Year 11 and Year 12 Handbook, W AU

Tags: Outcomes, Description, Catholic Ladies' College, unit students, investigation, VCE, development, Assessment Unit, Ladies' College, KLA Team Leader, Students focus, School-assessed Coursework, Code, Examination, Australia, cellular processes, Sports Psychology, Health Promotion Officers, VCE VET Certificate, Psychology Degrees, Examinations, Career Development Practitioners, Media response, interpersonal skills, Area of Study, Mathematics, Examination Unit, research methodologies, Students design, cognitive tasks, social cognition, Assessment, Victorian Certificate of Education, Religious Education Units, study, Hotel Management Unit, subject selection, Australian food systems, cellular structures, text, justice system, Australian Constitution, Semester Examination Catholic Ladies' College, texts, business environment, psychological disorders, Specialist Mathematics Units, food allergies, stem cells, BUSINESS MANAGEMENT KLA Team Leader, psychological development
Content: Year 11 and Year 12 Handbook VCE/VCAL 2018-2019
CATHOLIC LADIES' COLLEGE LTD MARY AIKENHEAD MINISTRIES IN THE TRADITION OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY
19 DIAMOND STREET ELTHAM VIC 3095 03 9439 4077 /T 03 9431 1157 /F WWW.CLC.VIC.EDU.AU ABN 44 058 164 891
CONTENTS
General Information
Page No: Course Descriptions (cont'd)
Page No:
Abbreviations ................................................................. 2 VCE ............................................................................ 3 Planning a VCE Program ............................................... 3 Year 11 .......................................................................... 3 Studying a Unit 3/4 Sequence in Year 11 ....................... 3 Year 12 .......................................................................... 3 Subjects Pre-requisites for Units 3 and 4 ........................ 4 Assessment .................................................................... 4 General Achievement Test (GAT) .................................... 4 Units 3 and 4: The ATAR ................................................. 4 Students undertaking VCE outside of the College .......... 4 VCAL ............................................................................. 4 Planning a VCAL Program ............................................... 5 Assessment ..................................................................... 5 Subject Selection Process ............................................... 5 Careers and Tertiary Courses ...................................... 5
Open Days ...................................................................... 5
General Information/ Course Advice .............................. 6
More Information About VCE, VET and VCAL Courses and Expectations
6
Languages ­ German ............................................. Languages ­ Indonesian ...................................... Languages ­ Italian ................................................ Legal Studies ......................................................... Mathematics Offerings .......................................... General Mathematics Mathematical Methods ..................................... Specialist Mathematics Media ..................................................................... Music Industry­ VCE VET Certificate III ................... Music Performance ................................................ Physical Education................................................... Physics .................................................................. Psychology............................................................... Religious Education Offerings ................................ Religion and Society .............................................. VCAL (Personal Development Skills and Work Related Skills) .................................................. VCAL (Literacy) ...................................................... VCAL (Numeracy) ................................................... Visual Communication Design ................................
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39-40 41 42 43-44 45-46 47-48 49 50 51 52-53 54 55-56
Course Descriptions
Accounting
7
Applied Fashion Design and Technology VCE VET Certificate II
8
Art ................................................................................... 9-10
Australian and Global Politics ......................................... 11-12
Biology ........................................................................... 13-14 Forms
Business ­ VCE VET Certificate II ..................................... 15
Application for Year 11 Student to Study
Business Management .................................................... 16-17 VCE Units 3 and 4 (Proforma)
57
Chemistry ....................................................................... 18-19 Studies Undertaken Outside CLC (Proforma)
58
Drama ............................................................................. 20-21 Subject Selection Instructions VCE ­ 2017
59
English Offerings.............................................................. 22
English ­ Units 1-4 ........................................................... 23-24
English ­ Literature ........................................................ 25-26
Food Studies
.................................................. 27
Geography
........................................................... 28
Health and Human Development.................................... 29
History .................................................................... 30
ABBREVIATIONS
ATAR GAT SAC SAT VCAA -
Australian Tertiary Admission Rank General Achievement Test School Assessed Coursework School Assessed Task Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority
VCAL VCE VET VTAC -
Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning Victorian Certificate of Education Vocational Education and Training Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
2
Catholic Ladies' College provides a diverse and stimulating curriculum. The College aims to ensure that all students achieve success in their pathway to the future and in the development of the skills and attributes necessary for adult life. Students are supported in their studies by a highly qualified, experienced and committed staff. Special programs operate to support each student as she moves through her final years of schooling. These include a comprehensive Careers Program, a series of challenging Religious Education Units, an affirming Student Wellbeing Program and a range of Senior Leadership experiences and opportunities. At the Senior level students have a choice of completing one of the following certificates: Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) VCE The Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) is a state-wide certificate that students in Victoria receive on satisfactory completion of their secondary education. The VCE provides diverse pathways to further study or training at University or TAFE and to employment. The VCE is made up of a number of studies, each of which is broken up into four units. Each VCE study unit is numbered 1, 2, 3 or 4 and is of semester length. Students will complete Units 1 and/or 2 of a VCE study in Year 11. Units 3 and 4 of a VCE study are undertaken in Year 12. Students must complete both Units 3 and 4 of a study. To be awarded a VCE, students must: 1. satisfactorily complete a total of at least sixteen units 2. these sixteen units must include: i. three Units of English. The three Units of English may be selected from English Literature Units 1-4 and English Units 1­4. ii. three sequences of Units 3 and 4 studies other than English ­ this may include VET 3 and 4 sequences PLANNING A VCE PROGRAM When selecting a VCE course, particularly Units 1 and 2, students may experiment a little and try different subjects. However, students need to be aware that certain Unit 3 and 4 subjects cannot be selected in the following year without the completion of Units 1 and 2. Before making a final selection of subjects' students should make sure that they satisfy the requirements of tertiary or post-secondary courses they wish to enter, or the conditions of the employment they intend seeking. In addition, students must be aware that choosing too wide a range of subjects increases the likelihood of timetable clashes. When making their subject selections, it is important for students to look at the detail of individual University and TAFE courses. Students must consult the VTAC Guide (www.vtac.edu.au) and the VICTER 2018 which lists Tertiary prerequisites for the year in which students will enter University or TAFE. For further information please make an appointment with the Careers Advisers Ms Kilsby or Mrs Major. YEAR 11 It is a College requirement that all Year 11 students undertake: English or English Literature Units 1 and 2; and Five other Unit 1 and 2 studies; Year 11 Religious Education. Students who satisfy the set criteria can apply to take one Unit 3 and 4 sequence in place of one of the Unit 1 and 2 studies (see section "Students interested in studying a unit 3 and 4 sequence in Year 11"). There are no subject prerequisites for entry into Units 1 and 2, except for Languages. STUDENTS INTERESTED IN STUDYING A UNIT 3 AND 4 SEQUENCE IN YEAR 11 Year 11 students interested in this option should collect the appropriate application form from the Administration Office, a copy of which is included in this Handbook. Students will be required to meet the criteria set out in the application form and will be asked to attend an interview with a staff panel which has been formed to decide the success of each application. The application form should be returned with the Year 11 initial subject selection form. Students are advised to be flexible in their choice of a Unit 3 and 4 subject and are reminded of the benefits of undertaking tertiary prerequisite subjects within their Year 12 program. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss this option with their Year 10 subject teacher and the appropriate KLA Team Leader. Where class size is an issue, Year 12 student choices will take preference. All students who undertake a Unit 3 and 4 in Year 11 are expected to take a full load (five subjects) at the Year 12 level the following year. YEAR 12 It is a College requirement that all Year 12 students undertake a full VCE program, which usually consists of: English or English Literature Units 3 and 4; Four other Unit 3 and 4 sequences; Year 12 Religious Education.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
3
All students who undertake a Unit 3 and 4 subject in Year 11 will not be allowed to take less than the Year 12 College requirements unless medical and/or other evidence is produced that demonstrates that the student will be otherwise unable to successfully complete the VCE. An interview with the Deputy Principal Learning and Teaching, the student and her parents will be organised to discuss the situation. Subject prerequisites for Units 3 and 4: There are no prerequisites for entry into Units 3 and 4, except for Languages. However, students are advised that in some subject areas the expectations of the course and the skills required for necessary completion mean that it would be very difficult to take them up at Unit 3 and 4 level. See specific subject pages for details. ASSESSMENT Satisfactory Completion of Units 1 - 4 A student will receive an: S for Satisfactorily completed N for Not Satisfactorily completed for each Unit depending on whether or not they have satisfactorily completed the outcomes of the Unit. Level of Performance in Units 1 and 2 In Units 1 and 2 there will be graded Assessment Tasks and grades for these tasks will be included on student reports. However, they will not be included in the official statement of results from the VCAA. This statement will show S and N results only. Level of Performance in Units 3 and 4 Each subject will have a number of assessment components. These will consist of School Assessed Coursework (SACs) and/or School Assessed Tasks (SATs) and an end of year examination. All School Assessments will be based on specific outcomes. General Achievement Test (GAT) All students who are studying a VCE Unit 3 and 4 will undertake the GAT. The GAT is a three hour test, measuring levels of general achievement across three broad areas: Written communication; Mathematics, Science, Technology; Humanities, the Arts and Social Sciences. GAT results are used in a number of ways by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA), one of which is to monitor school based assessment. Units 3 and 4: The ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank) The Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) runs the application and offer process for approximately 2000 Tertiary courses by providing information concerning VCE applicants to selection officers at each institution. How the information is used varies from course to course, but nearly all courses make some use of the ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admission Rank) which is an overall measure of how a student has performed in his or her studies. It is expressed as a rank and is an estimate of where the student came in the relevant age group. The overall rating is on a scale of 0 ­ 99.95. VTAC uses the study scores awarded by the VCAA to calculate the ATAR. VTAC scales the study scores to allow for any variation in the strength of competition between the cohorts of students taking the various studies that year. The ATAR is calculated by adding the scaled score for English Units 3 and 4 or English Literature Units 3 and 4 or English Language Units 3 and 4, the next best three scaled scores and 10% of any fifth and sixth scaled score. The increment for a sixth study may be replaced with an increment for satisfactorily completing an approved University study as part of the VCE extension study program. Students undertaking VCE units outside of the College For various reasons, students may wish to undertake one or more VCE Units at another provider (eg: Night school, Dance school, Language school, TAFE, Private Music, etc). Catholic Ladies' College however will still be regarded as the HOME SCHOOL and WE must therefore enrol the student. As such, we must be notified regarding the undertaking of these studies by: 1. Obtaining a separate form from the Year 10-12 Learning Leader; 2. Enrol in units outside CLC and pay your fees (if applicable); 3. Return the form to the Administration Office.
VCAL
The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is an alternate Senior Certificate to the VCE, which is aimed at developing and extending pathways for young people who are considering the following options:
Further study at TAFE
Employment
Apprenticeship or Traineeship
VCAL is a `hands on' option for Year 11 and 12 students and its flexibility enables students to undertake a study program that suits their interests and learning needs. VCAL sits alongside the VCE as a senior secondary option for Victorian students.
There are three levels of the VCAL: Foundation, Intermediate and Senior. CLC offers Intermediate and Foundation level to Year 11 students and Intermediate and Senior level to Year 12 students. VCAL may be undertaken by students enrolled in either Year 11 or Year 12. Students may choose to complete two VCAL levels over two years. The VCAL provides a program of studies in the following compulsory strands:
Literacy
Numeracy Work-Related Skills Industry-Specific Skills Personal Development Skills
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
4
PLANNING A VCAL PROGRAM A student's VCAL program will be individually tailored to her needs and interests. A student must satisfactorily complete ten accredited units in order to be awarded the VCAL. Students will be enrolled in the following VCAL units: Literacy, Numeracy, Work Related Skills and Personal Development Skills. In addition to these VCAL units, students will be assisted to build a program that includes: a Vocational Education Training (VET) Certificate or school-based apprenticeship in a vocational area of interest to them and VCE Units. Students may elect to enrol in VCAL during the subject selection process. It is also possible to move from VCE to VCAL during the year, subject to VCAA dates. The required VET program may be one of the VCE VET courses listed in this Handbook or may be chosen from any available to secondary students through local TAFEs and the Northern Melbourne VET Cluster, for example, Hairdressing, Childcare. ASSESSMENT Styles of assessment vary according to the units studied. Assessment in VCAL units is school-based and there are no exams. Successful completion of the VCAL will provide young people with skills that are important for life, work and further study as well as a Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning. Students Entering Years 11 in 2018 ­ Subject Selection Process
Thursday, 15 June Tuesday, 18 July
Year 11 2018 Assembly regarding subject selection timeline (8:45 ­ 9:15 am, College Hall) VCE/VCAL 2018-2019 Handbook emailed to all Year 10 students and uploaded to PAM; Outline of subject selection process. Student VCE Subject Expo 1 - Periods 3 and 4 (Currajeen) Student VCE Subject Expo 2 - Periods 1 and 2 (Currajeen)
Wednesday, 19 July
VCE/VCAL Information Evening for parents and students (Currajeen)
6:00 pm - 8:30 pm
VCE/VCAL teachers available
6:00 pm
VCE Session 1 (CAS) OR VCAL Session 1 (C6)
6:45 pm
VCAL Session 2 (C6) (repeated)
7:15 pm
VCE Session 2 (CAS) (repeated)
Monday, 24 July Monday, 31 July Tuesday, 1 August Thursday, 3 August
Year 11 2018 commencement date for entering subject selection via the internet ­ Receipts to Homeroom Teachers. Individual Year 11 2018 student interviews (9:00 am ­ 2:00 pm, Currajeen CAS). Year 11 2018 final date for entering subject selection; Applications to study a VCE Unit 3 and 4 subject close - applications must be submitted to the Administration Office by 3:00 pm. Final day to return signed subject selection receipt to Homeroom teachers. Interviews for Year 11 2018 students applying for a VCE Unit 3 and 4 subjects.
CAREERS AND TERTIARY COURSES All students are invited to make appointments with the Career Advisers, Ms Kilsby and Mrs Major, to discuss Course and Career options and subject selection and to use the many Careers resources located in the Resource Centre: The Good Careers Guide ­ www.goodcareersguide.com.au www.gooduniversitiesguide.com.au ­ this site allows exploration of courses, plus it links to the Good Careers Guide as well. www.myfuture.edu.au ­ this site provides the information about jobs. Go to: The Facts. It also has links to job prospects and shows the expected demand in different industries. Students do need to set up and account (free) for this site. www.vtac.edu.au ­ course search for post Year 12. www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au ­ a good website to explore many aspects of working/careers including a link to check award wages. VTAC Guides, TAFE directories and VICTER booklets which detail Tertiary Entrance Requirements OPEN DAYS Most Universities and TAFEs have an Open Days each year. This is a wonderful chance to visit the Campus, inspect facilities, discuss course and career outcomes with lecturers, course selection officers, current students, graduates and others.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
5
General Information/Course Advice Students are encouraged to speak to subject teachers for specific subject advice. All students will be interviewed before their final subject selection is submitted. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SUBJECTS
THE ARTS Ms Andrea Durham Art (Units 1-4) Drama (Units 1-4) Music Performance (Units 1-4) Media (Units 1-4) Visual Communication and Design (Units 1-4)
ENGLISH Miss Samantha Duncan English (Units 1-4) Literature (Units 1-4)
HEALTH & PE Mr Tony Regan Health and Human Development (Units 1-4) Physical Education (Units 1-4)
HUMANITIES Mr Damian Brasier Accounting (Units 1-4) Australian and Global Politics (Units 1-4) Business Management (Units 1-4) Geography (Units 1-4) History (Units 1-4) Legal Studies (Units 1-4)
LANGUAGES Ms Caroline Bailey German (Units 1-4) Indonesian (Units 1-4) Italian (Units 1-4)
MATHEMATICS Mr Vincent Lam General Mathematics (Units 1-2) Further Mathematics (Units 3-4) Specialist Mathematics (Units 1-4) Mathematical Methods (Units 1-4)
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Mr Patrick Platt Religious Education Religious Education (Units 3 and 4)
SCIENCE Mrs Cathy Jackson Psychology (Units 1-4) Physics (Units 1-4) Chemistry (Units 1-4) Biology (Units 1-4)
TECHNOLOGY Ms Melinda Wills Food Studies (Units 1-4)
VCAL Mrs Janet Deller Personal Development Skills: 2 Units; Work Related Skills: 2 Units (Foundation/ Intermediate/ Senior) Numeracy: 1 Unit (Foundation/ Intermermediate/ Senior) Literacy: 1 Unit oral communication: 1 Unit (Foundation/ Intermediate/ Senior)
VET Ms Annette Kilsby VCE VET Certificate III Music Industry VCE VET Certificate II Business VCE VET Certificate II Applied Fashion Design and Technology
This Handbook has been compiled from the VCAA Study Designs. Students can access the full VCAA Study Designs for all VCE units via www.vcaa.vic.edu.au or can find hard copies in the Resource Centre.
FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT VCE, VET AND VCAL COURSES AND EXPECTATIONS
Mrs Debbie Brock Mrs Christina Pascalis Ms Annette Kilsby Mrs Janet Deller
Acting Deputy Principal Learning and Teaching Year 10-12 Learning Leader Careers and VET Coordinator VCAL Team Leader
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
6
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ACCOUNTING
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier
Career Paths / Future Directions: Accountancy, Banking, Business, Finance, Insurance, Law, Marketing, Merchant Banking, Owning or managing a trading or service business, Record keeping for business.
