Art History Portable, Book 3: A View of the World, Part One

Tags: salient characteristics, AUTHOR, Art of Africa, class activity, discussion, DATE, discussion groups, Art History, Field Lab, Shah Jahan, environment, Vietnam, West Africa Questions, North Africa Questions, East Africa Questions, Thien Hau Pagoda, Susan L. Kings, Response papers, Jonathan M. Bloom, Lecture, Museum of Fine Arts Ho Chi Minh, Harry N. Abrams, Ebba Mughal Palace Gardens, Ho Chi Minh, Stokstad, political concerns, African Art, History of Art, Michael Cothren Art History, Art Questions, Buddhist art, east Africa, Vinh Nghiem Pagoda, Contemporary Art, Japanese art, stylistic characteristics, Lecture Eighteen, practice exam questions, Africa, Vinh Nghiem Pagoda Academic Objectives, South Africa
Content: SEMESTER AT SEA course syllabus Voyage: Spring 2013 Discipline: art history ARTH 1051: History of Art I Upper or Lower Division: Lower Faculty Name: Ariana Maki Pre-requisites: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION In this class we will examine various art forms of the cultures we will visit--Japan, China, India, Southeast Asia, and Africa--dating from ancient to modern times. We will treat works of art as artifacts expressing human values within their respective cultural and historical contexts. Using illustrated lectures and classroom discussions, we will learn by means of visual analysis how to identify formal methods and materials of artistic expression based on culturally specific definitions of beauty.
COURSE OBJECTIVES 1. Discern the hallmark characteristics of each culture's art, including formal concerns such as line, proportions, composition, perspective and use of color 2. Art works will be explored in their political, social and religious contexts, and students will be exposed to Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam and indigenous religious traditions 3. Study and understand the ways in which themes of cultural continuity, cross-cultural contact and innovation can be noted in the visual arts 4. Explore how status and power are communicated through painting, sculpture and architecture 5. Grasp the role that religious and political concerns play in the patronage and creation of art, and in what way those works communicate to the population as a whole
REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS
AUTHOR: TITLE: PUBLISHER: ISBN #: DATE/EDITION:
Stokstad, Marilyn and Michael Cothren Art History Portable, Book 3: A View of the World, Part One Pearson 0205790933 and ISBN 13: 9780205790937 June 30, 2010/First (copyright date 2011)
AUTHOR: TITLE: PUBLISHER: ISBN #: DATE/EDITION:
Stokstad, Marilyn and Michael Cothren Art History Portable, Book 5: A View of the World, Part Two Pearson 020579095X and ISBN 13: 9780205790951 July 1, 2010/First (copyright date 2011)
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TOPICAL OUTLINE OF COURSE Jan. 10: Orientation Lecture One: Introduction to Art History and Art in Cultural Context Questions to be addressed: What is the discipline of art history? How do we begin to understand a work of art and its context? Readings: "The Subjects and Vocabulary of Art History" from Gardner's Art through the Ages, 11th edition Assignments: Map of the World; Art Historical Terms Lecture Two: Birth of Art Questions: What were common themes in Paleolithic and Neolithic art? What cultural concerns drove people to create these artifacts? Assignment due: Map of the World; Art Historical Terms Jan. 15/16: No Class. Hilo Lecture Three-- Japan before Buddhism and the Life of the Buddha Questions: What are the major characteristics of early Japanese art? How did buried objects help our understanding of spiritual and cultural concerns of the time? What are the major events of the Buddha's life, and how can we identify the Buddha in art? Reading: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 11: Japanese Art before 1333, 335-362 Assignment: Life of the Buddha, DVD (2010) Response Paper One assigned Lecture Four---Buddhist Art of Japan Questions: How did the Nara period foster the production of Buddhist art? In what ways did Buddhist art function in temples and sacred places? What key features distinguish Zen and Pure Land Buddhism? Readings: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 11: Japanese Art before 1333, 363-376 Jan. 21: (International Date Line). Lost day. Jan. 22: Study Day. No Class. Lecture Five--- Later Japanese Art Questions: How did political power and patronage change the types and styles of art that was produced? How did woodblocks change art and the artists that produced it? What were the results of contact with foreign cultures? Readings: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 25: Japanese Art after 1333, 813-834 Response Paper One due Lecture Six-- Arts of China-Neolithic to Tang Questions: What philosophical and religious traditions were prevalent in early Chinese 2
