Romeo and Juliet 6 week Unit

Tags: Romeo and Juliet, Lesson Plan Title, HSGT, Anticipatory Set, Step-By-Step Procedures, Donovan Student Name, interpretation, William Shakespeare, rhyme scheme, Shakespearean sonnet, Act III, inquiry based learning, The scene, biographies, Petrarchan sonnet, Romeo & Juliet
Content: Romeo and Juliet 6 week Unit Lynn Berry Sarah Donovan Meghann Hummel ELAN 4400 Conceptual unit December 2, 2003
Romeo and Juliet Rationale We are designing a unit based on William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet to introduce our overarching theme of conflict with authority. While this unit could be used in any high school setting, we are specifically designing it for our student teaching practicum in Gwinnett County. Therefore, the majority of our students will live in the suburban areas surrounding metro-Atlanta. We will be teaching students from multiple socio-economic backgrounds and cultures. This unit is created with ninth graders in mind, yet could be taught at any grade level. Tracking is a non-issue because the unit could be modified and taught to accommodate all students. The issues presented in Romeo and Juliet can be related to the lives of many adolescents. As Freire (1987) says, "reading the world always precedes reading the word" (p. 35), and we hope to connect the students' worlds to the words of Shakespeare. Although dated around the mid 1590s, the issues presented in Romeo and Juliet transcend time and place. Research completed by Erikson and Piaget shows that when learning is tied to personal or cultural interests, students are more likely to pay attention to the material because they can relate to the subject matter (Shaffer, 1994). While some people would argue that something written so long ago is outdated, issues of love, rebellion, death, and acceptance are prevalent in the lives of most students as well as the play. We plan to provide an opportunity to connect personal experiences to learning through Romeo and Juliet. The insecurities and obstacles of today's adolescents resonate with those faced by Romeo and Juliet. By teaching a play relevant to current social problems, students are more willing to engage in the material. Social relevance is important because research has shown that students are more invested in learning material that they can relate too (Hull and Schultz, 2002). Issues in Romeo and Juliet transcend and connect cultures, and through teaching this we will show students that something written centuries ago can still reflect problems in today's society.
"One of the interests of teens is love-from frivolous to sensuous, from friendship love to romantic love" (Chance, 2002, p. 139). Romeo and Juliet is often recognized as the most renowned love story ever written. Its historical and literary significance commands its presence in the majority of schools' curricula. The readers of this work are widespread, and it has impacted modern writers around the world. Much of what is written and said in American culture requires a basic reading and understanding of Romeo and Juliet and its language. This play is referenced in writing, the media, movies, television, and even conversation. Therefore this work not only connects with the students' individual lives, but also with the culture and mass media that they are surrounded by. We have not designed this unit to force students into memorizing a play, but to discuss the issues that arise in Romeo and Juliet. Student choice is very important because options allow students to have a more active role in their education. According to Starnes and Paris (2000), the students of teachers that give them choices are more likely to buy into their education and learn. By framing our major assessment around Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (1999), we allow students to express their knowledge in the medium through which they learn best. Students may choose from performance art, visual art, and/or writing to convey their interpretation of a scene of their choice. In doing so we hope to validate all forms of expression and provide room for creativity. Just as our students will learn from us as teachers, we hope to learn from their interpretations and gain insight into their thoughts and ideas. We will allow for group and individual projects in order to meet the needs of all students. Viewing all who enter the classroom as learners and teachers, we hope to provide an environment conducive to critical inquiry and learning. This relates to Joan Wink's (2000) idea of conscientization involving "a transformation of the learner and teacher as a result of interaction between the two of them" (p.
