E-reader ownership doubles in six months

Tags: November 2010, cell phone, telephone numbers, Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, continental United States, question wording, response rate, Cooperation, telephone number, Survey Sampling International, LLC, sample, population parameters, cellular telephone, Non-Contact, September 2010, working numbers, percentage points, desktop computers, adults ages, laptop computers, tablet computers, older adults, Pew Research Center, Pew Internet Project, Completion Rate, African-American adults, Hispanic adults, National Center for Health Statistics
Content: E-reader Ownership Doubles in Six Months Adoption rate of e-readers surges ahead of tablet computers Kristen Purcell, Associate Director for Research, Pew Internet Project June 27, 2011 Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project 1615 L St., NW ­ Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 202-419-4500 | pewinternet.org http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/E-readers-and-tablets.aspx
e-Reader ownership surges since last November; tablet ownership grows more slowly The share of adults in the United States who own an e-book reader doubled to 12% in May, 2011 from 6% in November 2010. E-readers, such as a Kindle or Nook, are portable devices designed to allow readers to download and read books and periodicals. This is the first time since the Pew Internet Project began measuring e-reader use in April 2009 that ownership of this device has reached double digits among U.S. adults. Tablet computers--portable devices similar to e-readers but designed for more interactive web functions--have not seen the same level of growth in recent months. In May 2011, 8% of adults report owning a tablet computer such as an iPad, Samsung Galaxy or Motorola Xoom. This is roughly the same percentage of adults who reported owning this kind of device in January 2011 (7%), and represents just a 3 percentage-point increase in ownership since November 2010. Prior to that, tablet ownership had been climbing relatively quickly. Growth in e-reader and tablet ownership among U.S. adults 30%
25%
20%
15%
e-Readers
12%
Tablets
10%
8%
5%
0% April 2009 Sept 2009 May 2010 Sept 2010 Nov 2010 Jan 2011 May 2011
Source: The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 tracking survey. N=2,277 adults ages 18 and older. Interviews conducted in English and Spanish. Margin of error = +/- 2 percentage points.
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These findings come from a survey conducted from April 26-May 22 among 2,277 adults ages 18 and over, including surveys in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. The margin of error for the sample is plus or minus 2 percentage points. Both e-book reader and tablet computer adoption levels among U.S. adults are still well below that of other tech devices that have been on the market longer. Cell phones are far and away the most popular digital device among U.S. adults today, followed by desktop and laptop computers, DVRs, and MP3 players.
Both e-reader and tablet ownership far behind other devices % of adults who own each gadget
100%
90%
80%
83%
70%
60%
50%
57%
56%
52%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Cell Phone Desktop Laptop
DVR
44%
12%
MP3
e-Reader
8% Tablet
Source: The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 tracking survey. N=2,277 adults ages 18 and older. Interviews conducted in English and Spanish. Margin of error = +/- 2 percentage points.
There is notable overlap in e-reader and tablet computer ownership ­ 3% of US adults own both devices. Nine percent own an e-book reader but not a tablet, while 5% own a tablet computer but not an ereader.
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Three percent of all adults own both an e-reader and a tablet
Source: The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 tracking survey. N=2,277 adults ages 18 and older. Interviews conducted in English and Spanish.
Further confirming the overall trend toward adoption of mobile devices, this survey marks the first time that laptop computers are as popular as desktop computers among U.S. adults. In November of last year, desktop ownership outpaced laptop ownership by 8 percentage points, 61% to 53%. This changing pattern is the result of both a steady decline in the popularity of desktops and a steady increase in the popularity of laptops over time. Laptops have already overtaken desktops in popularity among adults under age 30, and appear poised to do the same among OLDER ADULTS. Who owns e-readers and tablets? Hispanic adults, adults younger than age 65, college graduates and those living in households with incomes of at least $75,000 are most likely to own e-book readers. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to own these devices. Some demographic differences have only recently emerged. For instance, in November of 2010, parents and non-parents were equally likely to own e-readers, yet in the past six months ownership of these
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devices among parents has grown more rapidly than it has among-non-parents. Similarly, e-reader ownership grew at a faster pace among Hispanic adults over that time period than it did among white or African-American adults. Moreover, ownership among adults ages 18-49 grew more rapidly than any other age group.
