AUSTRALIAN BRIDGE FEDERATION INC

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Content: NEWSLETTER
AUSTRALIAN BRIDGE FEDERATION INC.
EDITORS: David & Sue Lusk Approved for Print Post S65001/00163
NO. 101 MAY 2003 ABN 70 053 651 666
Opinion 2003 has been dubbed `The Year of the Official' apparently in the vain hope that supporters will give AFL and NRL referees a fair go. If that is the case, perhaps it is timely to consider the lot of your humble director. Fortunately, most directors' rulings escape immediate reactions from spectators. However, players' reactions are sometimes less than complimentary. It would be nice if, in this `Year of the Official', players could resolve to accept adverse rulings with a modicum of good grace. Although many directors are acting in a paid capacity, they are unlikely to be doing it to get wealthy. Most of the directors with whom I come into contact do the job because they love the game and enjoy working with bridge players. We all know that players could make their job a good deal easier by doing a few things differently. Here are some of my pet hates: · Score sheets marked with the wrong number. For example, marking board 26's sheet as 27. · Writing scores in random positions on the scoresheet and doing so consistently even after having been reminded of the correct position for your score.
that the player(s) concerned have a genuine reason for wanting a second opinion. However, it is important to realise that the original ruling was given having heard two sides of the story, not just one. Most directors who are asked for this kind of ruling review will suggest that any advice is flawed by the fact that they were not at the table and have only heard one side of the story. No one would sensibly suggest that players always receive the right ruling. If that were so, then appeals panels would never have come into existence. Players who say that they always get rough rulings should look at what they are doing rather than anything else. So while you are contemplating being a better spectator at the footy, spare a thought for your long-suffering director. David Lusk 2003 Women's Playoff THE (MANY) QUALIFYING STAGES Despite finishing the Finals of the 2003 Playoffs in a tie, which we lost on countback, I thought the most interesting hand of the event occurred in the first session of the first stage (of too many stages):
· Failure to pay attention to simple instructions. It makes sense that a director should not give instructions until such time as the room is quiet but this does not guarantee that everyone is paying attention. · Calling the director over childish disputes which the average eight year-old would resolve amicably. I agree that the director should intervene in serious disputes but so many trivial situations create unnecessary acrimony. · Players who attempt to use the appeals process as a threat. Players have the right to appeal any ruling based on fact but the often automatic "Well! I'll appeal" is irritating in the extreme. If you wish to appeal, the process is available. If you need help with the process, the director will be happy to assist. Many directors actually welcome appeals on rulings that have caused them difficulty. I am often asked to evaluate rulings that have taken place at some previous time. I am usually prepared to assume
Board: 12 Dealer: W Vul: NS West (Robb) «J Є J632 © Q92 Ё AJ543
North
(Havas)
« 98
Є AKQ109
© J863
Ё Q2
East
(Bashar)
« 10765432
Є 87
© 105
South Ё 97
(Travis)
« AKQ
Є 54
© AK74
Ё K1086
After West's pass, Bashar's 3« bid over Havas' 1Є opening was designed to inhibit our slam bidding. Unfortunately it did the opposite, generating us into 6NT. After winning the spade lead I finessed the heart. Now I
1
crossed back to hand with a diamond and finessed the heart again. Unfortunately I now had to cash the hearts, in case East held the ЁA, so my hand was squeezed before West.
East's bid had helped me until I mistimed the play, thinking that Bashar actually held something for her bid. After the heart finesse succeeded, I had to cross back to hand to lead a club towards dummy. When the queen held, I could cross back to hand with a spade, cash the final spade to extract West's `spare' card, then cash the hearts. Dummy is down to ©J8, Ё2; I hold ©K7, ЁK; West must come down to ©Q9, ЁA on the final heart. Now a club exit endplays West to lead the diamonds for me.
This was a typical case of the wild pre-empt assisting declarer in the play. I didn't feel so bad because many of the players were in the no-play 6©. I even heard that one Open player managed to go five off in 6NT!
Our final had some pretty interesting swingy hands, but session four of stage one had the most extreme hands ­ two grand slams and one small slam (6© where several pairs tried 5Є or 6Є, both going down!). Try Board 25, our first board of the match. At favourable vulnerability, partner opened 4« and I held: «KQ ЄQ97632 ©J97 Ё86. East bid 5Ё so I decided to pass, hoping for no further action but willing to save later! West bid 6Ё and partner took the 6« save! So much for my plans... Well, this worked out much better for us because East held the spade length so doubled and West felt compelled to pass. I was delighted. With a little help in the diamond suit 6«X went for 300. The whole hand:
Index
Articles Of Interest & Information
ABF Calendar
16
ABF Councillors
9
ABF News
10
CONTACT DETAILS
15
Copy Deadline
23
Country Congress Calendar
15
Green Point Achievements - 31 March 2003 8
McCutcheon Trophy - 30 April 2003
22
Playoff Qualifying Points -12 March 2003 23
Youth News
11
Major Tournament Reports & Results
2003 Women's Playoff
1
The 2003 Seniors Play-offs
5
Tournament Results
11
Regular Features
Bidding into the 21st Century
20
Book & Software Reviews
12
Coaching Cathy at Contract
18
Opinion
1
The Director's Chair
17
2
Board: 25
Dealer: N
North
Vul: EW
« AJ1098432
Є4
© Q865
West Ё --
East
«--
« 765
Є K105
Є AJ8
© K10432
©A
Ё KJ1093 South Ё AQ7542
« KQ
Є Q97632
© J97
Ё 86
Where South took the 6« save, West had a forcing pass available (showing first round spade control), so the grand slam was easily bid. At least 7« was a cheap save too! Somehow our teammates were allowed to play in 6Ё, for a 14 IMP gain.
Then it was decision time over another pre-empt of partner's. I held «KQ1072 Є10 ©1087 ЁQJ74 facing partner's vulnerable (against not) 3Ё pre-empt and East's jump to 4Є. Clearly the opponents held a lot of red-suit winners. If I passed or bid 5Ё it would surely encourage West to bid on, so I determined that 4« was the most damaging bid I could make (and I could run to 5Ё when doubled!). Little did I realise the trouble I would cause for the opponents ­ West held two small clubs and was worried about losers there; East held four spades and was worried about losers there! So West's 5Є was passed out:
Dealer: N Vul: EW West « A86 Є 743 © AKQJ5 Ё 62
North «9 Є6 © 9632 Ё AK109853 East « J543 Є AKQJ9852 ©4 South Ё -- « KQ1072 Є 10 © 1087 Ё QJ74
It was most impressive that Matthew McManus and Tony Nunn managed to bid both grand slams and the correct small slam in this match ­ few pairs bid any of the hands to the correct contracts.
In Stage 2, we played a 48-board match against the Evans team ­ the eventual winners of the Final. All three matches were one-sided, so it became clear that the winners of Match 1 (Moses) and Match 2 (Bourke) would qualify for the semi-finals (Stage 3). Our match therefore became incidental ­ both teams (Travis and Evans) would also qualify. This was the most interesting hand to play and defend:
Board: 21
Dealer: N
North
Vul: NS
« J65
Є K7
© J10532
West
Ё 1094
East
« 8732
« K109
Є 64
Є A952
©6
© AQ9
Ё KJ8652 South Ё AQ3
« AQ4
Є QJ1083
© K874
Ё7
East arrived in 3NT after South overcalled the 1Ё opening with 1Є. The (unfortunate) opening lead of the heart queen went to the king and ace. As should be done when in 3NT with 8 top tricks, East cashed her long suit. This often exerts too much pressure on the defenders ­ they may make a mistake or, as in this case, one hand may be squeezed. Five discards were just too much for the South hand, especially if East kept hearts held (a possibility if watching South's discards closely). Thankfully for us, East was not sure whether I had to hold the ©K for my overcall, nor did she know how many hearts I held. I'd bared the ©K early and declarer now had to decide whether to finesse, drop the king, or endplay me. She got it wrong. But I always find these hands a fascinating psychological challenge between defenders and declarer.
In Stage 3 Moses met Evans and Bourke played Travis in 48-board semi-finals. Both matches were extremely closely fought battles.
Going into the final 12 boards, Travis led by 10 IMPs. The session score was 53-3 to Travis, but Board 22 was indicative of the sort of `luck' that Bourke faced:
Board: 22
Dealer: E
North
Vul: EW
« J96
Є2
© Q1074
West Ё 108632 East
« 543
« 1072
Є KQJ109
Є 74
© A985
© KJ632
Ё4
South Ё J75
« AKQ8
Є A8653
©--
Ё AKQ9
West
North
East
South
Beale
Havas
Smart
Travis
Pass
2Ё1
Pass
2©2
Pass
2Є3
X
2«4
Pass
3NT
All Pass
1. Strong 2. Any 0-3 or 10+ HCP 3. GF 4. Any 0-3 HCP
I wasn't sure how to value the South hand or even what I would do in response to a second negative from partner. However, Felicity Beale had a great hand for doubling 2Є; now I believed partner's 2« denied any length in hearts, so decided to rely on some black suit tricks and a non-diamond lead. 3NT was cold for 10 tricks.
Lusk and Tully, on the other hand, managed to bid to an excellent 6Ё, needing a 4-3 heart break or a 2-2 club break. With East holding the short hearts AND long trumps, this contract was destined to fail. (As it happens, with the spades breaking, 6« is the best contract ­ declarer can trump two hearts, one with the «J, and discard one heart on the long club.)
THE FINAL ­ THE `HAND', THE IMP Evans (Pauline Evans ­ npc, Berri Folkard, Rena Kaplan, Lynn Kalmin, Elli Urbach, Inez Glanger, Marcia Scudder), who had defeated Moses by 8 IMPs, and Travis (Barbara Travis, Elizabeth Havas, Valerie Cummings, Candice Feitelson, Jan Cormack, Carole Rothfield) contested the 64-board final. From their win in Stage 2, Travis had a 24 IMP carry-forward.
Board 5 was spectacular ­ East held a nine-card spade suit opposite West's 6-6 in the minors. As South I was foolish enough to walk into the auction. North had passed, East opened 4« and, holding «KJ ЄAKQJ653 ©A2 ЁJ10 vulnerable, I felt I should bid 5Є. Unfortunately West doubled and I went two off ­ why it was unfortunate was that two hearts tricks can be cashed because West held a 0166! The full hand:
Board: 5
Dealer: N
North
Vul: NS
« 93
Є 1084
© 8763
West Ё Q765 East
«--
« AQ10876542
Є7
Є 92
© KQ10954
©J
Ё A98432 South Ё K
« KJ
Є AKQJ653
© A2
Ё J10
The following hands provide some insight into the Evans team's win. On Board 18, we had bid to our vulnerable game but Folkard and Kaplan took a save in 4« which we doubled.
