Becoming a Superhero in the Classroom, LA Riffel

Tags: students, Seminars Corporation, contingencies, student, negative behavior, Whole School, Behavior Doctor Seminars Corporation, school vacation, paper placemats, your child, bulletin board
Content: Becoming a Superhero in the Classroom
By Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D. ©2014-2015 www.behaviordoctor.org [email protected] A Product of Behavior Doctor Seminars Corporation ISBN- 978-1-304-26707-8
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This book Becoming a Superhero in the Classroom FY15 Distributed by www.lulu.com for Behavior Doctor Seminars Published July 29, 2014 Author: Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.
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Putting on your CAPE Connections Affirmations Positive Praise Education
You do know what you will get in your classroom, unlike Forrest Gump's Box of chocolates:
Sensory Integration ADHD Other Health Impaired Speech and Language Impaired Specific learning disabilities Hard of Hearing Intellectual Disabilities Emotional Behavior Disorders
16% 10% 2.2% 20.5% 20% 1.3% 11.6% 8.6%
90.2% of your classroom
Functions of Behavior To Gain Attention: Peers Adults Access to preferred items or environmental controls Sensory Integration (Input)
To Escape Work/Tasks/chores People Adults Peers (Think bullying) Pain Emotional Physical Sensory (Overload)
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Sample Competing Pathway Chart for Changing Behavior
Less class disruptions
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Perceived Lack of Attention from Adults
Student blurts out in class and gets whole class off task
Attention for appropriate behaviors 8 Gets peer and adult attention
Greet students at door and give attention on front side of class time Give student helping job in class so they get adult and peer attention Allow student to choose class prize for group contingency group reward
Student is taught technique to keep from blurting (using a fidget to help with impulsivity)
Give tons of behavior specific praise for appropriate behavior. Ignore blurts and use proximity- but no verbal to guide student to use new tool to help with blurting.
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Connections Touch the students at the door with a high five or hand shake. Use their name in a positive way. Make eye contact. Smile. T U M S
It soothes the stomach- it soothes relationships. My articles on the topic: Recognize Alternatives to Use of Seclusion Special Ed Connection on May 2, 2012 Today's School Psychologist, January 2013 A study found if teachers greeted their students at the door, it increased on-task behavior from 45-72% (Allday & Pakurar, 2007).
Affirmations Remember Stuart Smalley from Saturday Night Live? He would look in the mirror and say, "You're good enough." "You're strong enough." And "Gosh darn it, people like you." As educators, we need to say: I'm good enough I'm strong enough And gosh darn it, those kids need me We also need to help children tell self-affirmations to themselves. We suggest making a list of possible self-affirmations once a month and giving students post-it notes so they can make their own. Instruct the students to put these on their mirrors and read them in the morning before they come to school and at night before they go to bed. See page 23 for affirmation suggestions for students to use. Self-esteem. When children are 6 years old, 80% of them have high self-esteem. When children are 10 years old, 20% of them have high self-esteem. When children are 17 years old, 5% of them have high self-esteem. (Canfield, 2005).
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The Four P's for Raising Self Esteem. Research conducted on over 1000 students in Kansas and Oklahoma proved positive results for every student using this formula. Proficiency- analyze what social and academic skills the student is lacking o Pre-teach upcoming lessons in a check-in/check-out private setting o Pre-teach needed skills in a check-in/check-out private setting Public relations- secretly devise ways to make this child look good in front of others o Draw their name out of the cup to be the teacher helper o Draw their name out of the cup to choose the class prize for the day Power- Help the child learn how to have power over their own emotions o Yoga breathing o Stress balls etc. Philanthropy- Help the child participate in school philanthropy, community philanthropy and world philanthropy. o Help a smaller child o Help School Collect Harvester's cans during the holidays o www.freerice.com ­ every correct answer earns free rice for starving villager. Positive Praise Are you Bill or Walter? All praise should be behavior specific. "Good job", does not tell a student what they did that was correct and it doesn't teach other students what behavior is of value. We need to say things like: "Wow, holding the door open for someone whose arms were full is being respectful of others." "Wonderful, picking up paper off the floor and putting it in the wastepaper basket is being responsible and respectful of the environment." "Good job respecting others by raising your hand and waiting to be called." Love Notes. Every single day, every single student. Every year we taught I used Love Notes. Every night I would fill out a love note for each student using little post-it notes. The Love Notes would look like this: Dear Johnny, I love the way you:
Love, Mrs. Riffel
As the day went on, I would keep these with me and pull them out and write something on each student's Love Note. At the end of the day, I would either read them out loud or pass them out
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(depending on the age of the students I had in my class). At the secondary level, I did five students a day per hour and then passed them out on Friday. Not one student ever threw them away in front of me or acted like they didn't care about it. At the secondary level, I did 5 students a day and gave them out on Friday. When you have 25-30 students every 50 minutes it is too hard to do all of them every single day. Older students can wait longer for feedback than younger students. Jen Ratio. What is your Jen Ratio? Positives to Negatives, how many positives and how many negatives come into your life on a daily basis? What comes in- comes back out. The same is true of students. What comes in to them, comes out of them. Watching 1 hour of television in the evening might net a result of 13 negatives and 2 positives in an hour. That would be a Jen Ratio of 2/15 or 13% which is a very low Jen Ratio. Multiply that times four hours of television and the Jen Ratio becomes worse. Take an average playground scenario at an elementary school: Two kids are playing tag and laughing Two kids are shooting basketballs and high fiving their successes Two kids are doing flips on the bars and giggling Two kids are over in the corner whispering about how clumsy the girls doing flips are. The Jen Ratio is 6/8 or a Jen Ratio of 75% which is a much better Jen Ratio. We want to shoot for a Jen Ratio of 80%. That means for every 1 negative or correction in the classroom, should be followed by four positives. Education There is a definition of education in the dictionary, but it is so much more than a definition out of the dictionary. In the classroom education really means: Communication Ambiance Pace Expectations Communication. Send home a newsletter every Friday with your lesson plans for the following week. Condense it to a front and back page piece of paper and send with students. Be sure to put in reminders for supplies and permission slips. Remind parents of "A" week or "B" week and give highlights or pictures from the previous week. I liked to hide notes in the newsletter for extra credit. Bring in an empty toilet paper roll for 2 points in Art (Little things like that). Here are some more facts you might like to send home:
