Introduction to Graduate Historical Studies, P Ethington

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Content: P. Ethington [email protected],edu 213-740-1669 History 500 Introduction to Graduate Historical Studies Fall 1999 Meets 3-6pm Thursdays in SOS B51 office hours for graduate students, Thursdays 1-3 pm, and by appointment. --- --- --- This course is designed to introduce first-year graduate students to the discipline of history. Professional history is a relatively young institution (about 100 years old) with deeper roots in literary and philosophical traditions. As an institution is it is also composed of many communities. To practice history as a professional requires a substantial familiarity with those traditions and communities. It requires many other skills, of course. Among these are fluency in the basic debates about the possibilities and uses of historical knowledge; the ability to recognize new, old, or revived arguments; the ability to situate historical works within the intellectual zeitgeist of their authors; and the ability to formulate cogent critiques of published works of history. Skills involved in performing primary historical research and those of writing original historical studies will be addressed in the continuation of this course during the spring semester, in the research seminar History 601. Just as art students have for centuries studied masterpieces as the primary road to finding their own original visions, this semester is devoted to a study of exemplary studies across the widest range of historical writing. This course is to a large extent the collective effort of the entire History Department. I have conceptualized it through consultation with the Graduate Studies Committee, and through a wider discussion with most of the members of the department. Most sessions will have a guest discussion leader drawn from the History Department faculty. Those faculty have helped me to select the required and recommended readings. I stress this aspect of the course in order to underline the importance of this course to your own potential in this program. We hope that you will take this course as an opportunity to familiarize yourself with potentially valuable mentors among the faculty, and to appreciate the potential contribution to your developing research from sources outside of your field. This course reflects a general disposition of this department to treat your training as much more than the cultivation of a narrow, nationally defined field. Excellence in historical scholarship has always required a broad conversation across subfields and across disciplines.
Requirements and Policies Readings and Meetings In order to excel you must first of all complete all of the assigned readings and attend all of the fifteen sessions. The heart of this course is its seminar format. During seminars you will learn to formulate opinions about historical scholarship, and exchange those opinions in constructive debate with your peers. These seminars are also didactic. Both my faculty colleagues and I will make brief presentations at the beginning of each seminar concerning the themes and literature for that week. Following these presentations, we will spend most of the time discussing the literature and its implications in depth. We will also listen to and respond to brief presentations by your selves on specialized topics. Written and Oral Assignments There are four written/oral requirements: 1) Weekly One-pagers (15%) 2) Discussion of Readings (15%) 3) Book Review (20 %) 4) Review Essay (50 %) 1) Weekly One-Pagers Turn-in at the beginning of each class one DOUBLE-SPACED, ONE PAGE (no more, more less) "summary" of that week's "Principal Reading." The "Principal Reading" is highlighted in Bold in the tabular summary of sessions. It is not the only important reading, but the one we use as a benchmark during our discussions. The other required readings will be discussed in depth. BRING TWO COPIES: ONE FOR ME, AND ONE FOR YOU TO USE DURING DISCUSSION. The purpose of the weekly one-pagers is several fold. First, it ensures that everyone has not only done the reading but has also organized her/his thoughts about those readings, so that our discussions will be productive. Second, it serves as minimal notes to yourself for future reference. Third, it is a skill-building exercise in "getting to the point" quickly and cogently. You have about 210 words to say exactly three (3) things: 1) What is this book about (what is/are the central problem[s] the author addresses?); What kind of evidence does the author use?; 3) What is the author's central thesis? Do the math. That's 70 words to answer each of these questions (on average: you may distribute these words unevenly depending upon the relative difficulty of conveying sufficient information about each element). These One-Pagers are very important, and the format is repetitive, unforgiving and not particularly hard. There are only two scores for these: "1" and "0" (credit/no credit). You will receive a "1" if you have all three elements in decent shape. You will receive a 0 if any one element is missing, or is seriously wrong. You will also receive a 0 if you print the One-pager in any other format than double-space, standard margins. The 2
entire point of this exercise is for you to learn to write efficiently, getting straight to the point. I am not asking you to "respond to" or "critique" the readings in these one-pagers. That skill is built in the other three assignments. In this assignment, you are expected to focus on fairly and accurately summarizing the content of the Principal Reading. 2) Discussion and debate are the soul of a seminar. Coming prepared is essential. Doing all the required reading is essential. A sincere effort to discuss the meaning an merits of the readings will result in a score of "1." Inability to discuss any of the readings, or absence will result in a "0" for this portion of your grade. 3) Book Review (1000 Words) You will write and orally present one Book Review during the semester, about a recommended reading from one of the 15 weeks of the course. The purpose of this assignment is to begin developing your skill at a basic task of intellectuals: reviewing books for journals or other venues. Book reviews are difficult because the space allotted is always short. You need to answer all of the questions listed under the One-Pagers plus two more: 4) What is the context of this book in the literature concerning its subject matter? 