civilization? How were the priorities of these methodologies communicated through art? Readings: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 10: Chinese and Korean Art before 1279, 325-338 Jan 27-31: No Class. Yokohama and Kobe. Lecture Seven: Arts of China-Tang to Five Dynasties Questions: What genres of art became most popular? In what ways did artists distinguish themselves? How did this art function in the lives of its viewers, and who were the intended audience of these works? Readings: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 10: Chinese and Korean Art before 1279, 339-349; Sullivan, Chapter 7: The Five Dynasties and the Song Dynasty, Arts of China, 163-205 Feb. 3-8: No Class. Shanghai and Hong Kong. Lecture Eight: Arts of China-Song to Modern Questions: Who were the famous landscape painters of this era, and what genres were most popular? How did the emergence of the Nationalist, and later the Communist, governments change art and its functions? How did new technology and foreign contact change artistic production? Readings: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 10: Chinese and Korean Art before 1279, 344-349; Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 24: Chinese and Korean Art after 1279, 791-806 Lecture Nine: SouthEast Asian Art Questions: What themes unite the art of this very large and diverse geographic area? What stylistic differences can we see in comparison to the art of China and Japan? How do art and architecture work together to communicate to visitors? Readings: Tingley, Introduction, Arts of Ancient Vietnam: From River Plain to Open Sea, 1-19; Lee, Chapter 11: The Medieval Art of Southeast Asia and Indonesia in A History of Far Eastern Art, 263-284 Feb. 12-17: No Class. Ho Chi Minh. (B class Lecture Nine meets after port) Lecture Ten: Southeast Asian Art: Part Two Questions: How do practitioners use art in their ritual environments? What did you encounter in Vietnam that looked very familiar, or only slightly familiar, to what we've studied so far? In what ways does Southeast Asian art impact you differently than when we were in Japan and China? Feb. 20-21: No Class. Singapore. (B class Lecture Ten meets after port) Lecture Eleven-- Early Art of India: Indus Valley to Gupta Dynasty Questions: How did religion drive production of early Indian art? What characteristics of style, 3
method, material, etc. distinguish a piece from Mathura, Sarnath or other major sites? Reading: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 9: Art of South and Southeast Asia before 1200, 291-312 Response Paper Two assigned Feb. 25-March 01: No Class. Rangoon. Lecture Twelve: Early Buddhist and Hindu architecture in India Questions: How does art contribute to a temple environment? What are the main religious beliefs of Buddhism and Hinduism, and in what ways are they different? What iconography helps us to distinguish Buddhist from Hindu art? Reading: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 9: Art of South and Southeast Asia before 1200, 291-319; Huntington, S. "Kings as Gods, Gods as Kings: Temporality and Eternity in the Art of India" in Ars Orientalis Vol. 24 (1994), 30-38 March 05: No Class. Study Day. Lecture Thirteen: Art of India: Gupta to Pala Dynasties Questions: Why do we consider Gupta art to be an `international' style? What stylistic and/or thematic similarities have you seen in other cultures we've studied to date? How can we recognize a work of art as being from the Pala Dynasty? What can we learn from the texts that survive from this era? Reading: Huntington, S. "Introduction to the Pla Period" in Leaves from the Bodhi Tree, 75122 March 06-11: No Class. Cochin. (B class Lecture Thirteen meets after port) Lecture Fourteen: Art of India: Arrival of Islam in India Questions: How did the arrival of Islam affect the arts of northern India? How was art and architecture of the south affected, if at all? What are the characteristics of Islamic art? Readings: Huntington, S. Chapter 23: The Vijayanagar Period (ca. 1336 to 1565) in Art of Ancient India, 573-586. Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 23: Art of South and Southeast Asia after 1200, 778-785. March 15: No Class. Study Day. Lecture Fifteen: Islamic Art and Architecture of the Mughals Questions: How was art different under the various Mughal emperors? What Islamic themes can be found in major monuments, such as palaces and the Taj Mahal? Readings: Blair and Bloom, Chapter 19: The Arts in India under the Mughals and Their Contemporaries in the Deccan, in The Art and Architecture of Islam: 1250-1800, 287-302 Response Paper Two due 4
Mar. 18: No Class. Port Louis. Lecture Sixteen: Review Session: open question and discussion session, and practice exam questions to familiarize students with the test format In class activity: The class will break up into discussion groups and be assigned an `unknown' image from India, for which they will have time to assign it an identity, describing its theme and salient characteristics. The groups will then share their findings with the class for larger discussion. Mar. 21: No Class. Study Day. Lecture Seventeen: Art of Africa: Introduction and South African Art Questions: What themes are commonly found in African art? Which were the major cultural groups throughout Africa? How is a group's perception of the world/environment around them translated into visual material? What are common symbols of royalty in Zimbabwe cultural arts? How are Zimbabwean arts distinctive from those of South Africa proper? Readings: Stokstad and Cothren, Chapter 13: Early African Art, 403-421, and Chapter 28: Art of Africa in the Modern Era, 879-899. Lecture Eighteen: Art of East Africa Questions: How do the contemporary arts of east Africa relate to earlier forms of traditional art? Which themes are common throughout time? What materials are most frequently used? Reading: Miller, "Art Movements in East Africa" in Art in East Africa; A Guide to Contemporary Art, 25-35. Mar. 25-30: No Class. Cape Town (B class has Lecture Eighteen after port) Lecture Nineteen: Art of West Africa Questions: How can we distinguish art from Ghana? What are major stylistic and thematic characteristics of the art of its neighbor, Benin? In what way did art change with the arrival of Europeans? What are the major themes and characteristics of Asante art? Readings: Visual Arts of Africa, "The Akan Peoples of Ghana and the Ivory Coast," 103-125. April 03: No Class. Study Day. Lecture Twenty: Art of North Africa Questions: What common themes have we noted so far in African art? How does African art differ from the arts of South, Southeast and East Asia? In what ways are they similar? What stylistic characteristics reveal an African origin? Reading: Njoku, Chapter Four: Art and Architecture/Housing in Culture and Customs of Morocco, 57-75. Field Lab Papers Due April 06-10: No Class. Tema (Accra). 5