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The amount of sleep required for children you teach- You can find this on http://www.webmd.com/parenting/guide/sleep-children Each hour a child watches television is a 7% decrease in classroom engagement http://healthland.time.com/2010/05/03/negative-long-term-effects-of-too-much-tv-asa-toddler/ Homework help- https://www.khanacademy.org/profile - Great information to help parents and children build skills Try this homework assignment ­ check out www.mathalicious.com and the unit on Jenratio o The students will watch television and tally the number of negatives they hear and the number of positives they hear. o The students will then figure their Jen-Ratio. o This might help them see why watching too much TV is a bad thing Mistakes. Every year, I painted the word misteaks on the wall and purposely misspelled the word. I would write Misteaks are Learning Opportunities. I would wait for a student to notice the word was misspelled and then I would model how we check spelling in the dictionary (I know old school- now I could go to dictionary.com). Then I would get out a can of red paint and cross out Misteaks and spell it correctly with the red paint. Then we would have a discussion about my expecting them to make mistakes throughout the year and that it was okay to make mistakes as long as they learned from them. I told them it was a child's job to make mistakes and to learn from them. I told them I made mistakes all the time and that I learned from them. I wanted to create an environment where the students felt safe to take chances with their writing, with their creativity, and to push themselves to learn something each day. Zeroes. Don't accept zero papers. Institute ZAP in your room. Zeroes Aren't Permitted. Get some blue sparkle eye shadow. When a student turns in a zero paper, smear a little blue sparkle eye shadow on the paper and write- That's okay. I put some ZAP detergent on it, so you can run it through again and it will be good as new. If students figure out they can turn in zero work, they will turn in zero work. The blue eye shadow ZAP detergent makes it kind of funny when they want to be mad, so they'll work for it. Three Stars and a Wish. This is another way to teach students that it's not one and done with writing. No good writer ever sat down and completed a novel in one setting. When students turn in a writing paper, do not circle every little thing that is wrong with it. The kids do not read those comments anyway, they turn it over and look for a grade and then they file it. Write three stars, three things they did well on the paper. Draw a line and point them out on the paper. Then write one wish. The one wish is one thing you'd like them to add or change on the paper. It might look like this: The spacing of your cursive handwriting really made it easy for me to read. The action words you chose in this sentence were extremely vivid. The way you used personification helped me visualize the setting. Way to go. Try adding some more detail to the main characters. I can't wait to read it again. When that paper comes back, do the same thing again with different stars and one new wish. I wish you would add some adjectives to your nouns and give them an example.
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Continue in this fashion until you have a work of art. By doing this the student will have learned truly how to write and all the topics you had in your agenda will be covered. Ambiance Colors. Colors chosen for the classroom are very important. If your room is a "hot" color like red, orange, bright yellow or bright white ask if you can paint your room. Many schools will provide the paint if you provide the labor. Deeper shades of blue are the most calming. Think about too much color when you do your bulletin boards. I always liked to use fabric to cover my bulletin boards because it didn't fade like the paper and I could leave it up all year. However, seven different bulletin boards with different print material backgrounds will have the students feeling antsy. You might try solid colors with a wild zebra stripe boarder around all the different colors if you really want to be wild. Every year, I liked to paint a mural on my wall. One year, I painted a rainforest with parrots and lemurs, and all sorts of bright colorful butterflies etc. in the jungle. Everything was a jungle theme. That year the children had a lot of energy and were pretty active. I had the same students the next year and I painted a medium blue and deep blue ocean theme with dolphins and whales and subdued colors of fish. The children were much calmer that year. Seating. I found over the years the best seating arrangement to be a "U" shape with me in the middle. This way all the students were in the front row, or close to the front row if I had to double row the "U". It was still easy for the students to turn their desks into "Think, Pair Share groups" or "Cooperative groups" if we needed. It just takes some coordinating so the students know which way to turn their desks. Color coding the name tags on the desks can really be beneficial in helping them know which way to go. With 24 students, choose 12 colors of name tags and have every two desks match in color. If you have a 25th student or an odd number have three desks together (no one wants to pair with the teacher all the time). Four groups of four have a shape in the right hand corner of the name tag and have all the squares get together, all the circles get together, all the triangles get together, all the hexagons get together, all the crescents get together etc. Bulletin Boards. Using the components of Feng Shui in the classroom your room should have the following colors in the following places: (Turn the diagram so it matches up with where your doorway is in your room)
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Purple bulletin board Clinic or Spa area Posters of nature 60 bpm music Relaxation posters Water feature Blue bean bag Green bulletin board Round wooden table Student pictures Blue bulletin board Pictures of heroes
Red bulletin board Battery operated candle Gotcha tallies Social information Yellow rug Doorway should be navy Pictures of class Pictures of you outside school
Pink bulletin board Team points Team divisions if using whole brain teaching White bulletin board White round table White metal clock Extended learning games Gray bulletin board Silver box Wind chime Globe
Explanation of each area: Purple (This is your "hokey pokey" clinic "Where you turn yourself around.") o Clinic or Spa area- Don't think of this as a "time-out" corner ­ but a place to get your thoughts together. Students will use it on their own without disrupting the class if you set it up this way. o Posters of nature- Pictures of nature are anxiety reducing and most students who are upset are anxious about something. o 60 bpm music- The resting heart rate is 60 bpm and yet we find students who are aggressive tend to have heart rates that range in the average of 147 bpm. Music therapy suggests our hearts will match the music we are listening to. Play 60 bpm in this area or have a headphone and music available for students to listen to while getting themselves turned around. o Relaxation posters- Have posters about breathing back in this area. For example a simple breathing technique like putting your tongue behind your two front teeth, closing your mouth and breathing in for a four count and out for a four count through your nose. If repeated 10 times it will slow your breathing down. Another technique for reducing an obsessive thought is to put your five fingers on your forehead and lifting each one up and back down two times. As you do this look up toward each finger. This action will help erase the obsessive thought. o Water feature- Running water is calming. A small fountain plugged in near this area will help students relax and get their thoughts together so they can come back to the area cool, calm and collected. o Blue bean bag- Your blue bean bag should be made of pleather for several reasons: 1) it's a cool material and 2) it's less likely to absorb critters of the lice variety. When students are upset they tend to get hot, sitting into the cool bean bag will help cool them down, it's a nice sensory hug without touching someone. Red Bulletin Board o Battery operated candle- Candles make places seem homey. Since the fire marshal frowns on real candles, a battery operated one will work.