Unit 1 ­ Establishing and operating a service business
(Code: AC011)
Description This unit focuses on accounting and financial management of a small business. Use of information and communication technologies will be used to compile reports for the small business owner. Outcomes Describe the resources required and explain and discuss the knowledge and skills necessary to set up a small business. Identify and record the financial data and report and explain accounting information for a sole proprietor of a service business.
Assessment Exercises Case studies Tests Assignments Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Accounting for a trading business
(Code: AC022)
Description This unit focuses on the accounting and financial operations of a sole proprietor trading business. Students will learn to account for credit transactions using the accrual approach. Outcomes Record and report financial data and information for a sole trader. Record financial data and report accounting information for a single activity sole trader using a commercial accounting software package and discuss the use of ICT in the accounting process. Select and use financial and non-financial information to evaluate a business and suggest strategies that will improve business performance.
Assessment Exercises Case studies Tests Assignments Semester Examination
Unit 3 ­ Recording and reporting for a trading business
(Code: AC033)
Description This unit focuses on financial accounting for a single activity trading business as operated by a sole trader and emphasises the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting.
Outcomes Record financial data for a single activity sole trader using a double entry system, and discuss the function of various aspects of this accounting system. Record balance day adjustments and prepare and interpret accounting reports.
Unit 4 ­ Control and analysis of business performance
(Code: AC034)
Description This unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3 and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the decision-making process. Students investigate the role and importance of budgeting for the business and undertake the practical completion of budgets for cash, profit and financial position. Students interpret and analyse accounting reports and graphical data to suggest strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business.
Outcomes Record financial data using double entry accounting and report accounting information using an accrual-based system for a single activity sole trader, and discuss the function of various aspects of this accounting system. Prepare budgets and variance reports, evaluate the performance of a business using financial and non-financial information and discuss strategies to improve the profitability and liquidity of the business.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Coursework includes:
Tests (manual and/or ICT)
(At least 30 marks in each Unit must be allocated to ICT based
assessment)
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25%
Examination
= 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
7
APPLIED FASHION DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
VCE VET CERTIFICATE II
KLA Team Leader: Ms Annette Kilsby Career Paths / Future Directions Fashion, Design, Technology Units 1 and 2 ­ Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design and Technology
(Code: MST20616)
Description The Certificate II in Applied Fashion has been designed to give students entry level training in the area of clothing design and manufacture as part of their VCE studies. The course aims to: Provide students with basic design and development skills and knowledge Provide the opportunity to acquire and develop skills in sewing, design processes, working with patterns, applying quality standards and interpreting basic sketches Develop an understanding of the design and clothing industry Enable participants to gain a recognised credential and to make a more informed choice of vocation or career path
Outcomes Completion of nine Units of Competence: Work safely; Work in the TCF industry; Apply quality standards; Modify patterns to create basic styles; Draw and interpret a basic sketch; Design and produce a simple garment; Identify design process for fashion designs; Use a sewing machine for fashion design; Produce a simple textile fabric or product. Assessment In Units 1 and 2 the course is focused on the achievement of competencies. Students will be given work related projects to provide them with the opportunity to apply and refine skills and knowledge acquired during the structured training.
Unit 3 and 4 ­ Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design and Technology
(Code: MST20616)
Prerequisite to study Units 3 and 4 is completion of Units 1 and 2 Description The Certificate II in Applied Fashion has been designed to give students entry level training in the area of clothing design and manufacture as part of their VCE studies. The course aims to: Provide students with basic design and development skills and knowledge Provide the opportunity to acquire and develop skills in sewing, design processes, working with patterns, applying quality standards and interpreting basic sketches Develop an understanding of the design and clothing industry Enable participants to gain a recognised credential and to make a more informed choice of vocation or career path
Outcomes Completion of four Units of Competence: Identify fibres, fabrics and textiles used in the TCF industry; Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices; Prepare design concept for a simple garment; Produce a simple garment. Units 3 and 4 Assessment In Units 3 and 4 the course continues to be competency based and is assessed accordingly. Students are eligible for an increment towards their ATAR score (ie. 10% of the average of the student's four best study scores).
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
8
ART
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham Career Paths / Future Directions: Advertising, Architecture, Designing, Fashion, Media, Photography, private practice, Teaching
Unit 1 ­ Artworks, experience and meaning Description This unit focuses on artworks as objects and examines how formal qualities such as art elements, materials and techniques communicate meaning. Students examine artists in different societies, cultures, and historical periods, to develop their own points of view about the meanings and messages of artwork. They explore the work of artists who have been inspired by ideas relating to personal and cultural identity. Students learn the Formal Framework and the Personal Framework to interpret the meanings of and messages contained in artworks and to document the reflection of their own ideas and art making. In their practical work, they explore the characteristics and qualities of materials and areas of personal interest to generate their own artworks
(Code: AR011) Outcomes Student should be able to analyse and interpret a variety of artworks using the Formal Framework and the Personal Framework. Students should be able to present visual creative responses that demonstrate their personal interests and ideas through trialling techniques, materials and processes. Assessment Self-Portraiture, Folio and Completed Artwork Compare and Contrast Essay Exam Self-Reference Folio and Completed Artwork Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Artworks and contemporary culture
(Code: AR022)
Description In this unit students learn that artworks can be created as forms of cultural expression for specific contexts, such as street art, public art, art produced for festivals, newspaper cartoons, art prizes, curated exhibitions and performance art. Students use the Formal Framework and the Cultural Framework to examine the different ways that artists interpret and present social issues. Students identify ways in which art expresses and reflects culture. They explore how Art is manifested across cultures and examine how art is influenced by time, place, beliefs and traditions. They use the Formal Framework and the Cultural Framework to examine the meanings and messages of selected artworks. In their practical work, students continue to explore techniques and develop personal and creative responses in their art making.
Outcomes Students should be able to analyse, interpret, compare and contrast artworks from different cultures using the Formal Framework and the Cultural Framework. Students should be able to demonstrate technical and artistic development in the presentation of visual responses that include one finished artwork, through the exploration of selected media, materials and techniques. Assessment Refinement process and completed Artwork Folio Essay Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
9
ART (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham Career Paths / Future Directions: Advertising, Architecture, Designing, Fashion, Media, Photography, Private Practice, Teaching
Unit 3 ­ Artworks, ideas and values Description In this unit, students study artists who have produced works before 1990 and since 1990. Students use all the Analytical Frameworks for interpreting and analysing the meaning of artworks. These Analytical Frameworks help students to appreciate how an artwork may contain different aspects and layers of meaning and diverse interpretations. Students link their growing theoretical understanding of art in Area of Study 1 to their own practice in Area of Study 2. Students apply imagination and creativity to develop their ideas through a visual language. Their art making is supported through investigation, exploration and application of a variety of materials and techniques. Students develop confidence in using the language and content of the Analytical Frameworks in their reflection of the formal, personal, cultural and contemporary aspects of their own developing artworks.
(Code: AR033)
Outcomes Students should be able to use the Analytical Frameworks to analyse and interpret artworks produced before 1990 and artworks produced since 1990, and compare and contrast the meanings and messages of artworks produced before 1990 with those of artworks produced since 1990. Students should be able to explore personal ideas and concepts through a folio of work. Conceptual and practical investigation including at least one finished artwork, using selected Analytical Frameworks to reflect upon and annotate their work.
Assessment
Art analysis report; comparing artists
pre and post 2000
10%
Developmental Art Making Folio
S/N
Unit 4 ­ Artworks, ideas and viewpoints Description In Unit 4 students continue to develop personal points of view and informed opinions about art ideas or issues and support them with evidence. They build their learning around the discussion and debate of broad themes or issues. They discuss and debate how art may affect and change the way people think. They examine and analyse their own viewpoints and those of others through commentaries. From this research students choose an art issue to explore. In Art Production students continue to build upon ideas and concepts begun in Unit 3. They focus on the development of a body of work that demonstrates creativity and imagination, the evolution of ideas and the realisation of appropriate concepts, knowledge and skills. At the end of this unit, students present a body of work accompanied by documentation of thinking and working practices.
(Code: AR034)
Outcomes Students should be able to discuss and debate an Art issue using selected artist/s works as context, and present their informed opinion with reference to artworks and with the support of selected commentaries and relevant aspects of the Analytical Frameworks. Students should have progressively communicated ideas, directions and/or personal concepts in a body of work that includes at least one finished artwork, having used selected Analytical Frameworks to underpin reflections on their art making.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework 10%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework 10%
Art making folio of resolved work
50%
Examination
30%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
10
AUSTRALIAN AND GLOBAL POLITICS
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier
Career Paths / Future Directions: Journalism, Diplomacy, Communications, Education, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public policy, Publishing, Research, Teaching, Administration, Local Government, Social Research.
Unit 1 ­ Ideas, Actors and Power
(Code: PS041)
Description In this unit, students are introduced to the key ideas relating to the exercise of political power. They explore how these ideas shape political systems and in particular the characteristics of liberalism. They consider the nature of power in Australian democracy and in a non-democratic political system. They also explore the nature and influence of key political actors in Australia: political parties, interest groups and the media. All these forms of participation in Australian democracy influence the political agenda. Area of Study 1: Power and Ideas Area of Study 2: Political Actors and Power
Outcomes On completion of the unit students should be able to: Identify and explain key ideas relating to the exercise of political power. Analyse and evaluate different approaches to governmental power by comparing Australian democracy with a nondemocratic political system. Explain and analyse the roles and functions of political parties, interest groups and the media and their influence on participation in Australian politics. Assessment Research report Case study Essay Short answer questions Extended response questions Oral presentation Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Global Connections
(Code: PS042)
Description This unit introduces students to the global community and the global actors that are part of this community. In Area of Study 1 students explore the myriad ways lives have been affected by the increased interconnectedness ­ the global links ­ of the world through the process of globalisation. In Area of Study 2, students consider the extent to which global actors cooperate and share visions and goals as part of the global community. They investigate the ability of the global community to manage areas of global cooperation and to respond to issues of global conflict and instability. Area of Study 1: Global Threads Area of Study 2: Global Cooperation and Conflict
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Identify and analyse the social, political and economic interconnections created by globalisation and evaluate Australia's participation in the global community. Describe and analyse the extent to which global actors can effectively manage cooperation, conflict and instability in relation to selected case studies. Assessment Research report Case study Essay Short answer questions Extended response questions Oral presentation Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
11
AUSTRALIAN AND GLOBAL POLITICS (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier
Career Paths / Future Directions: Journalism, Diplomacy, Communications, Education, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public policy, Publishing, Research, Teaching, Administration, Local Government, Social Research.
Unit 3 ­ Global Actors
(Code: PS053 )
Description In this unit students investigate the key global actors in twentyfirst century global politics. They use contemporary evidence. post 2000, to analyse the key global actors and their aims, roles and power. They develop an understanding of the key actors through an in-depth examination of the concepts of national interest and power as they relate to the state and the way in which one AsiaPacific state, China, uses power within the region to achieve its objectives. Global actors could include states; international institutions of global governance, for example the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, International Criminal Court and the World Trade Organisation; transnational corporations (TNCs), for example Nike or Apple; and nonstate actors. For the purposes of this study, the term `non-state actors' covers a range of global actors: altruistic non-governments organisations (NGOs), for example Amnesty International and Greenpeace; organised religions; terrorist movements, for example Al-Qaeda; and organised crime syndicates.
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Evaluate the power and influence of key global actors in the twenty-first century and assess the extent to which they achieve their aims. Analyse and evaluate types of power as used by a specific AsiaPacific state in the region in pursuit of its national interest. Assessment (Selection from) Multimedia presentation Case study Essay Report Test Structured questions Short-answer questions Extended response
Area of Study 1: Global Actors Area of Study 2: Power in the Asia-Pacific Region
Unit 4 ­ Global Challenges
(Code: PS054 )
Description In this unit students investigate key global challenges facing the international community in the twenty-first century. They examine and analyse the debates surrounding two ethical issues, which are underpinned by the contested notion of global citizenship. Two of the following issues can be studied; human rights, people movement, development, arms control and disarmament. They then evaluate the effectiveness of responses to these issues. Students also explore the context and causes of global crises, and consider the varying effectiveness of responses and challenges to solving them. Two of the following crises will be studied; climate change, armed conflict, terrorism or economic instability. This unit is concerned with contemporary issues and events. Conflicts in the Congo, Middle East or Asia could be studied. Area of Study 1: Ethical Issues and Debates Area of Study 2: Global Crises
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Analyse two global ethical issues from a range of perspectives and evaluate the effectiveness of global actors' responses to these issues. Explain two contemporary global crises and evaluate the effectiveness of responses to these.
Assessment (Selection from) Multimedia presentation Case study Essay Report Test Structured questions Short-answer questions Extended response
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework
50%
Examination
50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
12
BIOLOGY
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson Career Paths / Future Directions: Biomedical Engineering, Biotechnology, Environmental Science, Dental Hygienist, Food Technology, Genetics, Horticulture, Marine Biology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Speech Pathology, Veterinary Science and Zoology. Cross-disciplinary study of Chemistry: Pharmacology, Nutrition, Toxicology and Winemaking. Cross-disciplinary study of Physics: Prosthetics and Nuclear Medicine Technology.
Unit 1 ­ How do living things stay alive?
(Code: BI011)
Description This unit introduces some of the challenges to an organism in sustaining life. Students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, from the single celled to the multicellular organism and the requirements for sustaining cellular processes in terms of inputs and outputs. They analyse types of adaptations that enhance the organism's survival in a particular environment and consider the role homeostatic mechanisms play in maintaining the internal environment. Students investigate how a diverse group of organisms form a living interconnected community that is adapted to andutilises,theabioticresourcesofitshabitat. The role of a keystone species in maintaining the structure of an ecosystem is explored. Students consider how the planet's biodiversity is classified and the factors that affect the growth of a population.
Outcomes Students should be able to: Investigate and explain how cellular structures and systems function to sustain life. Explain how various adaptations enhance the survival of an individual organism, investigate the relationships between organisms that form a living community and their habitat and analyse the impacts of factors that affect Population Growth. Design and undertake an investigation related to the survival of an organism or species and draw conclusions based on evidence from collected data. Assessment (Selection from) Fieldwork activity Practical work folio of activities or investigations Media response Data analysis and problem solving Reflective Learning journal/blog Tests Student-designed or adapted investigation Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ How is continuity of life maintained?
(Code: BI022)
Description This unit focuses on cell reproduction and the transmission of biological information from generation to generation. Students study the cell cycle, examine the process of DNA replication and compare cell division in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Students explore asexual and sexual reproductive strategies and consider the advantages and disadvantages of these two types of reproduction. The role of stem cells in the differentiation, growth, repair and replacement of cells in humans is examined and their potential use in medical therapies is considered. Outcomes Students should be able to: Compare the advantages and disadvantages of a sexual and sexual reproduction, explain how changes within the cell cycle may have an impact on cellular or tissue system function and identify the role of stem cells in cell growth and cell differentiation and in medical therapies.
Outcomes (cont'd)

Apply an understanding of genetics to describe patterns of
inheritance, analyse pedigree charts, predict outcomes of
genetic crosses and identify the implications of the uses of
genetic screening and decision making related to inheritance.

Investigate and communicate a substantiated response to a
question related to an issue in genetics and/or reproductive
science.
Assessment Fieldwork activity Practical work folio of activities or investigations Media response Data analysis and problem solving Reflective learning journal/blog Tests Report of an investigation into genetics and/or reproductive science Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
13
BIOLOGY (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson Career Paths / Future Directions: Biomedical Engineering, Biotechnology, Environmental Science, Dental Hygienist, Food Technology, Genetics, Horticulture, Marine Biology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Speech Pathology, Veterinary Science and Zoology. Cross-disciplinary study of Chemistry: Pharmacology, Nutrition, Toxicology and Winemaking. Cross-disciplinary study of Physics: Prosthetics and Nuclear Medicine Technology.
Unit 3 ­ How do cells maintain life?
(Code: BI033)
Description This unit investigates the workings of the cell from several perspectives. It explores the importance of the plasma membrane and the control of the movement of molecules in and out of the cell. Base pairing specificity, the binding of enzymes and substrates, the response of receptors to signalling molecules and reactions between antigens and antibodies are studied. The synthesis, Structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins as key molecules in cellular processes are explored. The chemistry of cells is examined through biochemical pathways, their components and energy transformations. How cells communicate with each other using signalling molecules are considered. The types of signals, the transduction of information within the cell and cellular responses are addressed. At the molecular level, the human immune system and interactions between its components to provide immunity to a specific antigen are studied.
Outcomes Students should be able to: Explain the dynamic nature of the cell in terms of key cellular processes including regulation, photosynthesis and cellular respiration and analyse factors that affect the rate of biochemical reactions. Apply a stimulus-response model to explain how cells communicate with each other, outline human responses to invading pathogens, distinguish between the different ways that immunity may be acquired and explain how malfunctions of the immune system cause disease.
Unit 4 ­ How does life change and respond to challenges over time?
(Code: BI034)
Description This unit examines the continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. The relatedness between species and the impact of various change events on a population's gene pool are investigated. The accumulation of changes over time is considered as a mechanism for biological evolution by natural selection that leads to the rise of new species. The change in life forms using evidence from palaeontology, biogeography, developmental biology and structural morphology is considered. Technological developments in the fields of comparative genomics, molecular homology and bioinformatics that have resulted in evidence of change through measurements of relatedness between species are studied. The structural and cognitive trends in the human fossil record and the interrelationships between human biological and cultural evolution are considered. The biological consequences, and social and ethical implications, of manipulating the DNA molecule and applying biotechnologies is explored for both the individual and the species.
