment in `agriculture, hunting and forestry' industries is highest in Southern Scotland (8%). Adults in Edinburgh are more likely than those in any other areas to be employed in `financial intermediation' services (10%) and `real estate' (18%) (no table).
15
Bulletin 6 3. Demographics
Table 13: Standard industrial classification by urban/rural classification
Column percentages
Adults currently working
Very
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
remote
small Accessible Remote
towns rural
rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Agriculture, hunting
and forestry
0
1
1
2
2
6
15
10
2
Fishing
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
6
0
Mining and quarrying 1
1
1
2
0
1
1
2
1
Manufacturing
12
20
19
19
7
15
11
7
15
Electricity, gas and
water supply
1
1
1
4
2
2
0
2
1
Construction
7
8
9
7
10
7
10
9
8
Wholesale and retail
trade, repair trade 12
13
14
15
15
12
10
11
21
Hotels and restaurants 5
5
5
7
6
4
7
7
5
Transport, storage and
communication
8
8
5
6
9
6
4
7
7
Financial intermediation 5
3
4
3
3
3
2
1
4
Real estate, renting
and business activities 14
11
9
11
11
10
9
10
12
Public administration
and defence
6
8
6
5
6
8
3
4
7
Education
9
6
7
4
8
7
5
6
7
Health and social work 14
12
13
8
14
14
14
14
13
Other community, social
and personal services
activities
5
5
4
3
3
4
8
4
5
Private households with
employed persons
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
Base
3,899 3,959 1,344
220
414 1,781
301
809 12,727
16
Bulletin 6 4. Local services
4. Local services Introduction Here we examine levels of contact with the local council and the use of different local services by geographical location. This section also looks at levels of satisfaction with various services. Contact with services The SHS asks about contact with a range of Council services, including Council Tax, street lighting and maintenance and trading standards (all the services covered by the SHS are outlined in Table 16). Overall, a third (33%) of adults have been in contact with their Council in the last year in relation to any of the services asked about (Table 14).
Relatively few adults report having been in contact with their Council more than once in the last year (9% overall). There is relatively little difference across the Urban and Rural areas, although adults in `accessible rural areas' are the most likely to have been in contact with their Council (35%), while adults in `remote small towns' are the least likely to have done so (29%). In terms of the Local Authority grouping, contact with the Council in the past year is lowest in Grampian (with 25% reporting having been in contact) and highest in the Lothians (38%) (Table 15).
Table 14: Number of contacts with Council in last year by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
None One Two Three or more
The four cities 69 23 5 2
Other urban areas 68 24 6 2
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
67
71
26
22
5
6
3
2
Very remote small towns 68 24 6 4
Accessible rural 65 22 7 3
Remote rural 68 24 6 4
Very Remote rural 67 22 6 5
Total 68 24 6 3
Base
9,476 8,760 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,671 28,267
Table 15: Number of contacts with Council in last year by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
None One Two Three or more Base
64 70 70 64 66 68 75 71 67 64 67 68 62 70
68
26 23 23 26 24 23 18 22 24 26 24 24 27 22
24
6
5
5
7
6
6
4
5
6
7
6
6
7
4
6
3
2
2
3
4
3
2
2
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
2,339 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,844 2,228 2,067 1,887 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,859 1,413 28,277
17
Bulletin 6 4. Local services
The services adults are most likely to have contacted their council about are refuse/bin collection (with 10% of adults saying they have contacted their
Council about this service in the last year) and Council Tax (also contacted by 10% of adults) (Tables 16 and 17).
Table 16: Level of contacts with Council for each
Column percentages (multiple response)
service in last year by urban/rural classification
Adults
The four cities
Refuse
10
Council Tax
10
Environmental health 5
Building control
4
Planning
3
Street lighting
3
Road repairs/potholes 2
Street cleaning
2
Pavements
1
Winter maintenance 1
Trading standards
1
No contact with
Council
69
Other urban areas 11 10 5 4 3 4 2 2 2 1 1
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
11
7
10
9
4
3
4
4
5
4
4
5
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
Very remote small towns 13 8 5 5 5 4 2 1 2 1 1
Accessible rural 9 9 6 5 8 3 4 1 1 2 1
Remote rural 8 11 4 5 6 2 6 1 1 2 0
Very Remote rural 8 10 4 6 10 2 6 1 1 2 1
Total 10 10 5 4 4 3 3 2 1 1 1
68
67
71
68
65
68
67
68
Base
9,476 8,760 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,671 28,267
Table 17: Level of contact with Council for each service in last year by local authority grouping
Column percentages (multiple response) Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Refuse
13
9 10 14 12 10
6
7 12 14
9 11 14
5
10
Council Tax
11 10
8 10
9 10
7 10
9 11
8 11 12 11
10
Environmental health 6
5
5
8
5
5
3
5
6
5
5
3
4
4
5
Building control
4
6
4
5
6
5
3
4
4
6
4
5
5
5
4
Planning
5
2
4
3
4
6
5
5
4
4
4
4
6
5
4
Street lighting
4
2
3
4
4
3
3
4
3
3
5
4
3
3
3
Road repairs/potholes 2
2
2
3
4
4
2
2
3
4
5
2
3
3
3
Street cleaning
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
Pavements
1
0
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
Winter maintenance
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
Trading standards
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
No contact with Council
64 70 70 64 66 67 75 71 67 64 67 68 62 70
68
Base
2,339 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,844 2,228 2,067 1,887 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,859 1,413 28,277
18
Bulletin 6 4. Local services
Overall, 73% of those who had contacted the Council about refuse/bin collection were satisfied (i.e. `very' or `fairly satisfied') with the way their enquiry was handled. By contrast, only 57% of those who had contacted their Council about Council Tax were satisfied with how their enquiry was dealt with (no table). Use of services The SHS also asks about use of a number of different public services. Tables 18 and 19 show that there are substantial differences in the use of these services. For example, overall, 34% of adults had visited a public/open space in the week prior to the interview, while only 3% had visited a museum or art gallery.
Patterns of use of services are broadly similar across the different area types. Adults in urban and `accessible rural' areas were slightly more likely to have used a sport or leisure centre than those in more `remote rural' areas. If the month prior to the interview is taken as the reference, rather than the week prior, the proportion of adults who had used the services increases. For example, the proportion of adults who had visited a public/open space increases from 34% to 50% and the proportion who had visited a museum or art gallery increases from 3% to 10% (no table). High levels of satisfaction were noted in relation to all the services asked about (no table).
Table 18: Proportion of adults who have used services in the last week by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
Library Public/open space Museum/art gallery Swimming pool Sports/leisure centre
The four cities 13 34 5 11 14
Other urban areas 15 35 2 10 14
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
16
12
37
42
3
2
10
9
13
12
Very remote small towns 19 27 3 11 10
Accessible rural 14 35 3 10 13
Remote rural 17 36 3 8 8
Very Remote rural 14 24 4 11 9
Total 14 34 3 10 14
Base
9,473 8,759 2,738
488
867 3,564
700 1,671 28,260
Table 19: Proportion of adults who have used services in the last week by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Library
14 11 16 12 14 15 13 17 19 16 17 13 16 14
14
Public/open space
46 27 35 27 33 28 37 37 37 36 32 35 38 39
34
Museum/art gallery
8
5
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
2
3
Swimming pool
13
9 12 10 10 12 11
9 11 12 13
8 11
8
10
Sports/leisure centre 17 11 16 12 13 11 13 13 15 19 16 13 17 10
14
Base
2,337 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,843 2,227 2,067 1,885 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,858 1,413 28,270
19
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
5. Neighbourhoods Introduction This section examines adults' views of their neighbourhood and their experience of a range of neighbourhood problems. It also looks at community involvement, for example, the types of social contacts people have had in the last two weeks and their views on the availability of help and support from friends and relatives in their area. Rating of neighbourhood Overall, nine in ten (91%) adults rate their local area as either a `very good' or `fairly good' place to live. Adults in small towns and rural areas are more
likely than those in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' to rate their neighbourhood as being a `very' or `fairly good' place to live (Table 20). In terms of Local Authority grouping, there is a high and consistently positive rating across all groups. Table 21 shows that adults in Southern Scotland and the Highlands and Islands are the most positive about their neighbourhoods (95% rating them as being either a `very' or `fairly good' place to live in each case), while those in Glasgow and North Lanarkshire are the least positive (83% and 87% respectively rating their neighbourhood as being a `very' or `fairly good' place to live).