5) What is your evaluation of the book, based on its: a) thesis and evidence, and b) contribution to the field? Students will have some choice concerning books and weeks, but I may have to assign some weeks or books, depending upon the distribution. At the meeting for which your Book Review is due, you will give a five minute presentation of your review. Since many students will not have read the recommended readings for a given week, these Book Reviews are a community service, widening the knowledge base of all the students in the seminar. 4) Literature Review Essay (4000-5000 words) The Literature Review Essay is your opportunity to apply the skills you have developed throughout the course, to a topic of your own choosing. It is also an essential step toward developing your research paper project for History 601. The literature review essay is essentially a collective book review, in which you survey a field, assessing the merits and shortcomings of the works and trends within it. The primary goal of a literature review essay is to locate an open space for promising potential inquiry on your or someone else's part. You may choose your own topic, within these limitations: a) the field needs to be significantly related (in either empirical matter or theoretical/methodological approach) to one of the 15 fields we have covered in this course; b) the field must not be too broad nor too narrow; c) it must be conceived as the background to a potential research project; d) it (the literature review and the potential research project) must be approved by myself and your faculty adviser. In addition to the questions you answered for the short essays and book reviews (1-5), you should also address the following in your literature reviews: 6) How did this field or sub-field emerge into historical consciousness in the first place? 7) what are the "schools" of thought within this field or sub-field? 8) How have these "schools" followed one another in time, and what might have led the authors of the different 3
"schools" to form themselves as such? 9) What are the strongest contributions of the field, and 10) Where does this field fall short, and in what direction does it need to go? You should use this assignment as a "bridge" to your chosen or a likely adviser in the field/subfield you are pursuing. It is expected of you to consult with that adviser before choosing the literature to be reviewed. It is also expected of you to develop a working relationship with an adviser with expertise in the field of your research project for History 601. Ideally, all of this will come together. By the end of this semester, you should have reviewed the literature background for a serious research paper, and you will have identified the areas in which fresh research could produce significant results. That is an essential step for any research project, and to have it done before next semester will save you many weeks of background work. My goal is for you to begin your primary research tasks immediately in the new millenium! Policies: This is a graduate seminar, and so I treat you very differently than I treat undergraduates. There is no need for excused absences, because I don't ask any questions and you don't owe me any explanations. If you cannot come because of some emergency, that is the same to me as if you just decided not to come. Grading on the weekly one-pagers and the discussion portions of the class are basically binary decisions for me. Coming and participating are crucial and will be recorded without comment. Grading on the Book Review and Literature Review Essay are based on the quality of your ability to answer the ten questions listed in the assigment descriptions above, plus the quality of your writing. You should remember that graduate grades should always be "A"s if you want to succeed in the profession. Assigned Readings The following is a checklist of all assigned readings: the same titles are repeated in the weekly assignments. A. Available at the Bookstore and Elsewhere (not on reserve): G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of World History: Introduction Trans. H.B. Nisbet, Intro by Duncan Forbes (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1975). Peter Novick, That Noble Dream: The "Objectivity Question" and the American Historical Profession (Cambridge University Press, 1988). Karl Marx and Fredrick Engels, The German Ideology, Part One (New York: International Publishers, 1970). M.I. Finley and Brent D. Shaw, Ancient Slavery and Modern Ideology (1980; Marcus Weiner, 1999). William H. McNeill, The Pursuit of Power: Technology, Armed Force, and Society Since A.D. 1000 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984). 4
Joseph R. Strayer, On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1970). William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England (New York: Hill and Wang, 1984). Albert Soboul, A Short History of the French Revolution: 1789-1799 Trans Geoffrey Symcox (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989) Lynn Hunt, The Family Romance of the French Revolution (Berkeley; University of California Press, 1992). E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class (New York: Vintage, 1966). Eugene D. Genovese, Roll, Jordon Roll: The World the Slaves Made (New York: Random House, 1976). Caroll Smith-Rosenberg, Disorderly Conduct: Visions of Gender in Victorian America (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985). Lizabeth Cohen, Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919-1939 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). Charles Maier, The Unmasterable Past: History, Holocaust and German national identity (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998) Michael S. Roth, The Ironist's Cage: Memory, Trauma, and the Construction of History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1995). B. In Course Reader, On Reserve, and on Electronic Reserve: (Items marked with* [2] will be in a second reader) For Week 3 Joan Wallach Scott, Chapter 1: "Women's History," and Chapter 2: "Gender; A Useful Category of historical analysis," in Scott, Gender and the Politics of History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988), pp. 15-50. For Week 4 M.I. Finley, The Ancient Economy (Berkeley: University of California Press, 19**), ix-xxxvi. D. Brendan Nagle, "Toward a Sociology of Southeastern Etruria," Studi Periodici di Letteratura e Storia dell'Antichitа (1979), 411-441. *[2] T.E.J. Wiedmann, Slavery (New York; Oxford University Press, 1987), pp. 1-56. For Week 5 Andre Gunder Frank, ReOrient: Global Economy in the Asian Age (Berkeley: University of California Press 1998), 226-257. *[2] Layton, Susan "Nineteenth-Century Russian Mythologies of Caucasian Savagery," in Browder, D.R., and Lazzerini, E.J., eds., Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (Bloomington, 1997), pp. 80-114. 5
