The Oregon Sage

Tags: Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, OLLI, discussion group, the University of Oregon, Facilitator, Central Oregon, Shakespeare, University of Oregon, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Us Shakespeare, CN, Digital World, Editor's Note, Carolin Keutzer, study group, David Kolb, Lara Bovilsky, University of Oregon Eugene, Stan Cook, Carolyn Roth, Facilitators, William Shakespeare, MX, Program Committee, Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, American Bar Association, Pelican Cove Internal University, Academic Extension, George Kaufman, discussion, Columbia University, OLLI-UO, Dennis Lawrence, David Starkey, Central Oregon Editor's Note, UO Professor, Oregon Sage Monthly newsletter, Karolinska Institute, Ottoman Caliphate, Southern Oregon University, King Lear, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Bob Harrison, Sheri Fink, UO Baker Downtown Center, CedarsSinai Medical Center, Larry Weinberg, Keith L. Black, Middle Eastern history, Undergraduate Studies, Aging Research Center, brain health, lecture session, Cynthia R. Green
Content: The Oregon Sage Monthly newsletter from the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon
Volume 6, Number 1 INSIDE Central Oregon Editor's Note . . . . . . . . . . 2 Upcoming Presentations . . . . . 2 Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Learning Circle . . . . . . . . . 6 Eugene/Springfield Editor's Note . . . . . . . . . . 7 Upcoming Presentations . . . . . 7 Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Learning Circle . . . . . . . . 12
January 2016 CENTRAL OREGON--ISIS and the History of the Caliphate Monday, January 11, 2016, 10:00 a.m. ­ noon Join Bob Harrison for an analysis of the Arab Caliphate--its origin and history. We'll discuss the Ottoman Caliphate; the British promise and subsequent failure to restore the Caliphate; and western penetration into the Middle East and North Africa and the Islamic response. Finally, we'll discuss the rise of Al-Qaeda, ISIS, and the use of historical memory and militant jihad. OLLI member Bob Harrison taught Middle Eastern history at southern Oregon University, was a Fulbright Scholar in Egypt in 1987 and a Malone Fellow in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain in 1989-1990. Survival is Insufficient: Contemporary science fiction, Shakespeare's King Lear and the Nature of human nature Tuesday, January 12, 2:30­4:30 p.m. In a lecture session broadcast from the Eugene-Springfield classrooms, UO Professor and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies, Lisa Freinkel, will explore the nature of human nature in a discussion that's heavy on Shakespeare, but continued on page 2
EUGENE/SPRINGFIELD--Dipping into the Digital World (DDW) Wednesdays, January 6 and 20, 1:30­3:30 p.m. Dipping into the Digital World, an eight-session discussion group, is set to meet the first and third Wednesdays, January­April at 1:30 p.m. at the UO Baker Downtown Center. Our first meetings, and topics for these sessions, are as follows: January 6: Follow-up on smart phones; user ID and passwords; virus protection and management; identifying legitimate promos and avoiding scams. January 20: Considering and choosing a digital device; apps for digital devices--what are apps, usefulness, do's and don'ts. Facilitators: Jan Moursund, Gordon Nagai, and Larry Leverone Outside of OLLI: Sweetly Writ: Oregon Shakespeare Festival Gala Performance Saturday, January 9, 7:00 p.m. OLLI members are also encouraged to attend a gala performance and reception, Sweetly Writ: Oregon Shakespeare Festival Celebrates Shakespeare's First Folio at the Hult Center for the performing arts. continued on page 7 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Academic Extension 1277 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1277 800-824-2714 [email protected] http://osher.uoregon.edu January 2016 | 1
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OLLI-CO Editor's Note
It's the start of the new year. It's a time for looking at the year gone by and the one to come. For many of us, it is a time to make resolutions--get onto the treadmill, take more walks, eat better, learn a new skill. At AARP.org there is an excellent article on the top 10 changes we can make to improve our brain health. Included in the list are regular exercise, including pumping iron, meditating, and eating an Omega 3 rich diet. See (http://www.aarp.org/health/brain-health/info01-2012/boost-brain-health.1.html for the full article) Also on the list are learning new skills and socializing-- two benefits that come with your OLLI membership. Seek Out New Skills "Learning spurs the growth of new brain cells. `When you challenge the brain, you increase the number of brain cells and the number of connections between those cells,' says Keith L. Black, MD, chair of neurosurgery at CedarsSinai Medical Center in Los Angeles." "UCLA researchers using MRI scans found that middle-
aged and older adults with little Internet experience could trigger brain centers that control decision-making and complex reasoning after a week of surfing the net. `Engaging the mind can help older brains maintain healthy functioning,' says Cynthia R. Green, PhD, author of 30 Days to Total Brain Health." Get a Social Life "`Who needs friends? You do! Having multiple social networks helps lower dementia risk, a 15-year study of older people from Sweden's Karolinska Institute shows. A rich social life may protect against dementia by providing emotional and mental stimulation,' says Laura Fratiglioni, MD, director of the institute's Aging Research Center. Other studies yield similar conclusions: Subjects in a University of Michigan study did better on tests of shortterm memory after just 10 minutes of conversation with another person." There are a number of new and continuing programs at OLLI-UO in Central Oregon this month. Jump-start your brain and join us this year. (originally printed in The Oregon Sage in January 2013)
continued from page 1 not afraid to refer to contemporary sources like Star Trek and Emily St. John Mandel's post-apocalyptic novel, Station Eleven. Read a full description on page 7 of this newsletter. Armchair Traveler: Machu Picchu and the Mountains of Peru Tuesday, January 19, 1:30­3:30 p.m. Join OLLI and member Larry Weinberg at the UO Bend Center for a tour of the Sacred Valley of Peru. We will visit Inca and pre-Inca ruins, as well as the incredible site of Machu Picchu. For those of you who were part of the Great Courses class on the Lost Worlds of South America, this will seem like visiting an old friend.