3
Dealer: E
North
Vul: NS
«6
Є QJ83
© AK10
West Ё Q10972 East
« K10873
« AQ92
Є 542
Є7
© 43
© 98752
Ё KJ5
South Ё A86
« J54
Є AK1096
© QJ6
Ё 43
Havas led the ЄQ which I ducked. Now the contract is cold ­ declarer can establish dummy's diamonds for a club discard. I needed to overtake the heart and immediately switch the clubs to establish a trick in that suit.
At the other table West did not overcall on her poor hand, so 4Є made. Just the doubled double game swing, for 15 IMPs away.
And look at Board 8 in the next session:
Board: 8
Dealer: W
North
Vul: Nil
«8
Є A1043
© KQ54
West Ё KJ98 East
« 106432
« AKQ7
Є KQJ82
Є 765
© 96
© AJ
Ё7
South Ё 10432
« J95
Є9
© 108732
Ё AQ65
At our table West opened 2«, showing two five-card suits of the same rank. This meant that West played in 4« and partner led a logical ©K. Declarer won, drew trumps and lost just one trick in each other suit. ­620.
Both Elizabeth and I thought to ourselves that our teammates would have opened 2Є (both majors) but this would result in East playing the hand. On a heart lead from South, there will be a heart ruff. South must then try a small club for a second ruff ­ a distinct possibility.
We could not have foreseen what actually happened. This hand is a clear demonstration of why hands are considered fouled when played through 180° or with a different dealer. Somehow, though it is not supposed to occur with screens, North bid first in the auction and neither North nor East (screen-mates) noticed. (In fact, the dealer issue was not noticed until after the session.) Thus, North opened 1© and, after a competitive auction,
4
North-South ended in 5©X. East needed to switch to clubs after one spade lead in order to defeat the contract!
At least this was only a not vulnerable doubled double game swing, for ­14 IMPs!
This is a summary of the last session from my perspective ...
We were trailing by 11 IMPs at the start of the final 16 boards. On the first board, the opponents' opening methods generated us to a cold 3NT, for 7 IMPs back. Next hand, with a favourable lead, I'd made 3© holding a 4621 opposite a 2155 shape; a trump lead from the AKx would have left me stranded. On the third hand I played in 2« making. However, Rena Kaplan had given me a chance to make an overtrick, which I noticed immediately afterwards. My, "I hope that overtrick IMP isn't important," was rather too prophetic!
We'd had several tidy results when Board 28 arrived on the table. As dealer, I picked up, «QJ ЄA10986532 ©-- ЁAQ8 at favourable vulnerability, too good for 4Є, so I opened 1Є. Berri Folkard made a weak jump to 2«. Feeling that the match was going well and not wanting a disaster, Elizabeth made the `lazy' bid of 4Є. Rena Kaplan now bid 4«. Being aware of the vulnerability, I attributed a decent hand to Rena and a poor hand to partner ­ after all, she had many stronger options available, including 3« (a good raise to 4Є), 4Ё or 4© (fit-showing jumps) or 4« (a cue-bid). From my perspective I wanted to play in 6Є, but thought I should take the slow route there ­ so bid 5Є, hoping to `save' over 5«. Rena duly complied, so I now tried 6Є over her 5«. When this came back to her, she uttered her prophetic words, "Why do I get the feeling that this hand will decide the match?" She'd already checked what partner's 4Є showed, and I'd explained that it was weaker than bidding via 3« and so forth. However, she knew one of us had more than we'd shown because she was limited herself! Eventually she bid 6«, so I doubled ­ anticipating ANY lead but a heart!! (And any other lead would have defeated 6«...) On the heart lead and seeing dummy, my heart plummeted:
Dealer: E
North
Vul: EW
« AK10852
Є4
© 10942
West Ё 73
East
« QJ
« Void
Є A10986532
Є KQJ7
©--
© K876
Ё AQ8
South Ё KJ1094
« 97643
Є--
© AQJ53
Ё 652
The diamond suit was just good enough for a club discard. This time we scored up a doubled double slam
swing! 1660 together with 1010 (for 6Є) converted to a 21 IMP loss to Travis. I opened the next board in fourth position on a hand I would normally pass in; making 7 tricks in 1NT was 1 IMP away. We then gained the same 22 IMPs back on the final three boards. The match was a tie! The tie-breaking procedure, quite rightly, firstly removes any carry-forward. This meant that Evans had won the final, since they had won the head-to-head match. We could be full of `what ifs', such as `what if I hadn't doubled 6«?', `what if I'd made that overtrick?', but most of us are not. The Evans team played well, took calculated risks, and certainly had more luck on the day. This year, the `losers' still ended up being winners. The ABF had decided that the Playoff winners could select an event to attend and the losers would represent Australia at the other major event. The Evans team has chosen to go to Tahiti in early May for the Zone 7 Championships. The winner of the Zone 7 Championships will then head to Monaco for the Venice Cup. This means that the Travis team will represent Australia in the Pacific Asia Federation Bridge Championships in Manila in September. I hope both teams do Australia proud. Barbara Travis The ABF presents 2003 VICTOR CHAMPION CUP and the 2 DAY SENIORS TEAMS FOR THE MCCANCE TROPHY GOLD POINT SWISS TEAMS June 5 -June 9, 2003 At the EDEN ON THE PARK 6 QUEENS ROAD MELBOURNE Chief Toutrnament Director: Martin Willcox Convenor: Jenny Thompson Phone: (03) 9885 0160 Fax: (03) 9885 0676
The 2003 Seniors Play-offs Four teams were accepted into the event. On Day 1 they played a 3 x 20 board round robin. This was followed by 48 board semi-finals on Day 2 and a 64-board final on the last day.
DAY 1: Haughie defeated Westwood (21-9), Seres (17-13) and Moss (25-4). Seres beat Moss (22-8) and Westwood (2010) and Moss beat Westwood (23-7).
This arose in the first match:
Dealer: N Vul: Nil West « 742 Є9 © A753 Ё AQJ82
North
« Q1096
Є A108643
© Q4
Ё7
East
« AK85
Є--
© K1062
South Ё K9643
« J3
Є KQJ752
© J98
Ё 105
West Wyer 3Ё
North 2©1 Pass
East Seres Pass 6Ё
South 2Є All Pass
1. Weak two in one of the majors
Lead: ЄA. Wyer ruffed, drew trumps, played off the ©A and ©K, followed by «A, «K and then the third diamond. With no spades left, South had to give declarer a ruff-anddiscard and away went the spade loser. The same contract failed at the other table after this auction:
West 3Є
North Pass 5Є
East
South



All Pass
Lead: ЄQ. 14 IMPs to Seres. Slam was not reached in the other match after psyches by North and South:
West
North
Lorentz Jackman
Pass
X
3Ё!
Pass

X
All Pass
1. Precision
East Lester 1©1 4« Pass
South Anderson 2Є Pass Pass
5
Declarer escaped for two down, ­300. At the other table:
West Januszke 3Ё 5Ё
North Nagy 2©1 3Є All Pass
East Chan 2Є2 4Є
South Klinger 2NT3 Pass
1. Weak, both majors 2. Minor take-out, preferring clubs 3. Strong enquiry Declarer made eleven tricks, +400 and +3 IMPs to Westwood.
DAY 2: Haughie selected Moss as their semi-final opponent because of the 16-Imp carry forward and won the match 125-80. In the other semi, Seres beat Westwood 139-89.
Despite the 5-3 heart fit, 3NT was the better spot on this deal:
Dealer: E Vul: EW West « 987 Є 65 © K986 Ё QJ85
North « KQ106 Є 1074 © Q4 Ё AK106 East « AJ52 Є J98 © A3 South Ё 9742 « 43 Є AKQ32 © J10752 Ё3
West
North
East
Hughes Januszke Griffin
South Chan
Pass

Pass

Pass

Pass
3Ё1
Pass

Pass
3NT All Pass
1. Fourth Suit Forcing
There is no record of the play but declarer finished with nine tricks for +400. At the other table after a relay auction where North effectively had the same information, 4Є by South was the contract. This can always be beaten via a diamond lead or spade-leaddiamond-switch where East scores a diamond ruff. The contract did go one down, 10 IMPs to Westwood.
In the other match, with East-West silent, Nagy jumped to 3NT after 1Є : 1«, 2©. He made nine tricks on the Ё2 lead for +400. At the other table, South opened 2« (reds or blacks), North inquired with 2NT and South's 3Є showed a maximum with the red suits. North chose 4Є
6
and declarer here, too, was one down. 10 IMPs to Haughie.
DAY 3: Moss beat Westwood 93-45 in the 32-board playoff for third spot. In the 64-board final, Haughie had a 4.5 carryforward and won the first set 48-20. Seres struck back 40-20 in the second quarter to trail by 12.5 at the half. Haughie won the third set 55-26 and the last 43-26 to finish with 170.5-122.
Haughie chose the World Seniors Teams in Monte Carlo next November as their mission. The Seres team will compete in the Pacific-Asian Teams in Manila in September.
This deal arose in the first session of the final:
Dealer: W Vul: NS West « J5432 Є 653 ©Q Ё QJ84
North
«6
Є 872
© AJ8654
Ё 1073
East
« A108
Є K4
© K10973
South Ё K52
« KQ97
Є AQJ109
©2
Ё A96
West Wyer Pass 1« Pass
North Lester Pass Pass 4Є
East Seres 1© 2« All Pass
South Lorenz X 3Є
Lead: ©Q Declarer took dummy's ace and led a spade. East rose with the ace and switched to the Є4. South finessed and made eleven tricks for +650. (In the playoff for third, both North-Souths played in 4Є after effectively identical auctions to the above. The lead was the ©Q led at each table and both declarers scored +620.)
West
North
East
South
Pass
Pass
1NT
X


Pass
3NT
All Pass
Lead: «3 East took the ace and returned a spade. Declarer can succeed from here but in practice went one down. 13 Imps to Haughie. The last session of the final started with a double game swing:
Board: 49 Dealer: E Vul: EW West «4 Є KQJ5 © 863 Ё AKJ62
North « KQ986 Є 87 © Q1042 Ё 94 South « AJ102 Є A64 © KJ975 Ё7
East « 753 Є 10932 ©A Ё Q10853
West Haughie
North Wyer
East Borin
South Seres
Pass
Pass




All Pass
Lead: ©2 Declarer won with dummy's ace, drew trumps, ruffing the diamond losers en route and had an easy eleven tricks for +400. At the other table:
West Hughes -- 1Є All Pass
North Klinger Pass 1«
East Griffin Pass 4Є
South Nagy 1© 4«
Lead: ©A East switched to a club and received a diamond ruff, but that was the end of the defence. Declarer could draw trumps and ditch the heart loser on the fifth diamond. +420 and +13 IMPs to Haughie.