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o Gotcha tallies- This is important information. In your school, the teachers will be giving out "gotchas" if you are a PBIS school and it is nice to keep a tally of how many tallies have been received by the room or the hour. Do not post individual names with tallies aside them because this would cause hurt feelings. Keep those tallies private and let other teachers know when a student has not received a tally for a while so they can catch them being good. If you are not a PBIS school, this can be where you keep your compliment board. We will discuss compliment board in the group contingency-group reward area below. o Social information- This is where you should post information about upcoming events that might be of interest to parents and students, the lunch calendar, and school vacation information etc. Pink bulletin board- This does not have to be a bulletin board. It can be a piece of pink tag board that is laminated. This area is for your group vs. group contingency. We will describe that in the contingency reward section below under group vs. group contingency. o Team points- You might have your class divided into the North vs. the South if you are a history teacher, or the peanut butters and the jellies if you are a kindergarten teacher. You might also have four groups instead of two based on how the students are grouped in cooperative grouping situations. o Team divisions if using whole brain teaching- Label the teams in this area and who is on what team. If you are a secondary teacher, you can even have the teams be Hour One, Hour Two, Hour Three and so on. Green bulletin board- This does not have to be a bulletin board either- you can use a green piece of tag board which is laminated. Ask students to bring in pictures of themselves to put up in the room. This gives it a homey feel and makes the students feel like they are part of a family. o Round wooden table- This round table will be where you meet with students to discuss work or help with individual needs. o Student pictures- Send out a post card asking students to bring a picture of themselves when they come to "Sneak a Peak" night to put up on the bulletin board. This is a nice way to introduce yourself to them and as you put their picture up that night, you will get to meet them and their parents. In the center of the room, you will put a yellow rug. This will be where you will stand so your podium or presentation table will be on this yellow rug.
Desk Preparation. The following will help students who need to fidget and basically most of the students need to fidget. Put strip of Velcro under the desktop on right hand or left hand edge, or Put bathtub applique under the desktop on right hand or left hand edge
Chairs. Students need proprioceptive input. They need to move side to side and figure out where their body is in time and space. Hard wood or plastic chairs do not provide the proprioceptive movement children need; therefore, the children will get up and move around the room to gain access to sensory input. Here are some ideas to help them stay in their seats. Find cushions for the chairs
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o Air-filled Yoga-Pilates air filled disks o Kitchen cushions o Foam cushions (stadium cushions, garden kneeling pad) Go to a business like a bank and see if they have any promotional items that were stadium cushions you could use o Camping pillows o Foam disks from IKEA in the children's department (only available at the store) Banding between chair legs o Physical therapy bands o Pantyhose leg o Run band or pantyhose through center of cut down pool noodle on each chair Check out this movie on http://behaviordoctor.org/materialdownload/trainingvideos/adhdchairideas.mp4 - great ideas for accommodations that will help students who need more proprioceptive input. Wiggling Toes. Taking off your shoes and wiggle your toes reduces anxiety by 39% (Segal et al., 2013). Children and teachers in Iceland are barefoot or in their stocking feet all day. Children in Australia and New Zealand are barefoot in school. What's the first thing you do when you get home at night? Music. Music calms us all. Our heart rates match the music we hear. Aggressive students have an average heart rate of 147 bpm about 45-90 seconds prior to the aggressive act. If we play 60 beats per minute (bpm) music during high energy times, we will decrease disruptions in the room. Here are some suggestions for you: Download free nature pictures paired with 60 bpm music off this linko Go to www.behaviordoctor.org Click on the training tab. Click on material download. Scroll down to calming videos. Download this app for your Apple products: o http://www.potionfactory.com/tangerine/ o It will tell you how many beats per minute your own music is Download this app for your Windows products: o http://www.beatunes.com/download-jre-win.html o It will tell you how many beats per minute your own music is Your music does not have to be exactly 60 bpm, anything between 50 and 70 should be fine. (No Alice Cooper). You can also Google Search "music set at 60 bpm" and whole list of popular tunes will come up for you. Lights. We know fluorescent lights exacerbate behavior of some students; however, it is what we use in schools because it is inexpensive. Here are some ideas to help you overcome that condition. Your headaches will thank you. Fluorescent lights- check out www.huelight.net ­ write a grant at www.donorschoose.org and request panels for your classroom If you cannot get the special panels which decrease the flickering and glare from the fluorescent lights, try having the custodian remove every other bulb so it decreases the glare and flicker in the room Standing work station. Some students prefer to stand when doing their work. This should not be offered as a punishment. A tall bar height table, a cut off podium with an old desk top
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attached, or a standing work station can be purchased if money is available. Here's a website with a lot of pictures of desks readers have made for their own home use: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/03/readers-standing-desks_n_1841194.html Story of David. Don't forget the story of David, the kindergarten student. Think about food smells, stuffy smells, perfume, noises from fluorescent lights, noises from chairs scooting on the floor, too much visual distraction, and any sensory influence can affect behavior. Pace Downtime. Downtime is a killer in the classroom. Any time the teacher does not have their ducks in a row and wastes a minute of class time it is easy for students to get off track. I remember when I was working the theatre and we would turn the lights off right before the show started, my stagecraft teacher taught us that one minute in the dark was equal to five to the audience. I sort of think it is the same way for students in the classroom. One minute "in the dark" is equal to five minutes to the students. Have all your papers lined up in a row ready to go. Make sure everything is in easy reach. Games. Use games to keep students engaged. I have gathered as many games as possible on this link: Go to www.behaviordoctor.org Click on the training tab. Click on material download. Scroll down to Games Who Wants to be a Millionaire? Jeopardy Are YOU Smarter Than a Fifth Grader? Check out the book Reality is Broken: How Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World by Jane McGonigal (2011). Also, check out this video by Ali Carr-Chellmann: Gaming to Re-Engage Boys in Learning. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23Uuehgmd14 Whole Brain Teaching. Chris Biffle has produced a wonderful website filled with examples and templates for beginning Whole Brain Teaching (WBT). You can even get free professional development points for watching his learning modules. www.wholebrainteaching.com Also, you can type in "Whole Brain Teaching" in www.youtube.com and find many samples from preschool through college. There really is no way the students could not be engaged in this scenario. Flipping Your Classroom. A Flipped Classroom is one where the teacher models, demonstrates and teaches through videotaped lessons. The students watch it for "homework". This way, they can listen and learn, fast forward through the things they already know, and/or replay the things they didn't understand. The teacher then spends class time going around the room and working individually with the students to ensure they are practicing the new skills. They can give extra support to those who struggle, check progress on typically developing students and provide enrichment for those that are further along than the mainstream. Here is a great video on flipping your classroom: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojiebVw8O0g Here's a link that discusses it in more detail from Poudre, Colorado school district: http://www.psdschools.org/academics/instructional-technology/teacher-resources/flipped-classroom Expectations
