Steps to Success, CL Barber

Tags: Ohio State University, Young Children, Food Activities, Steps to Success, physical activity, Extension Associate, Marion County, Fulton County, Extension Educator, American Academy of Pediatrics, Childhood Obesity, Orange Juice, Snack Recipe, CACFP, Healthy children, bleach, Adult Care Food Program, paper towel, Food Allergies, food preparation, Young Children Food Allergies, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, American Obesity Association, Journal of Allergy Clinical Immunology, Ohio Department of Education, Learning Activities, Mary F. Longo, State Specialist, Children Children, Handle Food Safely Basic Food Safety Guidelines, Anita Pulay, Ohio State University Extension, Cheryl L. Barber, Kathy Reschke, Belmont County, Nursery Rhymes, Journal of Nutrition Education, Snowmen Faces, American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Public Education, Partnership for Food Safety Education, Reindeer Sandwiches, Apple Cheese, Tortilla Roll Ups
Content: Steps to Success Literacy Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Authors: Cheryl L. Barber, M.F.C.S., R.D, L.D. Extension Educator, FCS, Fulton County; Mary F. Longo, M.S., Extension Educator, FCS, Marion County; Anita Pulay, M.Ed., Extension Educator, FCS, Belmont County; Kirk Bloir, M.S., Extension Associate, HDFS. Kathy L. Reschke, Ph.D., Extension State Specialist, Early Development and Care and Assistant Professor, HDFS, The Ohio State University. Page © 2004 Ohio State University
Introduction Objectives Purpose Why Literacy, Fitness & Food? Literacy Is Important Read to Children Encourage Children to Read The Many Faces of Children's Books Background Info for You Snacks are Important The Eating Environment About Serving Size Introducing New Foods Cultural Sensitivity Excess Weight in Childhood Obesity Managing Obesity Many Reasons for Childhood Obesity Move It!
Table of Contents
food allergies and Choking
3
Be Prepared for Food Allergies
13
3
Decrease the Risk of Choking
13
4
Handle Food Safely
Basic Food SAFETY GUIDElines
14
5
Food Preparation and Handling
14
5
Wash Your Hands
6
Hand Washing Routine
16
Sanitize, Sanitize, Sanitize
7
Sanitizing Spray Solution
17
7
Sanitizing Soaking Solution
17
8
Sample Weekly Snack Plan
9
Two Week Plan and Grocery List
18
9
The Child and Adult Care Food Program 19
CACFP Child Care Meal Pattern
20
10 learning activities Index
10
Alphabetical Order
21
11
Theme Order
22
12
References
23
Thanks! Please distribute the evaluation form to the clients/participants you train, collect and return them to us at: S2S, c/o HDFS Extension, 151 Campbell Hall, 1787 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43210-1295.
Written by: Cheryl L. Barber, M.F.C.S., R.D., L.D., Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fulton County. Mary F. Longo, M.S., Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Marion County. Anita Pulay, M.Ed., Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Belmont County. Kirk Bloir, M.S., Extension Associate, Human development and Family Science, Ohio State University Extension. Kathy Reschke, Ph.D., State Specialist, Early Childhood, Ohio State University Extension.
Reviewed by: Jackie Buell, Ph.D., Instructor, Department of Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University. Gail Kaye, Ph.D., R.D., L.D., L.P.C.C., State Specialist, Food and Nutrition, Ohio State University Extension. Lydia C. Medeiros, Ph.D., R.D., State Specialist, Food and Nutrition, Ohio State University Extension. Special thanks to: Rebecca Flowers, Office Associate, Department of Human Development and Family Science, The Ohio State University. Jodi Miller, Photographer, Section of Communications and Technology, Ohio State University Extension. Ellen Kilgore, Librarian, St. Clairsville Public Library.
We dedicate this to Anita, our friend and colleague. Thanks for living life out-loud and with purpose. Your memory will always be an inspiration of faith, courage and hope.
OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status. Keith L. Smith, Associate Vice President for Agricultural Administration and Director, OSU Extension. TDD No. 800-589-8292 (Ohio only) or 614-292-1868. | © 2004, Ohio State University Extension. Page 2 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children
Introduction Steps to Success is a resource containing practical ideas in the areas of literacy, physical fitness, and food for child care providers both in the home and in center-based environments. Learning activities can be used alone or with others to plan a day, a week, or even a month of fun experiences for children two to six years of age. Background information on literacy, nutrition, child and adult care food program information, food safety, snack planning, and additional resources are also available.
