A Comparison of the UK and the Scottish Marine Bills

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Content: The Scottish Parliament and Scottish Parliament Information Centre logos. SPICe Briefing A Comparison of the UK and the Scottish Marine Bills 7 September 2009 09/59 Wendy Kenyon This briefing summarises the provisions of the UK Marine and Coastal Access Bill Which was introduced to the House of Lords on 4 December 2008. It considers the main implications the Bill has for Scotland. The Marine (Scotland) Bill is at Stage 1 in the Scottish Parliament. The briefing looks at the main differences between the two Bills.
CONTENTS KEY POINTS ................................................................................................................................................................3 INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................................................................................................4 CURRENT STATUS OF THE MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS BILL...................................................................4 LEGISLATIVE CONSENT MEMORANDUM ...............................................................................................................4 CHANGES MADE TO THE UK BILL IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS ............................................................................5 THE MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS BILL ...........................................................................................................5 MARINE MANAGEMENT ORGANISATION ........................................................................................................................5 Relevance to Scotland .........................................................................................................................................6 UK Bill Compared to Scottish Bill.........................................................................................................................6 THE UK MARINE AREA .................................................................................................................................................6 UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill..........................................................................................................................6 MARINE PLANNING......................................................................................................................................................6 Relevance to Scotland .........................................................................................................................................6 UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill..........................................................................................................................6 MARINE LICENSING .....................................................................................................................................................7 Relevance to Scotland .........................................................................................................................................7 UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill..........................................................................................................................7 nature conservation.............................................................................................................................................8 Relevance to Scotland .........................................................................................................................................8 UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill..........................................................................................................................8 FISHERIES ..................................................................................................................................................................8 UK compared to Scottish Bill ...............................................................................................................................9 ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ............................................................................................................................................9 Relevance to Scotland .........................................................................................................................................9 UK compared to Scottish Bill ...............................................................................................................................9 COASTAL ROUTE ........................................................................................................................................................9 OTHER PARTS OF THE UK BILL ....................................................................................................................................9 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS BILL .................................................................10 SOURCES ..................................................................................................................................................................11 ANNEX .......................................................................................................................................................................12 MAP 1: MARINE MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................................................................12 MAP 2: EXCLUSIVE economic zone AND UK MARINE AREA ......................................................................................12 MAP 3: MARINE PLANNING ........................................................................................................................................13 MAP 4: MARINE LICENSING, RENEWABLE ENERGY ......................................................................................................13 MAP 5: MARINE LICENSING, HARBOUR DEVELOPMENTS...............................................................................................14 MAP 6: MARINE LICENSING, CONSTRUCTIONS WORKS.................................................................................................14 MAP 7: MARINE LICENSING, DREDGING ......................................................................................................................15 MAP 8: NATURE CONSERVATION ...............................................................................................................................15 MAP 9: INSHORE FISHERIES ......................................................................................................................................16 MAP 10: SEA FISHERIES ...........................................................................................................................................16 MAP 11: MIGRATORY AND FRESHWATER FISHERIES ...................................................................................................17 MAP 12: LICENSING ENFORCEMENT ...........................................................................................................................17 MAP 13: NATURE CONSERVATION ENFORCEMENT......................................................................................................18 MAP 14: SEA FISHERIES ENFORCEMENT....................................................................................................................18 MAP 15: COASTAL ACCESS .......................................................................................................................................19 RELATED BRIEFINGS ..............................................................................................................................................20 2
KEY POINTS · The Marine and Coastal Access Bill was introduced to the House of Lords on 4 December 2008 and seeks to establish the Marine Management Organisation, make provisions on marine planning, update licensing and consent controls in the marine environment, provide powers related to nature conservation and the designation of Marine Conservation Zones, change legislation on fisheries, provide for the appointment of enforcement officers, make provisions for a continuous route around the coast, and amend the Harbours Act 1964. · The Marine Management Organisation (MMO) would be an independent body responsible for implementation of much of the UK Marine Bill and for reserved matters in the seas between 12-200 nm around Scotland. Marine Scotland was established on 1 April 2009 as a Directorate of the Scottish Government (SG), intended to integrate core marine functions involving scientific research, compliance monitoring, policy and management of Scotland's seas. · The UK Bill proposes a new system of marine planning. A Marine Policy Statement (MPS) would set priorities for marine planning regions (Scotland may adopt the MPS). The UK Bill seeks to impose a duty on marine plan authorities to "seek to ensure" complete coverage of its marine planning region, the Scottish Bill does not. Reporting arrangements for marine plans are also different in the UK and the Scottish Bill. · Part 4 of the UK Bill seeks to replace the licensing and consent controls currently exercised under Part II of the Food and Environment Protection Act (FEPA) 1985 and Part II of the Coast Protection Act 1949. The UK Bill will executively devolve the new licences to Scottish Ministers so that the previous allocation of responsibilities is maintained. The UK Bill does not seek to adopt the threshold system in the Scottish Bill, whereby activities below the threshold do not need licences. Statutory maintenance dredging is exempt from licensing provisions in the UK Bill, but not explicitly exempt in the Scottish Bill. · Part 5 of the UK Bill provides a duty to designate new Marine Conservation Zones "MCZs" to create a network of conservation sites. In the Scottish Bill there is a "power" to designate Marine protected areas. In the UK Bill social and economic considerations may be taken into account in the designation of MCZs, this is not the case under the Scottish Bill, except in specific circumstances. · The UK Bill seeks to ensure consistent UK wide implementation of the Bill. This includes making Scottish Ministers a `policy authority', enabling Scottish Ministers to prepare marine plans for the offshore area adjacent to Scotland, and enabling Scottish Ministers to designate Marine Conservation Zones between 12-200 nm. 3