The tournament was exceptionally well run by David Stern convenor and Matthew McManus tournament director. An excellent feature were the bidding and play records for every match. Ron Klinger
Able to play The Duplimate is not only a reliable cardsorter, you will also get a range of versatile softwares with our package deal. You can for example print the contracts that are able to play on the actual layout of the cards. Push another button and you will have your hand-records as a (html) file, which everybody can access via the www. Join the crowd, discover why the Duplimate is called the duplicate players' best mate! Duplimate Australia applies a two years (standard) guarantee and an exceptional 12 months "no excuse" warranty. I.e. money back if you are not happy with your Duplimate. Duplimate Australia For details please contact Nick Fahrer Phone:(02) 9967 0644 Fax:(02) 9967 0444 Email: [email protected] or surf to www.duplimate.com 7
Green Point Achievements As At 31 March 2003
Category 1 (0-45) 1 PEARCE, Lawrence 2 CROSSMAN, Bruce 2 CROSSMAN, Bev 4 NOLAN, Ann 4 NOLAN, Allan 6 ALDONS, Malcolm 7 MURPHY, Jen 8 BERENGER, Trevor 9 TONGS, Janice 10 BARBER, Sally 11 INGERMAN, Dan 11 BORDING, Jay 13 COLBERT, Ken 14 ANGEL, Margaret 14 BLACK, Elaine 16 PRIOL, Fran 17 VIDLER, Ivy 17 JEPPESEN, Mervyn 17 HALL, Lawrie 20 HOAD, David 20 HOAD, Ian 22 STOREY, Alison 23 BUTWELL, Ann 24 FORDE, Maggie 24 STRITCH, Hilary 26 TURNER, Peter 27 MARSHALL, Andrew 28 WOODROFFE, Neil 29 ROLFE, Kathy 30 PALMER, Terence 30 WILLIAMS, Grant 32 COPPARD, Helen 33 NEILL, Ian 33 WATTS, Lynn 35 HERALD, Colin 35 KUKULSKI, Zygmunt 37 DAVIDSON, Frank 38 O'ROURKE, Jack 39 MILLER, Helen 40 COMRIE, Bob 41 NIXON, Roy 41 HAYMAN, Ross 41 KELSHIKER, Hemant 44 MOGUS, Marcia 45 HANSEN, Gwen 45 TEAGUE, Gillian 47 SLATTERY, Valerie 47 BLOW, Elizabeth 49 HOWSE, Jeanette 50 COHEN, June Category 2 (46-90) 1 PLACE, Bev 2 CALDER, Bill 3 MONAHAN, David 4 DAMS, Paula 5 FARRELL, Camille 6 ZAAR, Michael 7 McENCROE, Dennis 8 McCABE, Pauline 9 BURGESS, Betty 10 GILES, Leslie 11 SIEBOLD, Nicholas 12 McENCROE, Alison 13 CAMPBELL, Joan 14 SNELL, David
15 McLACHLAN, Robyn 4.28 16 MILLER, Judy 2.20 17 BUSH, Ron 2.20 17 THOMPSON, Kaye 2.01 19 SCHOFIELD, Linley 2.01 20 WILDING, Barbara 1.96 21 YANDLE, Roger 1.93 21 BOND, Roger 1.87 23 CREMA, Pat 1.81 24 McMURRAY, Carol 1.52 25 VERCOE, Ms C. A. 1.51 26 RAMSDEN, Jack 1.51 27 CHAINEY, Michael 1.47 28 HOYLAND, Jan 1.43 29 DUNSTAN, James 1.43 30 TSE, Sky 1.40 31 RAMSDEN, Jill 1.37 32 KENNEDY, Prue 1.37 33 LOGAN, Phyllis 1.37 34 BROCK, Jim 1.36 36 SAVAGE, Jennifer 1.36 37 CHEYNE, John 1.31 38 GREGORY, Ivy 1.29 39 CAPLE, Devin 1.23 40 RICHARDS, Patricia 1.23 40 JOHNSON, Jean 1.15 42 KNOWLES, June 1.13 43 JAMES, Mrs. D. 1.10 43 SCOTT, Mrs. I. E. 1.09 45 NASH, Mary 1.03 46 BONASSI, Vilma 1.03 47 STEENBEEK, Jorden 1.02 48 STRAUSS, Merv 0.98 49 WILSON, Adele 0.98 50 DUNN, Noeline 0.97 Category 3 (91-140) 0.97 1 BERBERIAN, Harry 0.96 2 WELSH, Dulcie 0.95 3 GOLDMAN, Rhonda 0.94 4 DONOGHUE, Suzanne 0.92 5 WILLIAMS, Jacqueline 0.91 6 DYSON, Janet 0.91 7 MAGUIRE, Evelyn 0.91 8 WILLIAMS, Pam 0.89 9 MORGANS, Anne 0.82 10 EVANS, Beryl 0.82 11 DENNIS, Marie 0.79 12 REEVES, Pamela 0.79 13 BROOKING, Judy 0.78 14 HARTMAN, Marguerita 0.77 15 TURNER, Elinor 16 ST LAWRENCE, Pat 6.33 17 KENTISH, Grace 5.63 17 WOOD, Michael 5.51 19 TURNER, Chris 5.36 20 NEWMAN, John 4.73 21 HUDSON, Tony 4.53 22 WELLS, Anthony 4.41 23 BENNETT, Janet 4.29 24 HACKETT, Tom 4.08 25 MAGEE, Doug 3.69 26 KENTISH, Norman 3.59 27 BROUGHTON, Rosalie 3.38 28 JONES, Rhonda 3.29 29 FAHEY, Bess 3.25 30 BRAMSTON, Rob
3.24 30 VAN-BEEK, Max
2.79
3.18 32 DICK, Rudolf
2.78
3.11 33 OLIVE, Dorothy
2.77
3.11 34 CLIFFORD, Graham
2.76
3.06 34 BROCKLEBANK, Nancy
2.76
3.01 34 MANIFOLD, Jean
2.76
2.96 37 CARO, Elizabeth
2.73
2.96 38 ROWE, Elaine
2.68
2.84 39 YARDLEY, Tom
2.65
2.83 40 ANTONIO, Gaby
2.57
2.78 41 STRUIK, Andrew
2.51
2.76 42 WARE, David
2.48
2.69 43 SHAW, Beth
2.47
2.58 44 SHIPWAY, Judith
2.46
2.54 44 DONOGHUE, Peter
2.46
2.52 46 SLARKE, Valerie
2.42
2.47 47 LIDBETTER, Pam
2.37
2.46 48 SCOTT-McKENZIE, Pauline 2.36
2.39 48 SCOTT-McKENZIE, Ewen 2.36
2.35 50 CHRESTMAN, Parks
2.35
2.31 Category 4 (191-300)
2.30 1 BAKKER, James
9.46
2.29 2 HAY, Bob
7.25
2.26 2 PROBERT, Hugh
7.25
2.21 4 BOHM, Heinz
7.08
2.21 5 ROSEBY, Heather
6.91
2.16 6 MORGAN, Sue
6.36
2.15 7 McPHAIL, Bruce
6.31
2.15 8 LIPTHAY, Peter
5.89
2.09 9 BENTLEY, John
5.74
2.08 10 CARAPIET, Sarah
5.70
2.05 11 OLSEN, Ruth
5.51
2.01 12 NELSON, Phil
5.47
1.99 13 DYMOND, Yvonne
5.14
1.98 14 MILLER, Marie
5.11
15 LEONHARDT, Gisela
5.02
10.93 16 DENKIEWICZ, Beata
5.00
8.80 17 McDONALD, Marie
4.90
5.94 17 ARROWSMITH, Gwen
4.90
5.83 19 DAVIDSON, Tony
4.86
5.17 20 MAHER, Verna
4.84
5.10 21 COFFEY, David
4.68
4.69 22 HUMPHREYS, Thayer
4.61
4.55 23 HERMAN, Morrie
4.60
4.22 23 HINCHLIFFE, Gwen
4.60
4.17 25 SHILBURY, Lud
4.54
4.16 25 FRANCIS, Neville
4.54
3.98 25 WIJERATNE, Jerry
4.54
3.85 28 FEWTRELL, June
4.50
3.81 29 HOMEWOOD, Joan
4.49
3.79 30 GREISS, Bernard
4.47
3.76 30 GREISS, Xava
4.47
3.71 32 BOOTH, Margaret
4.43
3.71 33 SMITH, Christine
4.41
3.66 34 HERMAN, Gloria
4.36
3.58 35 GILFOYLE, Mike
4.35
3.26 36 TABERNER, Michael
4.29
3.25 37 WADDELL, Muriel
4.28
3.23 38 BYRNE, Alan
4.27
3.19 39 MEYER, Gisela
4.26
3.09 40 DRURY, Dina
4.25
3.08 41 CAMERON, Mrs. D.