Objectives To help child care providers: 1. Incorporate literacy activities into their daily routine 2. Include physical activity as part of their daily routine 3. Involve children in fun snack food preparation 4. Take important food safety precautions when working with children to prepare kid-tested and approved snacks
Purpose Because food is a part of children's daily lives, this curriculum broadens the idea of snack time to include related physical activities, early literacy and math experiences. The suggested activities will also encourage social interaction, sensory motor development, and a beginning understanding of concepts about nutrition and food safety. Snack times will be transformed into a more meaningful context that not only nourish the body, but the mind and social self as well. Because the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has increased in recent years, child care providers will learn about the relationship between food consumed, activity levels, and overall good health. In addition, childcare providers will learn basic principles of food safety and nutritional needs of young children. Simple physical activity ideas that can lead children on a path towards a healthy lifestyle will be shared. Childcare providers receive snack recipes (tested with children), food safety tips and physical activity ideas that relate to a specific theme.
Authors: Cheryl L. Barber, M.F.C.S., R.D, L.D. Extension Educator, FCS, Fulton County; Mary F. Longo, M.S., Extension Educator, FCS, Marion County; Anita Pulay, M.Ed., Extension Educator, FCS, Belmont County; Kirk Bloir, M.S., Extension Associate, HDFS. Page 3 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Why Literacy, Fitness & Food?
Children's books, physical activity and snack ideas may seem like an odd combination of topics but there is a method to the madness! One of the principles of learning in young children is that, when they are first learning a new idea or new skill, it helps if they can "practice" it in several different types of activities. Children's books, movement activities and snack times are all familiar, everyday features in most child care centers and family child care homes, making them ideal contexts for emphasizing a topic that children are learning about or a skill that they are practicing.
For example, if it's September and children are noticing a lot of ladybugs around, it would be the perfect time to learn more about ladybugs. Children learn by doing, so look up the activities we've provided around a ladybug theme and think about ways of making each of the three activities an opportunity for discovery and learning.
Making Apple Raisin Ladybugs for Snack
Guiding children's learning often includes asking them questions that they can then discover the answer to themselves. Questions around the snackmaking table might include: · What color are ladybugs? Are they all the same color? · How many spots do ladybugs have? Do the all have the same number? Can you see a pattern of the spots on different ladybugs? Do they always have same number of spots on each side of their bodies? · How many legs do they have? Do they all have the same number of legs? These questions can lead children, depending on their age, to watching lady-
bugs, counting them, drawing them, or making charts or graphs to show differences in color or spots. Moving like a ladybug: Our physical activity suggestion is to have children move like ladybugs. But, of course, children will need to watch ladybugs before they will know how they move! Ladybugs in books: Our children's book selection is The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle. Although children won't learn many facts about the real insects from the book, it is a wonderful opportunity to talk about getting along with others. Check with your local children's librarian for different kinds of books featuring ladybugs ­ whether they are fact or fiction, they will enrich children's learning.
Page 4 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Literacy Is Important Read to Children Children exposed to storybook reading in a pleasant adult-child situation are the most successful early readers. They have better knowledge about, methods for, and attitudes towards reading. According to research studies conducted at the University of Oregon by Gunn, Simmons, & Kameenui, children exposed to literacy at a pre-school age: · develop a better understanding of Reading and Writing, · interact successfully with others through conversation, and · identify sounds and words successfully. Being exposed to written material, proper language, and having high educational standards in the home has a positive influence on a child. Children need to be able to explore when their interests are high in an area. Caregivers can support a child's learning by having books and hands-on activities that relate to their interests. The activities featured in this curriculum provide a variety of educational opportunities. They were chosen to help the childcare provider, whether parent, teacher, family member or friend, provide educational activities appropriate for children ages two to six. Encourage Children to Read · Be a role model. · Let children see you reading. · Read to children as often as possible. · Allow children to read to you. · Visit the library together. · Talk about stories read. · Ask questions about the characters. · Start a daily diary. · Make shopping lists together. · Write letters and stories together. · Spell, count, and identify simple items inside and outside the home. · Post signs to identify everyday items . · Let children help measure ingredients, read and discuss recipes. Page 5 © 2004 Ohio State University
Literacy Is Important
The Many Faces of Children's Books Children's books can serve many purposes in an early childhood program. Here are just a few:
Type of Book
Example
Possible uses
Board books ­ books made of thick cardboard, often with pictures but few, if any, words.