*[2] Al-Azmeh, "Mulsim 'Culture' and the European Tribe," in Islams and Moderities (London: 1996), pp. 1-40. *[2] Dussel, E., "Beyond Eurocentrism: the World System and the Limits of Modernity," from Jameson, F., and Miyoshi, M. The Cultures of Globalization (Duke: 1998), pp. 3-32. For Week 6 Paul A. Cohen, Discovering History in China: American Historical Writing on the Chinese Past (NY: Columbia University Press, 1984), Ch 4, pp 149-198; 219-227. From David Johnson, Andrew J. Nathan, and Evelyn S. Rawski, eds., Popular Culture in Late Imperial China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985): · Evelyn S. Rawski, "Economic and Social Foundations of late Imperial Culture" 3-33 · David Johnson, "Communication, Class, and Consciousness in late Imperial China." 34-72 · Daniel L. Overmyer, "Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature: Ming and Ch'ing Pao-chuan" 219-254. · Susan Naquin, "The Transmission of White Lotus Sectarianism in Late Imperial China." 255-291. · James L. Watson, "Standardizing the Gods: the Promotion of T'ien Hou (`Empress of Heaven') Along the South China Coast, 960-1960." 292-324. · Victor H. Mair, "Language and Ideology in the Written Popularizations of the Sacred Edict." 325-359. Thomas Metzger, Escape from Predicament: Neo-Confucianism and China's Evolving Political Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 1977), pp. 3-20. R. Bin Wong, China Transformed: Historical Change and the Limits of European Experience (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), 13-32, 277-294. For Week 7 Paul Freedman and Gabrielle M. Spiegel, "Medievalisms Old and New: The Rediscovery of Alterity in North American Medieval Studies," American Historical Review 103:3 (June 1998): 677-704. For Week 8 David Armitage, Greater Britain: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis?," American Historical Review 104:2 (April 1999): 427-445. J.G.A. Pocock, The New British History in Atlantic Perspective: An Antipodean Commentary," American Historical Review 104:2 (April 1999): 490-500. John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800 Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998), intro pp. 1-9 and Chapter 8, pp. 206-234. For Week 9 [2] Jack Censer, "The Coming of a New Interpretaton of the French Revolution?" Journal of Social History 21 (1987): 295-309 [2] Jack Censer, "Social Twists and Linguistic Turns: Revolutionary Historiography a Decade after the Bicentennial" French Historical Studies, v.22 no.1, (Winter 1999):139-167. Robert Darnton, "Worker's Revolt: The Great Cat Massacre of the Rue Saint-Sйverin," in Darnton, The Great Cat Massacre and Other Episodes in French Cultural History (New York: Vintage, 1985), pp. 75-104. 6
For Week 14 *[2] Alon Confino, AHR Forum, "Collective Memory and Cultural History: Problems of Method," American Historical Review (December 1997) 1386-1403. *[2] Michael Geyer, "The Place of the Second World War in German Memory and History," New German Critique 71 (Spring-summer 1997): 5-40. *[2] Atina Grossmann, "Trauma, Memory, and Motherhood: Germans and Jewish Displaced Persons in Post-Nazi Germany, 1945-1949," Archiv fьr Socialgeschichte 38 (1998): 215-239. *[2] Pierre Nora, "From Lieux de mйmoire to Realms of Memory" (Preface) and "Between Memory and History" (general introduction) to Realms of Memory; Rethinking the French Past Volume I: Conflicts and Divisions (Trans Arthur Goldhamer (NY: Columbia University Press, 1996) 7
COMPACT SUMMARY OF SESSIONS
Week Date Theme
Assigned Readings
(Principal Reading is in Bold)
1
0902 History,
· Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of
Modernity, and
World History: Introduction (1822-30)
the World
2
0909 Modern
Historians
· Novick, That Noble Dream: The "Objectivity Question" and the American
Historical Profession (1988)
3
0916 Class, Gender, · Marx and Engels, The German Ideology
and History
(1846)
· Scott, "Women's History," and "Gender; A
Useful Category of Historical Analysis"
(1988)
4
0923 Antiquity and
· Finley and Shaw, Ancient Slavery and
and Modernity:
Modern Ideology (1999)
The Case of Slavery
· Finley, The Ancient Economy, pp. ix-xxxvi. · Nagle, "Toward a Sociology of Southeastern
Etruria" (1979), 411-441.
· Wiedmann, Slavery, 1-56 (1987)
5
0930 World History, · McNeill, The Pursuit of Power:
World Systems,
Technology, Armed Force, and Society
Nations, States
Since A.D. 1000 (1984).
and Alterity
· Frank, ReOrient: Global Economy in the
Asian Age, (226-257)
· Layton, "Nineteenth-Century Russian
Mythologies of Caucasian Savagery,"
· Al-Azmeh, "Mulsim 'Culture' and the
European Tribe"
· Dussel, "Beyond Eurocentrism: the World
System and the Limits of Modernity"
6
1007 Varieties of
· Cohen, Discovering History in China:
Chinese History
American Historical Writing on the Chinese
Past (1984), excerpts
· Johnson, Nathan and Rawski, Popular
Culture in Late Imperial China (1985)
[essays by Rawski, Overmyer, Naquin,
Watson, Mair]
· Thomas Metzger, Escape from Predicament:
Neo-Confucianism and China's Evolving
Political Culture (1977) excerpts
· Wong, China Transformed: Historical
Change and the Limits of European
Experience (1997) excerpts
7
1014 Medieval and
· Strayer, On the Medieval Origins of the
Modern
Modern State (1970).
· Freedman and Spiegel, "Medievalisms Old
and New: The Rediscovery of Alterity in
North American Medieval Studies" (1998)
8
1021 Colonial North · Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians,
America and the
Colonists, and the Ecology of New
Atlantic World
England (1984).