Table 20: Rating of neighbourhood by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
Very good Fairly good Fairly poor Very poor No opinion
The four cities 44 44 7 5 0
Other urban areas 50 41 6 3 0
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
54
56
40
38
3
4
2
1
0
1
Very remote small towns 56 38 3 3 0
Accessible rural 63 33 3 1 0
Remote rural 69 26 3 2
Very Remote rural 67 29 3 1 0
Total 51 40 5 3 0
Base
9,476 8,760 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,671 28,267
Table 21: Proportion of adults who have used services in the last week by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Very good Fairly good Fairly poor Very poor No opinion Base 20
53 35 50 41 52 62 54 59 52 46 54 51 51 62
51
39 48 41 46 41 33 40 35 41 45 38 41 42 33
40
5
9
5
8
4
3
4
4
5
6
5
5
4
3
5
3
8
3
5
2
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
3
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,339 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,844 2,228 2,067 1,887 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,859 1,413 28,277
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
In terms of what people particularly
like about their neighbourhoods
(Tables 22 and 23), the attributes most
commonly mentioned are a
`quiet/peaceful'
environment
(mentioned by 57% of adults), `good
neighbours' (mentioned by 34%) and
`convenient
shops/amenities'
(mentioned by 31%). Five per cent of
adults say there are no aspects of their
area that they particularly like.
Adults in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' are more likely to mention attributes relating to convenience - for example `good public transport' and `convenient shops/amenities' - as aspects of their neighbourhood that they particularly like (Table 22). Adults in small towns and rural areas are more likely to
mention attributes relating to the appearance and character of their area - for example, `nicely landscaped/open spaces', `good outlook/view', `quiet/peaceful' - as aspects of their area which they particularly like. Adults in Edinburgh and Glasgow are more likely than those in other Local Authority groupings to say that they like their area because of `good public transport' facilities and `convenient shops and amenities'. Adults in South Lanarkshire, Highlands and Islands and Tayside are most likely to mention `safe/low crime' as a positive aspect of their neighbourhood. South Lanarkshire adults are also most likely to say that they like their local area because it is `well maintained' (Table 23).
Table 22: Aspects of neighbourhood particularly liked by urban/rural classification
Column percentages (multiple response) Adults
The four cities
Quiet/peaceful
48
Good neighbours
33
Convenient
shops/amenities
37
Friendly people
25
Nicely landscaped/
open space
17
Safe/low crime
15
Good public transport 27
Good outlook/view 12
Good local shops
19
Area well maintained 12
Good local schools 10
Good local leisure
facilities
8
Good facilities for
children
4
Other
14
Nothing
6
Other urban areas 58 37
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
62
63
39
40
Very remote small towns 66 43
Accessible rural 71 31
Remote rural 75 25
Very Remote rural 77 38
Total 57 34
34
26
24
47
15
10
10
31
27
33
29
39
34
32
39
28
15
19
17
16
27
32
33
19
16
18
18
38
21
25
39
18
17
11
5
9
5
2
2
17
14
18
20
26
25
33
47
17
13
11
8
12
7
3
5
14
10
9
7
11
7
5
5
10
11
10
8
13
7
4
6
10
6
5
3
7
3
1
3
6
4
4
3
5
3
2
3
4
11
13
16
11
16
16
15
13
5
4
3
3
4
4
2
5
Base
9,476 8,760 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,671 28,267
21
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
Table 23: Aspects of neighbourhood particularly liked by local authority grouping
Column percentages (multiple response) Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Quiet/peaceful
45 43 62 57 62 70 58 68 62 55 53 57 60 71
57
Good neighbours
26 34 30 48 45 37 30 38 34 32 35 36 29 33
34
Convenient shops/amenities
40 33 28 26 31 26 31 39 26 23 34 28 31 21
31
Friendly people
25 25 30 34 34 34 25 31 24 20 28 28 29 33
28
Nicely landscaped/ open space
25 15 15 13 23 25 15 24 19 18 15 15 18 22
19
Safe/low crime
17 13 18 16 23 29 15 23 14 11 18 15 14 18
18
Good public transport 30 28 14 18 20
6 14 19 12 17 18 14 14
5
17
Good outlook/view
15 10 15
9 17 31 14 22 16 16 21 18 14 22
17
Good local shops
21 21 11 12 19
8 12 16 13 11 12
9 13
5
14
Area well maintained 13 11
7 11 20
7
7 13
8
6 13
7
8
5
10
Good local schools
11 8 9 11 14 8 9 12 12 10 11 9 11 5
10
Good local leisure
facilities
10
8
5
5
8
4
5
8
5
3
7
3
8
2
6
Good facilities for children
4
3
4
3
4
4
4
6
3
2
3
3
6
3
4
Other
22 11
9 10
9 18 18 10 16 15 10 11 16 14
13
Nothing
5
8
5
7
4
4
4
4
6
6
5
7
5
4
5
Base
2,339 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,844 2,228 2,067 1,887 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,859 1,413 28,277
The most common neighbourhood aspects that adults particularly dislike are `young people hanging about/nothing to do for young people' (mentioned by 12% of adults), vandalism (mentioned by 8%) `drug abuse', `parking problems' and `nowhere for children to play (each mentioned by 6%). Forty-six per cent of adults say there is nothing about their area that they particularly dislike. Adults in Glasgow are more likely than those in any other area to mention `young people hanging about', `vandalism', `drug abuse', `alcohol abuse', the area being `poorly
maintained or run down' and the area being `unsafe (or having high levels of crime)' (no table). Again, there are differences between urban and rural areas, with adults in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' more likely to mention `young people hanging about', `vandalism' and `unsafe/crime' as dislikes. In each case, adults in `the four cities' are more likely to mention these dislikes than those in `other urban areas'. Adults in rural areas are more likely to mention `poor public transport' and `poor shops and amenities' as particular dislikes (Table 24).
22
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
Table 24: Aspects of neighbourhood particularly disliked Column percentages (multiple response)
by urban/rural classification
Adults
The four cities
Young people
hanging about
15
Vandalism
12
Drug abuse
9
Nowhere for children
to play
7
Parking problems
7
Noise
8
Poor public transport 4
Alcohol abuse
7
Poorly maintained/
rundown
7
Poor local leisure
facilities
4
Poor local shops
4
Unsafe/crime
7
Problem with
neighbours
4
Problem with dogs
5
Poor outlook/view
2
Poor local schools
1
Other
23
Nothing
41
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
11
10
7
6
8
5
4
12
7
5
7
4
4
1
1
8
5
5
3
5
3
2
0
6
6
5
7
8
4
1
3
6
6
5
7
7
2
1
6
5
4
4
8
3
1
1
5
3
4
3
4
13
13
13
5
5
3
3
6
2
1
1
5
4
2
2
5
2
1
2
5
3
5
5
6
7
8
8
5
3
4
3
5
7
6
9
4
3
2
2
2
1
1
0
4
5
3
3
5
3
1
2
4
3
3
4
8
2
0
1
4
2
1
2
5
1
0
2
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
21
22
29
26
27
27
34
23
49
50
47
50
46
55
47
46
Base
9,476 8,760 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,671 28,267
Neighbourhood problems Also relating to the subject of neighbourhoods, the SHS presents respondents with a range of `neighbourhood problems' and asks how common they think each is in their area. Tables 25 and 26 show the proportion of adults who think that each is either `very' or `fairly common' in their neighbourhood. Overall, `groups of young people hanging about' is considered the most
common problem (30% of adults believing this to be `very' or `fairly common' in their neighbourhood), while `noisy neighbours/loud parties' is considered the least common (8%). Table 25 shows that neighbourhood problems are most common in `the four cities', followed by `other urban areas' and then becoming progressively less common in less populated areas.