INTRODUCTION The Marine (Scotland) Bill is at Stage 1 in the Scottish Parliament. The UK Marine and Coastal Access Bill [HL] is awaiting its Report Stage in the House of Commons. The two Bills propose a considerable updating of the management of the marine environment around the UK. The Bills are designed to interact and be complementary, although their parallel timing means that they may be amended at the same time, making it difficult to ensure the provisions fit as well as they might otherwise. This briefing summarises the provisions of the UK Marine and Coastal Access Bill and considers the main implications they have for Scotland. It also looks at the significant differences between the Bills. DEFRA has published a series of indicative maps which have been created to help explain how the UK Bill will apply to different areas around the UK, but it also provides information on where the provisions from the Scottish Bill applies. These provide a useful summary of boundaries related to marine management, the UK Marine Area, marine planning, marine licensing, nature conservation, fisheries, enforcement, and coastal access. They have been reproduced in the Annex. A briefing that gives full details of the Marine (Scotland) Bill [as introduced] was produced by SPICe in April (Kenyon et al 2009). A briefing setting out key European aspects of the marine environment was also published (Kenyon 2009). CURRENT STATUS OF THE MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS BILL The Marine and Coastal Access Bill was introduced to the House of Lords on 4 December 2008. The Bill had its Second Reading debate on 23 June 2009 and was committed to a Public Bill Committee to be considered clause by clause. The remaining stages will be completed in the Autumn, but no dates had been announced at the time of writing. The Bill, as amended in the Public Bill Committee, is now available. Broadly, the Bill seeks to: · establish the Marine Management Organisation · make provisions on marine planning · update licensing and consent controls in the marine environment · provide powers related to nature conservation and the designation of Marine Conservation Zones · change legislation on fisheries · provide for the appointment of enforcement officers and related provisions · make provisions for a continuous route around the coast · amend the Harbours Act 1964. The UK Bill does not make any significant changes to seals legislation. LEGISLATIVE CONSENT MEMORANDUM A Legislative Consent Memorandum (LCM) relating to the parts of the Bill which affect Scotland was debated by the Rural Affairs and Environment Committee in early 2009. The Committee reported on 3 March 2009. The motion on the LCM was debated and agreed to in the Chamber on 18 March 2009. 4
CHANGES MADE TO THE UK BILL IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS The House of Lords spent 17 sessions debating the Marine and Coastal Access Bill and over 1,000 amendments were considered. The main changes made to the Bill are (DEFRA 2009c): · a stronger and clearer general objective for the Marine Management Organisation in relation to sustainable development, its use of science and other evidence to underpin decision-making · additional provisions for parliamentary scrutiny with new duties on Ministers to report on marine planning progress, to make a statement to Parliament on principles to be followed in implementing the duty to contribute to a network of marine conservation sites and to lay sustainable development guidance for the MMO before Parliament · a requirement on Government to publish a sustainability appraisal of the marine policy statement · a clearer description of roles for local authorities in marine licensing and coastal access · a clear obligation on the licensing authority to have regard to the need to protect the environment, human health and the need to prevent interference with other legitimate uses of the sea, when making an exemptions order under clause 74 (activities that do not need a licence) · provision for a modified remediation notice which can be used to order steps to compensate for harm caused by a licensable activity as well steps to restore the site to the state it was before the harm was done. · a clearer duty to designate marine conservation zones, introduction of a 12 month time limit to designation once intention has been published, and the addition of reckless damage into general offence · addition of a procedure for making objections and representations about coastal access reports · a duty on marine plan authorities to "seek to ensure" whole coverage of its marine planning region was inserted against the UK government's wishes. The UK Government has now accepted the amendment (with some drafting improvements) and is not seeking to overturn it. THE MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS BILL In this section the different elements of the Marine and Coastal Access Bill are briefly described, their relevance to Scotland set out, and a comparison with the Marine (Scotland) Bill made. MARINE MANAGEMENT ORGANISATION Part 1 of the Marine and Coastal Access Bill seeks to establish an independent body, the Marine Management Organisation (MMO). The MMO would discharge a number of marine functions on behalf of the UK Government. As a Non-Departmental Public Body (NDPB), the MMO would report to Parliament through the Secretary of State. The MMO would draw up marine plans under the proposed marine planning regime. It would also administer marine environmental licensing, electricity and harbours regimes, manage marine fisheries, undertake nature conservation functions and use powers set out in the Bill to enforce fisheries, licensing and nature conservation legislation. 5