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First Words. What is the first word a baby learns after mama and dada? The first words are usually "NO" after mama and dada. That is because a child hears that word all the time. What we have found is that students tune this word out along with the words "stop", "quit", and "don't". For some students, the words that come after those words gives them a laundry list of ideas to get the teacher's attention. Remember the story of my brother and how it changed my mother's parenting style forever. Tell Kids What To Do. We need to tell kids what we expect of them, not what we don't expect of them. We have to follow these guidelines: 3-5 words that are positively stated and easy to remember There has to be an action word associated with it- it can't just be a motto o Be All You Can Be is a motto- there is no action visualized with those words o Be Respectful of Others- is an expectation- we can start to visualize what that really means. We have to TIPP the behavior in our favor by doing the following once we have our expectations. o Teach it- We can't just say "be good". We have to teach the kids what we really mean using head, heart, and hands. What do we want them to think? What do we want them to feel? What do we want them to do with their hands and feet? o Imprint it- Imprint by modeling. We can't say "be respectful" and then turn around show disrespect in any fashion. o Practice it- We have to take them to all the areas of the school and have the students practice the new skills. It is worth taking the time. o Praise it- When we see good examples of those behaviors, we have to label it by saying, "Wow, picking up trash and putting it where it belongs is being responsible." Use Video Modeling. Check out www.pbisvideos.com for ideas of great video samples schools use to teach and re-teach behaviors. Once these videos are made and archived, they can be pulled out for "Tuesday Tune-ups", or reviewed with one or two students who are having trouble remembering the expectations. It's important to make your own because the students will relate to it better. See samples of schools practicing the behavior with their students on the same website. Use Video Self-Modeling. The use of video self-modeling works well for one or two students who are having difficulties. Rather than school models of whole groups, it is individualized for one child and shows the child only engaging in the appropriate behavior. The movie is approximately one minute for every year old the child is. The staff should work on one behavior at a time in this video. It should be shown in the morning before the child comes to school and during the day at school and then again after school, so the parents can quiz the child on how well they did at following the expectations. To see more samples of Video Self-Modeling, type in www.youtube.com and then type in "video self-modeling". There are a lot of good examples. Social Autopsy. The use of social autopsies are more relevant than a "think sheet". Here is why: 1) the tool on page 26 can be used with preschool through teenagers (preschoolers draw pictures and adults write narrative script), 2) it includes the trigger and the solution, 3) it is
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laminated and put in a folder for students to use (not filed in principal file cabinet, 4) teachers cue student with a cue word to take it out to remember new plan. Behavior Specific Praise. Be sure to praise the good behavior and not just give a generic "good job". The reason we give out "gotchas" in Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is to label the appropriate behavior. When we say to a student, "I like the way you held the door open for Mrs. Fine when her hands were full. That is being respectful of others." We are teaching all the students within earshot what it means to be respectful. They do not learn these things on television, listening to the radio, or playing their video games. We must teach them by labeling the behaviors when we see it. The more we catch the being good, the more others will be good. Getting the Students Hooked Caped Crusader C (contingencies) A (awards) P (points) E (encouragements Contingencies. Contingencies are "if" "then" statements. If this happens, you will earn this. If the whole school earns 1000 gotchas this week, we will have Friday be a homework free night for the whole school. If we have zero office discipline referrals, the principal will dress up like Zorro or Zero the Hero. The lunch room table with the most tallies will get to choose the teachers and choose the dance they will perform Friday morning. Awards. There should be three levels of awards in every school and every classroom. I like for gotchas to be in triplicate. One copy goes home to the parents so the parents can compliment and discuss good behavior with their children. One copy goes to the home-room teacher which can be saved for cash-in points. One copy goes to the principal, so the school can keep track of who has what number of gotchas and the principal will draw from this pile each day for special awards- like sitting in the principal's chair. These are the categories we have found students prefer: Quality time with adults or peers Escape from a task or chore Earning special privileges Physical touch ­ like a high five or hand shake Earning leadership roles Social praise Special assistance (help with something hard) Tangibles (school supplies)
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Point. The contingencies should point the students in the right direction- towards the positive. We have learned that it does not work to threaten the students. If you do this (negative behavior), you will lose your recess or you will get an after school detention. It works better to say this "If you do this (positive behavior) you will earn this reward." Encourage. Give booster shots to encourage appropriate behavior. Whatever was a problem the week before, the team should use as a booster shot on Tuesday Tune-up and show video modeling or teach a lesson on that particular infraction and what the positive would look like, sound like, and feel like. Use Contingencies and Rewards
Here are some examples of contingencies and rewards: Whole School Level o Class Versus Class o Whole School Versus Staff o Individual Earns Award from Staff (Gotchas, CEO awards etc.) Classroom Level o Whole Group Versus Teacher o Group versus Group o Individual Award Earned From Teacher Whole School Examples: 32 pages of ideas are on the bottom of the following page: Go to www.behaviordoctor.org Click on the training tab. Click on material download. Scroll down to Rewards.
Classroom Ideas Group Contingencies- Group Rewards (Worksheet page 25) The summer before you begin using this technique stop at garage sales in your area. Many of the items you might want for group contingencies can be purchased for a few dollars. If several of you are starting your teaching career together, you might want to meet for breakfast on Saturday morning and then head out to hit the garage sales. Most of the items on this list can be shared between two or three teachers. You will be looking for things that can be used to make good behavior a fun game. Group contingencies: Group rewards is about getting the students working together to earn a group prize. Use things like:
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Mr. Potato Head o As you catch the students being good as a whole class, draw one name out of your student pick jar and have that student come up and add a piece to "blank" Mr. Potato Head. Once he is all put together the students get a prize.