"Baby Faces" by Margaret Miller
Repetitive books ­ books that have repeating phrases or words
"Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?" by Eric Carle
"Talk-about" books ­ books with photographic images and few words, often intended to illustrate diversity concept books ­ books that illustrate a concept, such as colors, counting, letters, or opposites
"Families" by Debbie Bailey "1,2,3" by Tana Hoban
Vocabulary building books ­ books with lots of objects and their word labels
"Best Word Book Ever" by Richard Scarry
· To help toddlers learn the basics about books: how to hold them, turning pages, etc. · To begin a warm, enjoyable relationship between reader, listener and books that will last through childhood · To develop a love of stories: these are some of the most popular among children because they are predictable · To match spoken words to written words: because children quickly memorize the words, they can begin to recognize them on the page · To encourage children's spoken language skills: answering questions, telling a story about themselves, listening to others · To think about comparisons, notice similarities and differences in the pictures and in their own experiences · To reinforce a concept · To build spoken vocabulary · To build 2- and 3-year-olds' spoken vocabulary · To build 4-, 5- and 6-year-olds' recognition of written words
Letters-sounds books ­ alphabet books, rhyming books and others that focus on letter and word sounds
"My First Liftthe-Flap ABC Board Book" by Diane Thistlethwaite
· ·
To help children make the connection between written letters and the sounds they make (also called phonemic awareness) To recognize common words
Social problem-solving stories ­ stories in which the main character is in a difficult situation that is common to children
"When I Feel Angry" by Cornelia Maude Spelman
· To help children learn the words to describe their feelings · To help children understand social problems ­ why they happen and what to do about them · To give children ideas for solving social problems
Factual information books
"From Peanut to Peanut Butter" by Robin Nelson
· To give children factual information about their world and how it works
Just plain fun-to-read books!
"Cloudy with a
Chance of
· To help foster a love of stories and reading in young
Meatballs" by
children.
Judy Barrett
Page 6 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Background Info for You
As a child care provider (or parent) you are responsible for what, where, when and how food is offered. The child chooses how much food she/he eats.
Snacks are Important Snacks are very important for young children! Why? Because their stomachs are small and they usually can't eat enough in three meals to meet their energy, vitamin and mineral needs. Three hours after a meal, young children are frequently hungry. Nutrients missed in meals can be worked into snacks. In general, restrictions on specific foods should be avoided. Instead, focus on: providing a variety of foods, especially fruits, vegetables and calcium-rich foods; establishing a consistent routine of planned meals and snacks; and modeling good behaviors and attitudes toward food and physical activity.
The Eating Environment Encourage children to have a positive attitude about food: Establish regular meal and snack times. Provide child "size" eating arrangements (size and height of table and chairs "fit" the children's sizes). Provide plates and utensils sized for and appealing to the children. If possible, provide separate compartments so foods don't touch. Let the children explore their food--they may squish, squeeze, push and pull their food and even smear it on their hands and face. When given the opportunity to touch, smell, and explore foods they are more likely to eat them. Encourage tasting of different foods, but never force the issue. If overly tired or stimulated children may not eat.
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Background Info for You
About Serving Size The U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPyramid provides individualized serving recommendations for two- to six-year-olds. These recommendations are based on gender, age and activity level. To find the amounts that are right for the children in your care, go to MyPyramid.gov Putting too much food on a child's plate can be overwhelming. Some children may be discouraged from eating
anything. Others might think they need to eat all of it and learn to ignore their internal hunger cues. Over time, this could lead to those children being prone to obesity. Give less than you think they will eat and let them ask for seconds. But be careful to not over-restrict food intake, as over-restrictiveness has been linked to overeating and excess weight gain.
Page 8 © 2004 Ohio State University
Background Info for You
Introducing New Foods
Children between the ages of two and six, typically become resistant to eating new foods. Frequently, they refuse to eat anything but their favorites. Sometimes children go on food "jags," refusing to eat anything that isn't their favorite of the day (or week). Despite these temporary situations, most children can learn to like new foods over time. Research studies show that it takes between five to ten tries before most children will accept a new food. In many cases, children will be more likely to try a new food if they've helped prepare it. Here are a few other ideas to consider: Introduce new foods when children are hungry. Introduce one new food at a time. Serve new foods with familiar foods. Serve new foods in small quantities. Discuss new foods ­ ask about taste, color
and texture. As the adult, model appropriate behavior. If rejected, accept it and try again a couple of days or weeks later. Note: If you have a child in your care who seems to react very strongly against certainly foods and is very limited in what he or she will eat, that child may have a special need known as sensory integration dysfunction. Although there are several types of SID, one of them is an over-sensitivity to texture and touch, including the feel of foods in the mouth. Talk with the child's parents and suggest an evaluation by their pediatrician or an early intervention specialist. A specially trained therapist can suggest a number of simple ways to help these young children become more tolerant of food textures. If you would like to learn more about sensory integration dysfunction, several books are available, including the recently published book, "The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Integration Dysfunction," by Carol Stock Kranowitz.