4.24
3.01 42 SAME, Terri
4.12
2.89 42 COFFEY, Judith
4.12
2.84 44 DEVESKI, Jan
4.04
2.79 44 CZUBALA, George
4.04
8
46 MAHABLESHWARWALLA, Behram 47 DAVIS, Margaret 48 SIMMONDS, Paula 49 HILTON, Janice 50 BENSOUSSAN, Cathy Category 5 (301-800) 1 THOMPSON, Kay 2 ELSE, Ken 3 DYER, Gaylene 4 NEWNHAM, Lorna 5 AUDLEY, George 6 HERRING, Judy 7 HANSON, Rex 8 SINGH, Mohinder 9 LEEMING, Rita 10 DAWES, Enid 11 KOSTYRKA, Betty 12 DEMARCO, Therese 13 HUGHES, Stephen 14 VANKAN, Ton 15 BAILEY, John 16 VANKAN, Estelle 17 GOODSALL, Edward 18 NUNN, Pam 19 STAGG, Ron 20 HODGEN, Edna 21 MOONEY, Rosemary 22 DOONER, Jan 23 DAGNELL, Vera 24 WARTHOLD, Cathy 25 SIMPSON, Tony 26 FORAGE, Bert 27 HARDY, Mary 28 HALCROFT, Valda 29 BROWN, Ken
3.97 3.90 3.85 3.84 3.83 19.88 16.60 16.45 15.52 15.40 14.45 13.94 12.60 12.53 11.98 11.95 11.90 10.77 10.59 10.56 10.54 10.44 10.04 9.93 9.86 9.71 9.69 9.65 9.47 9.35 9.33 9.24 8.97 8.95
30 CHAPMAN, Ron 31 NUNN, Eric 32 De Jong, Jan 33 HAUBRICK, Tim 34 LOFF, Mrs. K. 35 ROOKE, Rebecca 36 SLUYTER, Henk 37 BRITTON, Helen 38 KUPERMAN, Mrs. D. 39 ROBINSON, Di 40 HALL, Laurence 40 TUTTY, Jodi 40 DONNELLY, Bob 43 DUKE, Lois 44 ASQUITH, Nancy 45 DAVIES, Arthur 46 SAMPSON, John 47 ALP, Peter 48 MILLIDGE, Peggy 49 GESCHEIT, Mrs. L. 50 CLARK, Lesley Category 6 (801+) 1 AZZOPARDI, Paul 2 BURNS, Jack 3 GRAEBNER, David 4 HEAIRFIELD, Ian 5 McERLEAN, Tina 6 CHURCHILL, Val 7 CHARLESWORTH, Thelma 8 BLOCH, Shirley 9 SASSON, Clare 10 POGACIC, Stan 11 FISHER, Janet 12 MAY, Jim 13 MANNING, Joan 14 CARVER, Rosie
8.91 8.83 8.71 8.67 8.42 8.21 8.07 8.04 8.03 7.92 7.86 7.86 7.86 7.85 7.84 7.73 7.69 7.64 7.63 7.62 7.58 29.84 28.36 26.11 24.05 22.05 19.51 19.07 18.81 18.78 18.26 15.98 15.94 15.79 15.67
15 JANZEKOVIC, Darko 16 SAXBY, Elspeth 17 TAYLOR, Elaine 18 BIRBECK, Rod 19 NEWTON, Annette 20 BADENOCH, Gwen 21 SLAUGHTER, Cathy 22 HECKER, Robert 23 HAN, Jenny 24 BILNEY, Leonard 25 PLEYDELL, Van 26 ALLEN, Anne 27 GRISTWOOD, Jenny 27 POZZA, Delsi 29 CRIPPS, John 30 CHARLESWORTH, Ian 31 SEEFELD, Helga 32 BEYFUS, John 33 FOREMAN, Carole 34 PIANTA, Richard 34 SFREDDO, Edi 36 SELLEY, Kate 37 LAY, Margaret 38 WATERHOUSE, Ron 39 JAKES, Maureen 40 MARSHall, John 41 FEHSE, Lisa 42 EMERSON, Susan 43 HOGGARD, Ian 44 TODD, Ken 45 CASTELL, Judith 46 CORNISH, Joan 47 CLAPP, Kevin 48 WOOLFORD, Tony 49 FENSOME, Carol 50 SMITH, Alf
15.28 15.09 14.89 14.55 14.15 14.09 13.81 13.26 13.23 13.18 13.10 13.02 12.57 12.57 12.52 12.25 12.20 12.14 11.98 11.92 11.92 11.86 11.81 11.67 11.63 11.57 11.54 11.53 11.46 11.45 11.42 11.35 11.33 11.31 11.18 11.17
ABF Councillors ACT Mr Andrew Struik Snowy Bend DALGETY NSW 2628 Tel 02 6456 5079 H [email protected] Mrs Julia Hoffman PO Box 9599 DEAKIN ACT 2600 Tel 02 6260 3728 0408 446 127 [email protected] New South Wales Mr John Arkinstall 26 Blair Street BONDI NSW 2026 Tel 02 9300 0720 Fax 02 9300 0702 [email protected] Mr Keiran Crowe-Mai 20 Boonah Street EAST GARDENS NSW 2036 Tel 02 8347 2221 H 02 8296 3071 W [email protected]
Northern Territory Mr Helge Pedersen GPO Box 2101 DARWIN NT 0801 Tel 08 8924 4138 W Fax 08 8924 4053 [email protected] Mr Ken Miller GPO Box 2157 DARWIN NT 0801 Tel 08 8948 2244 W 08 8985 5957 H [email protected] Queensland Mr Tony Jackman 101/120 Uxbridge Street GRANGE QLD 4051 Tel 07 3356 2416 H 0400 844 693 [email protected] Mr Keith McDonald (President) 10 Skerry Street KENMORE QLD 4069 Tel 07 3378 6168 H 07 3365 2998 W Fax 07 3365 7579 [email protected]
South Australia
Victoria
Mr David Smyth
Mr Justin Stark (Treasurer)
1 Hill Street
1574 Malvern Road
BURNSIDE SA 5066
GLEN IRIS VIC 3146
Tel 08 8331 3146
Tel 03 9833 1207 H 0411 440 725
[email protected]
03 8877 2582 W
Mr Phil Gue
Fax 03 9275 3508
209 Glen Osmond Road
[email protected]
FREWVILLE SA 5063
Mr Martin Willcox
Tel 08 8379 2044 W
PO Box 1105
Fax 08 8379 3558
MOUNTAIN GATE VIC 3156
[email protected] Tel 0419 380 392
Fax 03 9779 6612
Tasmania
[email protected]
Mr Andrew Richman
Best Western Tall Trees Motel Western Australia
PO Box 624
Mr Joe Greenfeld
DICKSON ACT 2602
PO Box 244
Tel 02 6247 9200 W
MIDLAND WA 6056
0418 725 402
Tel 0894446070H0892509000W
Fax 02 6257 4479
Fax 08 9274 1762 W
[email protected] 08 9444 6670 H
Mrs Dallas Cooper
[email protected]
2/20 Alma Street
Mr Dennis Yovich (Secretary)
BELLERIVE TAS 7018
41 Somerton Road
Tel 03 6244 8860 H 0427 724 266 KARRINYUP WA 6018
03 6272 4266 W
Tel 08 9341 8116 H
Fax 03 6272 1958
08 9420 2458 W
[email protected] Fax 08 9341 4547
[email protected]
9
ABF News PABF CHAMPIONSHIPS POSTPONED Originally scheduled for Manila in June, this year's PABF Championships have been postponed until September due to concerns about the SARS virus. ANC SYSTEM CARDS FOR INTERSTATE REPS. The ABF Tournament Committee has decided that all pairs who represent their States at the Australian National Championships in the Interstate Teams are obliged to have available to their opponents for some months in advance of the event a completed ABF Convention Card. The Lee Edwards ABF Convention Card program is able for downloading from: http://www.abf.com.au/system/index.html Each partnership will be expected to supply by email to their captain a completed convention card using the above program. The state secretary should supply a complete set of team cards to [email protected] and they will be uploaded to this site. THE NATIONWIDE PAIRS Players and clubs are reminded about the Nationwide Pairs, a new event being trialled by the ABF. It is being held on the 2nd and 4th week of every month. More information is available from: http://www.abf.com.au/events/nwp/index.html 2004 SUMMER FESTIVAL OF BRIDGE VENUES Following the successful trial of the Exhibition Hall for the Swiss Pairs in 2003, we have been able to secure this excellent venue for six days in 2004. Consequently the Swiss Pairs and the South West Pacific Teams (one of the two fields) will be held at the National Convention Centre. Parking will be available underneath the Convention Centre on a multiple entry basis for $5 per day. The associated hotel, the Crowne Plaza, is offering single or double rooms at $139 plus $20 per head for breakfast. The full venue list is: Hyatt Hotel Canberra: National Seniors Teams and Australian Mixed Pairs Rydges Lakeside Hotel: National Women's Teams, Non-Life Masters Teams, Mens Pairs, NWT & NST Stage II, NWT & NST Finals, Australian Open Pairs, Graded Pairs, SW Pacific Teams, National Open Teams and Australian Mixed Teams National Convention Centre: National Swiss Pairs and SW Pacific Teams 10
Director/Manager Canberra Bridge Club Incorporated The Canberra Bridge Club is the largest bridge club in the Canberra region with approximately 550 members. We are seeking applications for the full time position of director/manager of the club for a three year term commencing in July 2003. Applicants must be accredited directors at a national level. The role involves two main areas of activity: · Directing all regular club sessions (or arranging suitable alternate directing services), directing Congress events, and directing major state selection events for the ACT. · Managing all administrative tasks to ensure the efficient functioning of the club and its clubrooms A competitive remuneration package will be negotiated with the successful applicant. Applications must be in writing and must address the selection criteria outlined in the job description available by contacting Neil Ewart at [email protected] Applications close on June 1st 2003. Please send written applications to: The Canberra Bridge Club Incorporated c/- Neil Ewart 10 Bremer Street Griffith ACT 2603 Darwin a "Bridge too Far" in July? Why not come to Noosa Heads Butler Pairs Congress July 19 - 20 and sample the first class restaurants, and quality accommodation Contact: Colin Regan (07) 5449 0941 [email protected]
Tournament Results
AUSTRALIAN TEAMS PLAYOFFS
OPEN:
SEMI-FINALS:
Noble B. Noble, M. Prescott, P. Marston,
110
T. Brown, P. Gue, S. Hans
defeated
Rothfield J. Rothfield, S. Browne, G. Smolanko,
76
P. Gumby, K. Dyke, W. Lazer
Thomson M. Thomson, I. Del'Monte, R. Richman,
127
R. Fruewirth, T. Antoff, A. Simpson
defeated
Fordham P. Fordham, D. Beauchamp, M. McManus,
116
A. Nunn, J. Roberts, B. Neill
FINAL:
Thomson 201 defeated Noble 162
WOMEN'S:
SEMI-FINALS:
Evans P. Evans (npc), R. Kaplan, B. Folkard,
104
I. Glanger, M. Scudder, E. Urbach,
L.Kalmin
defeated
Moses K. Moses, W. Halvorsen, H. Snashall,
93
S. Murray-White, N. Bashar, M. Robb
Travis B. Travis, E. Havas, V. Cummings,
136
C. Feitelson, C. Rothfield, J. Cormack
defeated
Bourke M. Bourke, F. Beale, J. Hay,
176
S. Lusk, D. Smart, T. Tully
FINAL:
Evans 176 defeated Travis 176
Tie-break (removal of carry-forward) applied.