Cootie Bug o As you catch the students being good as a whole class, draw one name out of your student pick jar and have that student come up and add a piece to a "blank" cootie bug. Once he/she is all put together the students get a prize. www.tinyurl.com/homeworkopoly o This is a free download that looks like a Monopoly game o As you catch the class being good in returning their homework, you move the pieces on the game board and the students earn prizes Scratch off tickets o Use this as the reward portion of the group contingencies- when they have the Potato Head put together or the marble jar lit up etc., they get to scratch off a prize. Mix two parts airplane model paint with 1 part dishwashing detergent Draw bubble letters on a piece of tag board Write a prize inside each letter Laminate the bubble letters Paint over the letters Let dry- will take more than one night for it to dry Students can scratch off
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Barrel of Monkeys o Purchase any color of barrel of monkeys, they are available for less than $10 at toy discount stores o Put a self-stick hook on the white board up near the top Put one of the monkeys hanging up on the hook As you catch the students being good, add a monkey When the monkeys reach the silver tray, the whole class wins a prize
Links on a chain o Dollar stores have giant links for babies. They are very colorful and link together o Do the same thing as the Barrel of Monkeys, but with links o During months that are more difficult for behavior, use smaller links and that way you can catch more kids being good
Angry Birds o http://pinterest.com/pin/65794844526127798/ o http://pinterest.com/pin/108508672241479053/ o http://pinterest.com/pin/22236591879621123/ o http://pinterest.com/pin/174866398001635953 Plastic Sink Strainer- Ribbons- Weaving good behavior in the classroom o Purchase a plastic sink strainer at a dollar store o Gather left over ribbons and attach them to the top of the sink strainer o As students are caught being good, draw one student's name to come "weave a row for good behavior"
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o When the whole strainer is woven, the class earns a prize Brownie Points Aluminum cookie sheet Brownies run off from "pictures on Microsoft Office". o Make the appropriate size so that 12 of them will fit on the cookie sheet Laminate the brownies and put a magnet on the back. Marble Run- Made from a Pool Noodle o Purchase a pool noodle from the dollar store o Cut it in half hot dog way (the long way) o Attach it to the silver tray under the white board o Put each end into a clear Tupperware square and label one "A" and one "B" o Get two big shooter marbles and set them on the silver tray o You'll choose two students from your name cup and give each a marble. o Whichever one lands first is the winning prize. Mystery Motivator
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Like hangman- students flip over letters to find out what the reward they earned Marbles in a jar- light it up o Purchase marbles, clear flat rocks, or jelly beans they have at the dollar store and a clear glass mason jar. o As you catch the kids being good, you will add marbles I used this type of system: 3 marbles if another teacher complimented my students 5 marbles if the principal complimented my students 2 marbles if I complimented the whole class 1 marble if I complimented one student- they earned it for the whole class Right before the last marble is about to be entered to the jar, take all the marbles out while the kids are gone. Sneak in a strand of Christmas lights and hide the cord on the back side of a book shelf. Plug the lights into a power strip with a switch turned "OFF" When the last marble goes in, move your foot to the switch and light up the jar. The kids' eyes will pop out of their head and they will want to do it again. Piggy bank jar of good choices o Purchase a small piggy bank and use pennies o When the piggy bank is full, the students earn the prize
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CD Tower- used as a spinner with pie shaped prizes o Once the students have earned a prize, one student's name is drawn and that student gets to spin the wheel to see what prize the students win Pot holder loops o Put tons of pot holder loops in your pockets o As you catch individual students being good, hand them a pot holder loop to wear as a bracelet o Give behavior specific praise as you hand the student a loop o At the end of the day walk around the room with a container and collect all the pot holder loops and count them as you pick the loops up. Have a set number in mind that you have shared with the students and if they reach that number, they earn the number of pot holder loops they earn the class prize
Smarty Pants I purchased a Smarty Pant game online at Ebay for several dollars. I use the plastic pants as a holder. When students get caught being good, they get to add their name to the Smarty Pants I can draw a name from the pants for any number of prizes including being able to spin the prize wheel, or drop a marble down the marble run A real prize the students like is the ability to sit in the teacher's chair
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student teacher Rating Sheet See pages (29-37). Tie your student teacher rating sheet into check-in/check-out (Hawken, 2011). Here's a modified flow chart of what that would look like:
Earned reward
Parent report to school
Go over daily graphed points working towards
Home checkin
Graph points
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Workbook Section
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Workbook Page One: Self-Affirmations for Students Work on teaching students to make self-affirmations. Here are a list of self-affirmations: I am good enough. I deserve to have good grades. I am capable. I will do well on my tests. I will be ready for tests. I'm dependable. I will be well rested. I will eat good foods so my body is healthy. I will exercise my brain, so I do well in classes. I will practice my breathing so I am cool, calm, and collected for my classes. No fight is worth losing privileges over. I am better than any petty disagreement. I am strong. I am patient. I am responsible. I turn in work that I am proud of every time. I believe in myself. Any negativity that comes to me today- will be returned to sender. I am going to build my dream, if not someone will hire me to build theirs. I don't stumble over my past. s w I am a tudent ith Aspirations of Greatness. I have SWAG
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Workbook Page Two: Competing Pathway Chart (Sample on page 3)
What is the goal behavior?
What adult or peer behaviors will reinforce this behavior in the long term?
What event or setting takes place prior to the target behavior? (Antecedent)
What behavior are you targeting to change? (Behavior)
What adult or peer behaviors are reinforcing this behavior? (Negative or positive reinforcement) (Consequences)
What settings/contexts/antecede nts can you modify to make proactive changes in the environment to make the target behavior unnecessary?
What new behaviors might you teach to the student to replace the current target behaviors?
How might you change the adult behavior regarding the original target behavior and the new replacement behaviors?
Adapted from O'Neill and Horner, 2005
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Workbook Page Three: Group Contingencies and Group Rewards (Pages 15-20) Day 1: Contingency to try:_____________________________________________________ Reward to Earn: ______________________________________________________ Day 2: Contingency to try:_____________________________________________________ Reward to Earn: ______________________________________________________ Day 3: Contingency to try:_____________________________________________________ Reward to Earn: ______________________________________________________ Day 4: Contingency to try:_____________________________________________________ Reward to Earn: ______________________________________________________ Day 5: Contingency to try:_____________________________________________________ Reward to Earn: ______________________________________________________
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Workbook Page Four: Social Autopsy (from page 13) (based on the work of Rick LaVoie, 2005) CSI
Here's what was Here's what I
Here's what
going on:
did that caused a happened when
social error:
I did that:
Here's what I should do to make things right:
Here's my plan for next time it happens:
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Workbook Page 5: The Four P's for Raising Self Esteem (from page 4 & 5)
Proficiency (What skills are they lacking?)
Public Relations (How can we make them look good?)
Student
Power (How can we give them power over their emotions?)
Philanthropy (How can we set them up to help others?)
Start Date:_____________________________ Baseline grades _______________________________________________________ Baseline target behavior _________________________________________________ Probe Date (one month later):_____________________________ Probe grades _______________________________________________________ Probe target behavior _________________________________________________
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Worksheet Page Six: Three Stars and a Wish (page 7) (Alternative Journal Entry) (From John Morris, 2009) One thing that went really well this week: Second thing that went really well this week: Third thing that went really well this week:
One thing I wish had gone differently this week:
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Workbook Page Seven: Student Teacher Rating Sheet (page 20 and 21)
Student Name:_____________________________________________
Date:____________________________________________________
Keep hands and feet to self
Hour One TS
Hour Two TS
Hour Three TS
Hour Four TS
Hour Five TS
Hour Six Hour Seven TSTS
Respect T S T S T S T S T S T S T S personal space between each other
Turn
TS TS TS TS TS TS TS
work in
on time
Accepts Score (Teacher only) Total
Total Points Earned Today: ____________________out of 84 possible Prize Earned: ________________________________________________________ Parent Signature: _____________________________________________________ Prize tomorrow for 67-84= _______________________________________________ Prize tomorrow for 58-66=_______________________________________________ Prize tomorrow for 50-57=_______________________________________________ Prize for 49 or lower=___________________________________________________
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Student Copy of Teacher Student Rating Sheet- This sheet should be laminated so the student can reuse.