Outcomes
Students should be able to:
Analyse evidence for evolutionary change, explain how
relatedness between species is determined, and elaborate on the
consequences of biological change in human evolution.
Describe how tools and techniques can be used to manipulate
DNA, explain how biological knowledge is applied to biotechnical
applications, and analyse the interrelationship between scientific
knowledge and its applications in society.
Design and undertake an investigation related to cellular processes
and/or biological change and continuity over time, and present
methodologies, findings and conclusions in a scientific poster.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 16%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 24%
Examination
= 60%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
14
BUSINESS ­ VCE VET CERTIFICATE II
KLA Team Leader: Ms Annette Kilsby Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Business, General Reception, Human Resources, Legal Secretary, Marketing, Medical Reception, Office Administration
Units 1 and 2 ­ Certificate II in Business
(Code: BSB20115)
Description The Certificate II in Business is and entry level qualification which provides VCE students with the knowledge and skills to enhance their employment prospects in a business or office environment. The course aims to: Provide an understanding of business fundamentals within the Australian context. Assist students to gain employment opportunities in an entry level administrative or customer service role. Provide some basic skills and knowledge for entry to the office administration field. Develop interpersonal skills essential for a successful career in the business world. Students are required to complete 5 days of work placement in an administrative environment. Units 3 and 4 ­ Certificate II in Business
Outcomes Completion of 10 Units of Competence; Contribute to health and safety of self and others Communicate in the workplace Work effectively with others Produce simple word processed documents Organise and complete daily work activities Work effectively in a business environment Process and maintain workplace information Create and use spreadsheets Use business technology Deliver a service to customers Assessment In Units 1 and 2 the course is focused on the achievement of competencies which will be assessed by a variety of the following methods: Practical application and demonstration of skills Practical Exercises Verbal and Written Reports Group activities Discussion and role-play Tests Semester Examination (Code: BSB30115)
Pre-requisite to study Units 3 and 4 is completion of Units 1 and 2 Description The Certificate II in Business with selected units of competence from Certificate III provides VCE students with a broad range of skills and knowledge to work in a variety of work contexts using discretion, judgement and relevant theoretical knowledge. The course aims to: Provide an understanding of business fundamentals within the Australian context. Assist students to gain employment opportunities in an entry level administrative or customer service role. Provide some skills and knowledge for entry to the office administration field. Develop interpersonal skills essential for a successful career in the business world.
Outcomes Completion of; Organise personal work priorities and development Organise workplace information Design and produce business documents Recommend products and services Deliver and monitor a service to customers
Assessment In Units 3 and 4 the course continues to be competency based and is assessed according to VCAA requirements.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework = 66%
Examination
= 34%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
15
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier Career Paths / Future Directions: Banking, Business, Education, Finance, Government and Private Organizations, Management, Small Business
Unit 1 ­ Planning a Business
(Code: BM011)
Description Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore, how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation's wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate and the effect of these on planning a business. Outcomes Describe how and why business ideas are created and developed, and explain the methods by which a culture of business innovation and entrepreneurship may be fostered in a nation. Describe the external environment of a business and explain how the macro and operating factors within it may affect business planning. Describe the internal business environment and analyse how factors from within it may affect business planning
Assessment A range of tasks from the following: Case study analysis Business research report Development of a business plan and/or feasibility study Interview and report on contact with business Business simulation exercise School-based short-term business activity Essay Business survey and analysis Media analysis Tests Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Establishing a Business
(Code: BM022)
Description This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business's life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management practices in this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years. Outcomes Explain the importance when establishing a business of complying with legal requirements and financial record keeping, and establishing effective policies and procedures. Explain the importance of establishing a customer base and a marketing presence to achieve the objectives of the business, analyse effective marketing and public relations strategies and apply these strategies to business-related case studies. Discuss the staffing needs for a business and evaluate the benefits and limitations of management strategies in this area from both an employer and an employee perspective.
Assessment A selection from the following range of assessment tasks: Case study analysis Business research report Development of a marketing plan and/or feasibility study Interview and report on contact with business Business simulation exercise Essay Business survey and analysis Media analysis Tests Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
16
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier Career Paths / Future Directions: Banking, Business, Education, Finance, Government and Private Organizations, Management, Small Business Unit 3 ­ Managing a Business
(Code: BM033)
Description In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice. Outcomes Discuss the key characteristics of businesses and stakeholders, and analyse the relationship between corporate culture, management styles and management skills. Explain theories of motivation and apply them to a range of contexts, and analyse and evaluate strategies related to the management of employees. Analyse the relationship between business objectives and operations management, and propose and evaluate strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business operations.
Assessment A range of tasks selected from the following: Case study Structured questions Essay Test Report in written format Media analysis
Unit 4 ­ Transforming a Business
(Code: BM034)
Description Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory. Outcomes Explain the way business change may come about, use key performance indicators to analyse the performance of a business, discuss the driving and restraining forces for change and evaluate management strategies to position a business for the future. Evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of strategies used by managers to implement change and discuss the effect of change on the stakeholders of a business.
Assessment A range of tasks selected from the following: Case study Structured questions Essay Report Media analysis Test
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 25% = 25% = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
17
CHEMISTRY
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson
Career Paths / Future Directions: Health Sector: Doctor, Nurse, Dentist, Vet, Physiotherapist, Optometrist, Pharmacist, Pharmacologist, Biochemist and Microbiologist. Food and Nutrition: Food Scientist, Dietician, Nutritionist and Winemaker. Research: Medical Scientist, Sports Scientist, Environmental Scientist and Nanotechnology. Engineering: Chemical Engineer, Petroleum Engineer, Bio-Medical Engineer, Environmental Engineer and Industrial Engineer. Education: Teaching and Tutoring. After completing Units 1 to 4 in Chemistry you will be well equipped to begin any of the careers mentioned above and many more.
Unit 1 ­ How can the diversity of materials be explained?
(Code: CH011)
Description In this unit students investigate the chemical properties of a range of materials. Using their knowledge of atomic structure students explore and explain the relationships between properties, structure and bonding forces within and between particles. Students examine a range of metallic, ionic and non-metallic substances and relate their structures to specific applications. Students are introduced to quantitative concepts in chemistry including the mole concept. Students use chemistry terminology to represent and explain observations and data from experiments. Outcomes Students should be able to: Relate the position of elements in the periodic table to their properties, investigate the structures and properties of metals and ionic compounds, and calculate mole quantities.
Outcomes (cont'd) Investigate and explain the properties of carbon lattices and molecular substances with reference to their structures and bonding, use systematic nomenclature to name organic compounds, and explain how polymers can be designed for a purpose. Investigate a question related to the development, use and/or modification of a selected material or chemical and communicate a substantiated response to the question. Assessment Report of a practical activity Topic tests Report of an independent investigation of a selected topic using an appropriate format, for example digital presentation or written report. Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ What makes water such a unique chemical?
(Code: CH022)
Description In this unit students explore the physical and chemical properties of water, the reactions that occur in water and various methods of water analysis. Students are introduced to stoichiometry and to analytical techniques and instrumental procedures. Students explore the solvent properties of water in a variety of contexts and analyse selected issues associated with substances dissolved in water. Students use chemistry terminology to represent and explain observations and data from experiments. Outcomes Students should be able to: Relate the properties of water to its structure and bonding, and explain the importance of the properties and reactions of water in selected contexts.
Outcomes (cont'd) Measure amounts of dissolved substances in water and analyse water samples for salts, organic compounds and acids and bases. Design and undertake a quantitative laboratory investigation related to water quality, and draw conclusions based on evidence from collected data.
Assessment Report of a practical activity Topic tests Report of a student-designed quantitative investigation presented as a scientific poster Semester Examination
laboratory
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
18
CHEMISTRY (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson
Career Paths / Future Directions: Health Sector: Doctor, Nurse, Dentist, Vet, Physiotherapist, Optometrist, Pharmacist, Pharmacologist, Biochemist and Microbiologist. Food and Nutrition: Food Scientist, Dietician, Nutritionist and Winemaker. Research: Medical Scientist, Sports Scientist, Environmental Scientist and Nanotechnology. Engineering: Chemical Engineer, Petroleum Engineer, Bio-Medical Engineer, Environmental Engineer and Industrial Engineer. Education: Teaching and Tutoring. After completing Units 1 to 4 in Chemistry you will be well equipped to begin any of the careers mentioned above and many more.
Unit 3 ­ How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency?
(Code: CH033)
Description Unit 3 focuses on energy, comparing and evaluating different chemical energy resources. Students study energy transformation by exploring chemical reactions such as combustion, redox chemistry, so that energy efficiency and energy produced is understood. Manufacturing of different material is also explained through investigating and employing the principles of equilibrium. Area of Study 1 Comparison and evaluation of different energy types involves studying chemical reactions involved in fuel cells, galvanic cells, fossil fuels and biofuels. The energy transformations involved with each technique and the energy efficiency of each and any associated environmental impacts investigated.
Outcomes Students should be able to: Evaluate and compare quantitatively different fuels and sources of energy. Apply rates and equilibrium principles to predict the rate and extent of reactions so that they are optimised. Assessment Report on a laboratory investigation Comparison of two electricity-generating cells Reflective journal related to selected activities or in response to an issue Annotation of two practicals Media analysis Response to structured questions.
Area of Study 2 The factors involved with the efficiency and percentage yield of chemical manufacturing process is explored. This involves comprehending the factors that impact the rate of reaction and exploring and applying the principles associated with equilibrium to optimise yield in practical ways.
Unit 4 ­ How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?
(Code: CH034)
Description Unit 4 examines the chemistry of carbon atom so as to appreciate the diversity of organic compounds and their extensive use in the area of fuels, food, medicine and materials used in everyday life. Analysis of such organic compounds through practical and instrumental chemical analysis techniques is studied. Students explore reaction pathways and design pathways to produce certain particles. Area of Study 1 Students are able to compare the general structures and reactions of major organic compounds, recognising specific functional groups associated, specific reaction pathways they participate in and their general chemical properties. Area of Study 2 Students study the organic compounds in food that are used biologically to provide energy and as raw materials for building macromolecules that assist the body's growth and repair. The chemical reactions of condensation and hydrolysis are studied, as is the properties, structure and function of biological molecules.
Outcomes Students should be able to: Compare the general structures and reactions of major organic compounds through knowledge of instrumentation and reaction pathways. Distinguish the chemical structure of biological molecules and the chemical reactions involved in metabolism.
Assessment Analysis of data Practical report Response to structured questions Media analysis Reflective journal related to selected activities or in response to an issue Comparison of food molecules Structured scientific poster
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 16% = 24% = 60%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
19
DRAMA
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham
Career Paths / Future Directions Acting, Communication, Arts Administrator, Drama Teacher, Drama Therapist, Television/Film Production, Radio, Youth and Community Worker, Personnel Manager, Social Worker, Journalist, Marketing Manager, Public Administration, Publicist Scriptwriter, Higher Education Lecturer.
The study of Drama focuses on the creation and performance of characters, narratives and stories. Students draw on a range of content and use role and expressive skills to create, embody and present dramatic works. The study provides students with opportunities to explore the ways in which Drama represents social, political and historical contexts, narratives and stories. Students develop an appreciation of drama as an art form through participation, criticism and aesthetic understanding.
Unit 1 ­ Dramatic Storytelling
(Code: DR011)
Description This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised performance. Students develop an awareness and understanding of how characters are portrayed in naturalistic and non-naturalistic performance styles. They investigate a range of stimulus material and learn about stagecraft, theatrical conventions and performance styles from a range of social and cultural contexts. Outcomes Students should be able to: Use play-making techniques to devise solo and/or ensemble drama work/s based on experiences or stories. Describe the processes used to develop this work. Present devised performance based on a range of stimulus material relevant to the student's personal cultural or community experiences and stories to a live audience. Analyse a devised performance. Observation and analysis of student's own performance work. Reflection and articulation of work processes and product. Identify and evaluate use of dramatic elements and portrayal of stories and characters in a drama performance presented by other practitioners.
Assessment Demonstrate use of play-making techniques and document use of processes to create and develop stories and characters in Drama. A performance of a solo and/or ensemble devised Drama work. Analysis of the work presented as a written report, essay, oral presentation, multimedia presentation or structured questions. A written analysis of a professional performance Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Creating Australian Drama
(Code: DR022)
Description This unit focuses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised solo or ensemble performance. Students create, present and analyse a performance based on a person, event, an issue, a place, an art work, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context. Outcomes Students should be able to: Use Australia as an inspiration to create a solo or ensemble performance work as well as document and record the playmaking techniques used to shape and develop this performance work. Present a devised performance to a live audience in a space appropriate to the theme. Observe and analyse a student's own performance work, reflection on and articulation of, work processes and the work demonstrating continuing development of drama terminology. Analyse an Australian drama performance by professional or other drama practitioners.
Assessment Demonstrate use of play-making techniques and document use of processes to create and develop stories and characters in Drama. A performance of a devised Drama work. A written report, essay, oral presentation, multimedia presentation or structured questions including documentation relating to the creative and rehearsal processes and performance of the work. A written analysis of an Australian performance. Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
20
DRAMA (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham
Career Paths / Future Directions Acting, Communication, Arts Administrator, Drama Teacher, Drama Therapist, Television/Film Production, Radio, Youth and Community Worker, Personnel Manager, Social Worker, Journalist, Marketing Manager, Public Administration, Publicist Scriptwriter, Higher Education Lecturer.
The study of Drama focuses on the creation and performance of characters, narratives and stories. Students draw on a range of content and use role and expressive skills to create, embody and present dramatic works. The study provides students with opportunities to explore the ways in which Drama represents social, political and historical contexts, narratives and stories. Students develop an appreciation of drama as an art form through participation, criticism and aesthetic understanding.
Unit 3 ­ Ensemble Performance
(Code: DR033)
Description This unit focuses on non-naturalistic drama from a diverse range of traditions. Non-naturalistic performance styles and theatrical conventions are explored in the development of ensemble performance. The processes involved in the development and realisation of the ensemble performance are developed and evaluated. A non-naturalistic work selected from the prescribed play list will also be analysed.
Outcomes Students should be able to: Develop and present character[s] within a non-naturalistic ensemble performance. Analyse and evaluate the development and realisation of the ensemble performance and its character/s from Outcome 1. Analyse a non-naturalistic professional performance selected from the prescribed play list.
Assessment Non naturalistic ensemble performance Analysis of performance in ensemble Analysis and evaluation Professional Performance
Unit 4 ­ Solo Performance
(Code: DR034)
Description In this unit students develop two solo performances. For a short solo performance, they develop practical skills of researching, creating, presenting, documenting and analysing a solo performance work. In the development of a second solo performance, they devise, rehearse and perform an extended solo performance in response to a prescribed structure (VCAA). The processes involved in the creation and presentation of character/s in solo performance are analysed and evaluated. Outcomes Students should be able to: Create and present a short solo performance based on stimulus material. Create, develop and perform characters within a solo performance in response to a prescribed structure. Describe, analyse and evaluate the creation, development and presentation of a solo performance.
Assessment Working with Stimulus Material Solo Performance (external assessment) Analysis of processes of the creation and presentation of Solo performance Written Examination (external assessment)
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework = 40%
Performance Examination
= 35%
Written Examination
= 25%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
21
ENGLISH OFFERINGS English Course Options
YEAR 11
YEAR 12
VCE English Unit 1 AND VCE English Unit 2 AND/OR VCE Literature Unit 1 AND VCE Literature Unit 2
VCE Literature Units 3 & 4 AND/OR VCE English Units 3 & 4
Intermediate VCAL Literacy Unit 1 AND Intermediate VCAL Literacy Unit 2 OR Foundation VCAL Literacy Unit 1 AND Foundation VCAL Literacy Unit 2
Senior VCAL Literacy Units 1 & 2 OR Intermediate VCAL Literacy Units 1 & 2
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
22
ENGLISH
KLA Team Leader: Miss Samantha Duncan
Career Paths / Future Directions: Advertising, Editing, Film and Radio, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Policy Development, Politics, Public Relations, Publishing, Script Editing and Writing, Teaching
Unit 1 - English
(Code: EN011)
Description In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts. Areas of study This course is divided into two areas of study: Reading and creating texts Analysing and presenting argument
Assessment An analytical response to a set text A creative response to a set text such as a monologue, script, short story, illustrated narrative, short film or graphic text An analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language in text/s Oral presentation Semester Examination
Outcomes There are two key outcomes for Unit 1, which correspond to the areas of study: Students will respond to a set text in oral and/or written form, both analytically and creatively. Students will need to analyse how argument and persuasive language can be used to position audiences, and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students will identify and discuss how language can be used to persuade readers and/or viewers. Unit 2 - English Description In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in two texts. They will explore how comparing texts can provide a deeper understanding of ideas, issues and themes. Students will analyse arguments presented and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Areas of study The course is divided into two areas of study: Reading and comparing texts Analysing and presenting argument
(Code: EN012) Assessment A comparative analytical response to set texts A persuasive text that presents an argument or viewpoint An analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language in text/s. Semester Examination
Outcomes There are two key outcomes for Unit 2, which correspond to the areas of study: Students will compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in two texts. Students should be able to identify and analyse how argument and persuasive language are used in text/s that attempt to influence an audience, and create a text which presents a point of view.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
23
ENGLISH (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Miss Samantha Duncan
Career Paths / Future Directions: Advertising, Editing, Film and Radio, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Policy Development, Politics, Public Relations, Publishing, Script Editing and Writing, Teaching
Unit 3 - English
(Code: EN013)
Description In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts. Area of Study 1: Reading and Creating Texts In this area of study students identify, discuss and analyse how the features of selected texts create meaning and how they influence interpretation. Students examine the ways in which readers are invited to respond to texts. Students prepare sustained analytical interpretations of selected texts, discussing how features of the texts create meaning and using textual evidence to support their responses. Students present sustained creative responses to selected texts, demonstrating their understanding of the world of the texts and how texts construct meaning.