SENIORS:
SEMI-FINALS:
Haughie W. Haughie, R. Klinger, Z. Nagy,
125
J. Lester, G. Lorentz, J. Borin
defeated
Moss T. Moss, R. Cowan, M. Foster,
80
D. Zines, L. Kalmin, H. Bettman
Seres T. Seres, A. Walsh, M. Hughes,
139
E. Griffin, B. McDonald, P. Wyer,
defeated
Westwood W. Westwood, P. Chan, R. Januszke,
89
J. Brockwell, A. Jackman, D. Anderson
FINAL:
Haughie 170.5 defeated Seres 122
Youth News AUSTRALIAN YOUTH TO PARIS It has now been confirmed that the World Youth Teams will be held in Paris from the 18th ­ 28th of August. The Australian team which has been selected to play in that event is: Mark Abraham - Michael Wilkinson (ACT/NSW) Gabby Feiler - David Wiltshire (NSW/SA) Daniel Krochmalik - Joshua Wyner (NSW) John Hardy Bridge Books and Software No extra postage!
New and Popular books
Better Rebidding with Bergen
$16.50
Marty Bergen NEW!
Points Schmoints! - Marty Bergen
$39.60
Topics in Declarer Play - Eddie Kantar $36.30
25 Bridge Myths Exposed - David Bird $30.80
25 Ways to Take More Tricks as Declarer $30.80
Seagram & Bird
Hand Evaluation: Points Schmoints
$15.40
Marty Bergen
The Bridge Technique Series David Bird and Marc Smith Twelve volumes on various aspects of card play, designed for the improving player. $14.30 each or two for $27.00
Software
JACK ­ Winner of the 2001 and 2002 World
Computer Bridge Championship
Strong bidding and play and an attractive and easy
to use interface.
$119.90
Look at this! Bridge Baron 13 Points Schmoints interactive CD Marty Sez now on CD Mike Lawrence's Defence Test and improve your declarer play with the addictive Bridge Master 2000
$112.20 $59.40 $52.80 $62.80 $114.40
J.W. & S. Hardy (ABN 63 813 139 759) 63 Tristan St., Carindale QLD 4152 Ph. 07-33988898 or 0409-786050 Email [email protected] Website www.uq.net.au/~zzjhardy
11
Book & Software Reviews SPOT THE BRIDGE WRITER'S BLUNDER BY DANNY ROTH (FINESSE BOOKS, LONDON, 2003) In an original approach Danny Roth provides 75 deals that have been misanalysed by bridge authors and columnists. This may seem a difficult project, but computer programs that examine every variation of the most complex deal in less than a second have changed bridge writing and analysis forever.
Each deal is presented as a problem on the right hand page, with the solution overleaf. This is one of the many hands where the author finds an extra chance for declarer:
North
« K32
Є AKJ
© AKJ
West Ё A752 East
« J107
« Q986
Є 873
Є 64
© 854
© 1097
Ё KQ103 South Ё J986
« A54
Є Q10952
© Q632
Ё4
After North opens 2Ё, South declares 7Є on the ЁK lead. When the deal was first published the authors recommended a dummy reversal, ruffing three clubs in hand, and drawing trumps with the AKJ, eventually returning to «A to score the ©Q and make 2 spades, 3 top hearts, 3 ruffs, 4 diamonds and a club.
Roth points out the following improvement. Win ЁA, ruff a club, and play two rounds of trumps. Now, if trumps are 4-1, play to trump a spade in dummy. Cash «K and ©AKJ and cross to «A, next pitching dummy's third spade on ©Q. If you have survived all of this you can now trump your third spade in dummy for 13 tricks.
HOCUS-POCUS BY ERWIN BRECHER MORE HOCUS-POCUS BY ERWIN BRECHER & JULIAN POTTAGE. (PANACEA PRESS, LONDON, 2001/2) This brace of puzzle books presents yet another novel approach. Both books feature 96 bridge problems and 96 logic problems, with interesting anecdotes from the past freely interspersed among the pages of the second book. The average player 12
will find the bridge problems are not too tough. How do you make 4« on this deal?
North
« A106
Є Q9
© A76543
West Ё 107
East
«3
« 52
Є AK8643
Є 10752
© QJ
© K98
Ё AQ65 South Ё 8432
« KQJ9874
ЄJ
© 102
Ё KJ9
West leads ЄA and switches to ©Q. Win ©A and play ЄQ, discarding your second diamond. Now you have three entries in dummy's spades, two to trump two diamonds and one to return to discard on the last three diamonds. And East can't get in to spear through a club.
The logic problem on this deal is: Two devout Muslims, who had never seen each other, met outside the Regent's Park Mosque. Yet one of them was the father of the other one's son. Can you explain this?
SOLUTION: The two Muslims were a married couple, who were both blind.
ANECDOTE: A story is told about Albert Einstein who, after a lecture to a professional group, said, "Now I will take questions." One member of the audience raised his hand and said, "I don't understand your proof of Theorem B." Einstein replied, "That's not a question." These two very entertaining books are well recommended. Paul Lavings
25 WAYS TO TAKE MORE TRICKS AS DECLARER BY BARBARA SEAGRAM AND DAVID BIRD The "25 Ways..." books are an excellent series for the beginner and intermediate player. The first title "25 Bridge Conventions You Should Know" was awarded the prestigious American Bridge Teachers Association "Book of the Year" award a few years ago and I'd say it is the most popular non-Australian title in recent times.
"25 Ways to Take More Tricks as Declarer" is the cardplay companion to this title and its content follows a natural progression of difficulty, from explaining finesses and why it's important to ruff losers, through to some preliminary discussion on counting out the defenders' hand patterns and hand strengths to evaluating alternative lines of play. Each chapter's lesson is illustrated with plenty of examples and concludes with summaries and a short quiz.
Try this hand from the Chapter entitled: Combining
Two Chances:
North
« 652
Є AK75
© AQ5
West Ё Q104 East
« QJ1073
« 984
Є 842
Є Q1096
© J964
© K103
Ё2
South Ё 965
« AK
Є J3
© 872
Ё AKJ873
You bid well to 6Ё (lead:«Q) but... the play's the thing and you could easily lose two diamond tricks. You could just play a diamond towards dummy, play the queen and hope...but there are other chances. did you spot them? You could try for 3 heart tricks by leading low from dummy towards your doubleton Jack. If the Jack wins then you have six clubs, 2 spades, the ©A and three heart tricks for your contract. If the Jack loses to the Queen then you can discard one diamond on a top heart and NOW try the diamond finesse. This way you have combined your chances. All in all, this is a good, easy-to-read (and understand) card play book for the bridge player with 6-12 months experience. JACK CD ROM Let's start with some preliminaries. My name is Nick and I'm a bridge addict. Go on - put your hand up if you are too. Hmm. I thought so. Friends --today I bring you good news and bad news.
Bridge Holidays in 2003 with RON & SUZIE KLINGER Hamilton Island 27th May - 1st June Tangalooma Wild Dolphin Resort 9th -15th August (Booked out : Wait list only) 2nd - 8th August (Additional week : Space available) Shoal Bay Resort & Spa, NSW 7th - 12th September (Please note new dates) Norfolk Island 30th November - 7th December Brochures, details from HOLIDAY BRIDGE P.O. Box 140, Northbridge, NSW 1560 Telephone (02) 9958 5589 Fax (02) 9958 6382 Email [email protected]
13
First, the good news: I have come across what is far and away the best bridge software I have ever seen and believe me I have sampled a fair proportion of the 50 or more games available. Jack comes from THE NETHERLANDS and has won the last two World Computer Bridge Championships. There are lots of features that make a bridge game good or bad - the interface and ease of use, the choice of bidding systems, the library of hands - but ultimately we derive the most pleasure from playing a competent opponent. I thought games I had played before were OK, challenging for novices and intermediates but not more. Jack, however, plays a good game and is nowhere near as predictable as some of the other games around. System junkies will also be satisfied with the 65+ conventions to choose from, including leading and signalling methods. For the analysts among us, at the click of a button, the par result on the hand is calculated. There's also a library of pre-played tournament hands from Europe and when you've exhausted these you can create your own tournaments and Jack will score you against the par score it calculates for each hand. The truth is Jack won't beat the better players among you but its developer believes we're only a few years away from that stage. I can assure you however, that you wont be cursing your computer `partner' for the obviously dumb bids and plays that other bridge games sometimes throw at you. And the bad news you ask? Jack is addictive but just don't mention this minor detail to the bridge widow or widower in your house. Nick Fahrer HAND EVALUATION: POINTS SCHMOINTS BY MARTY BERGEN, BERGEN BOOKS, 61PP Marty Bergen has become one of the most prolific authors around. The title of this latest offering cashes in on his hugely popular earlier book "Points Schmoints". Many readers would have been sold on the Rule of Twenty for opening bridge hands, which suggests adding the length of your two longest suits to your HCP, and if it comes to twenty or more, open. Now Marty goes a step further and suggests that some evaluation and adjustments should be applied to this rule. 14
«KQ ЄJ6542 ©QJ62 ЁQJ Even though it adds up to 21, it also adds up to a pile of junk, with no aces and values concentrated in short suits. PASS. There are sections on opener 's actions and responder's actions. There are some good general tips, such as to be wary of misfit hands (stop bidding immediately) and length in the opponents' suit. Even if partner is short in it, the wrong opponent is probably also short and can overruff partner. Marty also warns against bidding on the basis that partner will have just the right cards, making the classic comment "He who seeks perfect dummy need only look in mirror". The sight-challenged will love this book with its large clear font and well-spaced text. The examples are clear, and the tips are right to the point. The light-hearted style makes for enjoyable reading, and this book is highly recommended to any player up to intermediate level. John Hardy A TRAVELLING BRIDGE PLAYER'S GUIDE TO EUROPE As a bridge player who travels overseas frequently I have often found it difficult to locate bridge clubs in the cities that I visit. Recognising this problem the first edition of the European Bridge Pass became available for bridge aficionados all around the world. The idea for the guide originated when a couple of bridge friends travelled through Spain to enjoy the sun and various cultural sights. However, when they encountered a few days of rain, they started talking about bridge and the possibilities to play with local bridge players somewhere. But they did not know where to go and they had no internet in their holiday home. Not really understanding their needs, the local tourist board suggested a tour to some ancient Roman bridges in the area. The guide holds more than 500 bridge locations in 21 countries across Europe including Austria, Belgium, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Wales, Malta and Monaco.
The details for each club includes · address · the number of members · session times · table money · email address and websites · languages spoken at the club · food and beverage availability
The guide also offers useful information about international tournaments, various bidding systems and a helpful translation of the most common bridge terms into several languages.
This guide is strongly recommended for those travelling to Europe and have any interest at all in visiting bridge clubs while holidaying.