Keep hands and feet to self
Hour
Hour
Hour
Hour
Hour
Hour Six Hour
One
Two
Three Four
Five
Seven
My score My score My score My score My score My score My score
Respect personal space between each other
My score
My score
My score
My score
My score
My score
My score
Turn work in on time
My score My score My score My score My score My score My score
Total from teacher's paper after we match
3= I give myself a 3 if the teacher did not have to remind me about the rule for each behavior I am working on. 2= I give myself a 2 if the teacher had to remind me a few times about the rule for each behavior I am working on. 1= I give myself a 1 if I did not remember to follow the rule at all and the teacher had to remind me more than a couple of times. Be Honest: Remember you earn points based on matching the teacher's score!
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Young Child copy of Teacher Student Rating Sheet- This sheet should be laminated so the student can reuse.
Keep hands and feet to self
Hour
Hour
Hour
Hour
Hour
Hour Six Hour
One
Two
Three Four
Five
Seven
My score My score My score My score My score My score My score
Respect personal space between each other
My score
My score
My score
My score
My score
My score
My score
Turn
My score My score My score My score My score My score My score
work in
on time
Teacher writes points on sheet for them
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Free or Inexpensive Rewards for Parents
young children 1. Assist the parent with a household chore 2. Send an email to a relative telling them what a good job they had done on a project at school. In other words, email Aunt Linda and tell her about the "A" you got on your spelling test. 3. Get to decorate paper placemats for the dining room table for dinner that evening 4. Get to choose what is fixed for dinner that night- example: "You get to choose, I can make tacos or meatloaf. Which do you want me to fix?" 5. Get to help parent fix dinner- shell peas, peel potatoes, make art out of vegetables, make ants on a log etc. 6. Get to be the first person to share 3 stars and a wish at the dinner table (3 good things that happened that day and one thing they wish had gone better.) 7. Get to create a family night activity- roller skating, hiking in the park, picnic dinner on the living room floor or under the dining room table with blankets over the top. 8. Camp out in the backyard with a parent. 9. Get a car ride to or from school instead of the bus 10. Get to have a picture framed for mom or dad's office 11. Get to choose the game the family plays together that night 12. Get to choose the story the family reads out loud together (read the classics) 13. Get to go with a parent to volunteer at a retirement home (the children will get tons of attention) 14. Get to gather old toys and take to a shelter for children who have nothing 15. Get to ask friends to bring dog and cat food to their birthday party instead of toys that will break. Take the food to a shelter the day after as a reward. They will get a ton of attention from the staff. 16. Bury treasures in a sandbox for the child to find. Put letters in plastic Easter eggs and they have to put the letters together that spell treat the child will receive. (Ideas: a walk with grandma, bike riding at the park, etc.) 17. Make special mud pies in the backyard with mom or dad or have a family contest to see who can make the best mud pie. 18. Dig shapes in the sandbox and then decorate with items found around the house. Pour inexpensive plaster of Paris into the shape and wait to dry. When it's pulled out it will be a sandy relief that can be hung on the wall (if you remember to put a paper clip in the plaster of Paris on the top before it dries ) 19. Get to go shopping with a parent as an only child. Give them a special task to look for something that you are seeking. For example: "Here's a picture of a blue blouse that I'm trying to find. Help me look for something that looks like this." 20. Take all the kids to grandma and grandpa's house except one and let that child stay home with mom and dad and be "only child" for the weekend. The other kids will get spoiled with lots of attention by grandma and grandpa and the "only child" will get lots of attention from mom and dad. (If you don't have grandma and grandpa nearby- trade with another family taking turns to keep each other's children.) 21. Download a fun recipe and let your child help you make that recipe as a surprise for the rest of the family that evening. (Put up signs that say "Secret Cooking in Progress". Must have special pass to enter the kitchen.
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22. Surprise your child with a scavenger hunt around the house. If they read, give them written clues hinting as to where the next card is hiding. At the end have them find a note that tells them their big prize. (If your child can't read, you can use pictures.) 23. Make a story on the computer with your child using Microsoft's PowerPoint program. Let your child be the star of the story. 24. Let your child take the Digital Camera out in the back yard and then come back in and turn those pictures into a story on the computer. Help them print off their book for a distant family member. 25. Go outside and collect cool leaves and flowers. Come inside and put those leaves and flowers between two sheets of wax paper. The parent will iron these two sheets together and create placemats for everyone in the family for the evening. 26. Start a family story at the dinner table and each person in the family has to tell a part of the story. The child being rewarded gets to start and end the story. 27. Let your child earn 5 minutes of either staying up later or sleeping in in the morning. Use that time to read together if they stay up later. 28. Play secretary and let your child dictate a story to you. Type up the story and send it out to some relatives who will call them and tell them how much they liked the story. 29. Write a story for your child where the child or their personal hero is a character in the story. 30. Change the screen saver on your computer to say "My child is the greatest." ...or something that would make them feel good about themselves. Do this at your office and then take a picture of it or take your child to your office on the weekend and let them see it. 31. Let your child help you do the laundry and then pay them with a special dessert for dinner. Be sure to say, "Since you helped me save time by helping me fold the laundry, I have time to make this special dessert for dinner." 32. Help your child organize their room giving them a mnemonic to help them remember where things go- for instance teach them the color order of the rainbow and then teach them to hang up their clothes in color groups matching the order of the rainbow (ROYGBIV). Later on when you catch them hanging up their clothes in the correct place draw a "rainbow" award for their good work and put it on their door as a surprise when they come home. 33. Have the bedroom fairy come while they are at school and choose the bedroom that is the neatest. Hang a fairy from the doorway of the room that is the neatest and that person gets to sit in "Dad's chair" to read that night. (Or something that would be appropriate at your house). 34. Mystery grab bag. Take an old pillow case and put slips of paper inside listing some of the prizes on this page and let the child draw out the prize they are going to get for their behavior reward. 35. Let your child dictate where you drive on the way home from a location. In other words, they have to tell you turn left here...turn right here. If they happen to steer you into a Baskin Robbins Ice Cream Parlor, it wouldn't be a horrible thing to stop and have a family treat together. 36. Give your child a special piece of jewelry that belongs to you to keep and wear for the day. (Nothing that costs a lot of money- but something that looks like it is special to you.) The child will feel special all day long. 37. Take your children to the library one at a time and give them special one on one time at the library checking out books or listening to stories. 38. Sign your child up for acting lessons (they have to have earned this privilege). Many universities offer free acting classes on the weekend for children. 39. Take your child to an art gallery and then have them draw a picture of their favorite painting or statue. Possibly stage a mini art gallery tour of the child's work for relatives who are coming to visit. Serve cheese and grape juice.