Who owns e-readers % of adults in each group who own an e-reader, in Nov. 2010 and May 2011
% of each group who % of each group who
owned an e-reader
own an e-reader
in Nov 2010
in May 2011
All adults in the U.S.
6%
12%
Gender
Male
6
12
Female
6
11
Parental status
Parent of child <18
6
16
Not a parent of child <18
6
10
Race/Ethnicity
White
6
11
African American
5
8
Hispanic
5
15
Age
18-29
6
10
30-49
5
14
50-64
9
13
65+
4
6
Education
Some high school
5
3
High school
4
6
Some college
6
13
College graduate
8
22
Household income
< $30,000
4
4
$30,000 - $49,999
3
13
$50,000 - $74,999
6
13
$75,000+
12
24
Source: The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 tracking survey. N=2,277 adults ages 18 and older. Interviews conducted in English and Spanish.
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Other demographic differences in e-reader ownership are becoming magnified over time. There was considerable growth in e-reader ownership between November 2010 and May 2011 among college graduates, one-fifth of whom now own these devices. This group was already outpacing other adults in Pew Internet's November 2010 survey. Similarly, while ownership grew across all adults with household incomes of at least $30,000 annually, gains were most pronounced among those in the highest household income category ($75,000 or more). As was the case six months ago, this group continues to outpace all other income categories by a wide margin, with one in four adults at this household income level owning an e-reader. Similar demographic patterns of ownership exist for tablet computers, though parents are no more likely than non-parents to own these devices. However, in the case of tablet computers, men are now slightly more likely than women to own this type of device. Between November 2010 and May 2011, the largest increases in tablet ownership have been among men when compared with women; Hispanic adults when compared with white and African-American adults; adults 18-29; those with some college or college degrees; and those reporting household incomes of $30,000 or more. Overall, the highest rates of tablet ownership are among Hispanic adults and those with household incomes of at least $75,000 annually.
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Who owns tablet computers
% of adults in each group who own a tablet computer, in Nov. 2010 and May 2011
% of each group who owned a tablet computer in Nov 2010
% of each group who own a tablet computer in May 2011
All adults in the U.S.
5
8
Gender Male Female Race/Ethnicity White African American Hispanic Age 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+ Education Some high school High school Some college College graduate Household income < $30,000 $30,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $74,999 $75,000+
6
10
4
6
4
7
4
8
7
15
6
12
6
9
4
8
2
2
4
4
3
5
4
10
8
13
4
4
3
8
3
8
9
17
Source: The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 tracking survey. N=2,277 adults ages 18 and older. Interviews conducted in English and Spanish.
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Survey questions
Spring Change Assessment Survey 2011 Data for April 26­May 22, 2011
Final Topline
5/25/2011
Princeton Survey Research Associates International for the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project Sample: n= 2,277 national adults, age 18 and older, including 755 cell phone interviews Interviewing dates: 04.26.2011 ­ 05.22.2011 Margin of error is plus or minus 2 percentage points for results based on Total [n=2,277] Margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points for results based on internet users [n=1,701] Margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points for results based on cell phone users [n=1,914] Margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points for results based on SNS or Twitter users [n=1,015]
Q10 As I read the following list of items, please tell me if you happen to have each one, or not. Do
you have... [INSERT ITEMS IN ORDER]?