· Armitage, Greater Britain: A Useful
Guest Professor Brendan Nagle Azade-Ayse Rorlich and Jack Wills Jack Wills Paul Knoll Carole Shammas
8
Category of Historical Analysis?"(1999)
· Pocock, "The New British History in Atlantic
Perspective: An Antipodean Commentary,"
(1999)
· Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making
of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800 (1998),
excerpts.
9
1028 The Ancien
· Soboul, A Short History of the French
Elinor Accampo
Rйgime and the
Revolution: 1789-1799 (1989)
The French Revolution:
· Lynn Hunt, The Family Romance of the French Revolution (1992)
Marx, Mentalitй, · Darnton, "Worker's Revolt: The Great Cat
and Mama
Massacre of the Rue Saint-Sйverin" (1985).
10
1104 Class Formation · Thompson, The Making of the English
Steve Ross
Working Class (1966)
11
1111 North American · Genovese, Roll, Jordon Roll: The World Terry Seip
Slavery
the Slaves Made (1976)
12
1118 Gender ,
· Smith-Rosenberg, Disorderly Conduct:
Lois Banner
Women's
Visions of Gender in Victorian America
History, and
(1985)
American Studies
· TBA
13
1125 Class, Culture, · Cohen, Making a New Deal: Industrial
Cities, and 20th-
Workers in Chicago, 1919-1939 (1990)
Century U.S.
Political History
14
1202 Holocaust and · Nora, "From Lieux de mйmoire to Realms of Paul Lerner
Collective
Memory."
Memory
· Maier, The Unmasterable Past (Harvard
University Press)
· Confino, AHR Forum, "Collective Memory
and Cultural History: Problems of Method."
· Geyer, "The Place of the Second World War
in German Memory and History."
· Grossmann, "Trauma, Memory, and
Motherhood: Germans and Jewish Displaced
Persons in Post-Nazi Germany, 1945-1949."
15
1209 Fragmentations · Roth, The Ironist's Cage: Memory,
Mauricio
Trauma, and the Construction of History Mazуn
(1995)
9
DETAILED WEEKLY SCHEDULE WEEK 1: History, Modernity, and the World Assigned Reading: G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of World History: Introduction Trans. H.B. Nisbet, Intro by Duncan Forbes (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1975). Recommended Reading on Hegel: Frederick C. Beiser, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to Hegel (New York; Cambridge University Press, 1993). Stephen Houlgate, Freedom, Truth and History; An Introduction to Hegel's Philosophy (London and New York: Routledge, 1991). Stephen Houlgate, The Hegel Reader (Cambridge; Basil Blackwell, 1998). Walter Kaufmann, "The Hegel Myth and its Method," in Alasdair MacIntyre, ed., Hegel: A Collection of Critical Essays (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 1972), 2160. Michael Roth, Knowing and History: Appropriations of Hegel in Twentieth-Century France (Ithaca; Cornell University Press, 1988). Recommended Reading on Modernity and Postmoderity: Richard J. Bernstein, Habermas and Modernity (Cambridge: MIT press, 1985). Elizabeth Deeds Ermarth, Sequel to History: Postmodernism and the Crisis of Representational Time (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992) Anthony Giddens, The Consequences of Modernity (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1990). Jьrgen Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity: Twelve Lectures Trans Frederick G. Lawrence (Cambridge; MIT Press, 1990). Carl E. Schorske, Fin-de-Siиcle Vienna: Politics and Culture (New York: Knopf, 1980). Stephen Toulmin, Cosmopolis: The Hidden Agenda of Modernity (Chicago; University of Chicago press, 1990). 10
WEEK 2: MODERN HISTORIANS Assigned Reading: Peter Novick, That Noble Dream: The "Objectivity Question" and the American Historical Profession (1988) Recommended Reading: AHR Forum: "Peter Novick's that Noble Dream: The Objectivity Question and the Future of the Historical profession," American Historical Review 96 (June 1991). Stanley Fish, Is There a Text in this Class? The Authority of Interpretive Communities (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1980). Edward Hallett Carr, What is History? (New York: Vintage, 1961). H. Stuart Hughes, History as Art and As Science: Twin Vistas on the Past (New York: Harper and Row, 1964). Rys Isaac, "Power and Meaning: Event and Text: History and Anthropology," in Dangerous Liasons: Essays in Honor of Greg Dening, ed. Donna Merwick (Melbourne: University of Melbourne Press, 1994). James Kloppenberg, "Objectivity and Historicism: A Century of American Historical Writing," American Historical Review 94 (October 1989). Dominick LaCapra, History and Criticism (Ithaca; Cornell University Press). Hans Meyerhoff, ed., The Philosophy of History in Our Time: An Anthology (Garden City, N.J.: Doubleday, 1959). Joan W. Scott, "The Evidence of Experience," Critical Inquiry 17:4 (1991): 773-797. Norman J. Wilson, History in Crisis?: Recent Directions in Historiography (Prentice Hall, 1999). WEEK 3: CLASS, GENDER, AND HISTORY Assigned Reading: Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The German Ideology (1846) Joan W. Scott, "Women's History," and "Gender; A Useful Category of Historical Analysis" (1988) 11
Recommended Reading: Kathleen Canning, "Feminist History after the Linguistic turn: Historicizing Discourse and Experience," Signs 19:2 (1994): 368-404. Dipesh Chakrabarty, "Marx After Marxism: History, Subalternity and Difference," Meanjin 52 (1993): 421-434. Laura Lee Downs, ""If `Woman' Is Just an Empty Category, Then Why am I Afraid to Walk Alone At Night? Identity Politics Meets the Postmodern Subject,' Comparative Studies in Society and History 35:2 (1993):414-43. Anthony Giddens, Capitalism and Modern Social Theory: An Analysis of the Writings of Marx, Durkheim and Max Weber (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1971). Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, "African-American Women's History and the Metalanguage of Race," Signs 17:2 (1992): 251-274. Raymond Williams, "Base and Superstructure in Marxist Cultural Theory," New Left Review 82 (November-December 1973). Raymond Williams, Marxism and Literature (New York: Oxford University Press, 1977). WEEK 4: ANTIQUITY AND MODERNITY: THE CASE OF SLAVERY Assigned Reading: M.I. Finley and Brent D. Shaw, Ancient Slavery and Modern Ideology (Marcus Weiner, 1999). M.I. Finley, The Ancient Economy (Berkeley: University of California Press, 19**), ixxxxvi. D. Brendan Nagle, "Toward a Sociology of Southeastern Etruria," Studi Periodici di Letteratura e Storia dell'Antichitа (1979), 411-441. [2ND Reader] T.E.J. Wiedmann, Slavery (New York; Oxford University Press, 1987), pp. 156. Recommended Reading: See Wiedmann (1987). 12