23
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
Table 25: Neighbourhood problems by urban/rural classification (%thinking each `very' or `fairly' common)
Column percentages Adults
The four cities
Groups of young people hanging about 36
Rubbish or litter lying
around
37
People drinking or
using drugs
26
Vandalism/graffiti/ damage to property 23
Noisy neighbours/
loud parties
10
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
30
29
23
18
24
14
7
30
28
27
24
21
20
10
11
29
22
21
16
14
14
9
6
21
17
15
12
7
11
5
2
17
8
6
5
8
4
2
2
8
Base
9,476 8,759 2,738
488
867 3,566
701 1,670 28,265
Table 26: Neighbourhood problems by local authority grouping (%thinking each `very' or `fairly' common)
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Groups of young people
hanging about
27 46 31 38 29 17 26 23 29 36 33 32 31 16
30
Rubbish or litter lying
around
40 43 27 30 27 18 24 22 27 32 30 30 29 17
29
People drinking or using drugs
17 35 22 30 22 11 19 15 21 26 22 25 20 10
21
Vandalism/graffiti/
damage to property 17 31 17 23 15
7 13 14 15 21 19 19 16
7
17
Noisy neighbours/
loud parties
10 13
9
8
6
5
6
6
7
8
8
7
7
5
8
Base
2,339 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,843 2,228 2,067 1,887 1,025 1,860 2,038 1,859 1,413 28,275
Adults in Glasgow are most likely to say that each problem is either `very' or `fairly common' in their area, with adults in the Southern Scotland and the Highlands and Islands least likely to say this (Table 26). Community involvement The SHS asks about the community involvement and social contacts of adults in the two weeks preceding the
interview. In particular, it focuses on involvement with other people in the local neighbourhood. Tables 27 and 28 show the different types of social contacts that adults have had in the two weeks prior to the interview. In general, there would appear to be high levels of social contact, with only 1% not having experienced any of the types of social
24
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
contact asked about. `Speaking with relatives on the phone' is the most common type of contact (83% of adults saying they have done this in the last two weeks). By contrast, actually going out with relatives is the least common form of contact (38% of adults saying they have done this in the last two weeks). In general, contact by telephone seems to be more common than face-to-face contact. Levels of contact tend to be fairly similar across different types of urban and rural areas (Table 27). Adults in Edinburgh and Central are more likely to have been `out with friends' in the two weeks preceding the interview than adults in any other local authority groupings. Those in North and South Lanarkshire, Central and the Lothians are more likely than
adults in other local authority groupings to have visited relatives (Table 28). Another aspect of community involvement is the availability of help and support from friends and relatives living in their area. Respondents are presented with the following statements and asked to what extent they agree with them: · `If I was alone and needed help, I could rely on one of my friends/relatives in this neighbourhood to help me' · `If my home was empty, I could count on one of my friends/relatives to keep an eye on it' · `I feel I could turn to friends/relatives in this neighbourhood for advice or support'
Table 27: Social contacts by urban/rural classification
Column percentages (multiple response) Adults
The four cities
Spoke to relatives on
the phone
83
Spoke to neighbours 78
Spoke to friends on
the phone
80
Went to visit relatives 61
Went to visit friends 61
Had relatives round 54
Went out with friends 55
Had friends round 51
Went out with relatives 39
None of these
1
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
82
84
84
85
85
83
84
83
82
82
85
87
83
80
82
81
80
79
80
84
82
81
81
80
69
66
65
60
65
54
57
64
61
62
57
62
62
58
64
61
58
56
52
63
55
48
53
56
53
50
53
50
48
43
47
52
51
50
49
59
50
50
56
51
40
36
34
35
36
33
28
38
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Base*
5,035 4,263 1,432
262
420 1,819
391
868 14,490
*Questions on social contact were introduced into the SHS in the second year so this table is based on year two data only.
25
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
There tends to be a very high level of agreement with each of these statements, with more than four-fifths of adults agreeing with each (Tables 29 and 30). Although the differences are relatively small, adults in `very remote rural' areas tend to be most likely to agree with each statement and adults in `the four cities' the least likely to agree Table 28: Social contacts by local authority grouping
(Table 29). For example, 91% of adults in `very remote' rural areas say they could rely on a friend or relative to look after their home if it was empty, compared with 84% of adults in `the four cities'. Again, the differences between the various Local Authority groups are relatively small (Table 30). Column percentages (multiple response) Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Spoke to relatives on
the phone
88 79 78 85 81 84 86 85 86 83 84 79 85
Spoke to neighbours 78 75 78 83 85 85 84 80 84 80 82 77 82
Spoke to friends on the phone
87 73 75 82 82 83 85 78 85 84 80 75 80
Went to visit relatives 61 54 67 72 71 60 63 64 70 66 64 65 71
Went to visit friends 68 56 62 58 63 64 61 61 68 59 63 57 60
Had relatives round
51 54 55 64 60 56 53 54 61 54 60 55 60
Went out with friends 63 50 53 51 55 46 50 50 60 52 57 51 51
Had friends round
58 48 49 46 53 55 52 47 59 46 54 50 50
Went out with relatives 37 37 41 40 42 33 33 41 45 36 44 37 38
None of these
1
2
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
Base*
1,186 1,671 880 727 749 1,948 1,144 1,038 954 532 1,045 1,030 895
*Questions on social contact were introduced into the SHS in the second year so this table is based on year two data only.
84
83
83
81
81
80
61
64
58
61
51
56
43
52
50
51
30
38
1
1
695 14,494
Table 29: Level of agreement with statements by urban/rural classification Column percentages
(% either `agreeing strongly' or `tending to agree')
Adults
The four cities
Could rely on friends/
relative (if alone)
84
Could rely on friends/ relative (if home empty) 86
Could turn to friends/ relative (for advice) 80
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
86
86
85
90
87
88
91
86
89
89
89
92
88
90
91
88
82
82
79
86
83
84
87
81
Base*
5,035 4,263 1,432
262
420 1,819
391
868 14,490
*Questions on social contact were introduced into the SHS in the second year so this table is based on year two data only.
26
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
Table 30: Level of agreement with statements by local authority grouping (% either `agreeing strongly' or `tending to agree')
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Could rely on friends/
relative (if alone)
82 83 83 90 88 90 88 83 88 88 87 84 84
Could rely on friends/ relative (if home empty) 85 85 86 93 90 91 91 85 93 93 88 86 87
Could turn to friends/
relative (for advice)
78 80 80 87 85 85 82 76 85 86 82 80 80
Base*
1,186 1,671 880 727 749 1,948 1,144 1,038 954 532 1,045 1,030 895
*Questions on social contact were introduced into the SHS in the second year so this table is based on year two data only.
84
86
86
88
79
81
695 14,494
In terms of how involved people feel in their local community, overall, a quarter (26%) of adults say they have either `a great deal' or `a fair amount' of involvement, while the remaining three-quarters do not feel they have much involvement (74% saying they feel either `not very' or `not at all involved'). Adults in small towns and rural areas are much more likely than their counterparts in `the four cities' and `other urban' areas to say that they
feel involved in their local community (Table 31). For example, 47% of adults in `very remote rural' areas say they feel they have either `a great deal' or `a fair amount' of involvement in their local community, compared to only 22% of adults in `the four cities'. Adults in the Highlands and Islands are the most likely to say that they feel involved in their local community (39%), while those in North Lanarkshire are least likely to say this (19%) (Table 32).
Table 31: Level of involvement in local community by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
A great deal A fair amount Not very much Not at all Don't know
The four cities 4 86 80 86 80
Other urban areas 3 19 49 29 0
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
5
5
19
26
47
47
29
21
0
1
Very remote small towns 11 31 38 20 0
Accessible rural 8 28 42 23 0
Remote rural 9 29 40 21 0
Very Remote rural 11 36 39 14 0
Total 5 21 45 29 0
Base*
5,035 4,263 1,432
262
420 1,819
391
868 14,490
*Questions on social contact were introduced into the SHS in the second year so this table is based on year two data only.