Outcomes There are two key outcomes for Unit 3, which correspond to the areas of study: An analytical interpretation of a selected text, and a creative response to a different selected text. An analysis and comparison of the use of argument and persuasive language in texts that present a point of view on an issue currently debated in the media. Assessment Analytical text responses Creative text response Analysis of the persuasive use of language
Area of Study 2: Analysing Argument In this area of study students analyse and compare the use of argument and language in texts that debate a topical issue. Students explore the argument of a persuasive piece, and the way written, spoken and visual language is used. Students develop written and spoken critical analyses of the use of argument and language in written, spoken, and/or multimodal texts, including analysis of the quality of the reasoning presented and the use of features intended to position audiences. They compare different written texts presenting argument on similar ideas or issues, considering different ways authors use language to express arguments.
Unit 4 - English
(Code: EN014)
Description In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in two texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media. Area of Study 1: Reading and comparing texts In this area of study students explore the meaningful connections between two texts. They analyse texts, including the interplay between character and setting, voice and structure, and how ideas, issues and themes are conveyed. By comparing the texts, they gain a deeper understanding of the ideas, issues and themes that reflect the world and human experiences. Students produce a written analysis comparing selected texts, discussing important similarities and differences and exploring how the texts deal with similar or related ideas, issues or themes from different perspectives to reflect particular values. Area of Study 2: Presenting argument In this area of study students build their understanding of both the analysis and construction of texts that attempt to influence audiences. They use their knowledge of argument and persuasive language as a basis for the development of their own persuasive texts in relation to a topical issue. This area of study focuses on the construction of persuasive texts. Students use discussion and writing to clarify their thinking and develop a viewpoint on an issue. Students reflect on their intentions in positioning the reader and consider how their use of language expresses their argument.
Outcomes There are two key outcomes for Unit 4, which correspond to the areas of study: A detailed comparison which analyses how two selected texts present ideas, issues and themes. A sustained and reasoned point of view on an issue currently debated in the media. Assessment Comparative Essay Point of View Oral Presentation and accompanying statement of intention Examination
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 25% = 25% = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
24
ENGLISH - LITERATURE
KLA Team Leader: Miss Samantha Duncan An understanding of English Literature has many benefits beyond the personal development. English is the language of not only our society but, increasingly, of the world and a good command of language empowers the individual.
Career Paths / Future Directions: English Literature has relevance in the following areas: Advertising, Communications, Court Reporter, Editing, Education, Ethics/Philosophy, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Marketing, Multi-media, Performance, Policy Development, Politics, Professional Writing, Psychology, Public Relations, Publishing, Social Research, Teaching, Theatre, TV/Film/Radio, Script Writing
Unit 1 ­ Approaches to Literature
(Code: LI011)
Description Unit 1 focuses on the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning. Students' analyses of the features and conventions of texts help them develop increasingly discriminating response to a range of literary forms and styles. Students respond critically, creatively and reflectively to the ideas and concerns of texts and gain insights into how texts function as representations of human experience. They develop familiarity with key terms, concepts and practices that equip them for further studies in Literature. Students will also develop an awareness of how the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text. Areas of Study The course is divided into two areas of study: Area of Study 1- Reading practices Area of Study 2- Ideas and concerns in texts
Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 1, which correspond to the areas of study: Reading practices Ideas and concerns in texts Assessment Reading journal/multi-modal presentation Analytical text response Creative responses: written or performed Film study Discussion Forums Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Context and Connections Description In Unit 2, students explore the ways literary texts connect with each other and with the world. They deepen their examination of the ways their own culture and the cultures represented in texts can influence their interpretations and shape different meanings. Drawing on a range of literary texts, students consider the relationships between authors, audiences and contexts. Ideas, language and structures of different texts from past and present eras and/or cultures are compared and contrasted. Students will analyse the similarities and differences across texts and establish connections between them. They engage in close reading of texts and create analytical responses that are evidence-based. By experimenting with textual structures and language features, students understand how imaginative texts are informed by close analysis. Areas of Study The course is divided into two areas of study: Area of Study 1- The text, the reader and their contexts Area of Study 2- Exploring connections between texts
(Code: LI012) Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 2, which correspond to the areas of study. Assessment Discussion Forums Reading journal Views and values essay/creative presentation Comparative analysis Close analysis Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
25
ENGLISH ­ LITERATURE (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Miss Samantha Duncan An understanding of English Literature has many benefits beyond the personal development. English is the language of not only our society but, increasingly, of the world and a good command of language empowers the individual.
Career Paths / Future Directions: English Literature has relevance in the following areas: Advertising, Communications, Court Reporter, Editing, Education, Ethics/Philosophy, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Marketing, Multi-media, Performance, Policy Development, Politics, Professional Writing, Psychology, Public Relations, Publishing, Social Research, Teaching, Theatre, TV/Film/Radio, Script Writing
Unit 3 ­ Form and Transformation
(Code: LI013)
Description In this unit students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. Students develop their skills in communicating ideas in both written and oral forms. Area of Study 1: Adaptations and transformations In this area of study students focus on how the form of text contributes to the meaning of the text. Area of Study 2: Creative responses to texts Students focus on the imaginative techniques used for creating and recreating a literary work. Students develop an understanding of the various ways in which authors craft texts. They reflect critically upon their own responses as they relate to the text, and discuss the purpose and context of their creations.
Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 3, which correspond to the areas of study: Analyse the extent to which meaning changes when a text is adapted to a different form. Respond creatively to a text and comment on the connections between the text and the response. Assessment Discussion Forums Reflections/Evaluations Comparative analysis Creative response At least one assessment in Unit 3 must include an oral component
Unit 4 ­ Interpreting Texts
(Code: LI014)
Description In this unit students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They consider the context of their responses to texts as well as the ideas explored in the texts, the style of the language and points of view. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.
Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 4, which correspond to the areas of study: Produce an interpretation of a text using different literary perspectives to inform their view Analyse features of texts, and develop and justify interpretations of texts. (two tasks on two different texts)
Area of study 1: Literary perspectives In this area of study students focus on how different readings of texts may reflect the views and values of both writer and reader. They compare and analyse two pieces of literary criticism reflecting different perspectives, assumptions and ideas about the views and values of the text studied develop their own response to a text. Area of study 2: Close analysis In this area of study students focus on detailed scrutiny of the language, style, concerns and construction of texts. Students attend closely to textual details to examine the ways specific features and/or passages in a text contributes to their overall interpretations.
Assessment Discussion Forums Close analysis Discussion papers
Examination At the end of the year there is a two hour examination with one literary perspectives question and one close passage question.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 25% = 25% = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
26
FOOD STUDIES
KLA Team Leader: Ms Melinda Wills
Career Paths / Future Directions: Catering, Chef, Cookery Demonstrator, Dietician, Food Stylist, Food Technologist, Food Technology, Teacher, Food Writer, Home Economist and Hotel Management
Unit 1 ­ Food Origins Description This unit focuses on food from historical and cultural perspectives. Students investigate the origins and roles of food through time and across the world. Area of Study 1: Food around the world Students explore the origins and cultural roles of food, from early civilisations through to today's industrialised and global world. Area of Study 2: Food in Australia Students focus on the history and culture of food in Australia. The practical component complements the study of ingredients indigenous to Australia and provides students with opportunities to extend their research into a selected cuisine brought by migrants. Unit 2 ­ Food Makers Description In this unit students investigate food systems in contemporary Australia. Area of Study 1: Food industries Students focus on commercial food production in Australia. They investigate new food product development and innovation. Students undertake a practical component, creating new food products using design briefs. Area of Study 2: Food in the home Students further explore food production, focusing on domestic and small-scale food production. Their practical skills are extended through designing and adapting recipes, encompassing a range of dietary requirements commonly encountered by the food service sector and within families. Unit 3 ­ Food in Daily Life
(Code: FY011) Outcomes Explain major factors in the development of a globalised food supply and demonstrate adaptations of selected food from earlier cuisines through practical activities. Describe patterns of change in Australia's food industries and cultures and use foods indigenous to Australia and those introduced through migration in the preparation of food products. Assessment Practical activities Short written report Oral presentation Practical demonstration (Code: FY022) Outcomes Describe Australia's major food industries, analyse relationships between food suppliers and consumers and design a brief and a food product that demonstrates the application of commercial principles. Compare and evaluate similar foods prepared in different settings, explain the influences on effective food provision and preparation in the home, and design and create a food product that illustrates potential adaptation in a commercial context. Assessment Design and develop a practical food solution in response to an opportunity or a need in the food industry or school community. Design and develop a practical food solution in response to an opportunity or a need in a domestic or small-scale setting. (Code: FY033)
This unit investigates the many roles and everyday influences of food. Area of Study 1: The science of food Students investigate the physiology of eating and microbiology of digesting, and the absorption and utilisation of macronutrients. They investigate food allergies, food intolerances and the microbiology of food contamination. Area of Study 2: Food choice, health and wellbeing Students focus on patterns of eating in Australia and the influences on the food we eat. Students undertake a practical component developing a repertoire of healthy meals suitable for children and families. Unit 4 ­ Food Issues, Challenges and Futures
Outcomes Explain the processes of eating and digesting food and absorption of macronutrients, causes of food allergies and analyse food selection models. Explain and analyse factors affecting food access and choice, analyse the influences that shape an individual's food values, beliefs and behaviours. Assessment Practical activities Short written report Annotated visual report Oral presentation (Code: FY034)
In this unit students examine debates about global and Australian food systems. Area of Study 1: Environment and ethics Students address debates concerning Australian and global food systems, relating to issues on the environment, ethics, technologies, food access, food safety and the use of agricultural resources. Area of Study 2: Navigating food information Students focus on food information and misinformation and the development of food knowledge, skills and habits. Outcomes Explain a range of food systems issues and create a food repertoire that reflects personal food values and goals.
Outcomes (cont'd) Explain a variety of food information contexts, analyse the formation of food beliefs, evaluate a selected food trend, fad or diet and create food products that meet the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Assessment Practical activities Short written report Annotated visual report Oral presentation
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Written Examination
= 30% = 30% = 40%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
27
GEOGRAPHY
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier
Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Agriculture, Business, Eco-Tourism, Environmental Management and Research, Environmental Planning, Journalism, Local Government, Public Policy, Science, Social Research, Teaching, Tourism, Urban Planning and Development, Economist, Lawyer, Diplomacy, Mining, Real Estate, Meteorology and Cartography.
Unit 1 ­ Hazards and Disasters
(Code: GE011)
Description In this unit students undertake an overview of hazards before investigating two contrasting types of hazards and the responses to them by people. Hazards can be geological (earthquakes, etc.), hydro-meteorological (floods, bushfire, etc.), biological (HIV/AIDS, malaria, etc.) or technological (oils spills, radiation leaks, etc.). Fieldwork Students will undertake fieldwork to a destination, such as Kinglake, relating to the type of hazard selected for study.
Outcomes On completion of the unit students should be able to: Analyse, describe and explain the nature of hazards and impacts of hazard events at a range of scales. Analyse and explain the nature, purpose and effectiveness of a range of responses to selected hazards and disasters. Assessment Fieldwork Report One of case study, research report, folio or test Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Tourism
(Code: GE022)
Description In this unit students investigate the characteristics of tourism, with particular emphasis on where it has developed, it's various forms, how it has changed and continues to change and its impact on people, places and environments. It will include a study of tourist destinations beyond Australia and the story of tourism to the Great Ocean Road and the Otway's region of Victoria. Fieldwork Students will undertake fieldwork to a tourist destination ­ the Otway Ranges and the Great Ocean Road. Unit 3 ­ Changing the Land
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Analyse, describe and explain the nature of tourism at a range of scales. Analyse and explain the impacts of tourism on people, places and environments and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies for managing tourism. Assessment Fieldwork Report One of case study, research report, folio or test Semester Examination (Code: GE033)
Description This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Land cover includes biomes such as forest, grassland, tundra and wetlands, as well as land covered by ice and water. Students will investigate three major processes that are changing many regions of the world; Deforestation Desertification Melting glaciers and ice sheets Fieldwork Students will undertake fieldwork to a destination relating to the topics studied, such as Summerland Peninsula, Philip Island. Unit 4 ­ Human Population ­ Trends and Issues
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Analyse, describe and explain land use change and assess its impacts. Analyse, describe and explain processes that result in changes to land cover and discuss the impacts and responses resulting from these changes. Assessment Structured questions test Fieldwork report Analysis of geographic data test (Code: GE034)
Description
Assessment
In this unit students investigate the geography of human Analysis of geographic data test
populations. They explore the patterns of population change, Structured questions test
movement and distribution and how governments, organisations Unit 3 and 4 Assessment
and individuals have responded to those changes in different Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework 25%
parts of the world. This unit will focus on the social, economic, Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework 25%
political, environmental, historical and technological factors Examination
50%
contributing to population trends and patterns.
Outcomes On completion of this unit, students should be able to: Analyse, describe and explain population dynamics on a global scale. Analyse, describe and explain the nature of significant population issues and challenges in selected locations and evaluate responses.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
28
HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
KLA Team Leader: Mr Tony Regan Career Paths / Future Directions: Community Health, Education, Food Science, Health Administration, Health Sciences, Nursing, Social Welfare
Unit 1 - The health and development of Australia's youth
(Code: HH011)
Description This unit focuses on the health and individual human development of Australia's youth. Students will develop an understanding of the physical, social, emotional and intellectual changes associated with the developmental stage of youth. Issues that impact on the health and individual human development of Australia's youth will also be investigated. Outcomes Describe the dimensions of, and the interrelationships within and between, health and individual human development. Describe and explain the factors that impact on the health and individual human development of Australia's youth. Outline health issues relevant to Australia's youth and, in relation to a specific health issue, analyse strategies or programs that have an impact on youth health and development.
Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Case study analysis Data analysis Visual presentation, such as concept/mind map, poster or presentation file Multimedia presentation Oral presentation, such as a debate or podcasts (audio or visual) Blog Test Written response, such as a research assignment or briefing paper Semester Examination
Unit 2 - Individual human development and health issues Description This unit focuses on the lifespan stages of prenatal childhood and adulthood. Students will develop an understanding of the health and individual human development of Australia's children and adults. A range of health issues that are having an impact on Australia's healthcare system will be discussed. Outcomes Describe and explain factors that affect the health and individual during the prenatal stage. Describe and explain the factors that affect the health and individual human development of Australia's children. Describe and explain the factors that affect the health and individual human development of Australia's adults.
(Code: HH022) Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Case study analysis Data analysis Visual presentation, such as concept/min map, poster or presentation file Multimedia presentation Oral presentation, such as a debate or podcasts (audio or visual) Blog Test Written response, such as a research assignment or briefing paper Semester Examination
Unit 3 ­ Australia's Health
(Code: HH033)
Description This unit focuses on the health status of Australians. Students will develop an understanding of the health status of Australians by investigating the burden of disease and the health of population groups in Australia. The development of the National Health Priority Areas and their relationship to burden of disease in Australia is examined. Students will discuss the roles and responsibilities of government and non-government organisations in addressing health needs and promoting health.
Outcomes Compare the health status of Australia's population with other developed countries, explain variations in health status of population groups in Australia and discuss the role of the National Health Priority Areas in improving Australia's health status. Discuss and analyse approaches to health and health promotion, and describe Australia's health system and the different roles of government and non-government organisations in promoting health.
Unit 4 ­ Global Health and Human Development
(Code: HH034)
Description This unit takes a global perspective on achieving sustainable improvements in health and human development. Students explore global health, human development and sustainability. The role of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals is investigated in relation to achieving sustainable improvements in health status and human development. Australia's contribution to international programs are also discussed. Outcomes Analyse factors contributing to variations in health status between Australia and developing countries, evaluate progress towards the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals and describe the interrelationships between health, human development and sustainability.
Outcomes (cont'd) Describe and evaluate programs implemented by international and Australian government and non-government organisations in promoting health, human development and sustainability.
Assessment Case Studies Written Reports Data Analysis Tests
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 25% = 25% = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
29
HISTORY
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier
Career Paths / Future Directions: Communications, Education, Journalism, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public policy, Publishing, Research
Unit 1 ­ Twentieth Century History (1918 - 1939)
(Code: HI031)
Description In Unit 1 students explore the nature of political, social and cultural change in the period between the world wars. World War One is regarded by many as marking the beginning of Twentieth Century History since it represented such a complete departure from the past and heralded changes that were to have an impact for decades to come. The period after World War One was characterised by significant social and cultural change in the contrasting decades of the 1920s and 1930s. In the USA, the consumerism and material progress of the 1920s was tempered by the Great Crash of 1929. Writers, artists, musicians, choreographers and filmmakers reflected, promoted or resisted political, economic and social changes.