We will get to hike in the mountains east of the Sacred Valley, with trails between 10,000 and 15,000 feet and including four passes at an elevation of 14,000-plus feet. Naturally there will be lots of photogenic llamas and alpacas, as well as glorious landscapes and the hardy people who are indigenous to the high mountain valleys. Machu Picchu is a magnificent tribute to a civilization that constructed over 24,000 kilometers of roads (the Inca trails) and massive building projects without benefit of wheeled vehicles or large beasts of burden.
Monarchy with David Starkey: Part Two Wednesdays, begins January 6, 2016, 10:00 a.m.­noon In January, we will begin the second half of the history of the British monarchy covering the reign of Elizabeth I to the present day. Henry VIII's support of the Church of England over Catholicism set in motion chaotic and often bloody conflicts that continued though several successive monarchs. In the time of Oliver Cromwell, the monarchy was even abolished briefly. The eventual restoration of the Church of England as the State "approved" religion, with reasonable tolerance of other faiths, opened the doors to stability and prosperity that
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bolstered Great Britain to become the dominant world power in the 1700s. These presentations cover the role of the royal families and their often-rocky relationships with Parliament, through the reign of Victoria. The final session includes a special video summarizing the modern trials and tribulations of the Royals into our times. This informative series is also a beautiful video tour of historic England. If you enjoyed part one last spring, this is a must-see continuation. Newcomers will be easily swept up into the dramas in this epic exploration of the English monarchy. Facilitators: Cal Pulis and Mike McAllister Nonfiction Book Group Tuesdays, January 5 and 19, 10:00 a.m.­noon January selection: Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a StormRavaged Hospital by Sheri Fink, MD When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, floodwaters rose in the Uptown streets surrounding Memorial Medical Center, where hundreds of people slowly realized that they were stranded. The power grid failed, toilets overflowed, stench-filled corridors went dark. Diesel generators gave partial electricity. Hospital staff members smashed windows to circulate air. Gunshots could be heard, echoing in the city. Two stabbing victims turned up at this hospital, which was on life support itself, and were treated. By Day 4 of the hurricane, the generators had conked out. Fifty-two patients in an intensive care wing lay in sweltering darkness; only a few were able to walk. The doctors and
nurses, beyond exhaustion, wondered how many could survive. When evacuations were done, 45 patients had not made it out alive. The State of Louisiana began an investigation; forensic consultants determined that 23 corpses had elevated levels of morphine and other drugs, and decided that 20 were victims of homicide. In her book Five Days at Memorial, Dr. Sheri Fink explores the excruciating struggle of medical professionals deciding to give fatal injections to those at the brink of death. Dr. Fink, a physician turned journalist, won a Pulitzer Prize for her investigation of these events in a 2009 joint assignment for ProPublica and The New York Times Magazine. This book is much more than an extension of that report. Although she had the material for a gripping disaster story, Dr. Fink has slowed the narrative pulse to investigate situational ethics: what happens when caregivers steeped in medicine's supreme value, preserving life, face traumatic choices as the standards of civilization collapse. The first half of this book covers the five days of the title. Then the viewfinder shifts to an entwined legal and political story in which state authorities pursue a homicide investigation. That so many people, starkly divided over the question of whether crimes had been committed, come off as decent and appealing makes this book an absorbing read. Dr. Fink brings a shimmering intelligence to its many narrative cul-de-sacs, which consider medical, legal and ethical issues. (NY Times Book Review by Jason Barry 9/3/13) Facilitator: Bill McCann
Page-turners: Fiction Book Group Tuesday, January 12, 10:00 a.m.­noon January selection: Calico Joe by John Grisham Calico Joe is the first-person account of a fictionalized beaning of a Chicago Cubs prodigy by the name of Joe Castle, by way of Calico Rock, Arkansas. After being called up suddenly by the Cubs, Castle, soon dubbed "Calico Joe," gets off to a roaring start. After 11 games, he has 12 home runs and 14 stolen bases. He's hitting a ridiculous .725 and leading the Cubs to first place in their division (an accomplishment almost as remarkable as a .725 average). The baseball world believes it may be witnessing the next Ty Cobb. Or perhaps his better. His story is told by Paul Tracey, son of Warren, a head-hunting power pitcher for the New York Mets who has more losses than wins and more anger than talent. Warren Tracey would be the one to end Joe Castle's career. While a young Paul watches in the stands, Warren aims a fastball at the head of Paul's boyhood hero, sending him into a coma and to the brink of death. In 1973, the storied career of Joe Castle comes to a tragic close after a mere 38 games. Warren claims the bean ball was unintentional. Paul, a longtime victim of his abusive father's hate-filled tactics, knows better. Jump ahead almost four decades and Joe Castle is a barely functional high school groundskeeper back in his hometown of Calico Rock; Warren Tracey is dying of cancer. Paul's dream/goal is to see his father continued on page 6