27
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
Tables 33 and 34 show the proportion of adults who give up their time to help any clubs, charities, campaigns or organisations in an unpaid capacity across the different area types and Local Authority groupings. Overall, 26% of adults in Scotland give up time in this way. Generally, the
proportion of adults giving up time is higher in rural areas than in urban areas. In `the four cities', 22% of adults give up time, and in `other urban areas', 24% do so. In `remote rural' areas, and `very remote rural' areas, 41% and 39% of adults respectively give up their time.
Table 32: Level of involvement in local community by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
A great deal A fair amount Not very much Not at all Don't know
5
6
4
4
5
8
4
4
5
4
5
4
4
18 22 22 15 25 31 20 17 21 16 21 17 18
46 36 47 46 42 42 46 47 50 49 43 51 47
31 36 26 36 28 19 29 31 24 32 31 28 31
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
Base*
1,186 1,671 880 727 749 1,948 1,144 1,038 954 532 1,045 1,030 895
*Questions on social contact were introduced into the SHS in the second year so this table is based on year two data only.
7
5
30
21
43
45
20
29
0
0
695 14,494
Table 33: Whether respondent gives up time to help a club, charity, campaign or organisation by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
Very
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
remote
small Accessible Remote
towns rural
rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Yes
22
24
29
28
39
34
41
39
26
No
77
76
71
71
61
66
59
60
73
Base*
5,057 4,284 1,444
262
420 1,824
391
868 14,550
*Year two data only as question wording changed between year one and year two.
28
Bulletin 6 5. Neighbourhoods
There are also variations between the different Local Authority groupings. Adults in North Lanarkshire and Glasgow are least likely to give up their time in an unpaid capacity (11% and 14% respectively), while in the Highlands and Islands, the proportion increases to 29% (Table 34). Table 34: Whether respondent gives up time to help a club, charity campaign or organisation by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Yes
31 17 25 15 19 38 30 28 27 26 24 31 25 35
26
No
68 82 75 85 80 61 70 72 73 73 76 69 75 65
73
Base*
1,185 1,690 885 729 758 1,948 1,146 1,040 957 533 1,046 1,044 894 699 14,554
*Year two data only as question wording changed between year one and year two.
29
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
6. Transport Introduction This section focuses on access and use of motor vehicles, travel to work and place of education, and availability and convenience of public transport. Possession of driving licences Table 35 shows the variation in possession of driving licences in the different area types. Overall, 63% of adults possess a full-driving licence, with 30% having never held a driving licence. In `the four cities', the
proportion of adults holding a full driving license decreases to 55%, while in `accessible rural', `remote rural' and `very remote rural' areas, the proportions are significantly higher (76%, 76% and 77% respectively). Similarly, the proportion of adults who have never held a driving licence is higher in `the four cities' (37%) and `other urban areas' (30%) than in rural areas (18%,17% and 17%). Table 36 shows possession of driving licences by Local Authority grouping. Adults in Glasgow are less likely than adults in any other area to possess a
Table 35: Possession of driving licence by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
Full driving licence Provisional driving licence Never held a UK licence Licence given up or disqualified
The four cities 55 6 37 2
Other urban areas 62
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
68
66
Very remote small towns 64
Accessible rural 76
Remote rural 76
Very Remote rural 77
Total 63
6
5
5
6
4
4
4
5
30
25
27
29
18
17
17
30
2
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
Base
9,397 8,661 2,719
485
862 3,526
698 1,655 28,003
Table 36: Possession of driving licence by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Full driving licence
64 45 66 59 64 72 70 64 68 65 59 64 65 71
63
Provisional driving licence
4
6
6
5
6
5
5
6
6
6
5
5
6
4
4
Never held a UK licence
31 47 26 36 29 21 22 28 25 28 33 29 28 23
30
Licence given up or
disqualified
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
Base
2,319 2,902 1,787 1,487 1,473 3,812 2,207 2,048 1,863 1,021 1,851 2,016 1,833 1,394 28,013
30
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
driving licence - 45% of adults in Glasgow have a driving licence compared with 63% overall. Conversely, adults in the Highlands and Islands, Grampian and Southern Scotland are the most likely to have a driving licence (72%, 70% and 71% respectively). If the data are further broken down into individual local authorities, the authority containing the smallest proportion of adults with driving licences is the City of Glasgow (45%). Dundee City, Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire, and Renfrewshire also have relatively small proportions of adults with driving licences (51%, 54%, 54% and 56% respectively) (No table).
Aberdeenshire has the highest proportion of adults possessing a driving licence (79%), closely followed by Orkney (78%) (No table). Access to motor vehicles Table 37 shows access to motor vehicles broken down by the urban/rural classification. Households in `the four cities', `other urban areas' and `very remote small towns' are the least likely to have access to a motor vehicle (47%, 35% and 40% respectively). Households in `accessible rural' and `remote rural' areas are most likely to have access to motor vehicles (80% and 82% respectively), with three out of ten having access to multiple vehicles.
Table 37: Number of motor vehicles households have access to by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Households
None One Two Three or more
The four cities 47 40 12 1
Other urban areas 35 47 16 2
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
28
28
52
55
17
15
2
1
Very remote small towns 40 48 11 1
Accessible rural 20 48 27 5
Remote rural 18 53 25 4
Very Remote rural 23 53 20 3
Total 36 45 16 2
Base
10,125 9,354 2,903
508
906 3,818
743 1,789 30,146
Table 38: Number of motor vehicles households have access to by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
None One Two Three or more Base
41 60 31 40 33 27 28 35 29 32 40 35 29 26
36
43 33 48 44 47 54 48 46 45 46 41 48 48 53
45
14
7 18 15 17 17 20 16 22 19 18 15 20 18
16
1
1
3
2
3
3
3
2
3
3
2
2
3
2
2
2,479 3,116 1,890 1,614 1,593 4,095 2,408 2,189 2,018 1,121 1,980 2,159 2,014 1,481 30,157
31
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
In terms of Local Authority grouping, households in Glasgow are least likely to have access to a motor vehicle (60% have no access) (Table 38). A high proportion of households in Edinburgh, North Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire and Inverclyde also have no access to a motor vehicle (41%, 40% and 40% respectively). Some variations appear within the Local Authority grouping when broken down into individual authorities. For example, although in Tayside as a whole, the proportion of households with no access to a motor vehicle is 35%, in Dundee City, the proportion increases to 49% (No table).
Frequency of driving Although there is a considerable amount of geographical variation in relation to access to motor vehicles and possession of driving licences, it appears that there is relatively little difference in the frequency of driving among those adults who hold a full driving licence. Table 39 shows that, overall, 70% of adults with a full driving licence drive every day. This decreases to 64% in `the four cities', but there does not seem to be any clear pattern relating to the rurality of areas. For example, those who live in `other urban areas' are as likely to drive every day as those who live in `very remote rural' areas (72% in each case).
Table 39: Frequency of driving by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults with full driving licences
The four cities
Every day
64
At least three times
a week
12
Once or twice a week 7
Less than once a week 7
Never
9
Other urban areas 72
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
72
66
Very remote small towns 71
Accessible rural 74
Remote rural 69
Very Remote rural 72
Total 70
11
13
15
12
13
16
14
12
6
6
8
7
7
9
6
7
4
4
6
4
3
3
3
5
6
5
6
6
3
3
4
6
Base
4,990 5,192 1,770
309
520 2,640
524 1,232 17,177
Table 40: Frequency of driving by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults with full driving licences
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Every day
55 61 72 74 75 72 70 70 76 72 75 72 73 68
70
At least three times
a week
16 10 11 11 11 12 13 13 12 11 11 13 13 15
12
Once or twice a week 10
8
7
6
5
7
8
7
5
5
4
5
7
7
7
Less than once a week 9
8
4
4
4
4
6
4
3
3
4
4
3
4
5
Never
10 12
6
6
6
5
4
6
4
9
6
7
4
5
6
Base
1,428 1,218 1,132 819 912 2,661 1,525 1,263 1,222 635 1,027 1,225 1,157 961 17,185
32
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
Variation does exist in driving frequency across the Local Authority groups, with those in possession of a driving licence in Edinburgh and Glasgow least likely to drive every day (Table 40). Public transport Adults in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' are more likely to say that they find it convenient to use public transport than those in other areas (Table 41). Overall, 75% of adults say public transport is either `very' or `fairly convenient'. This proportion increases in `the four cities' and `other urban areas' (85% and 80% respectively) and decreases in all other
area types, most substantially in `remote rural' and ` very remote rural' areas (35% and 39% respectively). In terms of the Local Authority grouping, adults in the Highlands and Islands are the least likely to say public transport is convenient (56%) (Table 42), while those in Edinburgh and Glasgow are the most likely to say it is convenient (86% and 85% respectively). There are, however, variations within these groupings. For example, only 3% of Orkney adults said that public transport is convenient, compared with 26% of adults in Highland (No table).