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Explain the consequences of the peace treaties which ended World War One, the impact of ideologies on nations and the events that led to World War Two. Explain the patterns of social life and cultural change in on or more contexts and analyse the factors which influenced changes to social life and culture in the inter-war years. Assessment A selection of tasks from: Historical inquiry Analysis of primary sources Analysis of historical interpretations Essay Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Twentieth Century History (1945 - 2000)
(Code: HI042)
Description In Unit 2 students explore the nature and impact of the Cold War and challenges and changes to existing political, economic and social arrangements in the second half of the Twentieth Century. The period saw challenge and change to the established order in many countries. The second half of the Twentieth Century also saw a rise of social movements that challenged existing values and traditions, such as civil rights movement, feminism and environmental movements. Unit 3 ­ The French Revolution Unit 4 ­ The Russian Revolution
Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to: Explain the ideological divisions in the post-war period and analyse the nature, development and impact of the Cold War on nations and people, in relation to one or more particular conflicts in the period. Explain the causes and nature of challenge and change in relation to two selected contexts in the second half of the Twentieth Century and analyse the consequences for nations and people. Assessment A selection of tasks from: Historical inquiry Analysis of primary sources Analysis of historical interpretations Essay Semester Examination (Code: HI133) (Code: HI134)
In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Post-revolutionary regimes are often threatened internally by civil war and externally by foreign threats. These challenges can result in a compromise of revolutionary ideals and extreme measures of violence, oppression and terror.
Description Area of Study 1: Units 3 and 4 ­ Causes of Revolution In this area of study students analyse the long-term causes and shortterm triggers of revolution. Area of Study 2: Units 3 and 4 ­ Consequences of Revolution In this area of study students analyse the consequences of the revolution and evaluate the extent to which it brought change to society.
Units 3 and 4 Outcomes Outcome 1: Analyse the causes of revolution and evaluate the contribution of significant ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Outcome 2: Analyse the consequences of revolution and evaluate the extent of change brought to society.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Historical inquiry Analysis of primary sources Analysis of historical interpretations Essay
Unit 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 25% = 25% = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
30
LANGUAGES - GERMAN
KLA Team Leader:
Ms Caroline Bailey
Students selecting Languages (German) should have completed study of that language in Years 7-10 and gained a good pass at Year 10 level. A language
other than English is a useful additional skill for many subject areas, including English, Science, Music and Engineering.
Career Paths / Future Directions: Education, Government organisations, International Business, international relations, Law, Commerce, Public Policy, Journalism, Tourism
Areas of Study (Applies to Units 1, 2, 3, and 4) The areas of study for German comprise themes and topics, grammar, text types, vocabulary and kinds of writing. The prescribed themes are `The Individual', The `German-speaking Communities' and `The Changing World'. Students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length and degree of difficulty, and there is a stronger emphasis on grammatical accuracy.
Unit 1 ­ German
(Code: LO101)
Description The study of German develops students' ability to understand and use the German language. German is a language of culture, music, theology and philosophy as well as a key language in the fields of science, medicine, economics and technology. The study of German will enable you to use the language to communicate with others; understand and appreciate the cultural contexts in which German is used to enhance your knowledge of your own culture through the study of another and to make connections between German and English.
Outcomes Demonstrate that you can speak or write on topics related to personal areas of experience. Demonstrate that you can understand longer spoken and written texts to obtain information and respond in writing. Demonstrate that you can respond orally or in writing to a text focussing on real or imaginary experience. Assessment An informal conversation or a response to a personal letter, fax or email Reading and listening to German texts and responding to them in writing, in either German or English An oral presentation or a review or an article Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ German
(Code: LO102)
Description Through the study of topics within the themes of `The Individual', `The German-speaking Communities' and `The Changing World', students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length and degree of difficulty, and there is a stronger emphasis on grammatical accuracy. Outcomes Demonstrate that you can make arrangements or ask for/give advice orally or in writing on a topic currently studied in class in the German language.
Outcomes (cont'd) Demonstrate that you can use information and ideas from spoken and written texts in the German language to produce your own text. Demonstrate that you can speak or write in German about real or imaginary experiences. Assessment A role-play or interview or a formal letter, fax or email Reorganise information from spoken and written texts in a different text type A journal entry or a personal account or a short story Semester Examination
Unit 3 ­ German
(Code: LO103)
Students selecting Languages (German Units 3/4) should have completed Units 1 and 2 of the Language and gained a good pass. A language other than English is a useful additional skill for many subject areas, including English, Science, Music and Engineering.
Description This unit enables students to use language to conduct daily activities, to develop relationships, to seek out and understand factual information, to use information for a variety of purposes. Through the study of topics within the themes of `The Individual', `The German-speaking Communities' and `The Changing World', students will consolidate and expand their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length, complexity and degree of difficulty. Students are expected to write longer pieces of around 300 words, and there is a strong emphasis on grammatical accuracy. In addition, students will begin work on a Detailed Study topic
Description (cont'd) This will enable students to explore and compare aspects of the language and culture of the German speaking community through a range of oral and written texts. This topic forms the basis of discussion in Section Two of the Oral Examination. Outcomes Demonstrate that you can write a personal or imaginative piece of approximately 300 words. Demonstrate that you can understand, analyse and use information from spoken texts. Demonstrate that you can exchange information, opinions and experiences to resolve an issue orally with another German speaker in a 3-4 minute role play.
Unit 4 ­ German Description In this unit students continue to consolidate their language skills in all areas. There is a particular focus on analysis and critically responding to texts and ideas. Writing tasks will place particular emphasis on informative, evaluative and persuasive writing. The Detailed study is continued through this unit.
(Code: LO104) Outcomes Demonstrate that you can understand, analyse and respond in written German to a variety of German texts. Demonstrate that you can produce an informative, evaluative or persuasive written response, which shows a critical response to aspects of language and culture of German speaking communities. Demonstrate that you can respond critically in an interview on an issue related to texts studied.
Unit 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework ­ three tasks
= 25%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework ­ three tasks
= 25%
Examinations - one oral (12.5%) and one written (37.5%) = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
31
LANGUAGES - INDONESIAN
KLA Team Leader: Ms Caroline Bailey Students selecting Languages (Indonesian) should have completed study of that language in Years 7-10 and gained a good pass at Year 10 level. A language other than English is a useful additional skill for many subject areas, including English, Science, Music and Engineering.
Career Paths / Future Directions: Armed Forces, Education, Government organisations, International Business, International Relations, Law, Commerce, Public Policy, Journalism, and Tourism.
Areas of Study (Applies to Units 1, 2, 3 and 4) The areas of study for Indonesian comprise themes and topics, grammar, text types, vocabulary and kinds of writing. The prescribed themes are; `The Individual', `The Indonesian- Speaking Communities' and `The Changing World'. Students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length and degree of difficulty, and there is a stronger emphasis on grammatical accuracy.
Unit 1 ­ Indonesian Description The study of Indonesian develops students' ability to understand and use the language of a country which is one of Australia's closest neighbours and is also one of the most populated countries in the world. Links between Australia and Indonesia have become more important in recent decades, particularly in areas such as business, tourism, education and security. The study of Indonesian will enable you to use the language to communicate with others; to understand and appreciate the cultural contexts in which Indonesian is used; to enhance your knowledge of your own culture through the study of another and to make connections between Indonesian and English. Unit 2 ­ Indonesian Description Through the study of topics within the themes of `The Individual', `The Indonesian-speaking Communities' and `The Changing World', students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length and degree of difficulty, and there is a stronger emphasis on grammatical accuracy. Outcomes Demonstrate that you can make arrangements or ask for/give advice orally or in writing on a topic currently studied in class in the Indonesian language. Unit 3 ­ Indonesian
(Code: LO401) Outcomes Demonstrate that you can speak or write on topics related to personal areas of experience. Demonstrate that you can understand longer spoken and written texts to obtain information and respond in writing. Demonstrate that you can respond orally or in writing to a text focussing on real or imaginary experience. Assessment An informal conversation or a response to a personal letter, fax or email Reading and listening to Indonesian texts and responding to them in writing, in either Indonesian or English An oral presentation or a review or an article Semester Examination (Code: LO402) Outcomes (cont'd) Demonstrate that you can use information and ideas from spoken and written texts in the Indonesian language to produce your own text. Demonstrate that you can speak or write in Indonesian about real or imaginary experiences. Assessment A role-play or interview or a formal letter, fax or email Reorganise information from spoken and written texts in a different text type A journal entry or a personal account or a short story Semester Examination (Code: LO403)
Students selecting Languages (Indonesian Units 3/4) should have completed Units 1 and 2 of the Language and gained a good pass. A language other than English is a useful additional skill for many subject areas, including English, Science, Music and Engineering.
Description This unit enables students to use language to conduct daily activities, to develop relationships, to seek out and understand factual information, to use information for a variety of purposes. Through the study of topics within the themes of `The Individual', `The Indonesian speaking Communities' and `The Changing World', students will consolidate and expand their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length, complexity and degree of difficulty. Students are expected to write longer pieces of around 300 words, and there is a strong emphasis on grammatical accuracy. In addition, students will begin work on a Detailed Study topic. This will
Outcomes Demonstrate that you can write a personal or imaginative piece of approximately 300 words. Demonstrate that you can understand, analyse and use information from spoken texts. Demonstrate that you can exchange information, opinions and experiences to resolve an issue orally with another Indonesian speaker in a 3-4 minute role play.
enable students to explore and compare aspects of the language and culture of the Indonesian speaking community through a range of oral and written texts. This topic forms the basis of discussion in Section Two of the
Oral Examination.
Unit 4 ­ Indonesian Description In this unit students continue to consolidate their language skills in all areas. There is a particular focus on analysis and critically responding to texts and ideas. Writing tasks will place particular emphasis on informative, evaluative and persuasive writing. The Detailed study is continued through this unit.
(Code: LO404) Outcomes (cont'd) Demonstrate that you can produce an informative, evaluative or persuasive written response, which shows a critical response to aspects of language and culture of Indonesian speaking communities. Demonstrate that you can respond critically in an interview on an issue related to texts studied.
Outcomes Demonstrate that you can understand, analyse and respond in written Indonesian to a variety of Indonesian texts.
Unit 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework ­ three tasks
= 25%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework ­ three tasks
= 25%
Examinations - one oral (12.5%) and one written (37.5%) = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
32
LANGUAGES - ITALIAN
KLA Team Leader:
Ms Caroline Bailey
Students selecting Languages (Italian) should have completed study of that language in Years 7-10 and gained a good pass at Year 10 level. A language
other than English is a useful additional skill for many subject areas, including English, Science, Music, Engineering, Law, Health and Social Care.
Career Paths/ Future Directions: Armed Forces, Education, Government organisations, International Business, International Relations, Law, Commerce, Public Policy, Journalism, Tourism, Nursing, Medicine, Design and Marketing.
Areas of Study (Applies to Units 1,2,3 and 4) The areas of study for Italian comprise themes and topics, grammar, text types, vocabulary and kinds of writing. The prescribed themes are: `The Individual', `The Italian-speaking communities', and `The Changing World'. Students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length and degree of difficulty, and there is a stronger emphasis on grammatical accuracy.
Unit 1 ­ Italian
(Code: LO141)
Description The study of Italian develops students' ability to understand and use the Italian language, which is one of the official languages of the European Union and the second most widely spoken language in Australia, after English. A knowledge of Italian in conjunction with other skills can provide employment opportunities in areas such as tourism, social services, banking, commerce, education, medicine, law and design. The study of Italian will enable you to use the language to communicate with others; understand and appreciate the cultural contexts in which Italian is used; to enhance knowledge of your own culture through the study of another and to make connections between Italian and English. Unit 2 ­ Italian
Outcomes Demonstrate that you can speak or write on topics related to personal areas of experience. Demonstrate that you can understand longer spoken and written texts to obtain information and respond in writing. Demonstrate that you can respond orally or in writing to a text focusing on a real or imaginary experience. Assessment An informal conversation or a response to a personal letter fax or email Reading and listening to Italian texts and responding to them in writing, in either Italian or English An oral presentation or a review or an article Semester Examination (Code: LO142)
Description Through the study of topics within the themes of `The Individual', `The Italian-speaking Communities' and `The Changing World', students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length and degree of difficulty, and there is a stronger emphasis on grammatical accuracy. Outcomes Demonstrate that you can make arrangements or ask for/ give advice orally or in writing on a topic currently studied in class in the Italian language. Unit 3 ­ Italian
Outcomes (cont'd) Demonstrate that you can use information and ideas from spoken and written texts in the Italian language to produce your own text. Demonstrate that you can speak or write in Italian about real or imaginary experiences. Assessment A role-play or interview or a formal letter, fax or email Reorganise information from spoken and written texts in a different text type A journal entry or a personal account or a short story Semester Examination (Code: LO143)
Students selecting Languages (Italian Units 3/4) should have completed Units 1 and 2 of the Language and gained a good pass. A Language other than English is a useful additional skill for many subject areas including English, Science, Music, Engineering, Law, Health and Social Care.
Description This unit enables students to use language to conduct daily activities, to develop relationships, to seek out and understand factual information and to use information for a variety of purposes. Through the study of topics within the themes of `The Individual', `The Italian-speaking Communities' and `The Changing World', students will consolidate and expand their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Spoken exchanges and written texts will increase in length, complexity and degree of difficulty. Students are expected to write longer pieces of around 300 words, and there is a strong emphasis on grammatical accuracy. In addition, students will begin work on a Detailed Study topic. This will enable students to explore and compare aspects of the language and culture of the Italian speaking community through a range of oral and written texts. This topic forms the basis of discussion in Section Two of the Oral Examination.
Outcomes Demonstrate that you can write a personal or imaginative piece of approximately 300 words Demonstrate that you can understand, analyse and use information from spoken texts. Demonstrate that you can exchange information, opinions and experiences to resolve an issue orally with another Italian speaker in a 3-4 minute role play.
Unit 4 ­ Italian Description In this unit students continue to consolidate their language skills in all areas. There is a particular focus on analysis and critically responding to texts and ideas. Writing tasks will place particular emphasis on informative, evaluative and persuasive writing. The Detailed Study is continued through this unit.
(Code: LO144) Outcomes Demonstrate that you can understand, analyse and respond in written Italian to a variety of Italian texts. Demonstrate that you can produce informative, evaluative or persuasive written responses, which show a critical response to aspects of language and culture of Italian speaking communities. Demonstrate that you can respond critically in an interview on an issue related to texts studied.
Unit 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework ­ three tasks
= 25%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework ­ three tasks
= 25%
Examinations - one oral (12.5%) and one written (37.5%) = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
33
LEGAL STUDIES
KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier
Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Legal Secretary, Business and Commerce, Correctional Services, Criminology, Justice system, Law, Paralegal, Public Service, Social Work and Teaching
Unit 1 ­ Guilt and Liability Description This study focuses on developing an understanding of legal foundations, such as different types and sources of law and the existence of a court hierarchy in Victoria. It investigates key concepts of criminal law and civil law and applying these to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios to determine whether and accused may be found guilty of a crime or liable in a civil dispute. It develops an appreciation of the way in which legal principles and information are used in making reasoned judgements and conclusions about the culpability of an accused and the liability of a party in civil dispute. Unit 2 ­ Sanctions, Remedies and Rights Description This study focuses on the enforcement of criminal law and civil law, the methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute, and the purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and their effectiveness. It also investigates two criminal cases and two civil cases from the past four years to form a judgement about the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve the principles of justice. Outcomes Explain key concepts in the determination of a criminal case and discuss the principles of justice in relation to the determination of criminal cases, sanctions and sentencing approaches. Unit 3 ­ Rights and Justice
(Code: LS011) Outcomes Describe the main sources and types of law and assess the effectiveness of laws. Explain the purposes and key concepts of criminal law and use legal reasoning to argue the criminal culpability of an accused based on actual and/or hypothetical scenarios. Explain the purposes and key concepts of civil law and apply legal reasoning to argue the liability of a party in civil law based on actual and/or hypothetical scenarios. (Code: LS022) Outcomes (cont'd) Explain key concepts in the resolution of a civil dispute and discuss the principles of justice in relation to the resolution of civil disputes and remedies. Evaluate the ways in which rights are protected in Australia, compare this approach with that adopted by another country and discuss the impact of an Australian case on the rights of individuals and the legal system. Units 1 and 2 Assessment Case Studies Structured assignment Folio and Report Test Semester Examination (Code: LS033)
Description In this unit students examine the methods and institutions in the justice system and consider their appropriateness in determining criminal cases and resolving civil disputes. Students explore matters such as the rights available to an accused and to victims in the criminal justice system, the roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and the parties, and the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve their purposes. Students investigate the extent to which the principles of justice are upheld in the justice system, and discuss recent reforms to the legal system. Unit 4 ­ The People and the Law Description In this unit, students explore how the Australian Constitution establishes the law-making powers of the Commonwealth and State Parliaments and protects the Australian people through structures that act as a check on Parliament in law making. Students develop an understanding of the significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. They investigate Parliament and the courts, and the relationship between the two in law making and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform. Outcomes Discuss the significance of High Court cases involving the interpretation of the Australian Constitution and evaluate the ways in which the Australian Constitution acts as a check on Parliament in law making.
Outcomes Explain the rights of the accused and of victims in the criminal justice system, discuss the means used to determine criminal cases and evaluate the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice. Analyse the factors to consider when initiating a civil claim, discuss the institutions and methods used to resolve civil disputes and evaluate the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice.
(Code: LS034)
Outcomes (cont'd) Discuss the factors that affect the ability of Parliament and courts to make law, evaluate the ability of these law makers to respond to the need for law reform and analyse how individuals, the media and law reform bodies can influence a change in the law.
Assessment Case study Structured questions
Unit 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 25% = 25% = 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
34
MATHEMATICS OFFERINGS
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
35
GENERAL MATHEMATICS
KLA Team Leader: Mr Vincent Lam Students undertaking Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4, require a completion of Units 1 and 2 Mathematics, excluding Foundation Maths. This course is for students intending to study Further Mathematics in the following year. It focuses on broad skill development, with an emphasis on statistics and arithmetic. Units 1 and 2 Mathematics is required for Primary Teaching. Career Paths / Future Directions: This course focuses on a broad mathematical development, with an emphasis on statistics. It is useful for Psychology related courses, and careers in Health Sciences.