WEEK 5: WORLD HISTORY, WORLD SYSTEMS, NATIONS, STATES, AND ALTERITY Assigned Reading: William H. McNeill, The Pursuit of Power: Technology, Armed Force, and Society Since A.D. 1000 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984). Al-Azmeh, "Mulsim 'Culture' and the European Tribe," in Islams and Moderities (London: 1996), pp. 1-40. Dussel, E., "Beyond Eurocentrism: the World System and the Limits of Modernity," from Jameson, F., and Miyoshi, M. The Cultures of Globalization (Duke: 1998), pp. 3-32. Andre Gunder Frank, ReOrient: Global Economy in the Asian Age (Berkeley: University of California Press 1998), 226-257. Layton, Susan "Nineteenth-Century Russian Mythologies of Caucasian Savagery," in Browder, D.R., and Lazzerini, E.J., eds., Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (Bloomington, 1997), pp. 80-114. Recommended Reading: Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origins and Spread of Nationalism (London: Verso, 1991). Benedict Anderson, The Spectre of Nationalism: SouthEast Asia and the World (London and NY: 1998). Al-Azmeh, A. Islams and Modernities (London: 1996). Janet L. Abu-Lughod, Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. 1250-1350 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989). Bhabha, H.K., Nation and Narration (Routledge: 1990). Browder, D.R., and Lazzerini, E.J., eds., Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (Bloomington, 1997). Buell, F. National Culture and the New Global System (Baltimore: 1994). Esposito, J. L. Voices of Resurgent Islam (Oxford: 1993). 13
Gyan Prakach, "Writing Post-Orientalist Histories of the Third World: Perspectives from Indian Historiography," Comparative Studies in Society and History 33:2 (1990): 383408. Hourani, A. Islam in European Thought (Cambridge, 1993). Jameson, F., and Miyoshi, M. The Cultures of Globalization (Duke: 1998). Robertson, R. Globalization: Social Theory and Global Culture (London: 1992). Edward W. Said, Orientalism (NY: 1978). Edward W. Said, Culture and Imperialism (NY: 1994). Tibi, B. Islam and the Cultural Accomodation of Social Change (Boulder: 1990). Immanuel Wallerstein, The Modern World-System: Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of European Hegemony in the Sixteenth Century Text Edition (New York: Academic Press, 1976). Patrick Wolfe, "Imperialism and History: A Century of Theory, from Marx to Postcolonialism," American Historical Review 102:2 (1997): 388-420. WEEK 6: VARIETIES OF CHINESE HISTORY Assigned Reading: Paul A. Cohen, Discovering History in China: American Historical Writing on the Chinese Past (NY: Columbia University Press, 1984), Ch 4, pp 149-198; 219-227. From David Johnson, Andrew J. Nathan, and Evelyn S. Rawski, eds., Popular Culture in Late Imperial China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985): · Evelyn S. Rawski, "Economic and Social Foundations of late Imperial Culture" 3-33 · David Johnson, "Communication, Class, and Consciousness in late Imperial China." 34-72 · Daniel L. Overmyer, "Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature: Ming and Ch'ing Pao- chuan" 219-254. · Susan Naquin, "The Transmission of White Lotus Sectarianism in Late Imperial China." 255-291. · James L. Watson, "Standardizing the Gods: the Promotion of T'ien Hou (`Empress of Heaven') Along the South China Coast, 960-1960." 292-324. · Victor H. Mair, "Language and Ideology in the Written Popularizations of the Sacred Edict." 325-359. 14
Thomas Metzger, Escape from Predicament: Neo-Confucianism and China's Evolving Political Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 1977), pp. 3-20. R. Bin Wong, China Transformed: Historical Change and the Limits of European Experience (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), 13-32, 277-294. Recommended Reading: Timothy Brook, The Confusions of Pleasure E. Bruce Brooks and Taeko Brooks, The Original Analects Wm. Theodore deBary, Neo-Confucian Orthodoxy and the Learning of the Mind-and-Heart Prasenjit Duara, Rescuing History from the Nation Mark Elvin, The Pattern of the Chinese Past Charlotte Furth, A Flourishing Yin Susan Naquin and Evelyn Rawski, Chinese Society in the Eighteenth Century Willard Peterson, Bitter Gourd Kristofer Schipper, The Taoist Body Paul J. Smith, Taxing Heaven's Storehouse Stephen F. Teiser, The Ghost Festival in Medieval China WEEK 7: MEDIEVAL AND MODERN Assigned Reading: Joseph R. Strayer, On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1970). Paul Freedman and Gabrielle M. Spiegel, "Medievalisms Old and New: The Rediscovery of Alterity in North American Medieval Studies," American Historical Review 103:3 (June 1998): 677-704. Recommended Reading: Marc Bloch, Feudal Society, Vol. 1 The Growth of Ties of Dependence Trans. L.A. Manyon, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1961). 15