Table 41: Convenience of public transport by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Adults
Very convenient Fairly convenient Neither nor Fairly inconvenient Very inconvenient No opinion
The four cities 54 31 3 6 4 2
Other urban areas 46 34 4 7 5 4
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
37
37
36
32
5
5
11
16
7
5
4
5
Very remote small towns 39 31 6 8 6 11
Accessible rural 22 29 5 18 21 4
Remote rural 17 18 4 18 39 4
Very Remote rural 13 26 5 18 33 6
Total 43 32 4 9 9 3
Base
9,472 8,759 2,738
488
866 3,564
700 1,671 28,258
Table 42: Convenience of public transport by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Very convenient Fairly convenient Neither nor Fairly inconvenient Very inconvenient No opinion Base
55 54 40 41 42 27 41 41 36 40 53 44 39 35
43
31 31 38 32 34 29 32 28 35 37 30 35 31 26
32
3
3
4
4
3
6
3
4
5
4
4
2
4
6
4
7
6 10
9
8 15
9 10 11
9
6
9 11 15
9
4
4
6
8
8 18 11 12 10
7
5
7 11 14
9
1
2
3
6
4
6
4
4
4
3
3
3
4
4
3
2,337 2,922 1,804 1,499 1,491 3,842 2,226 2,067 1,885 1,025 1,861 2,038 1,858 1,413 28,268
33
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
To measure more precisely the levels of access to public transport, adults are asked about the `nearness' and `frequency' of a bus service to their homes. `Near and frequent' is defined as less than a 15 minutes walk to a bus stop, with a frequency of service of at least one bus every 20 minutes (see section 10). Table 43 shows the wide variation between the area types in terms of the presence of a `near and frequent' bus service. Overall, 46% of households have a `near and frequent' bus service. However, this increases to 70% in `the four cities' and decreases in every
other area type. As might be expected, `remote small towns', `remote rural areas' and `very remote rural areas' are least likely to have a near and frequent bus service (2%, 0% and 1% respectively). Broad variation is also present in the existence of `near and frequent' bus services by Local Authority grouping. Households in the Highlands and Islands and Southern Scotland are least likely to have a `near and frequent' bus service (12% and 11% respectively), while households in Edinburgh are most likely to do so (81%) (Table 44).
Table 43: Accessibility of bus service by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Households
Near and frequent Near/infrequent Far and frequent Far/infrequent No buses Don't know
The four cities 70 13 1 0 0 16
Other urban areas 47 30 0 0 0 22
Accessible Remote small small towns towns
28
2
51
67
1
-
1
4
0
0
19
27
Very remote small towns 9 53 1 0 36
Accessible rural 10 58 1 6 4 22
Remote rural 0 48 12 14 27
Very Remote rural 1 60 - 13 13 13
Total 46 31 1 2 1 19
Base
10,125 9,354 2,903
508
906 3,818
743 1,789 30,146
Table 44: Accessibility of bus service by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Near and frequent Near/infrequent Far and frequent Far/infrequent No buses Don't know Base
81 67 40 45 44 12 46 41 25 50 65 45 34 11
46
10 13 45 28 28 56 30 35 45 24 16 32 43 52
31
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
7
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
5
2
0
0
0
0
1
5
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
3
1
8 19 13 26 25 20 18 19 28 24 16 20 20 30
19
2,479 3,115 1,890 1,613 1,593 4,092 2,407 2,189 2,018 1,120 1,979 2,159 2,014 1,481 30,149
34
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
At an individual local authority level, Edinburgh has the highest proportion of households with a `near and frequent' bus service (81%), followed by Aberdeen City (76%) Dundee City (73%), Inverclyde (72%), Renfrewshire (70%), the City of Glasgow (67%) and West Dunbartonshire (6%) (No table). Roughly one third of local authorities have around 50% of households with a `near and frequent' bus service (South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire, Midlothian, Fife, East Renfrewshire, East Lothian, East Dunbartonshire, East Ayrshire, North Ayrshire and North Lanarkshire). Orkney, Shetland, Eilean Siar and Argyll and Bute have the lowest proportions of households with a `near and frequent' bus service (0%, 0%, 2% and 3% respectively) (No table).
Travel to work and education Table 45 shows the main modes of travel to work or place of full-time education used by adults. Adults living in `very remote small towns' are more likely than those living in any other area type to walk to work/place of education (32% compared with 15% overall) and least likely to drive to work/place of education (37% compared with 52% overall). Adults living in `the four cities' are more likely to use a bus to travel to work than adults in any other area type (21% compared with15% overall). Adults in `accessible rural' areas are the most likely to drive to work or place of education (65%), followed by those living in `very remote rural' areas (60%).
Table 45: Mode of travel to work or place of full-time education
Column percentages
by urban/rural classification
Adults in work or full-time education
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Walking
17
15
15
20
32
9
14
14
15
Driving by car or van 44
53
57
49
37
65
58
60
52
Passenger travelling
by car
9
12
12
15
13
10
10
11
11
Bus
21
12
10
5
10
9
9
8
15
Other
9
8
6
10
7
6
8
8
8
Base
4,325 4,197 1,372
232
416 1,717
260
731 13,250
35
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
Adults in Fife and Central are more likely than adults in other local authority groupings to drive to work or place of full-time education (61% and 60% respectively compared with 52% overall). Adults in Glasgow and Edinburgh are more likely to travel to work or place of full-time education by bus (23% and 27% respectively) (Table 46).
A slightly different pattern emerges in relation to children's mode of travel to school (Table 47). Children in households in `remote small towns' are most likely to walk to school (73% compared with 54% overall). Children in households in `accessible rural', `remote rural' and `very remote rural' areas are more likely than children in any other types of area to travel to school by bus (41%, 58% and 60% respectively compared with 23% overall).
Table 46: Mode of travel to work or place of full-time education by local authority grouping
Column percentages Adults in work or full-time education
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Walking
20 18 14 12 11 18 17 18 12 10 12 11 12 20
15
Driving by car or van 40 39 61 53 56 53 55 50 60 54 54 58 54 49
52
Passenger travelling by car
6
9 12 14 15 10
9 14 10
9 10 11 11 16
11
Bus
27 23
8 14 12
8 12 12 10 12 16 12 16 10
15
Other
7 11
5
7
6 10
7
6
8 14
8
9
7
5
8
Base
385 584 381 374 342 868 489 402 458 242 425 455 438 293 6,136
Table 47: Mode of children's travel to school by urban/rural classification
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Column percentages Children
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Walking By bus By car Other method
60
59
59
73
44
36
25
17
19
19
7
21
41
58
20
19
18
17
32
20
16
3
3
4
3
3
3
1
Base*
1,821 1,994
611
134
182
831
146
*Some of the bases in this table are relatively small so care should be taken when interpreting figures.