43). We realize that no student comes to school an empty vessel and that all students have knowledge and experience that everyone can learn from. Students and teachers should work together in their learning endeavors in order to validate everyone's contributions. We plan on implementing this idea in our unit through discussion rather than lecture based activities. The students must inquire into the historical relevance of Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare, and aspects of the time period. Students choose which feature they are interested in researching and serve as the expert in relaying their findings to the class. When doing this, students take on the role as teachers and learners. Many of the activities and readings will stem from and involve writings and discussions that relate Romeo and Juliet to the lived experiences of our students. Through inquiry based learning we will bridge the gap between out-of-school and classroom literacies (Hull & Schultz, 2002) in an effort to give all students voice. This play is important not only because of its historical and literary relevance, but also because it connects student's social worlds with their education. According to Beach and Myers (2001) students have several different worlds: social, school, church, home, peer, etc., and schools should make a concerted effort to bring various worlds into the school environment. The bridging of these outside worlds to the school world allows students to feel more invested in the school curriculum. By encouraging the discussion of personal events related to those that occur in Romeo and Juliet we hope to allow out-of-school literacies in the classroom. Most adolescents have dealt with issues concerning conflicts with authority, and can therefore bring in various relevant perspectives from their social worlds. Through classroom activities and conversations we hope to discuss: conflicts with parents, power relations, gangs, suicide, violence, rebellion, love, death, and the development of character. Although some of these issues might be controversial, we feel it is better to discuss them in a safe, school environment rather than allow them to foster outside the classroom. All of these topics can be related to social worlds through
lived experience and the school world through Romeo and Juliet. According to Nieto (2002), when the curriculum is connected to students' lives there are positive results. We hope to have students invested in our unit initially through personal experiences and with the end result of a positive literary occurrence. Through choice and different mediums we hope to design a unit that will benefit all students. While time consuming and challenging, this unit offers multiple ways for students to express themselves both personally and through the work. We expect them to go beyond basic plot summary and to explore aspects of Romeo and Juliet that personally interest them. Their final project requires in depth knowledge of a scene of their choice, which they must either interpret through acting, drawing, rewriting, or a combination of these. We will provide scaffolding throughout the unit to prepare them for this challenging and creative assessment. Classroom discussion and activities will revolve around history, character, persuasive arguments, and different ways of interpreting works. We will provide visual stimulation through the viewing of Luhrmann's and Zeffirelli's take on the play through film. The students will compare the representation of these scenes to those of the written text. This will prepare them for developing their own original interpretation for the final. Students will also do research on computers, activities exploring character, create a Shakespeare Dictionary to understand language, participate in persuasive debates, and learn about and write their own soliloquies. With such a broad range of activities, we hope to target the strengths of all of our students. Aspects of choice, relevance, and connecting literary to social meaning are all important teaching devices we incorporate into our unit.
Works Cited Beach & Myers, (2001). Inquiry-Based English Instruction: Engaging Students in Life and Literature. New York: Teacher's College Press. Elliot, J., & Dupuis, M. (2002). young adult literature in the Classroom: Reading it, Teaching it, Loving it (p. 139). Pennsylvania: International Reading Association. Freire, P., & Macedo D. (1987). Literacy: Reading the Word and the World. South Hadley, Maryland: Bergin & Garvey. Gardner, H. (2000). The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts and standardized tests, the K-12 Education that Every Child Deserves. New York: Penguin Group. Hull, G. & Schultz, K. (2002). School's Out!: Bridging Out-of-School Literacies With Classroom Practice. New York: Teachers College Press. Nieto, S. (2002). Language, Culture, and Teaching: critical perspectives for a New Century. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Association. Shaffer, D. R. (1994). Social and Personality Development. (4th edition) Wadsworth Publishing. Starnes, B. & Paris, C. (2000). Choosing to Learn. New Jersey: The Foxfire Fund, Inc. Wink, J. (2000). critical pedagogy: Notes from the Real World. California: Addison Wesley Longman.
Grading: 20%= Daily Grades & Participation: Compare and contrast assignment, love lesson assignment, two journal entries, daily quizzes, and Venn diagram 30%= Test Grades: Compare and contrast essay, body biographies 50%= Final Project:
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 1, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: Introductory Activity Standards Addressed: Speak in a clear, understandable manner (QCC, CE) (LA09_A1998-2) Distinguish between statements of fact and statements of opinion (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-8) General Goal(s): To connect students' experiences with Romeo and Juliet through writing and discussion Specific Objectives: Complete opinionnaires. Discuss responses with the class. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, opinionnaire Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Have students complete opinonnaires individually and then discuss the differing opinions found within the class. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 10 minutes: Pass out and complete opinionnaires 40 minutes: Discuss opinionnaires 2 minutes: Pass out Romeo and Juliet Red Readers
Romeo and Juliet Opinionnaire
State to what extent you agree or disagree with the following statements. Write at least one sentence defending your position.