Units 1 and 2 ­ General Mathematics
(Code: MA071 / MA072 )
Description This course is made up of six Areas of Study as follows: Algebra and structure Arithmetic and number Discrete mathematics Geometry, measurement and geometry Graphs of Linear and Non-linear relations Statistics Outcomes Define and explain key concepts; apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures. Select and apply mathematical facts, concepts, models and techniques to investigate and analyse extended application problems in a range of contexts. Select and use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Assessment Demonstration of achievement of the outcomes is based on the student's performance on a selection of the following tasks: Modelling tasks Problem solving tasks Tests Summary or review notes Application tasks Semester Examinations * All assessment is internally set and assessed. (CAS calculator and one bound reference permitted in course work and Examinations)
Units 3 and 4 ­ Further Mathematics Description This course is made up of two Areas of Study: Area of Study 1 ­ Unit 3 Core: Data analysis AND Recursion and financial modelling Area of Study 2 ­ Unit 4 Applications (CHOOSE 2 FROM): Geometry and Measurement Graphs and Relations Matrices Networks and Decision Mathematics
(Code: MA073 / MA074)
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework (Application Task and Modelling and Problem Solving Task 1)
= 20%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework (Modelling and Problem Solving Task 2 and 3)
=14%
Written Examination 1
= 33%
Written Examination 2
= 33%
(CAS calculator and one bound reference permitted in course work and Examinations 1 and 2)
Outcomes Define and explain key concepts; apply a range of related mathematical techniques and models in routine contexts. Select and apply mathematical concepts, models and techniques in a range of contexts of increasing complexity. Select and use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
36
MATHEMATICAL METHODS
KLA Team Leader: Mr Vincent Lam Students who wish to study Units 3 and 4 Mathematical Methods need to have completed Units 1 and 2 Mathematical Methods.
Career Paths / Future Directions: Mathematical Methods Unit 3 and 4 is a pre-requisite for some Tertiary courses. Career paths may include Commerce, Biological and Physical Sciences, Computer Programming, Statistics, Education, Engineering, Medicine. Works well with Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2.
Units 1 and 2 ­ Mathematical Methods
(Code: MA111/ MA112)
Description There are four Areas of Study. They are: Functions and graphs Algebra Calculus Probability and statistics Outcomes Define and explain key concepts; and apply a range of mathematical routines and procedures. Apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts including situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches, and analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics. Select and use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Assessment Demonstration of achievement of the outcomes is based on the student's performance on a selection of the following tasks: Tests and Semester Examinations (some Tests and Examinations will be technology free) Summary or review notes Short/Extended Response Problem solving and modelling tasks * All assessment is internally set and assessed.
Units 3 and 4 ­ Mathematical Methods
(Code: MA113 / MA114)
Description A fully prescribed course of four Areas of Study. They are: Functions and graphs Algebra Calculus Probability and statistics Outcomes Define and explain key concepts; and apply a range of mathematical routines and procedures. Apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts including situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches, and analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics. Select and use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework (Application Task)
= 17%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework (Modelling and Problem Solving Task 1 and 2)
= 17%
Written Examination 1 (No calculators or notes permitted in Examination 1)
= 22%
Written Examination 2
= 44%
(CAS calculator and one bound reference permitted in Examination 2)
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
37
SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS
KLA Team Leader: Mr Vincent Lam Students selecting Unit 3 and 4 Specialist Mathematics should have completed four Units of Mathematics at Year 11. They also need to complete Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4, a prerequisite being that the student has completed Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2. It is necessary as preparation for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4, but is also useful as a good foundation for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4. It focuses on algebraic applications and analysis.
Career Paths / Future Directions: This course has an emphasis on algebraic applications and analysis and is directed towards Tertiary courses in Mathematics, Engineering and Physical Sciences. Also: Actuarial, Commerce, Computer Programming, Education, Engineering, Government Organisations, Medicine, Statistics
Units 1 and 2 ­ Specialist Mathematics
(Code: MA071 / MA072)
Description There are six Areas of Study and two Prescribed Topics per unit from: Number systems and recursion; Vectors in the plane; Geometry in the plane and proof; and Graphs of non-linear relations. Areas of study: Arithmetic and number Geometry, measurement and trigonometry Graphs of linear and non-linear relations Algebra and structure Discrete mathematics Statistics
Outcomes Define and explain key concepts; and apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures. Apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts, and analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics in at least 3 areas of study. Use technology to produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches in at least 3 areas of study. Assessment Demonstration of achievement of the outcomes is based on the student's performance on a selection of the following tasks: Tests and Semester Examinations (some Tests/Examinations will be technology free) Summary or review notes Short written responses Problem solving and modelling tasks
* All assessment is internally set and assessed.
Units 3 and 4 ­ Specialist Mathematics
(Code: MA093 / MA094)
Description A fully prescribed course of six Areas of Study: Functions and graphs Algebra Calculus Vectors Mechanics Probability and statistics Outcomes Define and explain key concepts as specified in the content from areas of study, and apply a range of mathematical routines and procedures. Apply mathematical processes, with an emphasis on general cases, in non-routine contexts and analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics. Select and use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework (Application Task)
= 17%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework (Modelling and Problem Solving Task 1 and 2)
=17%
Written Examination 1
= 22%
(No calculators or notes permitted in Examination 1)
Written Examination 2
= 44%
(CAS calculator and one bound reference permitted in Examination 2)
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
38
MEDIA
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham
Career Paths / Future Directions Advertising, Graphic Design, Interior Design, Marketing, Media Industry, Multimedia
Unit 1 ­ Representation and Technologies of representation
(Code: ME011)
Description Year 11 Media has a highly practical focus and allows students to specialise. Students learn to construct media representations with cameras, software, devices and emerging technologies. The subject allows for development in: filmmaking (short, feature, trailer, advert, YouTube); photography (still, cinematography, photojournalism, artistic); animation (flash, blender, stop-motion); 2D & 3D modelling and design (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign); App and game development (Unity); publishing (news, magazine, blogging, YouTube); sound recording. The subject's theory is built around analysis of a multitude of media including film, streaming television, photography, advertising, journalism, public relations and radio. The purpose of the theoretical work is to inform the practical. The purpose of this unit is to enable students to develop an understanding of the relationship between the media, technology and the representations present in media forms. Students develop practical and analytical skills, including developing an understanding of the contribution of codes and conventions to the creation of meaning in media products, and the role and significance of selection processes in their construction.
Outcomes Construct representation in chosen media form for selected demographic. Produce and compare media representations in two media forms. Implement an emerging technology into an original representation. Analyse genre codes and conventions to produce genre-specific product. Assessment Production of Representation in selected medium Production of Comparative Representations in selected medium Emerging Technology Research & Production in selected medium Filmic and Visual Representation Analysis Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Media Production and the Media Industry
(Code: ME022)
Description This unit will enable students to develop their understanding of the specialist production stages and roles within the collaborative organisation of media production. Students develop practical skills through undertaking assigned roles during their participation in specific stages of a media production and analyse issues concerning the stages and roles in the media production process. Students also develop an understanding of media industry issues and developments relating to production stages and roles and the broader framework within with Australian media organisations operate. Outcomes Explain the media production process and demonstrate specialist production skills within collaborative media productions.
Outcomes (cont'd) Discuss media industry issues and/or developments relating to the production stages of a media production and specialist roles within the industry. Describe characteristics of Australian media organisations and discuss the social and industrial framework within which they operate. Assessment Australian Media Organisation Report Media Production Design Plan Media Production Analysis of Media Production's industry Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
39
MEDIA (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham
Career Paths / Future Directions Advertising, Graphic Design, Interior Design, Marketing, Media Industry, Multimedia
Unit 3 ­ Narrative and Media Production Design
(Code: ME033)
Description The purpose of this unit is to enable students to develop an understanding of production and story elements and to recognize the role and significance of narrative organization in fictional film, radio or television programs. In this context students also consider how production and story elements structure narratives to engage an audience. Students also develop practical skills through undertaking exercises related to aspects of the design and production process. They design a media production for a specific media form with the relevant specifications presented as a written planning document with visual representations.
Outcomes Analyse production and story elements in fictional media texts and discuss how these elements structure the narrative. Use a range of equipment, applications and media processes to present ideas and explore aesthetic qualities in production design plan specification areas. Prepare a media production design plan incorporating the specifications appropriate for the chosen media product.
Assessment
Narrative Report
8%
Production Exercises S/N
Design Plan
S/N
Unit 4 ­ Media Process, Social Values and Media Influence
(Code: ME034)
Description The purpose of this unit is to enable students to further develop practical skills in the production of media products and to realise a production design. Organisational and creative skills are refined and applied throughout this process. In this unit students also analyse the ways in which media texts are shaped by social values and the influence of social values in the representations and structure of a media text. The role and influence of the media is also critically analysed in this unit.
Outcomes Produce a media product for an identified audience. Discuss the ways in which social values shape and are reflected in a media text. Discuss theories of media influence and analyse debates about the nature and extent of media influence.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Media exercises, design plan, production and process = 35%
Social Values Report
= 6%
Media Influence Report
= 6%
Examination
= 45%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
40
MUSIC INDUSTRY ­ VCE VET CERTIFICATE III
KLA Team Leaders: Ms Annette Kilsby Career Paths / Future Directions: Musician, song writer, composer, arranger, copier, promoter, teacher, instrumentalist. VCE VET programs lead to nationally recognised qualification, thereby offering students the opportunity to gain both the VCE and a nationally portable Vocational Education and Training (VET) Certificate.
Units 1 and 2
(Code: CUA30915)
Description VCE VET Certificate III in Music Industry involves; music industry knowledge, music performance, practical knowledge of copyright and health, safety and security procedures important to the music industry. Outcome Completion of six units of competence: Implement copyright arrangements Work effectively in the music industry Follow occupational health and safety procedures Apply knowledge of genre to music industry practise Develop ensemble skills for playing or singing music Make a music demo/ notate music
Assessment Performance Song writing techniques Rehearsal Production and Recording Music Technology Students who complete the Unit 1 and 2 sequence, but do not progress to the Unit 3 and 4 sequence of Music Industry, will be given recognition for the completion of VCE VET Units 1 and 2 and will receive a Statement of Attainment for the VET units they completed.
Units 3 and 4
(Code: CUA30915)
Description VCE VET Certificate III in Music Industry involves; music industry knowledge, music performance, practical knowledge of copyright and health, safety and security procedures important to the music industry. Outcomes Completion of five units of competence: Develop technical skills in performance Develop improvisation skills Prepare for Performance Develop and maintain stagecraft skills A choice of either; Perform music as part of a group Perform music as a soloist Assessment Performance Music Making and Improvisation Rehearsal Production and Recording Music Technology Aural Perception Exam
The satisfactory completion of Units 3 and 4 in Music Industry will earn the student a Certificate III in Music Industry (VET).
On the completion of Units 3 and 4 VCE VET Music Industry students will be eligible to receive VCE unit credits.
Students who choose not to receive a Study Score may still receive the VET Certificate III in Music Industry upon completion of the prescribed units of Competence.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework = 50%
Examination
= 50%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
41
MUSIC PERFORMANCE
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham It is recommended that students studying Music Performance Units 1 ­ 4 undertake Private Instrumental lessons of their chosen instrument with their teacher of choice. Students who wish to study Music Performance may be asked to audition.
Career Paths / Future Directions: Musician, song writer, composer, arranger, copier, promoter, teacher, instrumentalist, Music Industry,
Music Performance and Music Therapy
Unit 1 ­ Music Performance
(Code: MC011)
Description This unit focuses on building performance and musicianship skills. Students present performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments. They study the work of other performers and explore strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and practise technical work to address these challenges. They also develop skills in performing previously unseen music. Students study aural, theory and analysis concepts to develop their musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances. Area of Study 1: Performance (Outcome 1) Prepare and perform a practised program of group and solo works. Unit 2 ­ Music Performance
Area Study 2: Performance Technique (Outcome 2) Demonstrate instrumental techniques used in performance of selected works, demonstrate unprepared performance skills and describe influences on their approach to performance. Area Study 3: Musicianship (Outcome 3) Identify, re-create, notate and transcribe elements of music, and describe ways in which expressive elements of music may be interpreted. Unit 1 Assessment Solo technical presentation Solo and Group Performances Semester examination: Aural and Music Theory (Code: MC012)
Description In this unit students build their performance and musicianship skills. They present performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments. Students study the work of other performers through listening and analysis and use specific strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They also study strategies for developing technical and expressive performance skills. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and practise related technical work. They develop skills in performing previously unseen music and study specific concepts to build their musicianship knowledge and skills. Students also devise an original composition or improvisation. Area Study 1: Performance (Outcome 1) Prepare and perform a musically engaging program of group and solo works. Unit 3 ­ Music Performance
Area Study 2: Performance technique (Outcome 2) Demonstrate instrumental techniques used in performance of selected works, demonstrate unprepared performance skills and describe influences on their approach to performance. Area Study 3: Musicianship (Outcome 3) Identify, re-create, notate and transcribe elements of music, and describe how selected elements of music have been interpreted in performance. Area Study 2: Organisation of Sound (Outcome 4) Devise a composition or an improvisation that uses music language evident in work/s being prepared for performance. Unit 2 Assessment Solo Technical Presentation Solo and Group Performances Folio Composition/Improvisation work and presentation Semester examination: Aural and Music Theory (Code: MC043)
Description This unit focuses on building and refining performance and musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and begin preparation of a performance program they will present in the end of year examination. As part of their preparation, students will also present performances of both group and solo music works using one or more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues and spaces. They study the work of other performers and refine selected strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances. Unit 4 ­ Music Performance
Area of Study 1: Performance (Outcome 1)
Prepare and perform a program of group and solo works, and
demonstrate a diverse range of techniques and expressive qualities
and an understanding of a wide range of music styles and
performance conventions.
Area Study 2: Preparing for Performance (Outcome 2)
Demonstrate and discuss techniques relevant to performance of
selected works.
Area Study 3: Music Language (Outcome 3)
Identify, re-create, notate and transcribe short excerpts of music,
and discuss the interpretation of expressive elements of music in pre-
recorded works.
Unit 3 Assessment
School-Assessed Coursework
= 20%
Performance Demonstration
= 40%
Oral or Multimedia Presentation
= 10%
Test: Aural, Theory, Written and Practical Components = 50%
(Code: MC044)
Description In this unit students refine their ability to present convincing performances of group and solo works. Students select group and solo works that complement works selected in Unit 3. They further develop and refine instrumental and performance techniques that enable them to expressively shape their performance and communicate their understanding of the music style of each work. Students continue to develop skills in aural perception and comprehension, transcription, theory, analysis and unprepared performance. Students continue to study ways in which Australian performers interpret works that have been created since 1910 by Australian composers/songwriters. Area Study 1: Performance (Outcome 1) Students will be able to prepare and perform a practised program of group and solo works.
Area Study 2: Performance technique (Outcome 2) Students will demonstrate instrumental techniques used in performance of selected works, demonstrate unprepared performance skills and describe influences on their approach to performance. Area Study 3: Musicianship (Outcome 3) Students will identify, re-create, notate and transcribe elements of music, and describe how selected elements of music have been interpreted in performance.
Unit 4 Assessment School-Assessed Coursework
= 10%
Performance Demonstration Oral or Multimedia Presentation
= 40% = 10%
Examination: Performance Examination: Aural and Written
= 50% = 20%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
42
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
KLA Team Leader: Mr Tony Regan
Career Paths / Future Directions: Childcare, Chiropractor, Education, Fitness industry, Health industry, Nursing, Outdoor Education, Physiotherapy, Recreation, Sports Administration, Sports Marketing
Unit 1 ­ The Human Body in Motion
(Code: PE011)
Description In this unit students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement. Through practical activities students explore the relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. Students investigate the role and function of the main structures in each system and how they respond to physical activity, sport and exercise. They explore how the capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and participation in physical activity. Using a contemporary approach, students evaluate the social, cultural and environmental influences on movement. They consider the implications of the use of legal and illegal practices to improve the performance of the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems, evaluating perceived benefits and describing potential harms. They also recommend and implement strategies to minimise the risk of illness or injury to each system. Outcomes Collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of practical activities to explain how the musculoskeletal system functions and its limiting conditions, and evaluate the ethical and performance implications of the use of practices and substances that enhance human movement. Unit 2 ­ Physical Activity, Sport and Society Description This unit develops students' understanding of physical activity, sport and society from a participatory perspective. Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the role participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour plays in their own health and wellbeing as well as in other people's lives in different population groups. Through a series of practical activities, students experience and explore different types of physical activity promoted in their own and different population groups. They gain an appreciation of the level of physical activity required for health benefits. Students investigate how participation in physical activity varies across the lifespan. They explore a range of factors that influence and facilitate participation in regular physical activity. They collect data to determine perceived enablers of and barriers to physical activity and the ways in which opportunities for participation in physical activity can be extended in various communities, social, cultural and environmental contexts. Students investigate individual and population-based consequences of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. They then create and participate in an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines relevant to the particular population group being studied. Students apply various methods to assess individual and population physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels and analyse the data in relation to behaviour guidelines. Students study and apply the social ecological model and/or the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model to critique a range of individual and settings based strategies that are effective in promoting participation in some form of regular physical activity.