Lecture Twenty-one: Art of Africa Review In class activity: The class will break up into discussion groups and be assigned an `unknown' image from Africa, for which they will have time to assign it an identity, describing its theme and salient characteristics. The groups will then share their findings with the class for larger discussion. April 13: No Class. Study Day. Lecture Twenty-two: Final Review Session This class is dedicated to practice exam questions, open discussion and question sessions in anticipation of the final. APRIL 17: final exam FOR A CLASS April 18-21: No Class. Casablanca. APRIL 23: FINAL EXAM FOR B CLASS 6
FIELD LAB Participation in the Field Lab is mandatory; it and the related assignments constitute 20% of the final grade for the course. The field lab for this course will take place on our first day in Ho Chi Minh port, February 12, 2013. We will disembark at 0930 and travel as a group for the full day. Living Cultures of Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City, February 12, 2013 Destinations: Museum of Fine Arts Ho Chi Minh, Emperor Jade Pagoda, Thien Hau Pagoda, Vinh Nghiem Pagoda Academic Objectives of Field Lab: 1. Study first hand art from Vietnam in museum settings, noting points of intersect with and divergence from arts of Eastern Asia. 2. Examine the placement, style and functions of art in three different temple environments 3. Analyze the ways in which art is perceived and understood differently in the ritual environment in comparison to the museum setting Field Lab Description: In this field lab, we will engage the artistic and visual cultures of Vietnam in a variety of settings, and stemming from multiple religious, social and cultural contexts. We will discern characteristics of sculpture, painting and decorative works through first hand examination of the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts Ho Chi Minh (Bao Tang My Thuat), which displays significant archaeological finds, bronze ware, ceramics, and religious arts, spanning the early Champa era to the 19th century Dong. In addition to the museum environment, we will visit three temples in Ho Chi Minh city, each of which reflects a particular cultural symbiosis or distinct religious affiliation. The Emperor Jade Pagoda (Chua Ngoc Hoang) is based on the Tao tradition, which we first encountered in our study of Chinese art. To explore a Japanesestyle ritual environment in Vietnam, we will go to the Vinh Nghiem Pagoda. Thirdly, we will witness the symbiosis of Buddhism with pre-Buddhist Vietnamese beliefs at the Thien Hau Pagoda, where images of Thien Hau Thanh Mau (Holy Mother) sit aside those of the historical Buddha, surrounded by silk paintings. During the course of the day, students will be expected to document works of art, art in the environment, and to be able to perform comparative visual analysis with what we've seen previously. Special attention may also be paid to how people interact with "art" at the various sites. Students will produce a paper at least 6-8 pages in length, in which they articulate their understanding and analysis of the different environments, their benefits and drawbacks, the way(s) in which locals engage the works in any contexts, and how their experience in Vietnam was impacted through the material covered in this course. Students are encouraged to keep notes and photograph throughout their entire stay in Vietnam and incorporate analysis of pertinent experiences in the body of their papers. FIELD ASSIGNMENTS During the course of the day, students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of 7
course material, document works of art, note art in the environment, and to be able to perform comparative visual analysis. Students will write a paper at least 6-8 pages in length in which they articulate their understanding and analysis of the different environments, their benefits and drawbacks, the way(s) in which locals engage the works in any contexts (or don't), and how their own experiences in Vietnam were impacted through the material covered in this course. Students are encouraged to keep notes and photograph throughout their stay in Vietnam and include them as nonfield lab experiences in the body of their papers. METHODS OF EVALUATION / GRADING RUBRIC Grades for the course will be calculated as follows: Exam: 30% Field Lab Participation and Report: 20% Response papers, map, and in class assignments: 25% Class Participation: 25% At the beginning of the voyage, students will complete a map exercise based on our upcoming journey. Over the course of the trip, there will be two 2-4 page response papers where the student offers his or her perspective on a particular reading and its associated art. The field lab report will be a 6-8 page paper based on site visits as outlined in the Field Work section above. The final exam will consist of identification and comparisons of known and unknown works of art, answered in short essay form. For unknown works, grades will be based on the student's ability to adequately assign a culture of origin to the object, a rough time period, and provide a convincing supporting argument. We will practice for this throughout the semester during a series of in-class exercises, which, along with contributions to class discussions, regular attendance and adequate preparation for class, will constitute the participation component of the final grade.