23
54
60
23
15
19
2
3
393 6,112
36
Bulletin 6 6. Transport
In terms of local authority grouping, children in Edinburgh, Central and the Lothians are less likely than children in other local authority groupings to travel to school by bus (15%, 17% and 15% respectively compared with 23% overall) (Table 48). Table 48: Mode of children's travel to school by local authority grouping
Column percentages Children
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Walking By bus By car Other method Base
61 59 56 55 56 40 58 53 58 53 46 56 62 45
54
15 21 28 24 24 37 21 23 17 20 25 26 15 30
23
22 17 15 20 18 18 17 22 19 23 24 15 21 20
19
3
3
2
1
2
4
3
1
6
4
4
3
1
4
3
385 584 381 374 342 868 489 402 458 242 425 455 438 293 6,136
37
Bulletin 6 7. Household finance
7. Household finance The SHS also gathers data on the financial situation of households in Scotland. This section examines household income, how well households are managing financially and whether they have any savings and investments. Overall, 26% of households had an annual net income of over Ј20,000, with 37% of households having an income of less that Ј10,000 per annum. Table 49 shows household income by the urban/rural classification.
Households in `accessible rural' areas are most likely to have a net household income of Ј20,000 per annum or more (35%), while those in `very remote small towns' are the least likely (21%). In relation to local authority groupings, the Lothians and Grampian have the highest proportions of households with net annual incomes of over Ј20,000 (33% and 32%), while Glasgow has the lowest (16%). Glasgow has the highest proportion of households with net incomes of Ј10,000 or less (48%) (Table 50).
Table 49: Annual net household income by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Households
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Up to Ј6,000
15
12
12
14
14
13
15
16
14
Over Ј6,000 to Ј10,000 26
24
21
24
26
18
19
22
23
Over Ј10,000 to Ј15,000 22
22
22
22
23
19
22
21
22
Over Ј15,000 to Ј20,000 14
16
17
17
16
17
17
18
15
Over Ј20,000
23
26
27
24
21
35
27
24
26
Base
9,781 9,131 2,849
495
882 3,710
715 1,745 29,308
Table 50: Annual net household income by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Up to Ј6,000
14 17 14 11 11 15 13 15 13 12 13 14 10 13
14
Over Ј6,000 to Ј10,000 20 31 23 24 23 22 19 23 22 23 26 25 21 22
23
Over Ј10,000 to Ј15,000 22 24 20 26 22 22 19 21 20 19 20 21 21 23
22
Over Ј15,000 to Ј20,000 14 12 17 15 15 17 17 15 16 16 16 15 16 18
15
Over Ј20,000
30 16 27 24 29 25 32 26 30 30 25 24 33 23
26
Base
2,403 2,971 1,851 1,584 1,514 3,989 2,344 2,118 1,976 1,105 1,923 2,117 1,956 1,464 29,315
38
Bulletin 6 7. Household finance
Table 51 shows how well household respondents say they are managing financially these days by the urban/rural classification. Overall, 40% of households manage `very' or `quite well', 44% `get by all right' and 15% either `don't manage very well' or are `in financial trouble'. The table shows a broadly similar pattern across the different area types. Table 52 shows that households in Edinburgh are more likely than households in the other Local
Authority groupings to be `managing very well' or `managing quite well' (48%), while households in Glasgow are least likely to say so (28%). At the individual local authority level, around one fifth of households in the City of Glasgow, West Dunbartonshire, Eilean Siar and Clackmananshire say they are `not managing very well' or are `in financial trouble' (22%, 21%, 20% and 19% respectively) (No table).
Table 51: How well household is managing financially these days by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Households
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Manage very well
11
10
12
9
13
13
12
14
11
Manage quite well
27
30
30
33
27
32
26
30
29
Get by alright
44
46
44
43
44
42
47
40
44
Don't manage very well 8
6
5
5
4
5
5
7
7
In financial trouble
9
8
8
9
11
7
9
8
8
Refused
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
Base
10,109 9,340 2,899
507
902 3,815
742 1,782 30,096
Table 52: How well household is managing financially these days by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Manage very well
15
7 11
7
9 13 13 13 13 12 12
8 12 11
11
Manage quite well
33 21 30 27 31 30 32 31 30 27 28 30 31 30
29
Get by alright
38 49 46 49 48 43 43 43 42 44 44 46 43 45
44
Don't manage very well 5 12
5
6
6
6
5
6
7
8
5
5
6
6
7
In financial trouble
8 10
8 11
6
9
6
8
7
9 10
9
8
7
8
Refused
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
Base
2,476 3,109 1,889 1,609 1,591 4,083 2,405 2,189 2,014 1,119 1,978 2,156 2,013 1,476 30,107
39
Bulletin 6 7. Household finance
Overall, 53% of households in Scotland have some savings or investments. Generally, households in rural areas are more likely to have savings or investments than those in urban areas. Households in `very remote rural areas' are the most likely to have savings or investments, whilst households in `the four cities' are the least likely to do so (68% and 48% respectively) (Table 53).
Grampian has the highest proportion of households who have savings or investments (66%), followed by Southern Scotland (64%) and Highlands and Islands (63%). North Lanarkshire and Glasgow have the lowest proportion of households with savings or investments (35% and 37% respectively) (Table 54).
Table 53: Whether household has any savings or investments by urban/rural classification
Column percentages Households
The four cities
Other Accessible Remote urban small small areas towns towns
Very remote small towns
Accessible rural
Remote rural
Very Remote rural
Total
Yes No Refused Don't know Base
48
52
56
62
58
64
63
68
53
45
42
38
30
37
30
29
28
40
7
6
5
8
4
6
6
4
6
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
10,118 9,344 2,901
507
903 3,818
743 1,784 30,118
Table 54: Whether household has any savings or investments by local authority grouping
Column percentages Households
Scotland
Souther n Total
IRADneyvurnensfrrbhcilearyrewtdsoehnirsehiraend
ISsHNGlirooagarutnthlmhdhaspiLLnaaadnsnnaaarrknkssdhhiirree Tayside
Lothians
Central
Edinburgh Glasgow Fife
Yes No Refused Don't know Base
57 37 55 35 50 63 66 55 60 56 52 49 54 64
53
36 54 38 54 43 31 30 39 35 41 37 45 41 31
40
6
8
6 11
7
6
4
6
5
3 10
6
4
4
6
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2,477 3,113 1,890 1,610 1,591 4,086 2,407 2,189 2,016 1,119 1,979 2,158 2,014 1,480 30,129
40
Bulletin 6 8. Household in Scotland - summary tables
8. Households in Scotland summary tables This section consists of summary tables, which will be updated and repeated in subsequent bulletins, to provide the reader with a set of key figures from the survey that can easily be referred to. The figures in the tables are the percentages of people or households with the relevant characteristic. For example, the first row of Table A shows that 48% of people living in Scottish [private] households are male. All the percentages are calculated after the sample numbers have been re-weighted as described in section 8. The last row shows that there was a total (unweighted) of 70,715 people in the surveyed households. Similarly, the first row of Table B shows that 15% of Scottish [private] households consist of a single adult, with no children. The last row of Table B shows that a total (unweighted) of 30,157 households were interviewed in the survey. In Table G, the first row shows that 77% of men (aged 17+), and 73% of adults aged 25-34, hold a full driving licence.