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1 Friday UO Closed for New Year's Day 4 Monday No OLLI-UO in Central Oregon Programs Scheduled 5 Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Nonfiction Book Group [book group] Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink. Facilitator: Bill McCann (UOBC) Noon--Round Table Luncheon--Greg's Grill in the Old Mill District [social] For reservations, contact Harlie Peterson, 541-593-2015 or [email protected] Space is limited. 6 Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Monarchy with David Starkey: Part Two [DVD study group] Shadow of the King--Elizabeth I and The Stuart Succession-- Expansion and Crises. Facilitators: Cal Pulis and Mike McAllister (UOBC) 7 Thursday 9:30 a.m. Writers' Bloc [study group] Facilitator: Carolyn Hammond (UOBC) 1:30 p.m. A New History of Life [DVD study group] Permian Extinction-- Life's Worst Catastrophe and Finding the Killer--Greenhouse Earth. Facilitator: Jim Hammond (UOBC)
11 Monday 10:00 a.m. ISIS and the Caliphate [member lecture] Presenter: Bob Harrison (UOBC) 12 Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Page-turners Book Group [book group] Calico Joe by John Grisham. Facilitator: Flo Delaney (UOBC) 2:30 p.m. Survival is Insufficient: Contemporary Science Fiction, Shakespeare's King Lear, and the Nature of Human Nature [broadcast lecture] Presenter: Lisa Freinkel (UOBC) 13 Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Monarchy with David Starkey: Part Two [DVD study group] Cromwell: The King Killer and Return ofthe King: Charles II. Facilitators: Cal Pulis and Mike McAllister (UOBC) 14 Thursday 9:30 a.m. Writers' Bloc [study group] Facilitator: Carolyn Hammond (UOBC) 1:30 p.m. A New History of Life [DVD study group] The Dinosaurs Take Over and Letting the Dinosaurs Speak--Paleobehavior. Facilitator: Jim Hammond (UOBC) 15 Friday 10:30 a.m. OLLI-UO Central Oregon Governing Council [monthly meeting] (UOBC)
8 Friday 10:00 a.m. Membership Committee [monthly meeting] Chair: Burt Litman (UOBC)
18 Monday UO Bend Center and Academic Extension Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr Holiday 19 Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Nonfiction Book Group [book group] Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink. Facilitator: Bill McCann (UOBC) 1:30 p.m. Armchair Traveler: Machu Picchu and the Mountains of Peru [member lecture] Presenter: Larry Weinberg (UOBC) 20 Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Monarchy with David Starkey: Part Two [DVD study group] The Glorious Revolution--William and Mary and Rule Britannia--Rise of Great Britain. Facilitators: Cal Pulis and Mike McAllister (UOBC) 21 Thursday 9:30 a.m. Writers' Bloc [study group] Facilitator: Carolyn Hammond (UOBC) 1:30 p.m. A New History of Life [DVD study group] Conquering the Air--The Evolution of Flight and Monsters of the Deep--Mesozoic Oceans. Facilitator: Jim Hammond (UOBC) 22 Friday No OLLI-UO in Central Oregon Programs Scheduled
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25 Monday No OLLI-UO in Central Oregon Programs Scheduled 26 Tuesday 1:30 p.m. Program Committee [monthly meeting] Chair: Helen Pruitt (UOBC) 27 Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Monarchy with David Starkey: Part Two [DVD study group] Empire: The Rise of Parliamentary Power and Survival--Napoleonic Wars to Victoria. Facilitators: Cal Pulis and Mike McAllister (UOBC) 28 Thursday 9:30 a.m. Writers' Bloc [study group] Facilitator: Carolyn Hammond (UOBC) 1:30 p.m. A New History of Life [DVD study group] The Cretaceous Earth--A Tropical Planet and The Sky is Falling--End of the Dinosaurs. Facilitator: Jim Hammond (UOBC) 29 Friday No OLLI-UO in Central Oregon Programs Scheduled
Locations All meetings are held at the UO Bend Center, 80 NE Bend River Mall Drive, unless otherwise stated. Key UOBC = UO Bend Center TBA = To Be Announced Parking at the UO Bend Center OLLI-UO members and their guests may use the shopping mall parking spaces adjacent to the UOBC when attending OLLI meetings and classes. Please note that the parking lot in front of the Duck Store should be left open for the store's customers. OLLI attendees needing accessible parking may use the designated space in front of the Duck Store. During the winter months, OLLI members and their guests may park in the Duck Store lot if snow and ice have not been plowed from the shopping mall parking lot. Questions? Call 800-824-2714 Grid calendars available from the office or online at http://osher.uoregon.edu Central Oregon Editor: Jeanne Freeman, 541-504-5368 [email protected]
Renewals Mail renewals and membership applications to: OLLI-UO Central Oregon 1277 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1277 Or call the OLLI-UO office to renew, 800-824-2714 UO Staff Contacts: OLLI-UO Program Director: Ruth Heller, 800-824-2714 Administrative Program Assistant: Ann Kokkeler UO Bend Center office: 541-728-0685 UO Academic Extension Program Coordinator, Heather Inghram OLLI Committee Contacts: Council President: Bill McCann, 541-728-0262, or [email protected] Program Chair: Helen Pruitt, 541-382-7827, or [email protected] Membership Chair: Burt Litman, 541-504-5368, or [email protected] Hospitality Chair: Terry Schwab, 650-619-0300, or [email protected]
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L earning Circle Monthly Schedule Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Page-turners Fiction Group: second week. 10:00 a.m. Nonfiction Book Group: first and third weeks. Noon First Tuesday Luncheon at Greg's Grill in the Old Mill District Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Monarchy with David Starkey: Part Two: weekly. Thursday 9:30 a.m. Writer's Bloc: weekly. 1:30 p.m. A New History of Life: weekly. We welcome member proposals for study or discussion groups! Share your interests and expertise with other members or explore a new topic together. Contact the OLLI-UO office, or the Central Oregon Program Chair, if you're interested in proposing or leading a new group. OLLI-UO in Central Oregon will be on Winter Break from Monday, December 21 through Friday, January 1. The UO Bend Center will have staffing on Tuesday, December 29, for the OLLI Program Committee meeting.