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40. Take your child to the university astronomy lab. (It is usually free). Help them place stars on the ceiling of their room in their favorite constellation. If possible they could paint the stars with "glow in the dark" paint. 41. Take your child on a nature walk and collect rocks. Bring the rocks back home and have a contest painting the rocks to look like animals. 42. Have your child collect some toys they have outgrown. Clean up the toys and take them to a local hospital children's ward and donate the toys to the ward. The child will get lots of attention and feel good. 43. Go to your local appliance store and ask them to save a refrigerator box for you. The next time your child earns a reward, give them the box and help them plan and decorate the box to turn it into anything their imagination desires. 44. Make Papier-mвchй Halloween masks by taking punch ball balloons and spreading the paper strips over the balloon shape. Make noses, horns, tongues whatever they desire and then paint when dry. You will have a unique and free Halloween costume and you will have given your child tons of attention. 45. Find an old fashioned popcorn popper (not an air popper). Spread an old sheet out on the living room floor, put a little oil in the popper and then have your children sit outside the perimeter of the sheet. Put a few kernels of popcorn in the popper and watch them fly up in the air. The kids will love watching this. For a special treat pour cinnamon sugar on the popcorn after it pops. 46. Find some light balsa wood and create a boat powered by a rubber band and paper clip paddle wheel. Make a unique sail and take the boat to a creek or lake nearby and help your child launch their boat. Be sure to take a butterfly net to retrieve the boat when it goes downstream. (Proactively, you could put an eye hook on the front of the boat and attach some fishing line to it so it can be brought back to shore. 47. Take your child fishing. It's a great place to have some really in depth conversations. 48. Take your child for a ride looking for items that start with each letter of the alphabet. Take the child's picture in front of each item that starts with that letter and then put it together as an ABC Book. For example: "This is Johnny in front of Applebees." "This is Johnny in front of BlockBuster." And so on.... 49. Check with your local humane society and see if they allow children under 18 to volunteer to feed and water the animals. (Some shelters only allow adults over 18). Let your child earn the privilege of going to the shelter to feed and water the animals. Perhaps they can walk a small dog or pet a cat. 50. Take your child to the local fire department. As long as they are not busy, they will be glad to show the child around and give them some great attention. Most children have seen a fire truck, but few have actually gone to the fire department to see what it looks like. 51. Play the "Gatekeeper Game" with your child. A description of this game is available on www.behaviordoctor.org (under books- Stork Manual page 60.) 52. Tell your children you have a surprise performance for them. Get a stocking cap and lay on a sturdy table with your head hanging chin up in the air. Cover all of your face with the stocking cap except your chin and mouth. Draw two eyeballs on your chin and then lip sync to a silly song. It looks really funny, like a little headed person with a big mouth singing. Then let your child put on a performance for you. 53. Play hide and go seek in your house in the dark. Turn out all the lights and have everyone hide. One person is "it" and they have to go around the house and find the people who are hiding. It's really a great way to help your children not be afraid of the dark. You can limit it to one or two rooms if your children are young.
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54. Ask your children if they'd rather have a dollar a day for thirty days or a penny a day that doubles each day for 30 days. In other words on day one 1 cent, day two 2 more cents, day three 4 cents and so on. Once they decide then help them figure out which one would have been the better deal. $10,737,418.23 at the end of 30 days with the double the pennies per day. 55. Give your child a nice piece of Manila paper and some wax crayons. Have them color a design on every inch of the paper- could be stripes or wavy lines- whatever they desire. Then have them cover the entire page with black crayon. They color over the entire page. Then give them a paper clip and have them open one end and scratch a cool design into the black crayon. The colors underneath will show through. Do an art gallery tour and have tea and cookies after looking at the different pictures. 56. Teach your child how to throw a football, shoot a basket, kick a field goal, hit a baseball, and putt a golf ball. Then for fun, switch hands and try to do all of those things with the opposite side of the body. 57. Find an old croquet set- probably on Ebay. Set up croquet in your yard and challenge your child to a game of croquet. The winning child gets to choose what the family eats for dinner. 58. Turn your dining room table into a cave by covering it with blankets, quilts and sheets that cover the top and sides down to the floor. Lay inside the cave and draw picture by flashlight to hang on the wall of the cave- just like the caveman drawings. You can safety pin the pictures to the "cave walls". 59. Have a talent night for the family. Have everyone keep it a secret what they are doing and then perform for each other. 60. Teach your child how to darn a sock and then turn it into a magical sock puppet. Put on puppet shows for each other. 61. Take a tension curtain rod and put it in the door frame with some old curtains attached. Let your child put on a talent show for you as they enter through the curtain. 62. Attach cork panels to a wall in the kitchen or put in a large picture frame and put a special piece of art, poetry, or an exceptional paper on the board and have the entire family view and comment at dinner on the highlighted piece. 63. Let your child design thank you cards, birthday cards, or holiday cards and use them to send to friends and relatives. Make sure they sign their work. 64. Buy your child an inexpensive digital camera and have them take pictures and then gather the family with popcorn and watch the video on your television by hooking the camera to the television or upload to the computer and attach the computer to the television. Have everyone choose a favorite photo and talk about it. 65. Have a date night with your child as an only child. Take your child out to dinner and a play or a movie.