Relevance to Scotland Marine Scotland is the marine management organisation covering 0-12 nm around the Scottish coast, and for devolved and executively devolved functions under the Marine and Coastal Access Bill out to 200nm. However, MMO will be responsible for reserved matters in the seas between 12-200nm around Scotland (i.e. historic heritage, telecoms, oil and gas, and shipping). UK Bill Compared to Scottish Bill The UK Bill transfers functions to the Marine Management Organisation. Marine Scotland is not included in the Scottish Bill. See Map 1 in annex. THE UK MARINE AREA Part 2 of the Marine and Coastal Access Bill sets out the UK marine area which extends to the seaward limit of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) or the continental shelf boundary, which ever is further (see Map 2). The Bill also allows an EEZ to be designated. One zone can then replace the areas within the British fishery limits, the Renewable Energy Zone, the Pollution Zone, and the Gas Importation and Storage Zone. This will simplify management of UK offshore maritime areas and the UK will be abiding with accepted international good practice (National Assembly for Wales 2009). UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill The definition of the Scottish marine area in section 1 of the Scottish Bill essentially includes the seas from 0-12 nm around Scotland. This does not include waters in any area which is closed by a lock or "or other artificial means against the regular action of the tide", but these areas are included in the UK Bill in clause 42(3). MARINE PLANNING Part 3 of the Marine and Coastal Access Bill proposes a new system of marine planning. A Marine Policy Statement, guided by high level objectives, would set out the priorities for the UK Government, the Welsh Assembly, the Scottish Government and the Northern Ireland Assembly in their marine planning regions. It also provides for the preparation of marine plans which should be "in conformity with" the Marine Policy Statement and which will cover most of the UK marine area. See Map 3 in Annex. Relevance to Scotland Scottish Ministers, like the other UK administrations, have the right not to adopt the final Marine Policy Statement. In the offshore area adjacent to Scotland, the UK Bill makes provision for Scottish Ministers to be the Planning Authority, although marine plans would have to be agreed with the Secretary of State. UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill The UK Bill has one main tier of marine planning, and does not include marine regions except at an `administration' level (e.g. the Scottish offshore region, the NI inshore region etc.). The UK Bill says nothing about how those regions should be sub-divided into `marine plan areas'. The Scottish Bill has provisions for a national marine plan and regional marine plans and allows for the delegation of marine planning to the Scottish marine regions. 6
There is no Marine Policy Statement in the Scottish Bill, since the idea is that Scotland will adopt the UK marine policy statement. In the UK Bill a duty on marine plan authorities to "seek to ensure" whole coverage of its marine planning region was inserted. Reporting of marine plans under Section 12 of the Scottish Bill is at least every 5 years while in the UK Bill it is every 3 years. However, there is now an additional reporting duty in the UK Bill, requiring 6-yearly reports to the "appropriate legislature" by each marine plan authority on their current and proposed planning activity within their region(s). MARINE LICENSING The marine licensing provisions in Part 4 of the UK Bill seeks to replace the licensing and consent controls currently exercised under Part II of the Food and Environment Protection Act (FEPA) 1985 and Part II of the Coast Protection Act 1949. It also seeks to remove the consent requirements of the electronic communications code set out in Schedule 2 to the Telecommunications Act 1984. The considerations built into these regimes would be merged into the new regime, with some modifications. This part would change the relationship between marine licensing and certain other legislation governing activities in the marine area, including the Petroleum Act 1998 and the Electricity Act 1989. It also seeks to provide mechanisms and powers for enforcing the licensing regime. See Maps 4-7 in Annex. Relevance to Scotland Currently Scottish Ministers issue Electricity Act consents for renewables and FEPA licences in the 12-200nm zone on an executively devolved basis. In the 0-12nm area Scottish Ministers have both legislative responsibility and issue Harbour orders, FEPA and CPA licences as well as a range of other consents. The UK Bill will executively devolve the new licences to Scottish Ministers ensuring that the previous allocation of responsibilities is maintained. UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill Statutory maintenance dredging is exempt from licensing provisions in the UK Bill (clause 75). In the Scottish Bill statutory maintenance dredging using established techniques may be included in an exemption order under section 24, but this is not explicit. The Scottish Bill (under section 25) has exemptions from licensing requirements for activities below a specified threshold of environmental impact. Such activities would have to be registered. The UK Bill does not have an equivalent clause but provision can be made for this in any exemptions order made under clause 74. There are differences in appeals processes for licensing in the two Bills. Section 29 of the Marine (Scotland) Bill relates to appeals against licensing decisions, where Scottish Ministers must, by regulation make provision for a person to appeal against a licensing decision. In the UK Bill appeals against licensing decisions are also done by order. Appeals against civil sanctions in the UK Bill have to be heard by the First Tier Tribunal or other tribunal and the equivalent in the Marine (Scotland) Bill is sections 37 and 38 where provisions are made by order with no reference to tribunals. The Scottish Bill allows local authorities to give up their aquaculture consent function, under section 54. This is not in the UK Bill. Special procedures for harbour works are included in the UK Bill (clause 78) but not in the Scottish Bill. The remediation notice in the UK Bill allows the relevant authority to order steps to be taken to compensate for harm caused at the site in question or at another site as well as to restore a 7