continued from page 3 apologize to Castle before he dies, an idea that the gruff old former ballplayer scoffs at. In vintage Grisham fashion--few authors can build to a crescendo the way he does--the story picks up pace. Without revealing a rather satisfying ending, he plays good notes on the power of forgiveness, for the son, the dying pitcher and Calico Joe himself. (Los Angeles Times Review by Chris Erskine 5/12/12) Facilitator: Flo Delaney Coming In February: Imperial Russia: Russia Land of the Czars Wednesdays, February 10, 10:00 a.m.­noon Join OLLI-UO Central Oregon for an eight-week examination of Imperialist Czarist Russia including background to its organization in Kiev, its revival in Moscow, and evolution from a small principality to Eurasian conquest. The course covers the great czars including Ivan III, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Alexander I, and Nicholas II from the tenth century to the 1917 Revolution. Discussions on history, religion, culture, and geography are included in the series. The History Channel DVD of "Russia Land of the Czars" will be augmented with lectures from Bob Harrison, who taught history courses on Russia at Southern Oregon University during a 24-year period. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
Understanding the World's Greatest Structures: Science and Innovation from Antiquity to Modernity Thursdays, beginning February 11, 1:30­3:30 p.m. Our world is filled with structures that have stood the test of time; that give character to the cities and landscapes in which they're located. They are visited by millions of people each year and capture our wonder for the marvels of engineering innovation and progress. But while structures such as the Giza pyramids, Brunelleschi's dome, and the Brooklyn Bridge are visual spectacles in and of themselves, they are just as important for the way they were designed as for the way they look. Delivered by award-winning Professor Stephen Ressler of the United States Military Academy at West Point, a civil engineer and a nationally honored leader in engineering education, these 24 lectures take you on a fascinating and richly illustrated tour that deftly blends history and science to create an unforgettable survey of our world's most remarkable structural masterpieces. (from The Great Courses) Facilitator: Russ Hopper
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OLLI-ES President's Note
Amazingly, it's January again. The Roman twoheaded God Janus looks forward and backward, and I find myself doing it, too. We should be happy with the way our learning community has been developing. Yet looking forward and backward, I think we sometimes oversimplify who we are. I hear people talking about "old members" versus "new members." It's true that among us are pioneers who founded Learning In Retirement many years ago. We honor their insight and inspiration, but some people wonder if the times have moved on. I think that that picture is misleading because there's no simple division. In the 45-year age span of our members, there are many different "generations ABCXYZ." Members have different backgrounds, personal histories, and diverse wants and needs for lifelong learning. Some of our oldest members are more in tune with recent devel-
opments in science, culture, and education than some of our newest members. We affirm and respect those different backgrounds and possibilities, but there is more. Assert those differences! Find members who share your background and desires, and if those desires and needs are not being met, make them known: Talk to the program committee, write suggestions, organize a little group and work out possible topics for courses or lectures or discussions. We have more creativity and invention among us than we yet see. Speaking of new possibilities, I call your attention to an article on the last page of this newsletter about a joint trip possibility--a river cruise in Europe together with members of eight other OLLI programs from around the country. It looks to be an exciting opportunity. David Kolb, OLLI-UO in Eugene-Springfield Council President
continued from page 1 Actors from the Oregon Shake- speare Festival will perform excerpts from Shakespeare's own changing versions of King Lear, which demonstrate how Shakespeare conceived different takes and variations on the same characters and situations. The cast will discuss Shakespeare's changes and how actors and directors choose among the different texts in a post-performance discussion with the audience. The tickets are free if you pick them up at the Hult Center box office. Their hours are Tuesday through Friday from 12:00 p.m.­5:00 p.m. and Saturday from 11:00 a.m.­3:00 p.m. You may also reserve tickets online at hultcenter. org, but there is a $2.50 per ticket processing fee. For more information on all the Events Scheduled to coincide with the
First Folio! Exhibit, visit: https://jsma. uoregon.edu/ShakespeareEvents The Struggle for Justice in America: A Hollywood Perspective Mondays, January 11 and 25, 1:00­3:30 p.m. Join us second and fourth Mondays in January and February, and on March 14, for the winter term continuation of the series. Winter term films include: 12 Angry Men, His Girl Friday, Little Big Man, Network, and Gentleman's Agreement.