Peter Brown, Augustine of Hippo, A Bibliography (Berkeley, 1969). Carolyn Walker Bynum, Holy Feast, Holy Fast: the Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women (Berkeley, 1987). Carolyn Walker Bynum, "Wonder," American Historical Review 102:1 (February 1997): 1-26. Patrick Geary, Before France and Germany (New York, 1987). Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error (Cambridge, Mass., 1978). Francis Oakley, The Medieval Experience (New York: 1974; reprinted Toronto, 1995). Nancy F. Partner, ed., Studying Medieval Women: Sex, Gender, Feminism (Cambridge, Mass., 1993). WEEK 8: COLONIAL NORTH AMERICA AND THE ATLANTIC WORLD Assigned Reading: William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England (New York: Hill and Wang, 1984). David Armitage, Greater Britain: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis?," American Historical Review 104:2 (April 1999): 427-445. J.G.A. Pocock, The New British History in Atlantic Perspective: An Antipodean Commentary," American Historical Review 104:2 (April 1999): 490-500. John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800 Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998), intro pp. 1-9 and Chapter 8, pp. 206-234. Recommended Reading: David Hackett Fischer, Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (Oxford UP, 1986) · Forum on Albion's Seed in The William and Mary Quarterly 3d ser. 48 (1991) 223-308 Mary Beth Norton, Founding Mothers and Fathers: Gendered Power and the Forming of American Society ( Knopf, 1996) Robin Blackburn, The Making of New World Slavery: From the Baroque to the 16
Modern 1492-1800 (Verso, 1997) Philip D. Morgan, Slave Counterpoint: black culture in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and Lowcountry (Univ. of N. Carolina Press, 1998) Jon Butler, Awash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People (Harvard University Press, 1990) David S. Shields, Civil Tongues and Polite Letters in British America (Univ. of N.Carolina Press, 1997). Lester D. Langley, The Americas in the Age of Revolution 1750-1850 (Yale Univ. Press, 1996) WEEK 9: THE ANCIEN RЙGIME AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION: MARX, MENTALITЙ, AND MAMA Assigned Reading: Albert Soboul, A Short History of the French Revolution: 1789-1799 Trans Geoffrey Symcox (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989) Lynn Hunt, The Family Romance of the French Revolution (Berkeley; University of California Press, 1992). Jack Censer, "The Coming of a New Interpretaton of the French Revolution?" Journal of Social History 21 (1987): 295-309 Jack Censer, "Social Twists and Linguistic Turns: Revolutionary Historiography a Decade after the Bicentennial" French Historical Studies, v.22 no.1, (Winter 1999):139167. Robert Darnton, "Worker's Revolt: The Great Cat Massacre of the Rue Saint-Sйverin," in Darnton, The Great Cat Massacre and Other Episodes in French Cultural History (New York: Vintage, 1985), pp. 75-104. Recommended Reading on the French Revolution: See the two Censer essays above, and: Maurice Agulhon, The Republic in the Villiage Keith M. Baker, ed., The Political Culture of the Old Regime. Vol. 1 of The French Revolution and the Creation of Modern Political Culture (Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1987). 17
Franзois Furet, Interpreting the French Revolution trans. Elborg Forster. (New York : Cambridge University Press ; Paris : Editions de la Maison des sciences de l'homme, 1981). Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, The Ancien Rйgime: A History of France, 1610-1774 translated by Mark Greengrass. (Oxford ; Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell, 1996). Georges Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution trans R.R. Palmer (Princeton; Princeton University Press, 1947). Simon Schama, Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution (1988). William M. Reddy, Money and Liberty in Modern Europe: A Critique of Historical Understanding (Cambridge; Cambridge University Press, 1987). William H. Sewell, Jr., Work and Revolution in France: the Language of Labor from the Old Rйgime to 1848 (New York; Cambridge University Press, 1988). Recommended Reading on the History of "Mentalitйs" Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of MartinGuerre (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1984) Carlo Ginzburg , The Cheese and the Worms : The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller trans John Tedeschi and Anne Tedeschi. (reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr, 1992). Carlo Ginzburg , The Night Battles : Witchcraft and Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries trans John Tedeschi and Anne Tedeschi. (reprint Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr, 1992). Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error (Cambridge, Mass., 1978). WEEK 10: CLASS FORMATION Assigned Reading: E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class (New York: Vintage, 1966). Recommended Reading: Perry Anderson, Debates Within English Marxism Alan Dawley, "E.P. Thompson and the Peculiarities of the Americans," Radical History Review 19 (Winter 1978-79): 33-59. 18
John Foster, Class Struggle and the Industrial Revolution: Early Industrial Capitalism in Three English Towns Eric Hobsbawm, Labouring Men Patrick Joyce, Visions of the People: Industrial England and the Question of Class, 18401914 Ira Katznelson and Aristide Zolberg, eds, Working-Class Formation: Nineteenth-Century Patterns in Western Europe and the United States Harold Perkin, The Origin of Modern English Society, 1780-1880 E.P. Thompson, "Time, Work-Discipline and Industrial Capitalism,' Past and Present (1967). E.P. Thompson, "The Moral Economy of the English Crowd in the 18th Century," Past and Present 50 (February 1971). Frederick Cooper, "Work, Class and Empire: An African Historian's Retrospective on E.P. Thompson,' Social History 20:2 (1995): 235-241. WEEK 11: NORTH AMERICAN SLAVERY: RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE Assigned Reading: Eugene D. Genovese, Roll, Jordon Roll: The World the Slaves Made (New York: Random House, 1976). Peter Kolchin, "American Historians and Antebellum Southern Slavery, 1959-1984," in William J. Cooper, Jr., Michael Holt, and John McCardle, eds., A Master's Due: Essays in Honor of David Herbert Donald (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985). Recommended Reading: Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998). Robin Blackburn, The Making of New World Slavery, 1492-1800 (London: Verso, 1997). John R. Boles, Black Southerners, 1619-1869 (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1983) 19