Cultural Sensitivity
As a child care provider, there are many great opportunities to teach about different culture and food preferences. Everyone has a culture that impacts their values, habits, beliefs and behaviors. Our culture influences how we think about, value and share food, what we eat and in what combinations, what we don't eat, and when we eat, or stop eating. Where to Start Consider the cultural, ethnic and religious food habits of the children in your care. Look at cultural traditions and religious holidays.
Invite parents or family members to share their food traditions with the children.
Research history and holidays for events celebrated by the children in your care.
Explore food patterns that may be based on religion or personal preferences such as vegetarianism.
Some Cultures, Holidays and Food Patterns
to Explore
Chinese
Italian
Mexican
Caribbean
German
Kwanza
Hanukkah
Kosher
Christmas
Vegetarian
Egg-free
Milk-free
Page 9 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Excess Weight in Childhood
Training the children in your care to eat healthfully and to be physically active is the key to preventing obesity.
Obesity This is a growing problem with many possible causes: Overeating Poor food choices Inactivity Social and emotional factors Genetics These factors contribute to obesity: Food given as a reward or pacifier Force feeding Providing large portions Requiring a clean plate Over-restricting food intake Active children need more calories than inactive ones. Exercise and activity are needed daily. Exercise and activity: Stimulate a healthy appetite Use calories and maintains muscle tissue Improve coordination Encourage children to express themselves and develops social skills Weight loss diets are not appropriate for young children, unless ordered by a physician.
Managing Obesity Encourage physical activity. Limit TV viewing to no more than two hours of quality program viewing per day. Keep foods that are high in fat and sugar a small part of the diet. Provide high fiber, filling, crunchy foods, such as fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grain products. Offer water, milk or 100% fruit juices at meals and snacks. Provide 2% or skim milk to children older than two years. Put food on small plates. Provide three meals and two snacks each day. Use lots of non-food rewards-- activities, hugs, praise, kind words--instead of food. Help children deal with emotions and stress without turning to food. Be a good role model. Your food habits and attitudes influence children.
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Excess Weight in Childhood
Many Reasons for Childhood Obesity
Why is there such an explosion of childhood obesity these days? Research has shown what common sense might tell you: There are several reasons why so many children can be classified as obese today. According to the American Obesity Association, more than 15 percent of children ages 6 through 12 are obese. That's up from 11 percent in 1988-1994 and 7 percent in 1976-1980. Type II diabetes, asthma, high blood pressure, orthopedic complications and other physical problems can result. Why is this happening? Researchers have identified many risk factors. If parents are obese, children are more likely to be, too. Genetics and common eating habits are both likely causes. As with adults, a poor diet and limited amount of physical activity often add up to extra weight. Some researchers have pointed out changes in schools' food offerings as one reason for larger school kids. Students often have unlimited access to highcalorie, low-nutrition foods as a la carte items in the cafeteria line and in vending machines. In addition, required courses in Physical Education also have declined, decreasing the amount of activity and exercise students have as part of their school day.
Also, some research indicates that children in families who do not eat together at the dinner table are more likely to be overweight than those who do. Paying attention to what children eat seems to help. Another problem: Eating too many chips, candy bars and other unhealthful snacks. Sugary soft drinks also fall into this category. In fact,12 percent of preschoolage children, 33 percent of school-age children, and more than 50 percent of adolescents average 9 ounces of soft drinks or more a day. Other reasons: An inability to determine proper portion sizes. Eating due to stress, boredom or other reasons besides hunger. Eating too much fast food. Not participating in enough activity or exercise. Dietitians recommend that parents, educators and Health-Care Providers work together to make healthful foods more available and decrease access to foods with little nutritional value. Parents can help by eating together as a family as often as possible, paying attention to what their children eat and encouraging children to engage in an hour of physical activity daily.