yes
no
Don't know Refused
A desktop computer
Current
57
42
*
*
November 2010
61
39
0
*
September 2010
59
40
*
*
May 2010
62
38
*
*
January 2010
59
41
0
*
December 2009
58
42
*
*
September 2009
62
37
0
*
April 2009
64
36
*
*
April 2008
65
34
*
--
Dec 2007
65
35
*
--
April 2006
68
32
*
--
A laptop computer or netbook1 Current January 2011 December 2010 November 2010 September 2010 May 2010 January 2010 December 2009 September 2009 April 2009 April 2008 Dec 2007 April 2006
56
44
*
*
57
43
*
*
53
47
*
*
53
47
*
*
52
48
*
*
55
45
*
0
49
51
*
*
46
53
*
*
47
53
*
*
47
53
*
*
39
61
*
--
37
63
*
--
30
69
*
--
1 Through January 2010, item wording was "A laptop computer [IF NECESSARY: includes a netbook]." pewinternet.org
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Q10 continued...
yes
no
A cell phone or a Blackberry or iPhone or other
device that is also a cell phone2
Current
83
17
January 2011
84
16
December 2010
81
19
November 2010
82
18
September 2010
85
15
May 2010
82
18
January 2010
80
20
December 2009
83
17
September 2009
84
15
April 2009
85
15
Dec 2008
84
16
July 2008
82
18
May 2008
78
22
April 2008
78
22
January 2008
77
22
Dec 2007
75
25
Sept 2007
78
22
April 2006
73
27
January 2005
66
34
November 23-30, 2004
65
35
An electronic book device or e-Book reader, such as a
Kindle or Nook3
Current
12
88
November 2010
6
94
September 2010
5
95
May 2010
4
96
September 2009
3
97
April 2009
2
98
Don't know Refused
*
0
*
*
*
*
0
*
*
*
*
0
0
*
0
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
--
*
0
*
--
*
--
*
--
*
--
*
--
*
--
*
--
*
0
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
2 Question was asked of landline sample only. Results shown here have been recalculated to include cell phone sample in the "Yes" percentage. In past polls, question was sometimes asked as an independent question and sometimes as an item in a series. In January 2010, question wording was "Do you have...a cell phone or a Blackberry or iPhone or other handheld device that is also a cell phone." In Dec 2008, Nov 2008, May 2008, January 2005 and Nov 23-30 2004, question wording was "Do you happen to have a cell phone?" In August 2008, July 2008 and January 2008, question wording was "Do you have a cell phone, or a Blackberry or other device that is also a cell phone?" In April 2008, Dec 2007, Sept 2007 and April 2006, question wording was "Do you have a cell phone?" Beginning December 2007, question/item was not asked of the cell phone sample, but results shown here reflect Total combined Landline and cell phone sample. 3 Through November 2010, item wording was "An electronic book device or e-Book reader, such as a Kindle or Sony Digital Book".
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Q10 continued...
yes
no
An iPod or other MP3 player4 Current November 2010 September 2010 May 2010 September 2009 April 2009 December 2007 April 2006 February 2005 January 2005
44
56
43
57
47
53
46
54
43
57
45
55
34
66
20
79
11
88
11
88
A tablet computer like an iPad, Samsung Galaxy or Motorola Xoom5
Current
8
92
January 2011
7
92
November 2010
5
95
September 2010
4
96
May 2010
3
97
A digital video recorder or DVR
Current
52
48
November 2010
50
49
Don't know Refused
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
0
*
0
*
*
*
--
*
--
1
--
1
--
*
0
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
0
*
*
*
*
4 Through February 2005, question was not asked as part of a series. Question wording as follows: "Do you have an iPod or other MP3 player that stores and plays music files, or do you not have one of these?" 5 Through January 2011, item wording was "A tablet computer like an iPad"
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Methodology This report is based on the findings of a survey on Americans' use of the Internet. The results in this report are based on data from Telephone Interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from April 26 to May 22, 2011, among a sample of 2,277 adults, age 18 and older. Telephone interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by landline (1,522) and cell phone (755, including 346 without a landline phone). For results based on the total sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling is plus or minus 2.4 percentage points. For results based Internet users (n=1,701), the margin of sampling error is plus or minus 2.7 percentage points. In addition to sampling error, question wording and practical difficulties in conducting telephone surveys may introduce some error or bias into the findings of opinion polls.