1. The punishment for murder should always be death.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
2. Teenagers can't understand what true love really is.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
3. Killing someone in revenge for killing a close friend of yours is okay.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
4. Good friends should stick together at all times no matter how wrong a friend may be.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
5. Parents should make the decisions about their children's lives.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
6. It is possible to fall in love at first sight.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
7. Telling lies or hiding the truth is acceptable for the right reasons.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
8. Family feuds only affect adults.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
9. There are times when arranged marriage is appropriate.
strongly agree
agree
neutral
disagree
strongly disagree
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 1, Day 2 Concept / Topic to Teach: Further connecting R & J to students' lives. Brief history of Shakespeare and the time period. Standards Addressed: Take notes from lecture, reading, viewing and interviewing (QCC, SAT I) (LA09_G1998-64) Outline information (QCC) (LA09_G1998-69) Read for a purpose; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-6) General Goal(s): To familiarize students with the historical significance of R & J. Specific Objectives: Read the first scene of Romeo and Juliet. Begin discussing the history of Shakespeare. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Journal: Write about a time when you have experienced violence. This is open to personal experiences, media portrayal, or the way it is discussed in certain works of literature. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 5 minutes: Journal (About a time when you have experienced violence) 10 minutes: Small group discussion sharing journals 30 minutes: Read Scene 1/ Assign Scene 2 for homework 7 minutes: Begin discussing outline of the history of Shakespeare to familiarize students with the time period of the text and the author.
Shakespeare Notes I. Biography A. Born in 1564/Died April 23, 1616 (rumored to be his birthday) B. Born in Stratford-upon-Avon C. Thought to have attended Stratford Grammar School (he left school at the age of fifteen and never pursued further formal education) D. Married Anne Hathaway at the age of eighteen (she was eight years older) 1. She gave birth to his first daughter six months later 2. Two years later they had twins (one of which was a son who died at eleven) 3. Five years after his marriage to Anne Hathaway Shakespeare moved to London E. Began working at the Globe Theatre F. He first appeared as a poet in 1593 with "Venus" and "Adonis" G. 36 of Shakespeare's 38 plays were published in the 1st Folio of 1623 H. Retired in 1611 and moved back to Stratford I. Buried in the Church of the Holy Trinity in 1616 1. Died after an evening's drinking with some theatre friends 2. Gravestone says: "Good frend for Jesus sake forebeare, To dig the dust encloased heare, Bleste be ye man yt spares these stones, And curst be he yt moves my bones. J. Bard of Avon=poet of Avon II. Shakespeare's World A. Elizabethan Age 1. Queen Elizabeth I 2. Great Virgin Queen/ruled 1558-1603 B. Age of Discovery 1. Pursuit of scientific knowledge and the exploration of human nature 2. Assumptions concerning feudalism openly challenged (optimism concerning humanity) C. Shakespeare's works deal with civil harmony, either restoring or maintaining it 1. War of the Roses (Lancaster v. York) D. The Reformation 1. England is a Protestant/Anglican country 2. Continuous religious strife 3. Queen Margaret/"Bloody Mary"=Catholic sister of Elizabeth E. The Renaissance 1. The cultural rebirth of Europe (14th-17th centuries) 2. Based on the rediscovery of the literature of Greece and Rome 3. Music of Shakespeare=Baroque a. Strings, woodwinds and brass b. Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Corelli
III. The Globe A. Shakespeare's Globe Theatre was built in 1598 in the Bankside district of London B. Open-air octagonal amphitheater that could seat up to 3000 C. All shows occurred during the day (no lighting) D. No scene changes (props and costumes used) E. The "pit" is the floor surrounding the stage where "one-penny" spectators stood F. Brought together social elite and common drunks G. "Principal Actors" 1. Richard Burbage=most significant tragedian of Elizabethan stage 2. Initiated performances of "Hamlet, Lear, and Othello 3. Shakespeare wrote many tragic hero roles with Burbage in mind 4. Will Kemp=leading comic actor 5. Shakespeare as an actor=do not over-estimate, playwright and producer take precedence H. 1613 the Globe Theatre burned down 1. Thought to be caused by a canon in a performance of Henry VII I. New Globe built and operated until 1642 1. Puritans closed it down 2. 1644 the Globe was torn down by Cromwell's orders and tenements were constructed J. The new Globe Theatre opened in May 1997 by Queen Elizabeth II
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 1, Day 3 Concept / Topic to Teach: History of Shakespeare and the time period. Study Shakespearean language. Standards Addressed: Expand vocabulary through reading, etymology and the use of dictionaries and other references (QCC) (LA09_C1998-17) Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, electronic and other references to identify word meanings (QCC) (LA09_C1998-23) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) General Goal(s): To familiarize students with the historical significance of R & J and introduce the students to Shakespearean language. Specific Objectives: Briefly discuss Scene 2. Finish history lecture. Introduce Shakespeare dictionary assignment. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, construction paper, glue, markers, scissors, ribbon, and notebook paper, cd player (listen to Baroque music while creating dictionaries) Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Discuss marriage in Renaissance Italy and how this is pertinent in R & J. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 10 minutes: Discuss as a class Scene 2, marriage, love, and Elizabethan comic relief 20 minutes: Finish discussing Shakespeare history (view yesterday's lesson plans) 20 minutes: Show example of Shakespeare dictionary. Explain activity and divide into groups of four or five and assign words to define. Begin working. 2 minutes: Clean up and no homework.