UO Common Reading Events: Survival is Insufficient: Contemporary Science Fiction, Shakespeare's King Lear and the Nature of Human Nature Tuesday, January 12, 2:30­4:30 p.m. Contemporary science fiction and Shakespearean tragedy share at least one thing in common: both revel in "thought experiments" designed to plumb the truths of human existence by imagining that existence in extremis. Both create their worlds by means of hypotheticals: WHAT IF...? What if pandemic wiped 99 percent of humanity off the face of the planet in a matter of days? What if unimaginable technologies hurtled us to the ends of the galaxy in a matter of moments, exposing us to equally unimaginable worlds? What if everything we knew, continued on page 10
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1 Friday UO Closed for New Year's Day 4 Monday 9:30 a.m. Creative Writing Critique [study group] Facilitator: Livvie TaylorYoung (CN) 12:15 p.m. Beginning Spanish [study group] Contact: Sara Michener (BZ) 3:30 p.m. French Language [study group] Facilitator: Elaine de Martin Webster (CN) 5 Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Understanding Science [DVD study group] The Nature of Matter: Understanding the Physical World; Ionic Versus Covalent Matter and The Versatile Element: Carbon. Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose (AK/MX) 3:00 p.m. Interpretive Play Reading [study group] Facilitator: Esther Erford (CN) 6 Wednesday 9:30 a.m. international relations [discussion group] Challenges for International Relations in 2016. Facilitator: John Attig (CN) 1:30 p.m. Dipping into the Digital World [discussion series] Follow-up on smart phones; user ID and passwords; virus protection and management; identifying legitimate promos and avoiding scams. Facilitators: Jan Moursund, Gordon Nagai and Larry Leverone (AK/MX) 7 Thursday 9:30 a.m. Classics/Philosophy [book group] My First Summer in the Sierra by John Muir. Facilitator: Paul Holbo (CN) 11:30 a.m. Thinking Allowed [discussion group] How Many Immigrants Can We Take In? Facilitator: Chuck Adams (CN)
1:30 p.m. Short Story Discussion [study group] "Pornography" by Ian McEwan and "The Lifeguard" by Mary Morris. Facilitator: Shiela Pardee (CN) 3:15 p.m. Spanish Conversation [study group] Facilitators: Carolin Keutzer and Stan Cook (CN) 8 Friday 9:30 a.m. Membership, Promotions and Awards Committee [monthly meeting] Co-chairs: Betty Hosokawa and Wende Hitchcock (BZ) 11:00 a.m. Intermediate Spanish [study group] Contact Facilitator: Carolyn Roth, for additional information, 541-342-6745 (off-site) 9 Saturday 7:00 p.m. Outside of OLLI: Sweetly Writ: Oregon Shakespeare Festival Gala Performance [performance] Hult Center for the Performing Arts. 11 Monday 9:30 a.m. Philosophy Salon [study group] "Questions of Value." Facilitators: Byron Chell, Lorraine Ironplow, and Dennis Lawrence (CN) 11:45 a.m. Solutions [discussion group] Poverty, Hunger, and Malnutrition. Facilitator: Jerry Brule (CN) 12:15 p.m. Beginning Spanish [study group] Contact: Sara Michener (BZ) 1:00 p.m. The Struggle for Justice in America [film series] 12 Angry Men Introduced by Dana Edwards (AK/MX) 3:30 p.m. French Language [study group] Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster (CN) 12 Tuesday 2:30 p.m. Survival is Insufficient: Contemporary Science Fiction, Shakespear's King Lear and the Nature of Human Nature [lecture] Presenter: Lisa Freinkel (AK/MX)
13 Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Program Committee [monthly meeting] Co-chairs: Dina Wills and Randall Donohue (MX) 10:00 a.m. historical novels [book group] Paris: The Novel by Edward Rutherfurd. Facilitators: Corinne Hunt (CN) 4:30 p.m. The Art of Biography [reception and lecture] Presenter: H.W. Smith (AK/MX) 14 Thursday 9:30 a.m. News and Views [discussion group] Facilitator: Jack Meacham (CN) 1:30 p.m. Music Appreciation [DVD study group] Introduction to Verdi's Aida, Part One. Facilitator: Dennis Lawrence (CN) 3:15 p.m. Spanish Conversation [study group] Facilitators: Carolin Keutzer and Stan Cook (CN) 15 Friday 11:00 a.m. Intermediate Spanish [study group] Contact Facilitator: Carolyn Roth, for additional information, 541-342-6745 (off-site) 18 Monday UO Closed in Observation of Martin Luther King Jr. Day 19 Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Understanding Science [DVD study group] The Nature of Matter: Understanding the Physical World; The Strange Behavior of Water and Matter in Solution. Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose (AK/MX) 3:00 p.m. Interpretive Play Reading [study group] Facilitator: Esther Erford (CN)