Table A: Population
Sex
Male
Female
Percentages of all people 48 53
Age-group 0 ­ 15
21
16 ­ 24
10
25 ­ 34
13
35 ­ 44
15
45 ­ 54
14
55 ­ 64
11
65 ­ 74
10
75 +
6
ethnic group White Black ­ Caribbean Black ­ African Black ­ other Indian Pakistani Bangladeshi Chinese Mixed ethnicity Other Refused Base = 100%
98.3 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0 70,715
Table B: Household type
Percentages of
all households
Type of household Single adult
15
Small adult
17
Single parent
6
Small family
15
Large family
8
Large adult
10
Older smaller
14
Single pensioner 16
Base = 100% 30,157
41
Bulletin 6 8. Household in Scotland - summary tables
Table C: Housing Property type Detached house Semi-detached house Terraced house Flat / maisonette Other
Percentages of all households 20 22 21 36 1
Tenure
Owner-occupied
62
[Owned outright
24]
[Buying with loan / mortgage 38]
Rented
37
[Local authority / Scottish Homes 26]
[Housing Association / Co-op
5]
[Private rented
5]
Other
2
Other housing Sharing accommodation by choice Sharing accommodation, but not by choice Covered by house / building insurance Covered by home contents insurance Base = 100%
0.4 0.3 67 81 30,157
Table D: Banking and consumer durables
Percentages of
all households
Access to a bank
HIH or partner has a bank/building
society account
86
Number of motor vehicles
None
37
One
45
Two
16
Three or more
2
Consumer durables
Deep freeze or fridge freezer
94
Washing machine
95
Telephone
95
personal computer
33
Internet / e-mail access
from home
19
Base = 100%
30,157
42
Bulletin 6 8. Household in Scotland - summary tables
Table E: marital status by sex and age
Married Cohabiting Separated or divorced Single/never married Widowed Base = 100%
Sex
Men Women
60
53
7
6
6
9
22
19
5
13
12,111 16,165
16-24 4 9 1 86 0 2,299
Age
25-34 35- 44
47
68
17
8
6
11
30
13
0
1
4,805 5,217
45- 54 76 3 11 7 1 4,388
Percentage of all adults
All adults
55-64 65+
74
51
56
2
1
6
9
4
7
6
8
21
9
36
10
4,199 7,318 28,226
Table F: Education and training by sex and age
Sex
No qualifications Higher grade (or equivalent) or above Currently in training or education Base = 100%
Men Women
22
24
55
46
24
24
9,162 11,480
16-24 8 57 50 2,083
Age
25-34 15 59 26 4,785
35- 44 20 55 24 5,209
45- 54 29 48 19 4,382
Percentage of all adults
All adults
16 to 64
55-64
40
24
32
50
9
22
4,137
20,596
Table G: General Hold a full driving licence (those aged 17+) Base = 100%
Sex
Men Women
77
53
11,842 15,895
17-24 46 2,065
Age
25-34 73 4,805
35- 44 77 5,218
45- 54 74 4,385
Percentage of all adults
Adults
17 and over
55-64 65+
64
44
64
4,198 7,066 27,737
Require regular help or care Reporting a long-standing illness, health problem or disability Base = 100%
Men Women 16-24 25-34 35- 44 45- 54 55-64
6
8
23
25
2
2
3
5
8
9
11
15
21
36
65+
All
adults
17
7
44
24
12,111 16,166 2,299 4,805 5,218 4,388 4,199 7,318 28,227
43
Bulletin 6 9. Methodological details
9. Methodological details A total of 30,157 respondents were interviewed for the survey throughout Scotland during 1999 and 2000 by interviewers from NFO System Three and MORI Scotland. The sample was drawn from the Small User File of the Postcode Address File (PAF), a listing of all active address points maintained by the Post Office. The survey interview, which lasts an average of 42 minutes, is carried out in respondents' homes by interviewers using Computer Aided Personal Interviewing (CAPI). It has a two-part structure. The first part of the interview is carried out with the Highest Income Householder (HIH), or his/her spouse or partner, and collects mainly factual information about the composition and characteristics of the household. Some questions are asked in respect of each household member.
Comparisons with external sources, such as Census data and the 1996 Scottish House Condition Survey, suggest that the weighted data are broadly representative of the Scottish household population; consequently, no further weighting has been carried out. In many instances, the survey uses the same questions as in other government surveys in order to facilitate comparisons on a consistent basis. Due to differences in sampling and survey methods, however, the results from this survey will inevitably be slightly different from other government surveys. Throughout the Bulletin, comparisons presented in the text are statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. The statistical significance of reported differences have been confirmed by a t-test.
The second part of the interview takes The bases reported in tables may
place with an adult member of the differ. In some cases this is because
household selected at random and they relate to different populations
focuses more on individual attitudes (such as all households, all adults,
and behaviours. (In many cases, of adults of working age). In addition,
course, both parts of the interview are some questions were not asked of all
completed by the same person).
respondents because they only applied
in certain circumstances (for example,
The response rate for the first part of questions about childcare would not
the survey (taking account of be asked in a household without any
`deadwood' in the sample) was 65%.
children). In some cases, the bases
differ because some people did not
The data have been weighted to take want to answer certain questions, or
account of the unequal probabilities of because the information that was
selection inherent in the sample requested was not available at the
design due to (a) the over-sampling of time of the interview. Finally, some
smaller local authority areas relative to questions were only included in the
their household population in order to survey with effect from the start of
obtain a minimum number of 2000, so tables relating to these
interviews in each area and (b) the questions will inevitably have smaller
under-sampling of adults resident in bases. The base sizes are indicated in
multi-person households because only each table.
one `random adult' is interviewed in
each household.
44
Bulletin 6 10. A note on definitions
10. A note on definitions In all tables, percentages have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Nil percent is indicated by a dash (-). Figures between 0% and 0.5% are indicated by a zero (0). Figures between 0.5% and 1.0% are rounded to 1%. In some tables where figures have been rounded, the sum of constituent items may not always total 100%. In tables where multiple responses are allowed, totals may be more than 100%. For the purposes of the survey, a household is defined as one person or a group of people living in accommodation as their only or main residence and either sharing at least one meal a day or sharing the living accommodation. The highest income householder is taken as the household reference person for the first part of the interview. This must be a person in whose name the accommodation is owned or rented or be otherwise responsible for the accommodation. In households with joint householders, the person with the highest income is taken as the household reference person. If householders have exactly the same income, the older is taken as the household reference person. The term adult is used to refer to those aged 16 and over (except where otherwise stated). In each household one of the adult members is randomly selected to take part in the second half of the interview. This person is referred to as
the random adult. The random adult is automatically the `household respondent' in one-adult households and may be the same in households with more than one adult. Economic status The household respondent was asked to select which economic status category best described the current position of each member of the household. As economic status is selfdefined in the SHS, it may differ from other sources. The categories are as follows: · Full time employee · Part-time employee · Self-employed · Permanently retired from work · Unemployed and seeking work · At school · In further/higher education · Government work or training scheme · Permanently sick or disabled · Unable to work because of shortterm illness of injury · Pre-school · Looking after the home or family · Other. Household type The household type variable used here is defined as follows:
45
Bulletin 6 10. A note on definitions
A single pensioner is one adult of pensionable age and no children A single parent is an adult of any age and one or more children. A single adult is an adult of nonpensionable age and no children. An older smaller household is one adult of non-pensionable age and one of pensionable age and no children or two adults of pensionable age and no children. A large adult household is three or more adults and no children. A small adult household is two adults of non-pensionable age and no children. A large family is two adults and three or more children or three or more adults and one or more children. Small family households are two adults and one or two children. Pensionable age refers to men aged 65 and over and to women aged 60 and over The household working status is constructed from the economic status information about the highest income householder and, where applicable, his or her spouse/partner. Individuals are included as working where they work full- or part-time or if they are self-employed. The term household income refers to net income (i.e. after taxation and other deductions) from employment, benefits and other sources, which is brought into the household by the highest income householder and/or
their spouse or partner. This includes any contribution to household finances made by other household members (e.g. dig money). While in general, the level of missing data throughout the SHS was minimal, there was an appreciable level of item non-response in relation to the income information. Incomplete data resulted in around 34% of households having no computed total net income. Imputation of income information was carried out. This is a process whereby complete information given by a `similar' household is used for respondents that are missing information on income. Income is collected as a variety of different components, which are summed to create total net household income. Income was imputed for each component using either Hot Deck imputation, where the sample is divided into subgroups based on relevant characteristics, or Predictive Mean where a statistical model is constructed and the value is predicted using this model. After imputation, income data is unavailable for only 2.5% of households. Near and frequent bus service A `near and frequent' bus service is defined as where a bus stop is less than 15 minutes walk from the respondents home and where a bus leaves from the stop at least every twenty minutes. A `near and infrequent' bus service is defined as one where a bus stop is less than 15 minutes walk from the respondents home but where the bus leaves less frequently than every 20 minutes.
46
Bulletin 6 10. A note on definitions
A `far and frequent' service is defined as one where a bus stop is more than 15 minutes walk from the respondents home and where a bus leaves from the stop at least every 20 minutes. A `far and infrequent' service is defined as one where a bus stop is more than 15 minutes walk from the respondents home and where the bus leaves less frequently than every 20 minutes.