Marriage, Love, and Elizabethan comic relief · Through the examination of arts and entertainment, much can be learned about people. · Theater, for example, is a mirror of the people and society from which it springs. · Through the ages, plays have been used as forms of worship, educational tools, forces for political and social change, forms of personal expression, and sources of entertainment. · Music, poetry, literature and drama flourished under Elizabeth's reign, largely due to the Queen's love of the arts. · During this time, young women (like Juliet) were controlled specifically by their fathers. They were expected to marry within their own class. This play is a reflection of the time in which it was written. · The women's say so in whom they wanted to marry was only a mention. Juliet's father says "My will to her consent is but a part" [I.ii.15]. · Many marriages were simply arranged and there was nothing that could be done about it. · Love was not really known back then, or at least it did not matter. Marriages were arranged in order to promote status and wealth within families, like the Capulets. · Comic relief is defined in a tragedy as a short comic scene that releases some of the builtup tension of the play - giving the audience a momentary "relief" before the tension mounts higher. · Note in Scene three the comedy of the nurse. - The nurse's low-end humor (sexual punning) - Being a servant she has no social etiquette - "I would say thou hads't suck'd wisdom from thy teat" [I.iii.76] · In the best tragedies, comic relief also provides an ironic counterpoint to the tragic action.
Shakespearean Dictionary Project Assignment: For this project you will work in groups and pick five words from the list below to create an illustrated Shakespearean dictionary. This dictionary will help in understanding the language presented in Shakespeare's works for a better overall concept of their meanings. Requirements: Each page will contain one word and its definition. Each page will be neatly and appropriately illustrated. The dictionary will contain a cover page, designed with input from the entire class. Please come prepared with the appropriate materials (crayons, markers, glue, construction paper, etc.). Each group will present their words to the class, and at the end of the period you will assemble them into your own dictionary. *You will be graded on thoroughness, neatness, creativity, and illustration.
`tis gi' e'er e'en coy prevailment collied aby afeard on
Word List: (pick 5 per group)
ope ne'er oft new square beteem eyne wot in against
o'er i' a' fair waxen an neaf upon to anon
Teacher Copy Shakespearean Dictionary Project Assignment: For this project you will work in groups and pick five words from the list below to create an illustrated Shakespearean dictionary. This dictionary will help in understanding the language presented in Shakespeare's works for a better overall concept of their meanings. Requirements: Each page will contain one word and its definition. Each page will be neatly and appropriately illustrated. The dictionary will contain a cover page, designed with input from the entire class. Please come prepared with the appropriate materials (crayons, markers, glue, construction paper, etc.). Each group will present their words to the class, and at the end of the period you will assemble them into your own dictionary. *You will be graded on thoroughness, neatness, creativity, and illustration.
`tis- it is gi'- give e'er- ever e'en- even coy- to caress prevailment- power collied- darkened aby- atone, to pay for afeard- afraid on- of
Word List: (pick 5 per group)
ope- open ne'er- never oft- often new- newly square- to fight, quarrel beteem- allow eyne- eyes wot- know in- on against- in anticipation from
o'er- over i'- in a'- he fair- beauty waxen- to increase an- if neaf- fist upon- by to- in anon- presently
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 1, Day 4 Concept / Topic to Teach: Shakespearean language Standards Addressed: Expand vocabulary through reading, etymology and the use of dictionaries and other references (QCC) (LA09_C1998-17) General Goal(s): Discuss the Shakespearean language. Specific Objectives: Finish Shakespeare dictionary assignment. Share with class. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, construction paper, glue, markers, scissors, ribbon, and notebook paper, cd player (listen to Baroque music while finishing dictionaries) Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Divide into groups from yesterday and finish the dictionaries. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 25 minutes: Finish dictionaries 25 minutes: Share the terms with the class and copy them into personal dictionaries. 2 minutes: Read Act 1, Scene 3 for homework
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 1, Day 5
Concept / Topic to Teach: Arranged Marriage
Standards Addressed: Read orally with appropriate fluency and phrasing
(LA09_B1998-15)
Read for a
purpose; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate
ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-6)
General Goal(s): Discuss comic relief (the nurse) and its relevance, along with arranged marriage. Analyze and discuss Mercutio's "Queen Mab" speech and its significance (Scene 4).
Specific Objectives: Discuss Act 1, Scene 3 and begin Scene 4
Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader
Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Journal (Write about your views on arranged marriage. Can you imagine not choosing your mate?)