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20 Wednesday 9:30 a.m. International Relations [discussion group] Taiwan and Great China: the Global Bamboo Network. Facilitator: Susan Walcott (CN) 11:45 a.m. January Brown Bag [social] (CN) 1:30 p.m. Dipping into the Digital World [discussion series] Considering and choosing a digital device; apps for digital devices--what are apps, usefulness, do's and don'ts. Facilitators: Jan Moursund, Gordon Nagai and Larry Leverone (AK/MX) 21 Thursday 9:30 a.m. Poetry Writing [study group] Facilitator: Gloria Wells (CN) 11:30 a.m. Thinking Allowed [discussion group] Planned Parenthood Dilemma. Facilitator: Chuck Adams (CN) 1:30 p.m. Short Story Discussion [study group] "The Canebrake" by Mohammed Mrabet or "The Tale of the Crystal Kiosk" by Murathan Mungan. Facilitator: Shiela Pardee (CN) 3:15 p.m. Spanish Conversation [study group] Facilitators: Carolin Keutzer and Stan Cook (CN) 22 Friday 11:00 a.m. Intermediate Spanish [study group] Contact Facilitator: Carolyn Roth, for additional information, 541-342-6745 (off-site) 11:00 a.m. First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare [field trip] Group One. Leader: Lara Bovilsky (Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art) 2:00 p.m. First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare [field trip] Group Two. Leader: Lara Bovilsky (Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art) 4:00 p.m. First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare [field trip] Group Three. Leader: Lara Bovilsky (Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art)
25 Monday 9:30 a.m. Philosophy Salon [study group] "Questions of Value." Facilitators: Byron Chell, Lorraine Ironplow, and Dennis Lawrence (CN) 11:45 a.m. Solutions [discussion group] Education. Facilitator: Jerry Brule (CN) 12:15 p.m. Beginning Spanish [study group] Contact: Sara Michener (BZ) 1:00 p.m. The Struggle for Justice in America [film series] His Girl Friday Introduced by Linda Jensen (AK/MX) 3:30 p.m. French Language [study group] Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster (CN) 27 Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Historical Novels [book group] Paris: The Novel by Edward Rutherfurd. Facilitators: Corinne Hunt (CN) 11:00 a.m. Eugene-Springfield Governing Council [monthly meeting] President: David Kolb (MX) 1:00 p.m. The Most Talented Man of the Century [lecture] Presenter: Helene-Carol Brown (AK/MX) 28 Thursday 9:30 a.m. News and Views [discussion group] Facilitator: Linda Rockey (CN) 1:30 p.m. Music Appreciation [DVD study group] Introduction to Verdi's Aida, Part Two. Facilitator: Dennis Lawrence (CN) 3:15 p.m. Spanish Conversation [study group] Facilitators: Carolin Keutzer and Stan Cook (CN) 29 Friday 11:00 a.m. Intermediate Spanish [study group] Contact Facilitator: Carolyn Roth, for additional information, 541-342-6745 (off-site)
Locations All meetings are held at Baker Downtown Center, 975 High Street, unless otherwise stated. Key AK = Alaska Room MX = Mexico Room CN = Canada Room BZ = Belize Room TBA = To Be Announced Renewals Mail renewals and membership applications to: OLLI-UO Eugene Springfield 1277 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1277 Or drop them off at the office: 975 High Street, Eugene Questions? Call 541-346-0697 Grid calendars available in the office or online at http://osher.uoregon.edu OLLI Staff Contacts: OLLI-UO Program Director: Ruth Heller, 541-346-0697 OLLI Committee Contacts: Council President: David Kolb, 541-345-3110 Program Committee CoChairs: Dina Wills, 541-687-4784 and Beate Galda, 541-484-3958 Membership, Promotions and Awards: Betty Hosokawa, 541-683-1907 and Wende Hitchcock, 541-953-4173
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continued from page 7 and everything we are, was suddenly stripped away? In the end these audacious hypotheticals strip away our most flattering social myths. At stake is nothing less the question of who we are beneath all the modern conveniences. UO Professor and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies, Lisa Freinkel will explore the nature of human nature in a discussion that's heavy on Shakespeare, but not afraid to refer to contemporary sources like Star Trek and Emily St. John Mandel's postapocalyptic novel, Station Eleven. The answers we encounter may surprise the average, technophilic Star Trek fan, but they surely won't surprise Star Trek's muse: namely, the Bard himself. The Art of Biography Wednesday, January 13, 4:30­6:30 p.m. Author H.W. Smith will discuss his new book, Roy K. Johnston--A Life in Sound, Color and Word. The biography of Johnston, an OLLI-UO member, chronicles Roy's extraordinary life in the arts, examining his multiple careers as an orchestral clarinetist, teacher, arts administrator, fundraiser, and poet. Smith, a former clarinet student of Johnston, will read selections from the book and share his thoughts on the creative process and the challenges inherent in writing a biography. In addition to his work as a writer, Smith is also a composer and music producer living in Los Angeles. He was formerly the founder and managing partner of Humecke/Smith, a music production firm whose clients included Universal Studios, IMAX films, and the Discovery Channel. He recently composed and produced an album of
original Christmas songs and scored the music for a comedy series entitled Another Day With You. He is an active music educator and a regularly performing woodwind specialist and jazz pianist throughout Southern California. Smith holds a BA in English from Princeton University and is an alumnus of the Berklee College of Music. This event is open to the public. OLLI members are encouraged to invite their friends and family members to join us for this presentation and reception. January Brown Bag Social Wednesday, January 20, 11:45 a.m. It was such fun to visit other OLLI members during our fall term brown bag lunch. If you missed that opportunity, we have scheduled another one to kick off winter term. Save the date and bring your lunch! We will gather at the UO Baker Downtown Center Canada classroom after the International Relations discussion group and before the Dipping into the Digital World session. Coffee, tea, and an assortment of cold drinks will be provided. Field Trip--First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare Friday, January 22, 11:00 a.m., 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. The UO Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is the first stop for the Folger Shakespeare Library's national traveling exhibition, First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare. The exhibition, organized to commemorate the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death, will be at the museum January 6­February 7. Admission to the museum will be free to allow more