For more information, see www.bridgepass.nl or send an email to [email protected]
David Stern Country Congress Calendar
Dates Where/Event
Contact
May
31- Leeton
Carol Saddler
1 June Annual Congress
Leeton Soldiers BC
Pairs & Teams
PO Box 479
Leeton 2705
(02) 6953 4385
June
1 Maitland
Rosemary Pout
Open Teams Congress (02) 4966 5376
1 Sunshine Coast
Anne McLeod
Honeysuckle Pairs
PO Box 5152
Maroochydore Business Centre 4558
(07) 5492 7539
21-22 Tweed Heads
Joy Rennie
Wintersun Congress
PO Box 106
Pairs & Teams
Tweed Heads 2486
(07) 5536 1570 (c) or (02) 6676 1792 (h)
28-29 Gold Coast
Congress Secretary
Gold Coast Teams
PO Box 7009
Gold Coast Mail Ctr
Bundall 9726
July
6 Wollongong
Margaret Spira
Swiss Butler Pairs
Illawarra Br. Assoc.
11 Princes Hwy
Figtree 2525
[email protected] (02) 4267 3699
19 - 20 Noosa Heads
Colin Regan
Butler Pairs Congress
PO Box 40
Noosaville 4566
(07) 5449 0941
Dates Where/Event
Contact
July cont.
27 Tweed Heads
Margo McGuiness
Twin Towns Swiss Teams PO Box 161
Open Congress
Banora Point 2486
(07) 5524 5092
August
9 -10 Wagga Wagga
John Dare
Wagga Wagga Congress 22 Hammond Ave
Wagga 2650
Ph: (02) 6921 8289
9 -10 Surfers Paradise
Congress Secretary
Weekend Teams Congress PO Box 6628
Gold Coast Mail Centre 9726
Ph: (07) 5597 0085
[email protected]
Fax: (07) 5597 1172
10 Sunshine Coast
Anne McLeod
Novice Pairs (0-99 MP's) PO Box 5152
Maroochydore Business Centre 4558
(07) 5492 7539
15-17 Yarrawonga
Richard Kahn
Congress
PO Box 13
Yarrawonga 3730
(03) 5743 1774
31 Sunshine Coast
Anne McLeod
Teams
PO Box 5152
Maroochydore Business Centre 4558
(07) 5492 7539
September
5 - 7 Orange
Margaret Robinson
Walk In Pairs
51 Byng Street
Pairs and Teams
Orange 2800
[email protected] (02) 6362 8241
ABF Newsletter Editors Send contributions and correspondence to: David & Sue Lusk 6 Vincent Court, Campbelltown, SA 5074 Phone: (08) 8336 3954 Email: [email protected] ABF Secretariat Val Brockwell PO Box 397, Fyshwick, ACT 2609 Ph: (02) 6239 2265 Fax: (02) 6239 1816 Email: [email protected] ABF Masterpoint Centre John Hansen PO Box 2172, Churchlands, WA 6018 Phone/Fax: (08) 9204 4085 Email: [email protected] ABF Website http://www.abf.com.au 15
Dates Where/Event
Contact
September cont.
6-7 Tweed Heads
Margo McGuiness
Twin Towns
PO Box 161
Open Congress
Banora Point 2486
Pairs & Teams
(07) 5524 5092
13-14 Port Macquarie
Bridget Earle
Swiss Teams
(02) 6582 3232
[email protected]
21 Surfers Paradise
Congress Secretary
Birthday Teams Congress PO Box 6628
Gold Coast Mail Centre 9726
Ph: (07) 5597 0085
[email protected]
Fax: (07) 5597 1172
27-28 Gold Coast
Congress Secretary
Gold Coast Butler Pairs PO Box 7009
Gold Coast Mail Ctr
Bundall 9726
28 Noosa Heads
Colin Regan
Teams
PO Box 40
Noosaville 4566
(07) 5449 0941
October
3-5 Broken Hill
Marise Allen
Pairs & Teams
Broken Hill BC
PO Box 834
Broken Hill 2880
10-12 Albury
Eileen Ferris
Super Congress
[email protected]
(mark Attn: Bridge Club)
11-12 Taree
Judy Scott
Congress
Taree Bridge Club
PO Box 520
[email protected]
Taree 2430
C (02) 6551 0091
H (02) 6553 7878
November
2 Surfers Paradise
Congress Secretary
NoviceTeams (0-99)
PO Box 6628
Gold Coast Mail Centre 9726
[email protected]
(07) 55970085
9 Tweed Heads
Joy Rennie
Birthday Teams
PO Box 106
Tweed Heads 2486
(07) 5536 1570 (c) or (02) 6676 1792 (h)
10 Surfers Paradise
Congress Secretary
Qld Senior & Youth Pairs PO Box 6628
Championship Gold Coast Mail Centre 9726
Ph: (07) 5597 0085
[email protected]
Fax: (07) 5597 1172
9 Tweed Heads
Joy Rennie
Birthday Teams
PO Box 106
Tweed Heads 2486
29-30 Geelong
Elaine Hooper
Geelong Congress
PO Box 1546
Pairs & Teams
Geelong 3220
Open & Restricted
(03) 5286 8200
[email protected] (03) 5248 2978
16
ABF Calendar
Date Event/Contact
Location/Phone
June
6-9 barrier reef Congress Cairns
Kim Ellaway
(07) 3885 3331
[email protected]
5-6 McCance Trophy
Melbourne
Jenny Thompson
(07) 3885 3331
[email protected]
7-9 Victor Champion Cup Melbourne
Jenny Thompson
(07) 3885 3331
July
5-12 NZ Nationals
Hamilton
Fran Jenkins
64 4 473 7748
[email protected]
12 Youth Test v NZ
Hamilton
David Lusk
(08) 8336 3954
[email protected]
11-26 ANC
Darwin
Pam Nunn
(08) 8985 1820
[email protected]
August
18-28 World Youth Teams Paris
David Lusk
(08) 8336 3954
[email protected]
23-24 Swan River Swiss Pairs Fremantle
Hilary Yovich
(08) 9341 8116
[email protected]
September
TBA PABF Championship Manila
Val Brockwell
(02) 6239 2265
[email protected]
18-21 Sydney Festival
Sydney
John McIlrath
(02) 9922 3644
[email protected]
26-29 HG Memorial Congress Perth
Hans Rosendorff Teams
Sue Pynt
(08) 9304 4916
[email protected]
Men's Swiss Pairs
Nigel Dutton
[email protected]
October
18-20 Australian Swiss Pairs Launceston
Barry Kelly
(03) 6228 5247
[email protected]
November
2-15 WBF BB/VC
Monaco
Val Brockwell
(02) 6239 2265
13-20 Spring Festival
Sydney
Frank Budai
(02) 9958 2374
[email protected]
The Director's Chair PENALTY CARDS AND LEADS OUT OF TURN Penalty cards may occur as a result of cards exposed during the auction, in the event that the offender becomes a defender. The criteria applying to whether it is designated as Major or Minor also apply as before. Should the offender become declarer or dummy, the exposed card is simply replaced in the hand. Have you ever been faced with thirteen penalty cards? Every now and again a player, believing he is dummy, faces all thirteen cards. Not good news! Law 51 Two or More Penalty Cards now comes into force and the fun begins. At every turn of the offender, the law gives declarer the right to designate any legal play of the remaining penalty cards. Every time the offender's partner is on lead, the declarer can require the lead of a suit, or prohibit the lead of any suit or suits exposed. However, if either of these options is selected, the offender picks up any cards in the suit or suits named, thus reducing the number of penalty cards, often considerably. The director will probably stay at the table throughout the play as the options listed above are fairly complex. Law 52 deals with failure to lead or play a penalty card. In the heat of battle it is easy to forget one's obligations as laid down by Law and lead or play a card from hand, forgetting that the exposed card should have been played to that trick. All that happens is, in effect, that the illegal play now becomes a second penalty card, with the declarer given the option to select which of the two cards is played. Part 3 of Section 2 covers irregular leads and plays. Herein lies the parrot fashion expounding of the opening lead out of turn options. Once a daily occurrence, now, thanks to the requirement to lead face down, a fairly rare phenomenon. As in other like laws, whereby irregularities can be accepted if advantageous, any lead out of turn can be accepted. One propounded theory goes along the lines that if a player doesn't know whose lead it is, then he is likely to have made a stupid lead. A lead out of turn is not confined to defenders. During the play, declarers often lead from the wrong hand before dummy has a chance to stop them. As an aside, dummy's role is very important, as an alert dummy
can certainly prevent the declarer from leading from the wrong hand, preventing any benefit to the defenders. Once a lead from the wrong hand occurs, either defender can accept the lead simply by playing to the trick or by making any statement to that effect. No consultation is permitted as any suggestion of this would void any requirement and would be treated as unauthorised information plus a breach of propriety. Every director has a pet way of expressing the law. The number of options and the volume of the director's statement confuse many players, not doing themselves justice in their selection of the play. My preferred line is to start off emphasising the option to accept the lead before starting on the other aspects. I believe that, if you eliminate this option first, you then leave the player to concentrate on the remainder, with the resultant benefit that the selection is completed in far less time. Richard Grenside
BAWA in Association with the ABF presents SWAN RIVER
OPEN SWISS PAIRS
New PQP Event (24, 18, 12 and 6 PQP's)
When:
23/24 August 2003
Where:
Esplanade Hotel, Fremantle ($145 per room)
Convenor:
Hilary Yovich: Ph: (08) 9341 8116 Fax: (08) 9341 4547 Email:[email protected]
Director:
Richard Grenside
entry fee: $120 per pair (includes GST)
Entries:
To Convenor or BAWA website (www.bawa.asn.au)
17