Outcomes (cont'd) Collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of practical activities to explain how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function and the limiting conditions of each system, and discuss the ethical and performance implications of the use of practices and substances to enhance the performance of these two systems. Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Written report analysing participation Practical laboratory report linking key knowledge and key skills to practical activity Case study analysis Data analysis Critically reflective folio/diary of participation in practical activities Visual presentation Multimedia presentation Physical simulation or model Oral presentation such as podcast, debate Written report Structured questions Semester Examination (Code: PE022) Outcomes Collect and analyse data related to individual and population levels of participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour to create, undertake and evaluate an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines for an individual or a specific group. Apply a social-ecological framework to research, analyse and evaluate a contemporary issue associated with participation in physical activity and/or sport in a local, national or global setting. Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Written plan and reflective folio Visual presentation Multimedia presentation Oral presentation such as podcast, debate Written report Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
43
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mr Tony Regan
Career Paths / Future Directions: Childcare, Chiropractor, Education, Fitness industry, Health industry, Nursing, Outdoor Education, Physiotherapy, Recreation, Sports Administration, Sports Marketing
Unit 3 ­ Movement skills and energy for physical activity
(Code: PE033)
Description This unit introduces students to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological perspective. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport. Students investigate the relative contribution and interplay of the three energy systems to performance in physical activity, sport and exercise. In particular, they investigate the characteristics of each system and the interplay of the systems during physical activity. Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery.
Outcomes Collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of physical activities to develop and refine movement skills from a coaching perspective, through the application of biomechanical and skill acquisition principles. Use data collected in practical activities to analyse how the major body and energy systems work together to enable movements to occur, and explain the factors causing fatigue and suitable recovery strategies. Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Practical laboratory report Case study analysis Data analysis Critically reflective folio/diary of participation in practical activities Visual presentation Multimedia presentation Structured questions
Unit 4 ­ Training to improve performance
(Code: PE034)
Description In this unit students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance within physical activity at an individual, club and elite level. Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on the ability of the individual and/ or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to design and evaluate an effective training program.
Outcomes Analyse data from an activity analysis and fitness tests to determine and assess the fitness components and energy system requirements of the activity. Participate in a variety of training methods, and design and evaluate training programs to enhance specific fitness components.
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25%
Examination
= 50%
Students participate in a variety of Training Sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual, and evaluate the chronic adaptations to training from a theoretical perspective.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
44
PHYSICS
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson
Career Paths / Future Directions: Physicists may undertake research and development in specialist areas including Acoustics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Atmospheric Physics, Computational Physics, Education, Energy Research, Engineering, Instrumentation, Lasers and Photonics, Medical Physics, Nuclear Science, Optics, Pyrotechnics and Radiography. Physicists may also work in cross-disciplinary areas such as Bushfire Research, Climate Science, Forensic Science, Geology, Material Science, Neuroscience and Sports Science.
Unit 1 ­ What ideas explain the physical world?
(Code: PH011)
Description Area of Study 1: How can thermal effects be explained? Students investigate heating processes, including concepts of temperature, energy and work. They analyse the strengths and limitations of the collection and interpretation of thermal data in order to consider debates related to climate science. Students will use Thermodynamic principles to investigate issues related to the environmental impacts of human activity. Area of Study 2: How do electric circuits work? In this area students undertake practical investigations of circuit components. Series and parallel circuits are explored and concepts of electrical safety are developed through the study of safety mechanisms and the effect of current on humans. Household circuits, appliances and simple DC circuits are investigated. Area of Study 3: What is matter and how is it formed? In this area of study students explore the nature of matter, and consider the origins of atoms, time and space. They examine the currently accepted theory of what constitutes the nucleus, the forces within the nucleus and how energy is derived from the nucleus. Radioactive decay and nuclear transformations are explained using E-mc2.
Outcomes Apply thermodynamic principles to analyse, interpret and explain changes in thermal energy in selected contexts, and describe the environmental impact of human activities with reference to thermal effects and climate science concepts. Investigate and apply a basic DC circuit model to simple battery-operated devices and household electrical systems, apply Mathematical Models to analyse circuits, and describe the safe and effective use of electricity by individuals and the community. Explain the origins of atoms, the nature of subatomic particles and how energy can be produced by atoms. Assessment Investigation and explanation of the operation of an electrical device Report of a selected physics phenomenon Media response Summary report of selected practical investigations Tests comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response questions Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ What do experiments reveal about the physical world?
(Code: PH022)
Description Area of Study 1: How can motion be described and explained? In this area of study students observe motion and explore the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on motion. They analyse motion using concepts of energy, including energy transfers and transformations, and apply mathematical models during experimental investigations of motion. They describe and analyse graphically, numerically and algebraically the motion of an object, using specific physics terminology and conventions. Students explore the power of experimentation. They plan and complete a self-designed and conducted practical investigation which requires them to develop a question, plan a course of action that attempts to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary data, organise and interpret the data, and reach a conclusion in response to the question.
Outcomes Investigate, analyse and mathematically model the motion of particles and bodies. Design and undertake an investigation of a physics question related to the scientific inquiry processes of data collection and analysis, and draw conclusions based on evidence from collected data. Assessment Proposed solution to a scientific or technological problem Report of a selected physics phenomenon Tests comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response questions Report of a practical investigation (student-designed or adapted) presented as a scientific poster. Semester Examination
Area of Study 2: Options? Twelve options are available for selection in Area of Study 2. Each option is based on a different observation of the physical world. Students choose one of twelve options related to Astrobiology, Astrophysics, Bioelectricity, Biomechanics, Electronics, Flight, Medical Physics, Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Physics, Optics, Sound and Sports Science. This option enables them to pursue an area of interest by investigating a selected question.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
45
PHYSICS (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson
Career Paths / Future Directions: Physicists may undertake research and development in specialist areas including Acoustics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Atmospheric Physics, Computational Physics, Education, Energy Research, Engineering, Instrumentation, Lasers and Photonics, Medical Physics, Nuclear Science, Optics, Pyrotechnics and Radiography. Physicists may also work in cross-disciplinary areas such as Bushfire Research, Climate Science, Forensic Science, Geology, Material Science, Neuroscience and Sports Science.
Unit 3 ­ How do fields explain Motion and Electricity?
(Code: PH033)
Description Students explore the interactions, effects and applications of gravitational, electric and magnetic fields. Students use Newton's laws to investigate motion in one and two dimensions, and are introduced to Einstein's theories to explain the motion of very fast objects. They consider how developing technologies can challenge existing explanations of the physical world. Outcomes Analyse gravitational, electric and magnetic fields, and use these to explain the operation of motors and particle accelerators and the orbits of satellites. Analyse and evaluate an electricity generation and distribution system. Investigate motion and related energy transformations experimentally, analyse motion using Newton's laws of motion in one and two dimensions, and explain the motion of objects moving at very large speeds using Einstein's theory of special relativity.
Assessment A selection of tasks, including: Report of a physics phenomenon Media analysis/response Explanation of the operation of a device Proposed solution to a scientific or technological problem Response to structured questions
Unit 4 ­ How can two contradictory models explain both light and matter?
(Code: PH034)
Description Students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter. They examine how the concept of the wave is used to explain the nature of light and explore its limitations in describing light behaviour. Students further investigate light by using a particle model to explain its behaviour. A wave model is also used to explain the behaviour of matter which enables students to consider the relationship between light and matter. Outcomes Students apply wave concepts to analyse, interpret and explain the behaviour of light. Students explore the design of major experiments that have led to the development of theories to describe the most fundamental aspects of the physical world ­ light and matter. Students design and undertake a practical investigation related to waves, fields or motion.
Assessment An extended practical investigation and a selection of tasks, including: a report of a physics phenomenon media analysis/response an explanation of the operation of a device a proposed solution to a scientific or technological problem a response to structured questions
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework Examination
= 40% = 60%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
46
PSYCHOLOGY
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson
Career Paths / Future Directions: Psychology, Counselling and Therapy, Health and Sport Promotion, Human Resources and Organisational Management, Neuroscience and Neuropsychology, Rehabilitation, Sports Psychology, Forensic Psychology, Education and Marketing, and Advertising. Graduates of Psychology Degrees are employed as Social Policy Researchers, Human Resources Professionals, Teachers, Life Coaches, Immigration and Correctional Officers, Social Workers, Market Researchers, Counsellors, Social Workers, Career Development Practitioners and Health Promotion Officers.
Unit 1 ­ How are behaviour and mental processes shaped?
(Code: PY011)
How does the brain function? Advances in brain research methods have led to new ways of understanding the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour. In this area of study students examine how our understanding of brain structure and function changed over time and how the brain enables us to interact with the external world around us. They analyse the roles of specific area of the brain and the interactions between different areas of the brain that enable complex cognitive tasks to be performed. Students explore how brain plasticity and brain damage can affect a person's functioning.
What influences psychological development The psychological development of an individual involves complex interactions between biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore how these factors influences different aspects of a person's psychological development. They consider the interactive nature of hereditary and environmental factors and investigate specific factors that may lead to development of typical or atypical psychological development in individuals, including a person's emotional, cognitive and social development and the development of psychological disorders.
Assessment Tests Logbook of practical activities Student directed research investigation Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ How do external factors influence behaviour and mental process?
(Code: PY022)
What influences a person's perception of the world? Human perception of internal and external stimuli is influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore two aspects of human perception, vision and taste, and analyse the relationship between sensation and perception of stimuli. They consider how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person's perception of visual and taste stimuli, and explore circumstances where perceptual distortions of vision and taste may occur.
How are people influenced to behave in particular ways? A person's social cognition and behaviour influence the way they view themselves and the way they relate to others. In this area of study students explore the interplay of biological, psychological and social factors that shape the behaviour of individuals and groups. They consider how these factors can be used to explain the cause and dynamics of particular individual and group behaviours, including attitude formation, prejudice, discrimination, helping behaviour and bullying. Students examine the findings of classical and contemporary research as a way of theorising and explaining individual and group behaviour.
Assessment Tests Logbook of practical activities Media response Student directed practical investigation Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
47
PSYCHOLOGY (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Cathy Jackson
Career Paths / Future Directions: Psychology, Counselling and Therapy, Health and Sport Promotion, Human Resources and Organisational Management, Neuroscience and Neuropsychology, Rehabilitation, Sports Psychology, Forensic Psychology, Education and Marketing, and Advertising. Graduates of Psychology Degrees are employed as Social Policy Researchers, Human Resources Professionals, Teachers, Life Coaches, Immigration and Correctional Officers, Social Workers, Market Researchers, Counsellors, Social Workers, Career Development Practitioners and Health Promotion Officers.
Unit 3 ­ How does experience affect behaviour and mental processes?
(Code: PY033)
Description This unit looks at two major areas of study: how the nervous system enables psychological functioning and how people learn and remember. Throughout each area students will also examine research methodologies and ethics. This unit focuses on evaluating how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person's nervous system functioning and the influence of factors on the fallibility of memory. Outcomes Explain how the structure and function of the human nervous system enables a person to interact with the external world and analyse the different ways in which stress can affect nervous system functioning. Apply biological and psychological explanations for how new information can be learnt and stored in memory and provide biological, psychological and social explanations of a person's inability to remember information.
Assessment At least two different tasks from: Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical logbook Evaluation of research Report of a student investigation Analysis of data including generalisations and conclusions Visual presentation Media analysis/response Response to a set of structured questions Reflective blog/learning journal related to selected activities or in response to an issue Test
Unit 4 ­ How is wellbeing developed and maintained?
(Code: PY034)
Description This unit looks at three major areas of study: the effect of consciousness on mental processes, behaviour and the influences of mental wellbeing and a practical investigation. Throughout each area students will also examine research methodologies and ethics. This unit focuses on the biological, psychological and social influences on sleep and the management of mental disorders. Outcomes Explain consciousness as a continuum, compare theories about the purpose and nature of sleep and elaborate on the effects of sleep disruption on a person's functioning. Explain the concepts of mental health and mental illness including influences of risk and protective factors, apply a biopsychosocial approach to explain the development and management of specific phobia and explain the psychological basis of strategies that contribute to mental wellbeing. Design and undertake a practical investigation related to mental processes and psychological functioning and present methodologies, findings and conclusions in a scientific poster.
Assessment Area Study One: Analysis and evaluation of stimulus material using at least one task selected from: Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical work folio Comparison of different states of consciousness Report of a student investigation Analysis of data including generalisations and conclusions Media analysis/response Response to a set of structured questions Reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue Test Area Study Two: Application of a biopsychosocial approach using at least one task (which is different from the type of task/s for Outcome 1) selected from: Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical work folio Analysis of the development of specific phobia or the maintenance of mental health Report of a student investigation Analysis of data including generalisations and conclusions media analysis/response Response to a set of structured questions Reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue Test
Area Study Three: Structured scientific poster according the VCAA template
Units 3 and 4 Assessment
Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework = 40%
Written Examination
= 60%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
48
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION OFFERINGS Religious Education Course Options
Completed in Year 10 - 2017
Year 11 - 2018
Year 12 - 2019
Religion and Society Unit 1 (Religion in Society)
Year 11 Religious Education
Year 12 Religious Education (school-based)
OR Religion and Society Units 3 and 4
OR Religion and Society Units 3 and 4
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
49
RELIGION AND SOCIETY
KLA Team Leader: Mr Patrick Platt
Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Advertising, Communications, Community Development, Education, Journalism, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public Policy, Public Relations, Publishing, Research, Social Research, Theology
Unit 3 ­ The Search for Meaning
(Code: RE033)
Description This unit focuses on investigating key religious beliefs and the ways in which these beliefs create meaning for people. These beliefs refer to views about ultimate reality held by individuals, organisations and whole societies. The areas of study are a) Meaning in Religious tradition and b) The development of Religious tradition
Outcomes Explain and evaluate the significance of a range of beliefs within one or more religious tradition/s. Explain the continuity and maintenance of a religious belief or beliefs within one or more tradition/s. Draw conclusions about the interplay between religious beliefs and significant life experiences.
Assessment Report Case Study Essay
Unit 4 ­ Challenge and Response
(Code: RE034)
Description religious traditions change and develop over time. This unit focuses on developments which challenge significant beliefs of the Catholic tradition and which may produce enduring historical or social consequences for the tradition. Students explore historical profiles of the religious tradition and analyse decisive occasions of challenge to that tradition. They also consider the implications of religious belief for action on behalf of social justice and for assessment of new problems arising from social and technological change.
Outcomes Analyse how the Catholic tradition responded to a significant internal or external challenge, and evaluate the outcome for the tradition. Analyse the interplay between religious beliefs and the vision of each tradition for society, and the way one or more specific issues are confronted in attempting to implement the vision. Assessment Analytical Exercise Short Report Biographical Exercise
Unit 3 and 4 Assessment
Percentage contributions to the study score in Religion and Society are
as follows:
Unit 3 School-Assessed Coursework = 25%
Unit 4 School-Assessed Coursework = 25%
Examination:
= 50 %
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
50
VCAL (VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING)
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Janet Deller
Career Paths / Future Directions: See `VCAL Pathways for students' on pages 4 and 5 of this Handbook
Personal Development Skills
(Code: PDS011 / PDS012 / PDS021 / PDS022 / PDS031 / PDS032)
Description Personal Development Skills is designed to develop skills, knowledge and attributes that lead to: the development of self, including self-confidence and resilience social responsibility empowerment for active citizenship Students participate in projects related to their interests as well as taking part in externally delivered programs and community partnerships.
Personal Development Skills (Foundation Units) 1 and 2, Personal Development Skills (Intermediate) Units 1 and 2 and Personal Development Skills (Senior) Units 1 and 2 are offered The two units at each level reflect a progression in skills, knowledge and attitude. Unit 1 focuses on development of organisation and planning skills, knowledge, practical skills, problem solving and interpersonal skills through participation in experiences of a practical nature relating to a person, health and wellbeing, education or family. Unit 2 focuses on community engagement, social awareness, interpersonal skills and planning and organisational skills. These can be achieved through participation in experiences of a practical nature within the community.
Work Related Skills
(Code: WRS011 / WRS012 / WRS021 / WRS022 / WRS031 / WRS032)
Description Work Related Skills focuses on the development of employability skills and personal attributes valued by employers. Skills in occupational health and safety and environment are also considered essential work related skills. Work Related Skills (Foundation) Units 1 and 2, Work Related Skills (Intermediate) Units 1 and 2 and, Work Related Skills (Senior) Units 1 and 2 are offered.
The student will: Learn about Occupational Health and Safety. Develop critical thinking skills that apply to problem solving in work contexts. Develop planning and work-related organisation skills. Participate in Structured Workplace Learning.
Personal Development Skills and Work Related Skills Assessment
A range of assessment methods are used to verify successful completion of the learning outcomes of each VCAL unit. These may
include:
student self-assessment
written tasks
teacher observation
discussion
reflective work journals
role-plays
student logbooks
folios of tasks or investigations
oral presentations
application of Information and Communications Technology
including internet usage
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
51
VCAL LITERACY
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Janet Deller
Career Paths / Future Directions: See "VCAL Pathways for students" on pages 4 and 5 of this Handbook. Units 1 and 2 Foundation, Units 1 and 2 Intermediate and Units 1 and 2 Senior (Codes: LIT011 / LIT012 / LIT021 / LIT022 / LIT031 / LIT032)
Description The VCAL Literacy Skills Units are designed for use within the Literacy and Numeracy Skills Strand of VCAL. Purpose The purpose of the VCAL Literacy Skills Units is to develop literacy skills and knowledge that allow effective participation in the four main social contexts in which we function in Australian society: family and social life workplace and institutional settings education and training contexts community and civic life Literacy (reading, writing, speaking and listening) occurs in all these social contexts and different domains or areas of literacy practice correspond with the social contexts.