members of campus and community the opportunity to see the exhibition. OLLI-UO members also have an opportunity to visit the exhibit as members of one of three guided tours on Friday, January 22. UO Associate Professor of English, Lara Bovilsky, will lead the OLLI tour groups. Each of our groups will be limited to a maximum of 15 participants, preregistration will be required. Please contact the OLLI-UO office at 541-346-0697 to reserve your place. The Most Talented Man of the Century Wednesday, January 27, 1:00 p.m. He was born in Malaga, Spain. He could draw before he could talk. He was a tiny child with an enormous name and an equally large capacity to see artful design in everything. By the time he was 14 he was accepted to the prestigious School of Fine Arts in Barcelona, He chafed at classical rules and sketched incessantly the people and the streets of his adopted city. In Madrid, at the Royal Academy, he considered Velasquez's and Michelangelo's work "the same old stuff." Back in Barcelona he made friends with radicals and intellectuals at a cafй called "The Four Cats." He began a lifelong practice of breaking the rules and inventing new art. At the turn of the twentieth century, he moved to Paris where he began his "Blue Period," distinguished by works of isolation and anguish. After meeting Gertrude Stein, he began a "Rose Period," marked by prosperity and his love of a striking Parisian model. By the end of the first decade of the twentieth century, he had met and formed an artistic alliance with
10 | January 2016
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon
Eugene/Springfield
Georges Braque. The two began to break persons and objects into sharply geometric shapes and depicted them from multiple perspectives at the same time in any given work. This was entirely new--and little understood at the time. It became known as Cubism. Two world wars, the advent of Surrealism, and new interests in sculpture, ceramics, and theatre filled much of his later years. He moved to Mougins in the south of France, where his house overflowed with hundreds of paintings, sculptures, tapestries and rugs from his hand. At his death in 1973, he remained the titan of the twentieth century art world. He signed his many works simply, Picasso. Join us to explore the world of this genius when Helene-Carol Brown presents Picasso. Writing as Discovery Tuesday, February 2, 11:30 a.m. Join new OLLI member George Kaufman in a six-session, once-aweek writing course starting February 2, at 11:30 a.m. Writing is conversation with words. Our life experiences have made us into teachers, students and observers, all rolled into one. In this course, you will have the opportunity to write from what you know, get in touch with what you feel, and let your words flow without the interference of your "self critic." The class will include writing exercises, techniques, and assignments for the next session. There will be opportunities to share what you have written, but only if you choose to share. Some of the elements of writing that will be addressed are metaphor and simile, style, memoir writing, and
Haiku. You may wish to read Writing from the Heart by Nancy Aronic. Class instructor George Kaufman earned degrees from Columbia University and Yale Law School. He is the author of the book Balancing Life and Work, which was published by the American Bar Association. He has taught courses at the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Esalen, New York Open Center, and Pelican Cove Internal University. If you are interested in participating in this short course, please sign up in the OLLI-UO office. This course is limited to 25 participants. If you have questions, please contact George at [email protected] or call him at 845-532-4725. New Year's Resolutions: Not too Late to Volunteer at OLLI-UO! Happy New Year! I hope you had a wonderful holiday season and are ready for a great year of participation in the learning and social opportunities at OLLI-UO. Thank you for your continued support. In the past few years we have asked for donations and raised over $85,000, which allows us to keep our membership fees low and to look at funding activities that we have not been able to afford. This year, we're asking you to put OLLI-UO into your New Year's resolutions and volunteer some of your time and effort to support and improve our programs. As you're aware, we are a volunteer run organization. Although we have wonderful staff help from UO Academic Extension--from Program Director Ruth Heller to parttime help from the Academic Extension office, technical, and financial staff-- planning and running the program depends on the members of OLLI-UO.