A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone. Both samples were provided by Survey Sampling International, LLC (SSI) according to PSRAI specifications. Numbers for the landline sample were selected with probabilities in proportion to their share of listed telephone households from active blocks (area code + exchange + two-digit block number) that contained three or more residential directory listings. The cellular sample was not list-assisted, but was drawn through a systematic sampling from dedicated wireless 100-blocks and shared service 100-blocks with no directory-listed landline numbers.
New sample was released daily and was kept in the field for at least five days. The sample was released in replicates, which are representative subsamples of the larger population. This ensures that complete call procedures were followed for the entire sample. At least 7 attempts were made to complete an interview at a sampled telephone number. The calls were staggered over times of day and days of the week to maximize the chances of making contact with a potential respondent. Each number received at least one daytime call in an attempt to find someone available. For the landline sample, interviewers asked to speak with the youngest adult male or female currently at home based on a random rotation. If no male/female was available, interviewers asked to speak with the youngest adult of the other gender. For the cellular sample, interviews were conducted with the person who answered the phone. Interviewers verified that the person was an adult and in a safe place before administering the survey. Cellular sample respondents were offered a post-paid cash incentive for their participation. All interviews completed on any given day were considered to be the final sample for that day.
Weighting is generally used in survey analysis to compensate for sample designs and patterns of nonresponse that might bias results. A two-stage weighting procedure was used to weight this dual-frame sample. The first-stage weight is the product of two adjustments made to the data ­ a Probability of Selection Adjustment (PSA) and a Phone Use Adjustment (PUA). The PSA corrects for the fact that respondents in the landline sample have different probabilities of being sampled depending on how many adults live in the household. The PUA corrects for the overlapping landline and cellular sample frames.
The second stage of weighting balances sample demographics to population parameters. The sample is balanced by form to match national population parameters for sex, age, education, race, Hispanic origin, region (U.S. Census definitions), population density, and telephone usage. The White, non-Hispanic subgroup is also balanced on age, education and region. The basic weighting parameters came from a special analysis of the Census Bureau's 2010 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) that included all households in the continental United States. The population density parameter was derived
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from Census 2000 data. The cell phone usage parameter came from an analysis of the January-June 2010 National Health Interview Survey.6
Following is the full disposition of all sampled telephone numbers:
Table 2:Sample Disposition
Landline
Cell
32,909 19,899 Total Numbers Dialed
1,416 1,428 32 16,833 1,629 11,571 35.2%
364 35 ---- 8,660 287 10,553 53.0%
Non-residential Computer/Fax Cell phone Other not working Additional projected not working Working numbers Working Rate
543 3,091 53 7,884 68.1%
96 3,555 10 6,892 65.3%
No Answer / Busy Voice Mail Other Non-Contact Contacted numbers Contact Rate
489 5,757 1,638 20.8%
1,055 4,618 1,219 17.7%
Callback Refusal Cooperating numbers Cooperation Rate
56 ---1,582 96.6%
33 426 760 62.3%
Language Barrier Child's cell phone Eligible numbers Eligibility Rate
60 1,522 96.2%
5 Break-off 755 Completes 99.3% completion rate
13.6% 11.5% response rate
The disposition reports all of the sampled telephone numbers ever dialed from the original telephone number samples. The response rate estimates the fraction of all eligible respondents in the sample that were ultimately interviewed. At PSRAI it is calculated by taking the product of three component rates: o Contact rate ­ the proportion of working numbers where a request for interview was made
6 Blumberg SJ, Luke JV. Wireless substitution: Early release of estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-June, 2010. National Center for Health Statistics. December 2010.
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o Cooperation rate ­ the proportion of contacted numbers where a consent for interview was at least initially obtained, versus those refused o Completion rate ­ the proportion of initially cooperating and eligible interviews that were completed Thus the response rate for the landline sample was 13.6 percent. The response rate for the cellular sample was 11.5 percent.
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