David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1966). Charles Dew, "The Slavery Experience," and Drew Gilpin Faust, "White Society, Culture, and Politics in the Antebellum Period, 1800-1860," in John Boles and Evelyn Thomas Nolen, eds., Interpreting Southern History: Historiographical Essays in Honor of Sanford W. Higginbotham (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1987), 12061, 78-119. Barbara J. Fields, "Ideology and Race in American History," in James McPherson & Morgan Kousser, eds., Region, Race, and Reconstruction: Essays in Honor of C. Vann Woodward (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982), 143-77. Eric Foner, "Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction," in Eric Foner, ed., The New American History, Revised and Expanded Edition (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1996). Herbert G. Gutman, The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom, 1750-1925 (New York: Pantheon, 1976). Drew Gilpin Faust, "The Proslavery Argument in History," in Faust, ed., The Ideology of Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Antebellum South, 1830-1860 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981). Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Within the Plantation Household: Black and White Women of the Old South (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988). George Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate Over AfroAmerican Character and Destiny, 1817-1914 (1971; reissued with a new Introduction, Boston: Wesleyan University Press, 1987) Kenneth S. Greenberg, Honor and Slavery: Lies, Duels, Noses, Masks, Dressing as a Woman, Gifts, Strangers, Humanitarianism, Death, Slave Rebellions, the Proslavery Argument, Baseball, Hunting, and Gambling in the Old South (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996). Winthrop Jordan, White Over Black: American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1968) Peter Kolchin, American Slavery, 1619-1877 (New York: Hill and Wang, 1990) Lawrence Levine, Black Culture and Black Consciousness: Afro-American Folk Thought from Slavery to Freedom (New York: Oxford University Press, 1977) 20
Sterling Stuckey, "Introduction: Slavery and the Circle of Culture," in Stuckey, Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 3-97. Bertram Wyatt-Brown, Southern Honor: Ethics and Behavior in the Old South (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982); available in abridged version as Honor and Violence in the Old South (1986). WEEK 12: GENDER , WOMEN'S HISTORY, AND AMERICAN STUDIES Assigned Reading: Caroll Smith-Rosenberg, Disorderly Conduct: Visions of Gender in Victorian America (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985). Excerpt from: Lois Banner, Finding Fran : History and Memory in the Lives of two Women (New York: Columbia University Press 1998). Recommended Reading: Lois Banner, In Full Flower: Aging Women, Power and Sexuality: A History (New York: Random House, 1992) Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood: Women's Sphere in New England, 1790-1835 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977) Estelle B. Freedman, "The History of the Family and the History of Sexuality," in Eric Foner, ed, The New American History Revised and Expanded Edition (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1997), pp. 285-310. Linda Gordon, "U.S. Women's History," in Eric Foner, ed, The New American History Revised and Expanded Edition (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1997), pp. 257284. Nancy Hewitt, "Beyond the Search for Sisterhood: American Women's History in the 1980s,' Social History 10 (1985): 299-321. Linda Kerber, "Separate Spheres, Female Worlds, Women's Place: The Rhetoric of Women's history, Journal of American History 75 (June 1988): 9-39. Joan W. Scott, Gender and the Politics of History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988). Stansell, Christine. City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1987) 21
Rosemarie Tong, Feminist Thought : A More Comprehensive Introduction 2nd ed. (Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 1998). Judith Stacey, Patriarchy and Socialist Revolution in China (Berkeley: 1983). WEEK 13: CLASS, CULTURE, CITIES, AND 20TH-CENTURY U.S. POLITICAL HISTORY Assigned Reading: Lizabeth Cohen, Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919-1939 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). Recommended Reading: Barton J. Bernstein, "The New Deal: The Conservative Achievements of Liberal Reform," in Bernstein, ed., Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History (New York: Knopf, 1968), pp. 263-288. Alan Brinkley, New Deal Liberalism in Recession and War (New York: Alfred Knopf, 1995). Stuart Ewen, Captains of Consciousness: Advertising and the Social Roots of the Consumer Culture (New York: McGraw Hill, 1976). Richard W. Fox and T.J. Jackson Lears, eds., The Culture of Consumption: Critical Essays in American History, 1880-1980 (New York: Pantheon, 1983). Gary Gerstle, Working-Class Americanism: The Politics of Labor in a Textile City, 19141960 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989) Richard Hofstadter, The Age of Reform: From Bryan to FDR (New York: Knopf, 1955). Barry D. Karl, The Uneasy State: the United States From 1915 to 1945 (Chicago: University of Chciago Press, 1983). Robin D. G. Kelley, Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990). William E. Leuchtenberg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal: 1932-1940 (New York: Harper and Row, 1963). George Sбnchez, Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945 (New York; Oxford University Press, 1993). 22