There are many ways in which you can help. These range from serving on the Governing Council, the Program Committee, and the Membership Committee to facilitating a group, giving a lecture, teaching a short course, helping with program planning, and helping with events. If you are not already a volunteer, please consider giving some time and effort to keep OLLI-UO the great organization it is. Volunteering not only gives you the satisfaction of contributing actively to a strong, vibrant OLLI organization, but is also a great way to make new friends and have fun doing so. This winter, the Program Committee will be hosting a Volunteer Opportunity event to showcase the many ways in which OLLI-UO members can help. We will be setting up "Think Tanks" which will meet periodically to help the Program Committee identify topics and speakers for future lectures or courses. Part of this event will also be training for anyone willing to serve as a "course manager," those members who invite speakers and help with introductions and the question-and-answer session after a presentation. You can also sign up to help with OLLI-UO events such as new member recruitment, parties, and other events requiring more help. Please attend this event if you can. If not, just let us know what you're interested in doing. You may wish to attend a committee meeting to see if you're interested in joining. You decide what, when, and how much you can do to give back to OLLI-UO and make 2016 a very special year. Thanks. Beate Galda, 2015 Program Committee Co-chair
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon
January 2016 | 11
L earning Circle Monthly Schedule Monday 9:30 a.m. Creative Writing Critique: first and third weeks 9:30 a.m. Philosophy Salon: second and fourth weeks 11:30 a.m. Solutions: second and fourth weeks 12:15 p.m. Beginning Spanish: weekly 3:30 p.m. French Language: weekly Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Understanding Science: first, third, and fifth weeks 3:00 p.m. Interpretive Play Reading: first and third weeks Wednesday 9:30 a.m. International Relations: first and third weeks 10:00 a.m. Historical Novels and Nonfiction: second and fourth weeks Thursday 9:30 a.m. Classics/Philosophy: first Thursday 9:30 a.m. News and Views: second and fourth weeks 9:30 a.m. Poetry Writing: third week 11:30 a.m. Thinking Allowed: first and third weeks 1:30 p.m. Short Story Discussions: first and third weeks 1:30 p.m. Music Appreciation: second and fourth weeks 3:15 p.m. Spanish Conversation: weekly Friday 11:00 a.m. Intermediate Spanish: weekly, off site 12 | January 2016
ACADEMIC EXTENSION Osher Lifelong Learning Institute 1277 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1277
Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Eugene, OR Permit No. 63
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon Active Minds for Active Lives http://osher.uoregon.edu
A Travel Opportunity for OLLI Members Have you ever wanted to take a river cruise on the Danube? What about exploring points of interest in Prague? If you've wanted to travel to the Czech Republic, Austria, Slovakia and Hungary but haven't known where to start here is an opportunity for you! Grand Circle Travel is offering a river cruise exclusively to OLLI members. OLLI- UO and eight other Osher
Lifelong Learning Institutes from around the country are sharing the opportunity for an excursion that can take you to all of these places with our members. Call or stop by the EugeneSpringfield or Central Oregon offices, or pick up a flier in the classrooms at either site for more information and the tour code. Grand Circle Travel will handle all registration, payment, and trip arrangements.
An equal-opportunity, affirmative-action institution committed to cultural diversity and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. This publication will be made available in accessible formats upon request. Accommodations for people with disabilities will be provided if requested in advance. © 2016 University of Oregon. AE #12519 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon

File: the-oregon-sage.pdf
Title: Osher Lifelong Learning at the University of Oregon Newsletter
Author: University of Oregon
Subject: September OLLI Newsletter
Published: Tue Dec 22 08:09:34 2015
Pages: 12
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