damaged site to the condition it was in before the harm was caused. The Scottish Bill is limited to ordering steps to protect the environment, human health or uses of the sea once damage has been done rather than remedying or compensating for that harm. NATURE CONSERVATION Part 5 of the UK Bill provides a duty to designate new Marine Conservation Zones "MCZs" to create a network of conservation sites (clause 123). It is proposed to convert existing Marine Nature Reserves into MCZs. The network would help fulfil the UK's OSPAR commitments to establish a network of MARINE PROTECTED AREAS. The Bill proposes new duties on public authorities to exercise their functions in ways that further the conservation objectives set for MCZs, and not to authorise activities or development where it carries a significant risk of hindering those conservation objectives. See Map 8 in Annex. Relevance to Scotland In the sea from 12-200nm Scottish Ministers will designate MCZs (to be known as Marine Protected Areas - MPAs) under the UK Bill with agreement from the Secretary of State. These will be complemented by MPAs designated in Scottish waters out to 12nm under the Marine (Scotland) Bill. UK Bill compared to Scottish Bill A clearer "duty" to designate marine conservation zones in the UK Bill was agreed to in its passage through the House of Lords (DEFRA, 2009c). In the Scottish Bill there is a "power" to designate a Marine Protected Areas (section 58). The UK Bill includes a duty to designate areas as MCZs so as to contribute to the achievement of a network of such areas. This does not appear in the Scottish Bill. In the UK Bill social and economic considerations may be taken into account in the designation of MCZs. In the Scottish Bill social and economic considerations can only be taken into account where there are two or more equal sites identified for consideration. Historic heritage is included in the Scottish Bill with specific provisions for historic marine protected areas to be designated under section 63. These are not found in the UK Bill. With respect to MCZs the UK Bill allows the Marine Management Organisation to make one or more byelaws to further the conservation objectives in England (out to 12 nm). The Scottish Bill does not make provisions for such byelaws. In terms of offences related to MCZs the UK Bill applies fixed monetary penalties (clause 142) as well as prosecution (clause 140). The Scottish Bill provides for prosecution only (sections 8284) for offences relating to MPAs. FISHERIES Part 6 changes the legislation relating to the establishment, organisation and responsibilities of Sea Fisheries Committees, establishing in England new bodies called Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities (IFCAs). Part 7 of the Bill amends legislation by which salmon, trout, eels and freshwater fisheries are managed in England and Wales, and the measures extend to the River Esk in Scotland. Substantively this covers amendments to the Sea Fish (Conservation) Act 1967; amendments to the Sea Fisheries (Shellfish) Act 1967; amendments to legislation concerning migratory and freshwater fisheries; and the repeal of various obsolete fisheries Acts. See Map 9 -11. 8
UK compared to Scottish Bill Fisheries legislation and inshore fisheries management is included in UK Bill, but is not in the Scottish Bill. ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS Part 8 provides for the appointment of enforcement officers and for a set of common enforcement powers for enforcing requirements across licensing, nature conservation and sea fisheries in the marine area. See Maps 12-14 in Annex. Relevance to Scotland Scottish enforcement officers working for Scottish Ministers will enforce licensing arrangements under the Marine (Scotland) Bill out to 12 nm, and under the Marine and Coastal Access Bill beyond 12 nm. Scottish enforcement officers will enforce Scottish nature conservation legislation out to 12nm under the Marine (Scotland) Bill, and enforce Marine Protected Areas beyond 12 nm using powers under the UK Bill. Under the UK Bill, Marine enforcement officers can also use the Bill's common powers if they are pursuing a suspected offender from one offshore area to another offshore area outside their jurisdiction. They will also be able to exercise common powers on land and in the inshore area of any part of the UK where they are investigating a suspected offence which occurred within an area where they have jurisdiction. Marine enforcement officers will retain their powers as British Sea Fisheries Officers to enforce sea fisheries legislation outside English and Welsh waters. UK compared to Scottish Bill The Scottish Bill includes common enforcement powers for licensing and conservation. The UK Bill includes powers for all enforcement activities - including sea fisheries ­ as well as some sea fisheries-specific powers. COASTAL ROUTE Part 9 of the Bill places a duty on the Secretary of State and Natural England to secure a long distance route ("the English coastal route") and land available for open-air recreation accessible to the public around the coast of England. In doing so the Bill amends existing legislation ­ namely the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 and the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. There are no similar provisions in the Scottish Bill. OTHER PARTS OF THE UK BILL Part 10 of the Marine and Coastal Access Bill amends legislation in relation to Natural England and the Countryside Council for Wales and modifies the regime governing harbours set out in the Harbours Act 1964. It also introduces navigational controls into the Energy Act 2008 in lieu of those currently contained in the Coast Protection Act 1949. See Map 15. Part 11 contains supplementary provisions including commencement arrangements and repeals. 9