WEEK 14: HOLOCAUST, HISTORY, AND MEMORY Assigned Reading: (Read First) Pierre Nora, "From Lieux de mйmoire to Realms of Memory" (Preface) and "Between Memory and History" (general introduction) to Realms of Memory; Rethinking the French Past Volume I: Conflicts and Divisions (Trans Arthur Goldhamer (NY: Columbia University Press, 1996). Charles Maier, The Unmasterable Past: History, Holocaust and German National Identity (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, ***) Alon Confino, AHR Forum, "Collective Memory and Cultural History: Problems of Method," American Historical Review (December 1997) 1386-1403. Michael Geyer, "The Place of the Second World War in German Memory and History," New German Critique 71 (Spring-summer 1997): 5-40. Atina Grossmann, "Trauma, Memory, and Motherhood: Germans and Jewish Displaced Persons in Post-Nazi Germany, 1945-1949," Archiv fьr Socialgeschichte 38 (1998): 215239. Recommended Reading: Ian Buruma, The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (New York: Farrar Strauss Giroux, 1994) Sarah Farmer, Martyred Village: Commemorating the 1944 Massacre at Oradour-sur-Glane (Berkeley, UC Press, 1999) Saul Friedlander, Memory, History and the Extermination of the Jews of Europe (Bloomington, Indiana UP 1993) Saul Friedlander ed., Probing the Limits of Representation: Nazism and the 'Final Solution' (Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1992) Peter Fritzsche and Alon Confino eds., Modern Pasts: The Social Practices of Memory in Germany (Champagne: University of Illinois Press, forthcoming 2000) Elizabeth Heinemann, "The Hour of the Woman: Memories of Germany's 'Crisis Years' and West German National Identity" American Historical Review, 101 (1996), 354-95 Jeffrey Herf, Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys (Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1997) 23
Maurice Halbwachs, Collective Memory (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 19??) Dominick LaCapra, History and Memory after Auschwitz (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1998) Matt K. Matsuda, The Memory of the Modern (NY: Oxford UP, 1996) Henry Russo, The Vichy Syndrome: History and Memory in France since 1944 (Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1991) Eric Santner, Stranded Objects: Mourning,Memory and Film in post-war Germany (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1990) James Young, The Texture of Memory: Holocaust Memorials and Meaning (New Haven: Yale UP, 1993) WEEK 15: FRAGMENTATIONS Assigned Reading: Michael Roth, The Ironist's Cage: Memory, Trauma, and the Construction of History (1995) Recommended Reading: F.R. Ankersmit, History and Tropology: The Rise and Fall of Metaphor (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994). Robert F. Berkhofer, Jr., Beyond the Great Story: History as Text and Discourse (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1995). Michel Foucault, The Order of Things (New York; Vintage, 1973). Jьrgen Habermas, "The Critique of Reason as an Unmasking of the Human Sciences: Michel Foucault,' in Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity: Twelve Lectures Trans Frederick G. Lawrence (Cambridge; MIT Press, 1990), pp. 238-265. Allan Megill, Prophets of Extremity: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida (Berkeley; University of California Press, 1985). Bryan D. Palmer, Descent into Discourse: The Reification of Langauge and the Writing of Social History (Philadelphia; Temple University Press, 1990). Richard Rorty, Essays on Heidegger and Others: Philosophical Papers, Volume 2 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991). 24
Carl E. Schorske, Thinking with History: Explorations in the Passage to Modernism (Princeton; Princeton University Press, 1998). Appendix Recommended Reading on the Annales School: Burke, Peter. The French Historical Revolution : The Annales School, 1929-89 (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1990). Peter Burke, ed., Economy and Society in Early modern Europe: Essays from the Annales (New York, Harper & Row, 1972) Fernand Braudel, The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Phillip II 2 vols., trans Sian Reynolds (1949: New York: Harper Colophon, 1972). · J.H. Hexter, " Fernand Braudel and the Monde Braudellien, Journal of Modern History 44 (1972). · H.R. Trevor Roper, "Fernand Braudel, the Annales, and the Mediterranean," Journal of Modern History 44 (1972). Lucien Febvre, The Problem of Unbelief in the Sixteenth Century, the Religion of Rabelais translated by Beatrice Gottlieb. (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982) Franзois Furet, "Beyond the Annales," Journal of Modern History 55 (1983). Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, The Peasants of Languedoc trans with an introd. by John Day. George (Urbana, University of Illinois Press, 1974). Traian Stoianovich, French Historical Method: The 'Annales' Paradigm, with a foreword by Fernand Braudel. (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1976). 25

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