Teenagers
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1. A gallon of paint is inexpensive. Let the child choose the color and help them paint their room. You can also buy mistake paint (colors that didn't work out for others) and let the child paint a mural on their bedroom wall. 2. Teenagers need extra-curricular activities; however, these activities are expensive. Work out a deal with the karate teacher, horse stable, art teacher, sport coach etc. Offer to provide transportation, house cleaning duties once a month, or precooked meals to get a discount on these classes for your teenager. 3. Teenagers have a difficult time with their emotions. Download yoga lessons from online and do yoga breathing exercises together as a family. Talk to your child about using these techniques when they feel tense at school. 4. Make a deal. If your child maintains the grades you agree upon, does not have any unnecessary absences, and has been agreeable, allow them to take a mental health day and stay home on a day you are home as well. Go window shopping together, fishing, go-kart riding, or whatever would float your child's boat. My mother did this with us when we were children and I still remember these days fondly. 5. Let your teenager play their music during dinner and talk to you about why they like each song that plays. 6. Watch an old black and white classic movie together and talk about how movies have changed. My children loved "Harvey" with Jimmy Stewart when they were teenagers. 7. Write half a story or poem and let your teenager write the other half. Submit the story for publication. 8. Scan your teenager's papers or art work and have them bound in a book (www.lulu.com has inexpensive binding available). Present the book to your teenager at a special dinner. 9. Make a scrap book of your teenager and their friends with ticket stubs and pictures and present at a surprise party. 10. Save your change for a year. Let your teenager choose what to do with that money. One family that I know saved enough to take a family of six to Disneyland. 11. One of the greatest gifts you can give to a teenager is to teach them charity. Sign up to work in a soup kitchen, nursing home, or other similar area and work with them once a month. 12. Organize a neighborhood football or basketball game "oldies" vs. "youngsters" or "men" vs. "women" and then have a block barbecue afterwards. 13. Let them drive the "good" car for a special occasion. 14. Surprise them with their favorite dessert for no special reason. 15. Write a story about the 20 things you love about them. Include fun pictures. 16. Choose a family member of the month and make a poster of them. Let them choose Friday night dinners for the month. 17. Teach your children how to play a game like Spoons, Canasta, Poker, etc. and have a family game night. 18. Turn out all the lights in the house and play hide and go seek in the dark. The person that can stay hidden the longest gets to choose the movie the family watches on Saturday night. 19. Hire your child to be an interior decorator and using only items available in the house, redo a room in the house. 20. Do your own Trading Spaces. Parents redecorate the teen's bedroom and the teen redecorates the parent's bedroom. 21. Use plastic Easter eggs and put dollar amounts in the eggs on slips of paper and number the eggs with a permanent marker. Play Deal or No Deal with one of the parents playing the banker.
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22. Help your teenager study for a test by downloading a free Who Wants to be a Millionaire PowerPoint game and put the answers to your teenagers' test into the game and then play to help them study. 23. Tape record your student's study questions onto a tape recorder for them so they can listen to them while they are going to sleep. 24. Make flash cards for your student's exams to help them study for a big exam. 25. Help your teenager organize their notebook using color coded folders for each subject and pocket folders for study cards. 26. Hide positive messages all over your teenager's room, in their books they use at home (you don't want them to get embarrassed at school), on their bathroom mirror, etc. 27. Watch Jeopardy and give each family member a pad of post it notes or index cards. Have everyone write down what they think the answer is and keep points. The person who wins gets to pick what the family does as an activity that weekend. 28. Do some research for your teenager. For example, if your teen is studying Greek Mythology go to the library and check out all the books on Greek Mythology for them or download some appropriate materials from the Internet (be careful of the Internet as some information is not correct). 29. Take your teen to a museum, on a nature walk, to a sporting event, whatever would float their boat. It's the time you spend with them that is important and there are many free events you can attend. 30. Make a special mix CD for your teen of their favorite songs. You can upload i-tunes and then copy their own CD's into the program and mix and match their favorite songs onto one CD so they don't have to flip through CD's to listen to their favorite songs. 31. Have a contest to see who can find something that no one in the family can guess what it is. For example, a shirt stay, or the inside spring to a toy, things that might not be recognizable away from their use. 32. Have everyone come to the table with a quote and then a contest to see who can guess who made the quote famous. 33. Surprise your teen with a scavenger hunt all over the house when they get home from school. Make the clues hard to figure out. I always had a little prize at the end like baseball cards. 34. Let your teen host the training of a guide dog. This will teach them responsibility and give them a sense of pride. 35. Help your teen become a big brother or sister to a child who needs a mentor. There is no greater gift you can give yourself than that of service to someone in need. For 32 pages of Free Rewards for Educators follow this link: Go to www.behaviordoctor.org Click on the training tab. Click on material download. Scroll down to Rewards
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Evaluation: Things I can't wait to go back to school and try: Things I want to look up and learn more about: Books I would like to check-out: The best thing I learned today was:
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References
Achenbach, T. M. (1991). Manual for child behavior checklist. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont, Dept. of Psychiatry. Alberto, P., & Troutman, A. (2003). Applied behavior analysis for teachers (6th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice-Hall. Alliance for Excellent Education. (n.d.). About the crisis. Retrieved August 21, 2010, from http://www.all4ed.org/about_the_crisis Atchison, B. (2007). Sensory modulation disorders among children with a history of trauma: a frame of reference. Kalamazoo, WI. Language Speech and Hearing (April 38, (2) 109116. Bambara, L., Dunlap, G., & Schwartz, I. (2004). Positive behavior support: Critical articles on improving practice for individuals with severe disabilities. Dallas, Texas: Pro-Ed. Bambara, L. M., & Knoster, T. (1998). Designing positive behavior support plans. Innovations ­ Research to Practice Series. Washington, DC. American Association on Mental Retardation. Bandura, A. (1976). Effecting change through participant modeling principles. In J. D. Krumboltz & C. E. Thorensen (Eds.), Self-control: Power to the person (pp. 86­110). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole. Bhaerman, R., & Kopp, K. (1988). The school's choice: Guidelines for dropout prevention at the middle and junior high school. Columbus, OHio: Naitonal Center of Research in vocational education. Blanchard, K., & Lorber, R. (1984). Putting the one-minute manager to work: How to turn the 3 secrets into skills. New York, NY: Berkley. Brandmeir, J. (Director). (2006). The child connection [Motion Picture]. USA: Better Life Media. Brown, F., Gothelf, C., Guess, D., & Lehr, D. (2004). Self-determination for individuals with the most severe disabilities: Moving beyond chimera. In L. Bambara, G. Dunlap, & I. Schwartz, Positive behavior support: Critical articles on improving practice for individuals with severe disabilities (pp. 22­31). Dallas, Texas: Pro-Ed. Burke, M., Davis, J., Lee, Y. H., & Hagan-Burke, S. (in press). Universal screening for behavioral risk in elementary schools using SWPBS expectations. Journal of Emotional Behavior Disorders Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010, November 12). Morbinity and mortality weekly report. Retrieved February 14, 2011, from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm5944.pdf. Crisis. (n.d.). In WordNet web. Retrieved from http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=crisis. Crone, D., & Horner, R. (2003). Building positive behavior support systems in schools. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Data Accountability Center. (2008). Welcome to Data Accountability Center.Retrieved August 21, 2010, from https://www.ideadata.org.
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LA Riffel

File: becoming-a-superhero-in-the-classroom.pdf
Author: LA Riffel
Author: Laura Riffel
Published: Mon Aug 25 12:37:12 2014
Pages: 42
File size: 1.98 Mb


About-face, 7 pages, 0.37 Mb
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