Source: Filipic, M. (12/29/02). Chow Line: Many Reasons for Childhood Obesity. Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Column reviewed by Jaime Ackerman, registered dietitian and Ohio State University Extension nutrition associate in the College of Human Ecology. Available on line at http://fusion.ag.ohio-state.edu/news/story.asp?storyid=730 Page 11 © 2004 Ohio State University
Excess Weight in Childhood Source: United States Department of Agriculture: http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/resources/moveit.pdf Page 12 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Food Allergies and Choking
Be Prepared for Food Allergies Be aware of all known food allergies of all children in your care. The most common food allergies are to cow's milk, eggs and peanuts. Other foods (such as wheat, tomatoes, strawberries, shell fish) can also cause allergic reactions. Always be alert for food allergy symptoms. Common, possible signs of food allergies include any, or all, of the following: · skin rashes, splotchiness · runny nose, cough, wheezing · abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting · anaphylactic shock (extreme breathing difficulties due to blocked airways) If a child in your care has an identified food allergy:
· make sure the child has no access to that food or food items · seat him/her away from other children/adults eating that food · clean up spills immediately · read ingredient labels for hidden sources of the food and related foods If a child is allergic to foods that leave oils or residues, such as peanut butter: · seat them at tables where peanut butter is never used · wash all hands and utensils that have touched the food immediately after use in hot soapy water · use a substitute food, if appropriate, such as soy nut butter, cream cheese, yogurt or cheese spread
Decreasing the Risk of Choking
Young children need special care and supervision to decrease the risk of choking. Their ability to chew and swallow is not fully developed until they are 8 years old. Foods more likely to cause choking are those that are difficult to chew, round, hard, or thick in consistency. Some specific foods that may be hazardous are: raw carrots; hard candy, nuts, popcorn; peanut butter when eaten from a spoon or when spread thickly on other food items; grapes; and hot dogs.
To decrease the risk of choking, modify the shape of foods: cut grapes into smaller pieces cut hot dogs lengthwise into quarters cook raw vegetables just until tender spread peanut butter thinly on bread or crackers, rather than in large amounts A good recommendation is to make certain that children sit while they are eating and that there is proper supervision at all times.
Page 13 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Handle Food Safely!
Basic food safety guidelines: Always wash hands with soap and warm running water before handling food. Never allow children to share food unless individual portions are made. Always keep food far away from a diapering area. Keep food and food utensils separate from classroom items.
Source: Herringshaw, D.I, Longo, M.F. and Zies, S., Healthy Kids: Germ Free. Ohio State University Extension, 1997. NEVER thaw frozen food by leaving it on the counter!
Food Preparation and Handling Store raw meats and seafood on the refrigerator's bottom shelf. Use two nonporous cutting boards: 1 for raw meat products and 1 for salads and other ready-toeat foods. Rinse all raw fruits and vegetables under running water before eating. Thaw frozen foods in the refrigerator. Foods can also be thawed in the microwave, or under cold running water, if you plan to prepare them immediately. Use a thermometer to check temperatures: Poultry - 180°F Beef, pork, other red meats and egg dishes - 160°F Leftovers should be reheated to 165°F
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Handle Food Safely
Wash tops of cans before opening. Wash cutting boards and food preparation surfaces with soap and hot water after contact with raw meats and seafood. Prepare and chill hazardous foods quickly and store properly. These include: Meat salads, potato & macaroni salads; Cream filled pastries; and Other prepared foods containing milk, meat, poultry, fish, and/or eggs. Avoid eating raw sprouts. Use only pasteurized fruit juices and dairy products. Do not prepare foods more than two hours ahead without plans for proper cooling and reheating. Keep hot foods at or above 140°F. Keep cold foods at under 40°F. Cover foods being transported. Never reuse a tasting spoon without washing it first. Never place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meats. Provide serving spoons for serving bowls. Refrigerate leftovers in shallow containers within two hours of preparation.
Keep home-packed lunches in the refrigerator until lunch time. Use a thermometer to make sure your refrigerator temperature is between 35°F and 40°F. Use disposable latex gloves when your hands have open cuts or sores. Contact your regulating agency for specific rules regarding food preparation and safety to be sure you are in compliance. Source: Herringshaw, D.I, Longo, M.F. and Zies, S., Healthy Kids: Germ Free. Ohio State University Extension, 1997.
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Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Wash Your Hands! Wash your hands properly and frequently. Be a good role model and help children learn the proper way to wash their hands too.
soap and warm running water jewelry Adapted from: Herringshaw, D.I, Longo, M.F. and Zies, S., Healthy Kids: Germ Free. Ohio State University Extension, 1997.
Use soap and warm running water. Rub your hands together vigorously. Wash hands for 20 seconds (sing "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" through twice). Wash all surfaces, including: · Backs of hands; · Wrists; · Between fingers; and · Under fingernails. Rinse well. Dry hands with a paper towel. Turn off the water using a paper towel, not your clean hands.
Page 16 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Sanitize, Sanitize, Sanitize!
Bacteria can lead to infection. Eliminating bacteria by sanitizing should greatly reduce bacteria. This leads to a healthier environment. Start by keeping your kitchen area clean by using lots of hot soapy water. Follow this up with sanitizing. Sanitizing Solution Spray Method Recipe 1 teaspoon of bleach to 1 quart (4 cups) of water in a spray bottle. Use for surfaces. Allow bleach to remain on the surface for two minutes then dry with a paper towel or let surface air-dry. Make solution daily, as bleach loses its strength when exposed to air. Store spray in a safe area out of children's reach.