Coaching Cathy at Contract PERPLEXING PROBLEMS WITH PARTNER'S PREEMPTS Hey, Guru, I think that I have got the hang of preempts and I have less trouble now when the opposition preempt. (That's not to say that I get that bit right all the time but I think I am getting it right more often.) These days I have most problems when my partner opens with a preemptive opening. We seem to be doing more damage to ourselves than to the opposition!! Perhaps the best thing is that I give you a few examples: Perplexing Preemptive Problem #1 We were playing weak twos and my partner opened 2«. I held: «65 ЄQJ96 ©AK54 ЁQJ9 I made an enquiry with 2NT and partner showed a minimum with good trumps. I signed off in 3« and we went one down. I thought that you were supposed to enquire with an opening hand when partner opens with a weak 2. Actually, I remember that I didn't make the enquiry one day when I had 14 points but a singleton in the weak 2 suit. My right hand opponent said that if it was a systemic agreement to bid 2NT with opening points, I was obliged to bid 2NT. Any comment? Perplexing Preemptive Problem #2 Partner opened 3© (not vulnerable) and I held: «AJ84 ЄKQ96 ©J ЁAK75 With 17 points, I though that I had to go on to game, so I bid 3NT. Partner had: «53 ЄJ ©KQ109765 Ё1032 They led a spade and I could never reach dummy. I eventually made only 7 tricks. Obviously we would have had no problem in 3©. Perplexing Preemptive Problem #3 Partner opened 3« (Vulnerable). I held: «-- ЄAQ73 ©A10954 ЁA865 I thought about bidding 4© but eventually decided to pass. Partner's hand turned out to be: «KQJ9642 ЄK6 ©7 Ё965 18
The opening lead was the ©K and my partner made 11 tricks when the trump 10 fell on the second round. I only had 14 points and no fit. Should I have bid 4«? Perpetually Perplexed, Cathy Hey, Perplexed, Responding to preemptive openings and weak twos is a different exercise when compared to other opening bids. Normal preemptive openings should be consistent with respect to the number of tricks that the opener can take but there is a proviso: the number of tricks is connected to the nominated suit. Many preemptive hands become worthless when some other suit is trumps. Weak two openings are a little less predictable with respect to tricks and more sensitive to fit. First of all, let me point out that holding an opening bid and a singleton in partner's weak two opening usually presents an excellent case for pass. Whoever your opponent was, the suggestion that there was some obligation to bid 2NT as an enquiry was absurd in the extreme. You are no more obliged to bid 2NT in response to a weak two than you are to open with 13 points if you don't like your hand. There are no regulations in place that do not give respect to a player's judgement of the value of his or her hand in the light of other bids. Looking at example #1, the judgement aspect came adrift to some extent. You have an opening bid but
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some very soft values in hearts and clubs. No doubt it is possible to construct maximum hands which will allow ten tricks but there are so many which won't. Worse still, there are plenty of minimum hands which won't take nine tricks. Q-J combinations are often of limited value opposite long trump suits. Aces and Kings are much better. The idea is to bid 2NT whenever it is reasonable to assume that your side can make game if the Weak two is a maximum and pass otherwise. This is not just a point-count exercise but rather one of judging fit quality and trick-taking strength. In example #2, you overlooked the distinct possibility that your partner's hand would be reduced to tram tickets in 3NT. Unless partner held AKQxxx(x) in diamonds or KQ10xxxx with a side winner, you were going to have to manage 9 tricks in NT all on your own. Opposite a non-vul preempt, which usually promises only 6 tricks (fewer if the opposition are vulnerable), the chances that partner would hold any of the above would be slim at best. One benefit of passing on a hand like this is that LHO may get involved in the auction and a bloodbath may well ensue. Had partner opened 3© vulnerable, there would have been a stronger argument for bidding a game of some sort. In example #3, you are more familiar with your partner's preemptive style than I. A vulnerable 3« opening should promise a suit of quality and 7 tricks. You have 3Ѕ tricks so 4« is likely to require the heart finesse at worst. Even in the absence of an obvious fit in partner's suit, there should be enough tricks to give 4« a decent chance. There is considerable variation in the standards that partnerships apply to preemptive openings. Regardless of the standards, the opener usually promises a specific number of tricks which are available if the suit is trumps. You will usually judge the potential of the hand much better by counting tricks than you will by counting points. The above does not cut across the notion that you should be aggressive in raising partner's preempts with excellent fits. The purpose is obviously different in these situations. Perpetually yours, David David Lusk
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19
Bidding Into The 21st Century TEST YOUR competitive bidding What do you bid after the following sequence at pairs, nil vulnerable? 1©* (Pass) 1NT (2«) ? *5 card major, better minor 1) «K83 Є96 ©AK98 ЁQJ82 2) «83 ЄQ63 ©KQ10873 ЁA8 3) «AQ108 ЄA972 ©A82 Ё62 4) «7 ЄA962 ©KQ642 ЁK82 5) «42 ЄA82 ©AKJ102 ЁQ102 6) «62 ЄA6 ©AKQJ92 ЁK92 7) «9 ЄA4 ©AQ1062 ЁKQ983 8) «2 Є8 ©AQJ875 ЁKJ873 1. 3Ё. The 1NT response to 1© will not contain a 4 card major, so must have at least 7 cards in the minors. This guarantees of a minimum of 4 clubs or 4 diamonds, so on this deal you must have at least an 8-card fit in one of the minors. It's not unusual for the 1NT responder to 1© to have 5 clubs, or even 6. On the other hand the opponents must have at least a 7-card fit in spades, quite possibly an 8card fit. It can hardly be wrong to bid 3Ё, and such bids in competition are in no way invitational. Partner must take the view that you are simply trying to push the opponents to the three level. When opponents do take the push it's "mission accomplished", and virtually never right to compete to the four level. 2. 3©. You don't have much of a hand but it's vital not to let the opponents play in their 8-card fit at the two level. The secret is to visualize how many scores minus110 will be better than on the travelling score sheet. Not many, if your side can score +110 or -50, or even -100. As in question 1, bids in competition are in no way invitational, and with a good hand opener must find a stronger bid than 3©. 3. Pass. Most pairs would play double for takeout here, so whenever you want to defend 2« the first step is to pass. If you chose to bid 2NT consider that you are planning to make the bulk of your tricks in spades, so why not defend 2«, where you 20
need 6 tricks for success rather than 8, and you get to lead to the first trick? If spades are trumps you probably have 6 tricks in your own hand, and the expectation is down two or three. If partner is bright enough to double with spade shortage, then +300 or +500 will be a clear top. 4. Double. On this deal opponents have at least 9 spades so it is unthinkable to leave them in such a cushy contract. Don't be afraid to push opponents into game. If opponents have game on, bidding will make life more difficult for them. If you passed, 3« by your LHO would be invitational, but when you double or bid, 3« is now competitive. Any action by you takes away 3« as a clear cut invitation. 5. 2NT. Partnerships need to decide what this bid means. My preference is to show a hand that has playing tricks, and something like two small spades, so that you don't want to defend 2«. It may suit responder to play 2NT, but 3Ё and 3© are also possible contracts. 6. 3«. Asking for a stopper. 3© is purely competitive, so you are much too strong for that. There is no reason the 1NT responder can't have «AK, or «K and ЁA, or many other hands where 3NT has 9 or 10 top tricks. 7. 4Ё. Again, if 3Ё is purely competitive then you are too strong for this action. Your worst spade holding on this auction is a small doubleton (since partner is also likely to have two losing spades and the lead is marked), therefore to invite game you are likely to have a singleton spade. Partner will put a high premium on honours in clubs or diamonds, and «A and ЄK. 8. 5Ё. Anything else fails to give the opponents an adequate problem. They'll just bid 4« and you'll end up going 5Ё anyway. Opponents have a super fit in both majors, and your side has the minors, so bidding the full limit at your first opportunity will leave them wondering who is doing what to whom. Should they bid 5« to make, or should they double you because they can make 4« and you are sacrificing. On the other hand maybe they should be saving in 5« because you can make 5Ё or 5©. A lesser bid than 5Ё will allow opponents to exchange sufficient information to get it right at the five level. Paul Lavings
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LAVINGS
Tel. (02) 9388-8861
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21
McCutcheon Trophy Standings - As At 30April 2003
Best Performing: Of all Masters
WALTERS, Margaret QLD 47.84 DYER, Gaylene
QLD 20.67
KLINGER, Ron
NSW 210.09 WARE, Griff