Urban/rural classification An urban/rural classification of Scotland has been developed based on settlement size and remoteness (measured by drive times). The six-fold and eight-fold classifications are outlined below:
6-fold urban/rural classification
1. The four cities
settlements sized over 125,000
2. Other urban
Urban areas (settlements 10,000 - 125,000)
3. Small accessible towns 4. Small remote towns 5. Accessible rural 6. Remote rural
Settlements 3-10,000 population and within a 30 minute drive time of a settlement of 10,000 or more Settlements 3-10,000 population and more than a 30 minute drive time of a settlement of 10,000 or more Settlements less than 3,000 population and within a 30 minute drive time of a settlement of 10,000 or more Settlements less than 3,000 population and more than a 30 minute drive time of a settlement of 10,000 or more
47
Bulletin 6 10. A note on definitions
8-fold urban/rural classification
1. The four cities
The four cities (settlements over 125,000)
2. Other urban
Urban areas (settlements 10,000 - 125,000)
3. Accessible small towns
Settlements sized between 3,000 and 10,000 and within a 30 minute drivetime from a settlement of 10,000 or more
4. Remote small towns
Settlements sized between 3,000 and 10,000 and between a 30 and 60 minute drivetime from a settlement of 10,000 or more
5. Very remote small towns
Settlements sized between 3,000 and 10,000 and over 60 minutes from a settlement of 10,000 or more
6. Accessible rural
Settlements of less than 3,000 and within a 30 minute drivetime from a settlement of 10,000 or more
7. Remote rural
Settlements of less than 3,000 and between 30 and 60 minutes from a settlement of 10,000 or more
8. Very remote rural
Settlements of less than 3,000 and over 60 minutes from a settlement of 10,000 or more
48
Bulletin 6 11. Scottish Executive Statistical Services
11. Scottish Executive Statistical Services
Our roles and aims Our role is to provide Parliament, government and the wider community with statistical information, analysis and advice on most aspects of Scottish life, to improve decision-making, stimulate research and inform debate. We aim to provide an authoritative and impartial picture of society and a window on the work and performance of government, which allows the impact of government policies and actions to be assessed. Information is available in a variety of paper forms and on the Scottish Executive Website at www.scotland.gov.uk/stats.
This is a National Statistics publication
National Statistics are produced to high professional standards set out in the National Statistics Code of Practice. They undergo regular quality assurance reviews to ensure that they meet customer needs. They are produced free from any political interference. National Statistics publications are grouped under the following broad subject headings (themes):
Agriculture, Fishing and Forestry Commerce, Energy & Industry Compendia & Reference Crime and Justice The Economy Education & Training The Natural and Built Environment
Other Government Health & Care labour market Population & Migration Social & Welfare Transport, Travel & Tourism
This publication belongs to the Social & Welfare theme.
Our commitment to data suppliers Confidentiality: Confidential data from statistical enquiries is handled in accordance with the Government Statistical Service Code of Practice and with the Data Protection Act. Burden: Information is not collected unnecessarily, but only when there is a clearly identified need. Only the minimum amount of information is collected to meet this need. Review of data collection: Data collection systems are reviewed regularly to ensure that the information is still required and that the collection system is operating cost-effectively. These reviews are conducted in conjunction with both users and suppliers of the data. Liaison: Close liaison is maintained with major suppliers of statistical data, such as local authorities, by a system of liaison committees. Feedback: Arrangements for major data suppliers to have access to the data (subject to confidentiality constraints) at no, or reduced, cost, is handled by the liaison committees or by direct consultation. Our commitment to users Consultation: We consult users about the development of our statistics. Integrity: We ensure the statistics produced are not presented in a way which is misleading. We also comprehensively check the data at all stages to safeguard standards of accuracy. Openness: We are completely open about our methods of collecting and processing data and about the methodology used in published analyses. Release: We will provide on request all available statistical information, subject to confidentiality, reliability, pre-publication embargoes, and on sufficient resources being available to carry out the work involved. An appropriate charge may be made. Timeliness: We guarantee that requests or correspondence will be given either a substantive reply within 7 working days or an acknowledgement to be followed up (by a stated date) with a substantive reply.
49
Bulletin 6 12. Correspondence and enquiries
12. Correspondence and enquiries
Enquiries on Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No.6 should be addressed to: Louise R Finlayson Central Research Unit Scottish Executive Room 53 James Craig Walk Edinburgh EH1 3BA Telephone: 0131 244 7557 Fax: 0131 244 5393 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/shs
General enquiries on Scottish Executive statistics should be addressed to: Kevin Meenan Central Statistics Unit Scottish Executive Education Department Area 3-B, Victoria Quay EDINBURGH EH6 6QQ Telephone: (0131) 244 0442; Fax: (0131) 244 0335 email: [email protected]
Advice on specific areas of Scottish Executive statistical work can be obtained from staff at the telephone numbers given below.
Scottish Executive Statistics contacts
Other contacts for Scottish statistics
Schools ­ qualifications Schools ­ pupils and teachers School audit Further and Higher Education Labour Market Business Income, tax and benefits Local government finance Environment, planning & local government staffing Housing Transport Health Social work Scottish Executive personnel Agricultural census and Labour force Fisheries Courts and law Recorded crime and prisons
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Forestry Commission The Scottish Funding Councils for Higher and Further Education General Register Office for Scotland - Vital statistics and publications - Population statistics, census statistics or digital boundary products
(0131) 314 6337 (0131) 313 6575 (0131) 314 4243 (0131) 314 4254
For general enquiries about National Statistics contact the National Statistics Public Enquiry Service on 020 7533 5888 minicom: 01633 812399 Email: [email protected] Fax: 01633 652747 Letters: Room DG/18, 1 Drummond Gate, LONDON SW1V 2QQ You can also find National Statistics on the internet - go to www.statistics.gov.uk
Current staff names, email addresses and the bulletins listed below can be found on the Scottish Executive Web site at www.scotland.gov.uk/stats. Further information on the General Register Office for Scotland is available on the website www.gro-scotland.gov.uk
Most recent Statistical Publications relating to the Scottish Household Survey
ISBN 0114972648 0748089195 0748089497 0748089616 1842684221 1842680269 1842680668 1842687808
Title Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No. 1 Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No. 2 Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No. 3 Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No. 4 Scottish Household Survey Bulletin No. 5 Scotland's People: Results from the 1999 Scottish Household Survey (Volume 1: Annual Report) Scotland's People: Results from the 1999 Scottish Household Survey (Volume 2: Technical Report) Household Transport: some Scottish Household Survey results
Last published August 1999 November 1999 February 2000 May 2000 August 2000 September 2000 November 2000 January 2001
Price Ј5 Ј5 Ј5 Ј5 Ј5 Ј20 Ј15 Ј2
Additional copies of these publications may be purchased from Scottish Executive Publication Sales, The Stationery Office Bookshop, 71 Lothian Road, Edinburgh, EH3 9AZ, Telephone: (0131) 228 4181, Fax: (0131) 622 7017. Cheques should be made payable to `The Stationery Office Limited'.
Complaints and suggestions If you are not satisfied with our service, please write to the Chief Statistician, Mr Rob Wishart, Room 1-A75, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh, EH6 6QQ, Telephone: (0131) 244 0302, e-mail [email protected] We also welcome any comments or suggestions that would help us to improve our standards of service.
ISBN 0 7559 0116 9
Price Ј5
© Crown copyright Brief extracts from the Crown copyright material in this publication may be reproduced provided the source is fully acknowledged.
50
I SBN 0 - 7 5 5 9 - 0 1 1 6 - 9
A Scottish Executive National Statistics Publication
9 780755 901166 Ј5.00

File: scottish-household-survey-bulletin-no-5.pdf
Title: B 20393 SHS Bull6 Text 5/6/01
Author: Sandra
Published: Wed Jun 6 15:30:48 2001
Pages: 54
File size: 0.6 Mb


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