Source: Herringshaw, D.I, Longo, M.F. and Zies, S., Healthy Kids: Germ Free. Ohio State University Extension, 1997. Store sanitizer and bleach in a sealed container. Be sure they are safely out of the reach of children.
Sanitizing Solution Soaking Method Recipe 1 tablespoon bleach to 1 gallon (16 cups) of water for soaking. Soak items for five minutes then rinse with clean water. Allow to air dry. Make solution daily, as bleach loses its strength when exposed to air.
Page 17 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children Sample Weekly Snack Plan
Week # 1 Snack Recipe
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Tortilla Snowflakes
Potato Snowmen
Snowmen Faces
Ice Cream in a Bag
Friday Fruit Smoothies
Week # 2 Snack Recipe
Monday Alphabet Sandwich
Tuesday Orange Smiles and Animal Crackers
Wednesday Space Roll Ups
Thursday Bunny's Favorite Snack
Friday Cereal Shake Up
Week # 1 Grocery Shopping List
Rice Cakes Low fat Cream Cheese Powdered Sugar Skim Milk Carrots Shredded Cheese Raisins Fruit Roll-Ups Mashed Potatoes Pretzel Sticks Frozen Mixed Vegetables Tortillas
Margarine Cinnamon Sugar Mixture Gallon-size Resalable Bags Pint-size Resalable Bags Vanilla Rock Salt Half and Half Sugar Ice Bananas Frozen Mixed Berries Orange Juice
Week # 2 Grocery Shopping List
Unsweetened Applesauce Plain Yogurt Dry Ranch Dressing Mix Flour Tortillas Low-fat Cream Cheese Thinly Sliced Extra-lean Ham American Cheese Slices Oranges Animal Crackers
Mini Bagels Celery Jelly Mini Pita Rounds Alphabet Cereal Carrots Round Oat Cereal Small Round Cracker Sandwiches with Cheese Raisins Peanut Butter Popsicle Sticks
Page 18 © 2004 Ohio State University
Sample Weekly Snack Plan The Child and Adult Care Food Program Can Help You! The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is a Federal program that helps provide healthy meals and snacks to children and adults receiving day care. It plays a vital role in improving the quality of day care and making it more affordable for many low-income families. CACFP provides reimbursement for meals and snacks served to small groups of children receiving nonresidential day care in licensed or approved private homes. A family or group day care home must sign an agreement with a sponsoring organization to participate in CACFP. The sponsoring organization organizes training, conducts monitoring, and helps with planning menus and filling out reimbursement forms. CACFP is administered at the Federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The State education or health department administers CACFP, in most States. Independent centers and sponsoring organizations enter into agreements with their State agencies to operate the program. For more information, visit the CACFP website on the United States Department of Agriculture's webpages at: http://www.nal.usda.gov/childcare/ In Ohio, the Department of Education administers the program. Contact them at: Center for Students, Families and Communities Office for Safety, Health and Nutrition, Ohio Department of Education 25 South Front Street, 3rd Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215-4183 Phone: 614-466-2945 or 800-808-MEAL Resources from the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service website: Newsletters with tons of stuff about the CACFP: · Mealtime Memos ­ http://www.nfsmi.org/Information/Newsletters/Mealtime_memo_index.html · What's Cooking http://www.nfsmi.org/Information/Newsletters/Whatscooking_index.html · Recipes for Centers http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Care/Publications/centerrecipes.htm · If you have questions about preparing or serving meals and snacks in CACFP, you can contact the Institute's Healthy Food Hotline, at 1-800-321-3054. A nutritionist will give you practical answers to the questions you have about your food service. Page 19 © 2004 Ohio State University
Sample Weekly Snack Plan
Child Care Meal Pattern From: http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Care/ProgramBasics/Meals/Snack.htm
Snack for Children Select Two of the Four Components for a Reimbursable Snack
Food Components
Ages 1-2
Ages 3-5
Ages 6-121
1 milk fluid milk 1 fruit/vegetable juice,2 fruit and/or vegetable 1 grains/bread3 bread or cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or cold dry cereal or hot cooked cereal or pasta or noodles or grains
1/2 cup 1/2 cup 1/2 slice 1/2 serving 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup
1/2 cup 1/2 cup 1/2 slice 1/2 serving 1/3 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup
1 cup 3/4 cup 1 slice 1 serving 3/4 cup 1/2 cup 1/2 cup
1 meat/meat alternate meat or poultry or fish4 or
1/2 oz.
1/2 oz.
1 oz.
alternate protein product or
1/2 oz.
1/2 oz.
1 oz.
cheese or
1/2 oz.
1/2 oz.