RESERVE LIBRARY LIST
AUTHOR: TITLE: PUBLISHER: ISBN #: DATE/EDITION:
Mason, Penelope History of Japanese Art Prentice Hall and Harry N. Abrams (published jointly) 0131176013 or 978-0131176010 2004/Second
AUTHOR: TITLE: PUBLISHER: ISBN #: DATE/EDITION:
Sullivan, Michael Arts of China University of California Press 978-0520255692 2009/Fifth 8
AUTHOR: TITLE: PUBLISHER: ISBN #: DATE/EDITION:
Dehejia, Vidya Indian Art Phaidon Press 978-0714834962 1997/First
AUTHOR: TITLE: PUBLISHER: ISBN #: DATE/EDITION:
Willet, Frank African Art (World of Art Series) Thames & Hudson 978-0500203644 or 0500203644 2003/Third
Optional:
AUTHOR: Lee, Sherman E. TITLE: A History of Far Eastern Art PUBLISHER: Harry N. Abrams ISBN #: 0-13-1830635 DATE/EDITION: 1994/Fifth
ELECTRONIC COURSE MATERIALS
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Njoku,Raphael Chijioke Chapter Four: Art and Architecture/Housing Culture and Customs of Morocco 2006 57-75
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Flam, Jack A Continuing Presence: Western Artists/African Art Western Artists/African Art 1994 59-78
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Sullivan, Michael Chapter 7: The Five Dynasties and the Song Dynasty Arts of China, 5th ed. 2008 163-205
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Lee, Sherman E. Chapter 11: The Medieval Art of Southeast Asia and Indonesia A History of Far Eastern Art, 5th ed. 1994 263-284
AUTHOR:
Tingley, Nancy
9
ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Introduction Arts of Ancient Vietnam: From River Plain to Open Sea 2009 1-19
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Huntington, Susan L. Introduction to the Pla Period Leaves from the Bodhi Tree: The Art of Pla India (8th-12th centuries) and Its International Legacy 1990 75-122
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Huntington, Susan L. Chapter 23: The Vijayanagar Period (ca. 1336 to 1565) Art of Ancient India 1985 573-586
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: DATE: PAGES:
Judith von D. Miller Art Movements in East Africa Art in East Africa: A Guide to Contemporary Art 1975 25-35
AUTHOR: ARTICLE/CHAPTER TITLE: JOURNAL/BOOK TITLE: VOLUME: DATE: PAGES:
Huntington, Susan L. Kings as Gods, Gods as Kings: Temporality and Eternity in the Art of India Ars Orientalis Vol. 24 1994 30-38
AUTHOR: ARTICLE TITLE: JOURNAL TITLE: VOLUME DATE: PAGES:
Koch, Ebba Mughal Palace Gardens from Babur to Shah Jahan (1526-1648) Muqarnas Vol. 14 1997 143-165
AUTHOR: CHAPTER TITLE: BOOK: DATE: PAGES:
Blair, Sheila and Jonathan M. Bloom, Chapter 19: The Arts in India under the Mughals and Their Contemporaries in the Deccan The Art and Architecture of Islam: 1250-1800, 1995 287-302 10
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Life of the Buddha, DVD (2010) HONOR CODE Semester at Sea students enroll in an academic program administered by the University of Virginia, and thus bind themselves to the University's honor code. The code prohibits all acts of lying, cheating, and stealing. Please consult the Voyager's Handbook for further explanation of what constitutes an honor offense. Each written assignment for this course must be pledged by the student as follows: "On my honor as a student, I pledge that I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment." The pledge must be signed, or, in the case of an electronic file, signed "[signed]." 11

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