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS BILL DEFRA argues that the Marine and Coastal Access Bill has been developed to ensure consistent UK wide implementation. A number of provisions in the Bill seek to enable consistent implementation in Scotland. These include (DEFRA 2009b): · introduction of Scottish Ministers as a `policy authority', thus enabling them to jointly agree a UK wide Marine Policy Statement together with UK Government, Wales and Northern Ireland · enabling Scottish Ministers, as a marine plan authority, to prepare marine plans for the offshore area adjacent to Scotland, but to require that any such plans be agreed by UK Government before they are put in place · enabling Scottish Ministers to designate Marine Conservation Zones between 12-200 nm, but to require that any such designations are subject to the agreement of UK Government. 10
SOURCES DEFRA (2009a) Marine and Coastal Access Bill ­ Indicative Maps. [Online]. Available at: http://www.defra.gov.uk/marine/pdf/legislation/indicative-maps.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] DEFRA (2009b) Marine and Coastal Access Bill Policy Paper [Online]. Available at: http://www.defra.gov.uk/marine/pdf/legislation/mab-policy.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] DEFRA (2009c) Marine and Coastal Access Bill: Changes made by the House of Lords [Online]. Available at: http://www.defra.gov.uk/marine/pdf/legislation/marinebill-lords090622.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] Kenyon, W. (2009) European Dimensions of the Marine Environment [Online] Bill Briefing SB 09/40. Available at: http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/business/research/briefings-09/SB09-40.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] Kenyon, W., K. Wright and A. Rehfisch (2009) Marine (Scotland) Bill [Online] SPICe Briefing SB 09/41. Available at: http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/business/research/briefings-09/SB0941.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] Marine and Coastal Access Bill [HL Bill] 137 2008-09. [Online] Available at: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200809/cmbills/137/09137.i-vii.html [Accessed 3 August 2009] Marine and Coastal Access Bill [HL Bill] 1 2008-09, Explanatory Notes. [Online]. Available at: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200809/ldbills/001/en/2009001en.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] Marine (Scotland) Bill [as introduced] Session 3 (2009). SP Bill 25. Edinburgh: Scottish Parliament. Available at: http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/s3/bills/25-MarineScot/b25s3-introd.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] National Assembly for Wales (2009) Marine and Coastal Access Bill [HL] research paper [Online]. Available at: http://www.assemblywales.org/09-025.pdf [Accessed 3 August 2009] 11
ANNEX The source of all maps is DEFRA (July 2009) Marine and Coastal Access Bill ­ Indicative maps. MAP 1: MARINE MANAGEMENT MAP 2: EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE AND UK MARINE AREA 12
MAP 3: MARINE PLANNING MAP 4: MARINE LICENSING, RENEWABLE ENERGY 13
MAP 5: MARINE LICENSING, HARBOUR DEVELOPMENTS MAP 6: MARINE LICENSING, CONSTRUCTIONS WORKS 14
MAP 7: MARINE LICENSING, DREDGING MAP 8: NATURE CONSERVATION 15
MAP 9: INSHORE FISHERIES MAP 10: SEA FISHERIES 16
MAP 11: MIGRATORY AND FRESHWATER FISHERIES MAP 12: LICENSING ENFORCEMENT 17
MAP 13: NATURE CONSERVATION ENFORCEMENT MAP 14: SEA FISHERIES ENFORCEMENT 18
MAP 15: COASTAL ACCESS 19
RELATED BRIEFINGS SB 09-41 Marine (Scotland) Bill (774 KB pdf) SB 09-40 European Dimensions of the Marine Environment (360 KB pdf) Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) Briefings are compiled for the benefit of the Members of the Parliament and their personal staff. Authors are available to discuss the contents of these papers with MSPs and their staff who should contact Wendy Kenyon on extension 85375 or email [email protected] Members of the public or external organisations may comment on this briefing by emailing us at [email protected] However, researchers are unable to enter into personal discussion in relation to SPICe Briefing Papers. If you have any general questions about the work of the Parliament you can email the Parliament's Public Information Service at [email protected] Every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in SPICe briefings is correct at the time of publication. Readers should be aware however that briefings are not necessarily updated or otherwise amended to reflect subsequent changes. www.scottish.parliament.uk 20

File: a-comparison-of-the-uk-and-the-scottish-marine-bills.pdf
Title: A Comparison of the UK and the Scottish Marine Bills
Author: Wendy Kenyon
Published: Wed Sep 9 16:09:41 2009
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