ACT 47.41 BRAGG, Christopher QLD 20.15
NUNN, Tony
NSW 192.26 NASH, Bill
SA 47.18 MAILES, Alison
WA 19.18
NEILL, Bruce
NSW 185.47 Best Performing: **National Masters BANNER, Freda
NSW 19.12
PRESCOTT, Michael NSW 178.48 ELSE, Ken
WA 36.40 WELLS, Peter
QLD 18.36
NAGY, Zolly
SA 170.66 GEMMELL, Gordon QLD 34.27 PLUMMER, Bruce
NSW 17.17
NOBLE, Barry
NSW 162.37 McERLEAN, Tina
SA 30.83 SMUTS, Griet
NSW 16.80
BILSKI, George
NSW 158.54 FOREMAN, Carole
SA 29.66 Best Performing: **Local Masters
GUMBY, Pauline
NSW 156.35 YOUNG, Helen
NSW 27.47 SMITH, Michael
SA 40.94
LAZER, Warren
NSW 155.01 SCICLUNA, Kathy
SA 27.35 LOCK, Richard
NSW 30.35
HANS, Sartaj
NSW 149.79 HORSFIELD, Setsuko QLD 26.57 CHIANG, Kathy
NSW 26.94
Best Performing: Silver Grand Masters WELLBY, Peg
SA 24.52 FEIGE, Renate
QLD 25.20
KLINGER, Ron
NSW 210.09 CLAPP, Kevin
SA 23.32 GANGAL, Nandu
NSW 23.35
NEILL, Bruce
NSW 185.47 JARVIS, Anne
VIC 22.87 HANSON, Sue
NSW 23.34
NAGY, Zolly
SA 170.66 Best Performing: *National Masters
GULLAN, Kate
ACT 20.55
GUMBY, Pauline
NSW 156.35 JANZEKOVIC, Darko QLD 85.70 POTTER, Terry
NSW 19.99
LAZER, Warren
NSW 155.01 DJUROVIC, Nevena NSW 62.61 SELLARS, Phil
SA 19.00
FORDHAM, Peter
NSW 143.26 MARSH, Peter
NSW 57.81 HENNIG, Elaine
QLD 18.65
BROWN, Terry
NSW 142.83 BROWN, Fiona
NSW 55.81 Best Performing: *Local Masters
RICHMAN, Bob
NSW 142.24 GEROMBOUX, Daniel ACT 54.34 HALE, Phil
QLD 43.44
LOWE, Leslie
NSW 124.58 HOENIG, Maha
QLD 53.43 BARDEN, Bianca
QLD 41.44
CUMMINGS, Valerie NSW 124.33 MACLEOD, Bronwyn QLD 52.84 TAYLOR, Roland
QLD 22.26
Best Performing: Grand Masters
SMITH, Wayne
NSW 47.39 HOUGHTON, Wayne NSW 17.63
NUNN, Tony
NSW 192.26 LEIBOWITZ, Louise NSW 47.29 KUNZE, Robert
NSW 13.95
PRESCOTT, Michael NSW 178.48 JEWELL, Gwenda
QLD 44.80 KEY, Rosemary
VIC 13.39
NOBLE, Barry
NSW 162.37 Best Performing: National Masters
MELDRUM, Ellen
QLD 11.91
BILSKI, George
NSW 158.54 CLIFTON, John
NSW 44.46 SUNTHARAMOORTHY, Kandiah
LORENTZ, Gabi
NSW 129.63 GIBSON, Neil
QLD 43.92
VIC 11.20
LESTER, John
VIC 129.63 WOOD, James
QLD 43.81 HOLDER, Anne
SA 11.12
HUGHES, Nick
NSW 125.73 GIBSON, Elizabeth
QLD 43.22 HOLDER, Wayne
SA 11.12
EBERY, Jamie
VIC 116.76 WILSMORE, Peter
NSW 42.53 Best Performing: Local Masters
VARADI, Les
NSW 114.46 FANOS, Elizabeth
NSW 39.02 KAMALARASA, Sanmugaras
GIURA, Nicoleta
NSW 99.87 WOOLLEY, Carolyne QLD 38.60
QLD 44.87
Best Performing: Gold Life Masters
WOOLLEY, Christopher QLD 37.99 WELLMAN, Deb
SA 23.63
HANS, Sartaj
NSW 149.79 EASTMAN, Dewi
QLD 36.08 DOECKE, Mike
SA 22.12
WYER, Paul
NSW 118.62 PYNT, Sue
WA 35.13 HORAN, Brian
QLD 17.75
KROCHMALIK, Robert NSW 78.50 Best Performing: *State Masters
McARTHUR, Robert
QLD 17.72
HAY, Jillian
NSW 76.89 LAMBARDI, Pablo
NSW 92.64 LEWIS, Karen
NSW 16.80
COWAN, Richard
NSW 69.64 FRANKLIN, Deirdre NSW 56.71 BEASLEY, Nu
NSW 16.29
CORMACK, Jan
NSW 65.62 LEIBOWITZ, Tony
NSW 56.06 TRAN, Hue
NSW 15.34
MALACZYNSKI, Wally NSW 64.16 DAWSON, Helena
NSW 51.42 STEFFENSEN, Kevin QLD 14.59
LALOV, Snejinka
NSW 63.28 TORELLI, Ghada
QLD 49.37 BEIER, Pamela
QLD 13.70
TOOTELL, Helen
NSW 58.29 PIETAK, Darek
NSW 42.98 Best Performing: Club Masters
WILKINSON, Michael NSW 57.29 STEPHENS, Adrienne ACT 38.28 JAKES, Maureen
QLD 39.34
Best Performing: Silver Life Masters
FORAN, Leigh
NSW 35.69 POLLETT, Phil
QLD 13.03
WILLIAMS, Justin
SA 69.21 WEBSTER, Bruce
NSW 35.61 CAMPBELL, Elizabeth NSW 12.53
ANDREW, Simon
NSW 62.54 BROWN, Frances
QLD 29.24 McDERMOTT, Peter QLD 11.49
MOLSKI, Felix
NSW 62.13 Best Performing: State Masters
ROGERS, Denise
QLD 10.47
MORAWIECKI, Roman QLD 59.68 JENNER-O'SHEA, William SA 66.32 BUTCHER, Brenda
QLD 10.43
SKINNER, Tony
NSW 57.07 RITTER, Catherine
NSW 42.29 HAWKEN, Ann
QLD 10.34
LOVELOCK, Lynn
NSW 56.71 SENDER, Sylvia
QLD 41.71 COLLINS, Lena
NSW 10.27
LARSEN, Patricia
QLD 55.77 VALKOV, Vess
NSW 40.24 FOSTER, Sylvia
NSW 9.97
HALMOS, Andrew
VIC 55.23 COOKSLEY, Maureen NSW 34.91 O'DONOHUE, Barry QLD 8.63
MACLAURIN, Normand NSW 54.31 THOMAS, Jim
NSW 31.53 Best Performing: Graduate Masters
GRENSIDE, Sue
WA 51.52 AZZOPARDI, Paul
SA 29.84 GRIFFITHS, Nye
ACT 21.66
Best Performing: Bronze Life Masters MOSCHNER, Ken
QLD 29.33 CLEAR, Martin
NSW 14.33
BRIFMAN, Mary-Anne NSW 71.21 DENNIS, Alfred
QLD 28.72 BURKETT, Maryanne ACT 12.38
WYNER, Joshua
NSW 62.47 RAJAN, Ranga
NSW 27.20 SISSON, Edith
QLD 10.46
FLYNN, Patrick
NSW 50.17 Best Performing: *Regional Masters
MEAKINS, Robert
NSW 7.23
WILTSHIRE, David
SA 46.77 MAYBURY, Ceiny
NSW 18.21 ROUSSEL, Carole
NSW 6.28
GOSS, Beverley
QLD 45.69 REITZER, Jeanette
NSW 16.28 BERENGER, Trevor ACT 6.22
ALLEN, Geoff
QLD 44.66 DAWE, Kirsty
QLD 15.89 GORRICK, Betty
NSW 5.10
GARRETT, Martin
NSW 44.30 KUBLER, Lindsay
QLD 15.84 Best Performing: Nil Masters
CHAUDHRY, Ashraf
QLD 44.26 CLOUSTON, Patricia QLD 14.03 SAMUELS, Bob
NSW 15.34
PHILLIPS, Michael
NSW 43.19 JEFFERY, Dorothy
NSW 13.99 SINGH, Mohinder
NSW 13.08
CHIRA, Traian
VIC 42.61 FLEISCHMANN, Andrew NSW 12.74 TAYLOR, Cora
QLD 12.88
Best Performing: Life Masters
BAARDA, Renk
QLD 12.03 TAYLOR, Jim
QLD 8.58
JEDRYCHOWSKY, Richard NSW 146.58 DETTMAN, Roger
SA 11.98 BONNER, Loydd
SA
8.47
NEUMANN, Dagmar NSW 72.23 WOODING, Deirdre
NSW 10.89 PORTER, Delwyn
SA
8.08
FEILER, Gabby
NSW 55.61 Best Performing: Regional Masters
LEVY, Collette
SA
7.50
O'DEMPSEY, Terence QLD 54.96 KOBLER, Louise
NSW 30.03 DJURASEVICH, Vicki SA
7.45
KROCHMALIK, Daniel NSW 53.71 BURNS, Jack
VIC 28.48 ZUBER, George
ACT 7.20
PORTER, Matthew
SA 53.07 FALLET, Tony
NSW 20.95 BROGAN, Aileen
SA
7.15
SQUIRE, Mary
NSW 52.83
22
Playoff Qualifying Points - As At 12 March 2003
OPEN Paul MARSTON Bruce NEILL Ron KLINGER John LESTER Gabi LORENTZ Peter FORDHAM Tony NUNN Bobby RICHMAN Matthew THOMSON Sartaj HANS Michael PRESCOTT Zolly NAGY David BEAUCHAMP Matthew McMANUS Terry BROWN Phil GUE Barry NOBLE Robert FRUEWIRTH Ishmael DEL'MONTE Pauline GUMBY Warren LAZER Theo ANTOFF Al SIMPSON Tim SERES Seamus BROWNE George SMOLANKO John ROBERTS Jessel ROTHFIELD Kieran DYKE George BILSKI Ted CHADWICK Valerie CUMMINGS Joe HAFFER Avi KANETKAR Peter REYNOLDS Wally SCOTT Peter GILL David HORTON Phil MARKEY Khokan BAGCHI Richard BRIGHTLING Siegfried KONIG David MORTIMER Nigel ROSENDORFF Peter SMITH Ben THOMPSON Ian THOMSON Jim WALLIS Paul YOVICH Jamie EBERY Leigh GOLD
102.0 95.0 89.0 84.0 84.0 70.0 70.0 69.0 69.0 66.0 60.5 57.0 54.0 54.0 52.5 52.5 52.5 45.0 45.0 42.0 42.0 40.5 40.5 36.0 33.0 33.0 27.0 24.0 24.0 22.5 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 12.5 12.0 12.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 4.5 4.5
WOMENS Valerie CUMMINGS Jan CORMACK Candice FEITELSON Elizabeth HAVAS Carole ROTHFIELD Barbara TRAVIS Lynn KALMIN Rena KAPLAN Elli URBACH Pauline GUMBY Julette ALEXANDER Jill DEL PICCOLO Wendy DRISCOLL Berenice FOLKARD Inez GLANGER Vivienne GOLDBERG Deidre GREENFELD Marcia SCUDDER Kate SMITH Sheila BIRD Nola CHURCH Karen CREET Julia HOFFMAN Felicity BEALE Margaret BOURKE Jillian HAY Sue LUSK Diana SMART Therese TULLY Wendy HALVORSEN Kinga MOSES Helen SNASHALL Sally MURRAY-WHITE Nazife BASHAR Merrilee ROBB Pauline EVANS Heather CUSWORTH Sue GRENSIDE Justine HARKNESS Lorraine HARKNESS Linda KING Catherine WRIGHT
120.0 102.0 102.0 102.0 102.0 102.0 51.0 51.0 51.0 42.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 15.0 12.0 12.0 12.0 12.0 12.0 12.0
Copy Deadline For Issue No 102, July 2003 June 25, 2003 Late submissions will be held over till Issue 103, September 2003 at the discretion of the Editors.
SENIORS Ron KLINGER John LESTER Gabi LORENTZ Zolly NAGY Jim BORIN Bill HAUGHIE Bruce NEILL Barry NOBLE Tim SERES Paul WYER George BILSKI Ian McKINNON Bill WESTWOOD Lester KALMIN Peter JAMIESON John BROCKWELL Peter CHAN Krzysztof LASOCKI Wally MALACZYNSKI Eric RAMSHAW Wally SCOTT Lynn KALMIN Dennis ZINES Les VARADI Ted GRIFFIN Mike HUGHES Ruth JAMIESON Barbara MCDONALD Jessel ROTHFIELD Alan WALSH Richard COWAN Margaret FOSTER Peter BUCHEN Jeannette COLLINS Valerie CUMMINGS Henry DYALL Janet KAHLER Peter KAHLER Stan KLOFA Elli URBACH John ASHWORTH Terry PIPER Charlie SNASHALL Tom MOSS Harold BETTMAN Janina FLEISZIG Andrew HALMOS Max HITTER John NEWMAN George PICK Susie PICK Tom REINER David MORTIMER David SMEE Don SMITH
197.0 192.0 192.0 165.0 108.0 108.0 95.0 88.5 60.0 60.0 58.5 44.0 44.0 44.0 42.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 36.0 33.0 32.0 30.0 26.5 24.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 21.0 21.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 18.0 16.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 12.0 12.0 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 9.0 9.0 9.0 23
THE BRIDGE SHOP
182 Penshurst Street WILLOUGHBY 2068 PO BOX 429
Tel: (02) 9967 0644
Fax: (02) 9967 0444
e-mail: [email protected]
web: www.bridgeshop.com.au
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Would you a like a catalogue posted to you? Call us on (02) 9967 0644 or email [email protected] 24

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