1 oz.
egg5 or
1/2
1/2
1/2
cooked dry beans or peas or
1/8 cup
1/8 cup
1/4 cup
peanut or other nut or seed butters or
1 Tbsp.
1 Tbsp.
2 Tbsp.
nuts and/or seeds or yogurt6
1/2 oz. 2 oz.
1/2 oz. 2 oz.
1 oz. 4 oz.
1 Children age 12 and older may be served larger portions based on their greater food needs. They may not be served less than the minimum quantities listed in this column.
2 Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength. Juice cannot be served when milk is the only other snack component.
3 Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain or enriched or fortified. 4 A serving consists of the edible portion of cooked lean meat or poultry or fish.
5 One-half egg meets the required minimum amount (one ounce or less) of meat alternate.
6 Yogurt may be plain or flavored, unsweetened or sweetened.
Page 20 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success
Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children
Learning Activities Listed Alphabetically
1. Alphabet Sandwich 2. Ambrosia Fruit Salad 3. Ants on Logs 4. Apple Cheese Towers 5. Apple Raisin Ladybugs 6. Apple Smiles 7. Apples & Fluffy PB Spread 8. Bagel Bugs 9. Balloon Bread 10. Banana Peanut Butter (BPB) Dogs 11. Bread & Make It Myself Butter 12. Broccoli Trees & Cheese Dip 13. Build A House 14. Bunny's Favorite Snack 15. Butterflies 16. Cereal Shake-Up 17. Cherry Tarts 18. Chocolate Chip "C" Pancakes 19. Cinnamon Rolls 20. Crispy Peanut Butter Balls 21. Dinosaur Veggie Pizza 22. Food Groups 23. Fruit Smoothies 24. Gingerbread Man 25. Grandma's Car 26. Ice Cream in a Bag 27. Inside Out Roller
28. Ironed Cheese Sandwiches 29. Jack-O-Lantern Face 30. Latkes 31. Letter Sandwiches 32. Mini Pizzas 33. Muddy Dip & Chips 34. Orange Smiles and Animal Crackers 35. P is for Pancake 36. Painted Toast 37. Pancake Faces 38. People French Toast 39. Popcorn Pizza 40. Potato Snowmen 41. Power Bars 42. Reindeer Cupcakes 43. Reindeer Sandwiches 44. Silly Hat Fruit Bowls 45. Snowmen Faces 46. Soft Pretzels 47. Space Roll Ups 48. Spiders 49. Tortilla Roll Ups 50. Tortilla Snowflakes 51. Turkeys 52. Under the Sea Spread & Crackers 53. Yogurt Sundaes 54. Yummy Yo-Yo's
Page 21 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success
Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children
Learning Activities Listed by Theme
1. Animals - Bunny's Favorite Snack 2. Ants - Ants on Logs 3. Apples - Apples & Fluffy PB Spread 4. Bananas - Banana Peanut Butter (BPB) Dogs 5. Bread - Tortilla Snowflakes 6. Bugs - Bagel Bugs 7. Butterflies - Butterflies 8. Christmas - Reindeer Cupcakes 9. Colors - Painted Toast 10. Construction - Apple Cheese Towers 11. Dancing - Cereal Shake-Up 12. Dinosaurs - Dinosaur Veggie Pizza 13. Exercise - Power Bars 14. Family - People French Toast 15. Feelings - Apple Smiles 16. Fish - Under the Sea Spread & Crackers 17. Flowers - Ironed Cheese Sandwiches 18. Food Groups - Food Groups 19. Gingerbread Man - Gingerbread Man 20. Grandparents - Grandma's Car 21. Halloween - Jack-O-Lantern Face 22. Hanukkah - Latkes 23. Hats - Silly Hat Fruit Bowls 24. Houses - Build A House 25. Ice Skating - Fruit Smoothies 26. Kwanza - Ambrosia Fruit Salad 27. Ladybugs - Apple Raisin Ladybugs
28. Letter "C" - Chocolate Chip "C" Pancakes 29. Letter "P" - P is for Pancake 30. Letter "Y" - Yummy Yo-Yo's 31. Letters - Letter Sandwiches 32. Magic - Balloon Bread 33. Mexico - Tortilla Roll Ups 34. Nursery Rhymes - Cherry Tarts 35. Opposites - Inside Out Roller 36. Oranges - Orange Smiles and Animal Crackers 37. Outer Space - Space Roll Ups 38. Pioneer - Bread & Make It Myself Butter 39. Pizza - Mini Pizzas 40. Polar Bear - Ice Cream in a Bag 41. Popcorn - Popcorn Pizza 42. Rainbows - Yogurt Sundaes 43. Reindeer - Reindeer Sandwiches 44. Self Esteem - Pancake Faces 45. Senses - Cinnamon Rolls 46. Shapes - Crispy Peanut Butter Balls 47. Snow - Snowmen Faces 48. Snowmen - Potato Snowmen 49. Spiders - Spiders 50. Thanksgiving - Turkeys 51. Trees - Broccoli Trees & Cheese Dip 52. Twisting - Soft Pretzels 53. Weather - Muddy Dip & Chips 54. Words - Alphabet Sandwich
Page 22 © 2004 Ohio State University