VCAL Certificate award level requirements VCAL Literacy Skills Units are offered at all three levels: Foundation: Literacy Skills Foundation Reading and Writing Unit Literacy Skills Foundation Oral Communication Unit Intermediate: Literacy Skills Intermediate Reading and Writing Unit Literacy Skills Intermediate Oral Communication Unit Senior: Literacy Skills Senior Reading and Writing Unit Literacy Skills Senior Oral Communication Unit
Reading and Writing Units
Description In the Reading and Writing Units, the four literacy domains: literacy for self-expression; literacy for practical purposes; literacy for knowledge, and literacy for public debate, provide a framework by which learners can become aware of the social context or areas of social practices in which they operate, the genres relevant to these social contexts and an applied `real life' approach to literacy development which they can develop skills to use the genres effectively. The purpose of Foundation Reading and Writing is to enable students to develop skills and knowledge to read and write simple or short texts. Texts will deal with mainly personal and familiar topics but may include some unfamiliar aspects. At this level, students, often with support, use the writing process with an awareness of the purpose and audience of the text. In reading, students are able to identify the main point of the text, some key details and express an opinion about the text as a whole as well as some of the details. At the end of the Foundation Reading and Writing Unit, students will be able to read and comprehend a range of simple short texts and write a range of short texts in a number of contexts which may be interrelated.
The Senior Reading and Writing Unit focuses on developing skills for future pathways. The reading and writing unit at this level aims to enable learners to develop the skills and knowledge to read and write complex texts. The texts will deal with general situations and include some abstract concepts or technical details. Learners will produce texts that incorporate a range of ideas, information, beliefs or processes and have control of the language devices appropriate to the type of text. In reading, the learner identifies the views shaping the text and the devices used to present those views. The learner will also express an opinion on the effectiveness and content of the text. At the end of the Senior Reading and Writing Unit learners will be able to read, comprehend and write a range of complex texts across a broad range of contexts. In both Intermediate and Senior Units, students will further develop their skills in the mechanics of writing, in particular, expression, punctuation and spelling. In addition, experience with proof-reading will assist students in their final written products.
The purpose of Intermediate Reading and Writing is to enable learners to develop the skills and knowledge to read and write a range of texts on everyday subject matters which include some unfamiliar aspects or material. At this level, once they have identified the audience and purpose of the text, learners use the writing process to produce texts that link several ideas or pieces of information. In reading, learners identify how, and if, the writer has achieved their purpose and express an opinion on the text, taking into account its effectiveness.
At the end of the Intermediate Reading and Writing Unit learners will be able to read, comprehend and write a range of texts within a variety of contexts.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
52
VCAL LITERACY (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Mrs Janet Deller Career Paths / Future Directions: See "VCAL Pathways for students" on pages 4 and 5 of this Handbook. Units 1 and 2 Foundation, Units 1 and 2 Intermediate and Units 1 and 2 Senior (Cont'd)
Oral Communication Units
The Oral Communication Units are designed to provide participants with knowledge, understanding and skills in spoken communication for different social purposes. The oral communication units reflect the theory that language use varies depending on the social context and purpose of the interaction, and uses this as its main organising principle. It identifies four primary purposes for oral communication which reflect the literacy domains and encompass a range of contexts for spoken interaction. These are: Self-expression Knowledge Practical Purposes Problem Solving and Exploring Issues The learning outcomes for the oral communication strand are based on typical spoken interactions used to fulfil these broad social purposes.
Oracy for knowledge focuses on spoken interactions involving presentations of information, principles, explanations and theories. The types of speech most likely to occur in this domain include reports, talks, informative interviews, speeches, lectures, presentations and news broadcasts. Oracy for practical purposes focuses on spoken interactions involving giving support, advice or expertise. The types of speech most likely to occur in this domain include giving or responding to instructions or directions, exchanging goods and services, making appointments and job interviews. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving focuses on spoken interactions involving giving opinions, evidence and information and resolving issues. The types of speech most likely to occur in this domain include public meetings, discussion, debates and meetings.
Unit Assessment: Reading and Writing; Oral Communication
A range of assessment methods is used to enable students to demonstrate competence in the learning outcomes. Assessment includes but is not restricted to:
Student self-assessment Teacher observation Reflective work journals Oral presentations Oral explanation of text Written text Physical demonstration of understanding of written or oral text
Discussion Debates Role plays Folios of tasks or investigations Performing practical tasks Peer assessment
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
53
VCAL NUMERACY
VCAL Team Leader: Mrs Janet Deller
Career Paths / Future Directions: See `VCAL Pathways for students' on pages 4 and 5 of this Handbook
Foundation, Intermediate and Senior Numeracy Skills
(Code: NUM011 / NUM021 / NUM031)
The VCAL Numeracy Skills Units are designed for use within the Literacy and Numeracy Skills Strand of VCAL. Purpose Underpinning the VCAL Numeracy Skills Units is the concept that skills development occurs best when it takes place within social contexts and for social purposes. Like the VCAL Literacy Skills Units, the purpose of the VCAL Numeracy Skills Units is to develop skills and knowledge that allow effective participation in the four main social contexts in which we function in Australian society: family and social life workplace and institutional settings education and training contexts community and civic life. Numeracy and mathematics is used in all these social contexts. VCAL Certificate Award Level Requirements: There are three VCAL Numeracy Skills units offered: one at Foundation Level, one at Intermediate Level and one at Senior Level. Each unit has a nominal duration of 100 hours.
Description: The learning outcomes are organised into four different domains which focus on the social purposes of numeracy and mathematics: Numeracy for Personal Organisation focuses on the numeracy requirements for personal organisational matters involving money, time and travel. Numeracy for Interpreting Society relates to interpreting and reflecting on numerical, statistical and graphical information of relevance to self, work or community. Numeracy for Practical Purposes addresses aspects of the physical world to do with designing, making and measuring. It incorporates mathematical skills related to the appreciation and application of shape and measurement. Numeracy for Knowledge is included at the Senior level. It deals with learning about formal mathematical skills and conventions needed for further study in mathematics, or other subjects with mathematical underpinnings and/or assumptions. The mathematics areas of number; space and shape, data, measurement, and algebra are present within the above domains.
Foundation Numeracy The purpose of this Unit is to enable students to develop the confidence and skills to perform simple and familiar numeracy tasks and to develop the ability to make sense of mathematics in their daily personal lives. The mathematics involved includes measurement, shape, numbers and graphs that are part of the student's normal routines to do with shopping, travelling, cooking, interpreting public information, telling the time etc. On successful completion of this Unit, students will be able to perform everyday mathematical tasks which involve a single mathematical step or process. Their communication about mathematical ideas would mainly be spoken rather than written responses. Intermediate Numeracy The purpose of this Numeracy Unit is to enable learners to develop everyday numeracy to make sense of their daily, personal and public lives. It also introduces learners to the mathematics required outside their immediate personal environment. This may be related to work or the community. At the completion of this unit, learners will be able to undertake a series of numerical tasks with some confidence including straightforward calculations either manually and/or using a calculator. They will also be able to select the appropriate method or approach required and be able to communicate their ideas both verbally and in writing. Senior Numeracy The Senior level unit aims to enable learners to explore mathematics beyond its familiar and everyday use to its application in wider, less personal contexts such as newspapers, workplace documents and procedures, and specific projects at home or in the community. The Mathematics covered includes measurement, graphs and simple statistics, use of maps and directions and an introductory understanding of the use of formulae and problem solving strategies. Learners who successfully complete the unit are expected to have the capacity to interpret and analyse how mathematics is represented and used, and to recognise and use some of the conventions and symbolism of formal Mathematics.
Assessment A range of assessment options are used according to the needs of the learner group and the learning situation, e.g. in the workplace, assessment could be of observation of students performing on-the-job tasks, whereas these may have to be simulated in a classroom environment. A folio of evidence could be collected through a combination of the following: · records of teacher observations of students' activities, oral presentations, practical tasks, etc. · samples of students' written work · written reports of investigations or problem solving activities · student self-assessment sheets, reflections, or journal entries · pictures, diagrams, models created by students. Traditional test based assessments are not appropriate strategies for assessing VCAL units.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
54
VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham
Career Paths / Future Directions: Graphic Design, Advertising, Architecture, Art Director, Creative Business Solutions, Desktop Publishing, Events Coordinator, Fashion Design, Industrial Design, Interior Design.
Unit 1 ­ Introduction to Visual Communication Design
(Code: VC011)
Description The purpose of this unit is to enable students to focus on using visual language to communicate messages, ideas and concepts. This involves acquiring and applying design thinking skills as well as drawing skills to make messages, ideas and concepts visible and tangible. Students practise their ability to draw what they observe and they use visualisation drawing methods to explore their own ideas and concepts. Students develop an understanding of the importance of presentation drawings to clearly communication their final visual communications. Through experimentation and through exploration of the relationship between design elements and principles affect the visual message and the way information and ideas are read and perceived. Students review the contextual background of visual communication through an investigation of design styles. This research introduces students to the broader context of the place and purpose of design.
Outcomes Create drawings for different purposes using a range of drawing methods, media and materials. Select and apply design elements and design principles to create visual communications that satisfy stated purposes. Select and apply design elements and principles to create visual communications that satisfy stated purposes. Describe how a visual communication has been influenced by past and contemporary practises and by social and cultural factors. Assessment Instrumental Drawing Folio Final Presentations Analysis Report Case Study Semester Examination
Unit 2 ­ Applications of Visual Communication within Design fields
(Code: VC022)
Description The purpose of this unit focuses on the application of visual communication design knowledge, design thinking skills and drawing methods to create visual communications to meet specific purposes in designated design fields. Students use presentation drawing methods that incorporate the use of technical drawing conventions to communicate information and ideas associated with the environmental or industrial fields of design. They investigate how typography and imagery are used in visual communication design. They apply design thinking skills when exploring ways in which images and type can be manipulated to communicate ideas and concepts in different ways in the communication design field. Students develop an understanding of the design process as a means of organising their thinking about approaches to solving design problems and presenting ideas. In response to a brief, students engaged in the stages of research, generation of ideas and development of concepts to create visual communications.
Outcomes Create presentation drawings that incorporate relevant technical drawing conventions and effectively communicate information and ideas for a selected design field. Manipulate type and images to create visual communication suitable for print and screen-based presentations, taking into account copyright. Apply the stages of the design process to create a visual communication appropriate to a given brief. Assessment Folio of Technical Drawings Folio of Typography and Image ideas Final Presentations Semester Examination
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
55
VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN (Cont'd)
KLA Team Leader: Ms Andrea Durham
Career Paths / Future Directions: Graphic Design, Advertising, Architecture, Art Director, Creative Business Solutions, Desktop Publishing, Events Coordinator, Fashion Design, Industrial Design, Interior Design.
Unit 3 ­ Visual Communication design practices
(Code: VC033)
Description The purpose of this unit is to gain an understanding of the process designers employ to structure their thinking and communication ideas with clients, target audiences, other designers and specialists. Through practical investigation and analysis of existing visual communications, students gain insight into how the selection of methods, media, materials and the application of design elements and design principles can create effective visual communications for specific audiences and purposes. They investigate and experiment with the use of manual and digital methods, media and materials to make informed decisions when selecting suitable approaches for the development of their own design ideas and concepts. Students use their research and analysis of visual communication designers to support the development of their own work. They establish a brief and apply design thinking skills through the design process. They identify and describe a client, two distinctly different needs of that client, and the purpose, target audience, context and constraints relevant to each need.
Outcomes Create visual communications for specific contexts, purposes and audiences that are informed by their analysis of existing visual communications. Describe how visual communications are designed and produced in the design industry and explain factors that influence these practices. Apply design thinking skills in preparing a brief, undertaking research and generating a range of ideas relevant to the brief. Assessment Analysis of Stimulus Investigation of Case Study Brief and Visualisation drawings
Design from a variety of historical and contemporary design fields is considered by students to provide directions, themes or starting points for investigation and inspiration for their own work. Students use observational and visualisation drawings to generate a wide range of ideas and apply design thinking strategies to organise and evaluation their ideas.
Unit 4 ­ Visual Communication design development, evaluation and presentation
(Code: VC034)
Description The purpose of this unit is to enable the development of design concepts and two final presentations of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. This involves applying the design process twice to meet each of the stated needs. Students will continue the design process by developing and refining concepts for each need stated in the brief. They utilise a range of digital and manual tow and three-dimensional methods, media and materials. They investigate how the application of design elements and design principles creates different communication messages with their target audience. As students revisit stages to undertake further research or idea generation when developing and presenting their design solutions, they develop an understanding of the iterative nature of the design process. Ongoing reflection and evaluation of design solutions against the brief assists students with keeping their endeavours focused. Students refine and present two visual communications within the parameters of the brief. They reflect on the design process and the design decisions they took in the realisation of their ideas. They evaluate their visual communications and devise a pitch to communicate their design thinking and decision making to the client.
Outcomes To be able to develop distinctly different design concepts for each need, and select and refine for each need a concept that satisfies each of the requirements of the brief. To produce final visual communication presentations that satisfies the requirements of the brief. Devise a pitch to present and explain their visual communications to an audience and evaluate the visual communications against the brief.
Assessment Design Process and Developmental work Resolution and Refinement of Final Presentations Presentation and Evaluation Examination
Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework School-Assessed Task (SAT) Examination
= 20% = 5% = 40% = 35%
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
56
Application for Year 11 Student to Study VCE Units 3 and 4
NAME:
UNIT 3 AND 4 SUBJECT:
1.
UNITS 1 AND 2 SUBJECTS:
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7. In completing this application, students need to discuss this option in detail with the appropriate Year 10 Subject Teacher and the KLA Team Leader.
PART 1: APPLICATION CRITERIA
Average of B+ in related subjects
C+ and above in all other subjects
Very good for effort in every subject

No `Not Submitted' results for Assessment Tasks
** If all four criteria are ticked continue to PART 2.
PART 2: Reason(s) you wish to study a VCE Unit 3 and 4 sequence in Year 11:
PART 3: YEAR 10 SUBJECT TEACHER'S RECOMMENDATIONS VCE Unit 3 and 4 Subject Name:
Comments: Student has an average of B+ in this subject
Yes
Subject Teacher's Signature:
SUPPORTING MATERIAL Please include a letter from your parents in support of this application. STUDENTS SHOULD NOTE THE FOLLOWING: Each application will be considered individually. Where class size is an issue, Year 12 student choices will take preference. Application will only be considered when all supporting material is supplied. A panel has been formed to decide the success of each application. Each student will need a preliminary interview with the panel.
Student Signature: Parent Signature: Date:
Applications due to Administration Office on Monday, 31 July 2017 by 3:00 pm.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
57
Studies undertaken outside CLC
Note: This form is condensed version. Coloured forms can be obtained from the Administration Office.
NAME: _______________________________________
YEAR LEVEL: _______________ HOME ROOM: ___________
To be completed by external provider: Name of Study: Semester(s): Unit Number(s): Institution/Provider: Address: Contact Person: Telephone: Name of teacher undertaking the study: Stamp or Signature of Enrolment Officer:
Year: Provider Number:
Student Signature:
Parent Signature:
DATE: ________ /_____ ___ / ________ Deputy Principal Learning and Teaching Signature: __________________________________ Date: ______ / ______ / _______
It is important to inform the Year 10-12 Learning Leader if a student interrupts studies undertaken outside Catholic Ladies' College.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
58
Subject Selection Instructions VCE ­ 2018 Students will receive an email entitled "[email protected]" with a subject line "Catholic Ladies' College VCE 2018 Subject Selection", please do not delete this email, you will need it to make your subject selections for 2018. When you are asked to make your subject selections you will need to logon to a computer with an internet connection (using Firefox or Google Chrome) and a printer. Open your email and click on the link "Click here to open Web Preferences" this will take you directly to the first page of your preference selection (you will need to use your Student Access Code and Password if you are using a computer that you cannot access your emails from). Check that your name appears at the top of the screen under "Web Preferences ­ Home Page". Click on the "Add New Preferences" green button in the middle of the screen. Click on "View Instructions" top left hand side ­ read and follow these instructions. Read and follow the instructions in each instruction box. Make your selections in the boxes on the bottom of the screen. If you have chosen a VCAL course of study you are not required to select reserve preferences. Click on the "Proceed" button when it turns green. If the button is greyed out please go back to the instruction box and ensure you have made a selection in all of the Preference boxes and the Reserve boxes and check that you have not selected a subject twice. A new screen will be shown listing your preferences and reserves. If all is correct click on the "Submit Valid Preferences" button. If you have any messages in red on this screen, click the back button and correct any errors before proceeding. The next screen shows your confirmed choices. Click on the "Open Print View" button. On the next screen, click the "Print Receipt" button. Year 11 and 12 2018 students - Submit the form to your Homeroom teacher no later than Tuesday, 1 August.
Catholic Ladies' College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2018 - 2019
59

W AU

File: year-11-and-year-12-handbook.pdf
Title: CATHOLIC LADIES COLLEGE LTD
Author: W AU
Author: Admin
Published: Wed Aug 23 09:14:56 2017
Pages: 59
File size: 1.47 Mb


, pages, 0 Mb

A big bet on gluten-free, 5 pages, 0.09 Mb

To Kill a Mockingbird, 65 pages, 1.17 Mb
Copyright © 2018 doc.uments.com