Steps to Success Literacy, Fitness and Food Activities for Young Children References American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Nutrition. (2003). Prevention of pediatric overweight and obesity. Pediatrics, 112, 424-430. Available on-line at www.aap.org/policy/s100029.html. American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Public Education. (2001). Children, adolescents, and television. Pediatrics, 107, 423-426. Available on-line at www.aap.org/policy/re0043.html. Berk, L.E. (2000). Child Development, 5th Ed. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Birch, L.L, Johnson, S.L., Andresen, G. Peters, J.C., & Schulte, M.C. (1991). The variability of young children's energy intake. New England Journal of Medicine, 324, 232-235. Briley, M.E., Roberts-Gray, C. (1999). Nutrition standards for child-care programs. Journal of the American Dietetic Assn., 99, 981-988. Epstein, L.H., Gordy, C.C., Raynor, H.A., Beddome, M., Kilanowski, C.K., & Pauluch, R. (2001). Increasing fruit and vegetable intake and decreasing fat and sugar intake in families at risk for childhood obesity. Obesity Research, 9, 171-178. Gunn, B.K., Simmons, D.C., & Kameenui, E.J. (ND). Emergent literacy: Synthesis of the research. Retrieved March, 1, 2004, from http://idea.uoregon.edu/~ncite/ documents/techrep/tech19/html. Johnson, R.K. & Nicklas, T.A. (1999). Dietary guidance for healthy children aged 2 to 11 years. Journal of the American Dietetic Assn., 99, 93-101. Kendrick, A.S., Kaufmann, R. & Messenger, K.P. (1995). Healthy Young Children: A Manual for Programs. Washington, DC: National Assn. for the Education of Young Children. Kleinman, R.E. (Ed.) (2004). Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, 5th Ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics. (Continued on page 24) Page 23 © 2004 Ohio State University
References Mederios, L.C., Hillers, V.N., Kendall, P.A., & Mason, A. (2001). Food safety education: What should we be teaching. Journal of Nutrition Education, 33, 108-113. National Association for the Education of Young Children. (1995). NAEYC Position Statement on School Readiness. Retrieved March 1, 2004, from http:// www.naeyc.org/resources/postion_statements/psredy98.htm. National Association for the Education of Young Children. (1996). Principles of Child Development and Learning that Inform Developmentally Appropriate Practice. Retrieved March 1, 2004, from http://www.naeyc.org/resources/ position_statements/dap3.htm. Novello, A.C., Degrau, C. & Kleinman, D.V. (1992). Healthy children ready to learn: An essential collaboration between health and education. Public Health Report, 107, 3-15. Oesterreich, L. Holt, BG, Karas, S. (1999). Iowa Family Child Care Handbook, 6th Ed. Iowa State University Extension: Ames, IA. Partnership for Food Safety Education. (ND). Fight BAC!. Partnership for Food Safety Education, Washington, DC. Retrieved March 1, 2004, from http:// www.fightbac.org. Sampson, H.A. (1999). Food allergy, part I: Immunopathogenesis and clinical disorder. Journal of Allergy Clinical Immunology, 103, 717-728. Satter, E. (1987). How to Get Your Kids to Eat...But Not Too Much. Palo Alto, CA: Bull Publishing. Subar, A.F., Brebs-Smith, S.M., Cooke, A. & Kahle, L.L. (1998). Dietary sources of nutrients among US children. Pediatrics, 102, 913-923. Sullivan, S. & Birch, L. (1990). Pass the sugar, pass the salt: Experience dictates preference. Developmental Psychology, 26, 546-551. United States Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. (1999). Tips for using the food guide pyramid for young children 2 to 6 years old. Program Aid # 1647. United States Department of Agriculture: Washington, D.C. Retrieved March 1, 2004, from http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/KidsPyra/PyrBook.pdf. OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status. Keith L. Smith, Associate Vice President for Agricultural Administration and Director, OSU Extension. TDD No. 800-589-8292 (Ohio only) or 614-292-1868. | © 2004, Ohio State University Extension. Page 24 © 2004 Ohio State University

CL Barber

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Title: complete intro for participants8-05
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