Step-By-Step Procedures:
3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping
5 minutes: Journal (Arranged marriage)
20 minutes: Class debate about arranged marriage. Divide class into two groups and assign pro and con. Allow about 5 minutes to prepare arguments and rebuttals.
25 minutes: Read Scene 4 aloud (discuss "Queen Mab" speech together)
2 minutes: Read Scene 5 for homework
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 2, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: Shakespeare Literary Terms Standards Addressed: Use phonetic respelling, key words and diacritics to pronounce unknown words (QCC) (LA09_C1998-22) Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, electronic and other references to identify word meanings (QCC) (LA09_C1998-3) General Goal(s): To familiarize students with Shakespeare Literary Terms. Specific Objectives: Go over literary terms. Play small group "Memory" game with literary terms. Groups make the cards themselves and then play the game "Memory" matching the term with the definition. Required Materials: Literary term list, note cards, markers Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Pass out literary terms handout Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 10 minutes: Pass out and review Shakespeare Literary Terms 40 minutes: Divide students into groups of 4. Have them create "Memory" cards with the terms. The term should be on one card and the definition on the other. The object is to match the term with the definition through remembering their placement. Allow a maximum of 10 minutes to create the cards. The other 30 should be spent playing the game. 2 minutes: Clean up and make sure students have read Act I
Shakespeare Literary Terms Drama-a story written to be acted for an audience Tragedy-a play, novel, or other narrative that depicts serious and important events in which the main character comes to an unhappy end Prologue-a short introduction at the beginning of a play that gives a brief overview of the plot Sonnet-fourteen-line lyric poem that is usually written in iambic pentameter and that has one of several rhyme schemes (Shakespearean-3 four-line units or quatrains, followed by a concluding two-line unit, or couplet; abab cdcd efef gg) Prose-direct, unadorned form of language, written or spoken, in ordinary use Chorus-a group who says things at the same time Anachronism-event or detail that is inappropriate for the time period Verbal irony-a writer or speaker says one thing, but really means something completely different Dramatic irony-the audience or reader knows something important that a character in a play or story does not know Monologue-a speech by one character in a play Soliloquy-an unusually long speech in which a character who is on stage alone expresses his or her thoughts aloud Foil-character who is used as a contrast to another character; writer sets off/intensifies the qualities of 2 characters this way Oxymoron-a combination of contradictory terms (EX: jumbo shrimp) Aside-words that are spoken by a character in a play to the audience or to another character but that are not supposed to be overheard by the others onstage Pun-a play on the multiple meanings of a word, or on two words that sound alike but have different meanings Comic relief-humor added that lessens the seriousness of a plot Static character-character who does not change much in the course of a story Dynamic character-character who changes as a result of the story's events Blank ("unrhymed"-no rhyme at the end of lines) Verse-poetry written in unrhymed iambic pentameter ("pent"=5; "meter"=measure); each line of poetry contains 5 iambs, or metrical feet, that consist of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable Couplet-two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme; couplets often signal the EXIT of a character or end of a scene
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet Week 2, Day 2 Concept / Topic to teach: R & J in review- Act I and its important scenes. Further explore Shakespeare's language through couplets (see handout). Standards Addressed: Acquire increased vocabulary through listening and demonstrate that vocabulary through speaking (QCC, CE) (LA09_A1998-4) Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT1, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Analyze relationship between plot and theme in a work (QCC, HSGT, SAT1) (LA09_D1998-25) General Goal(s): Students will review Act I and discuss puns, foil characters, iambic pentameter, rhymed verse, symbolized love, and comic relief. In addition they will be taught what couplets are and how to break down syntax or word order in order to understand what Shakespeare is saying. Specific Objectives: Review Act I (class discussion) and answer questions students may have. Go over iambic pentameter and couplets in order for students to understand Shakespeare's verse. Hand out comparison/contrast sheets and fill out Act I sections (prologue and fight scene) Required Materials: Text, handouts Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Begin by asking if anyone has questions about Act I, specific scenes. We will go scene by scene to summarize and pick out important lines. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 45 minutes: Class discussion and summarization of Act One (see handout). During the review a mini-lesson on iambic pentameter and couplets will be covered depending on when questions arise (10 minutes) (attached). 7 minutes: Wrap up and pass out compare/contrast sheet. Begin filling out Act I sections and finish for homework (prologue and fight scene)
UNDERSTANDING SHAKESPEARE'S LANGUAGE All your questions answered and the mystery unraveled! Blank ("unrhymed"--no rhyme at the end of lines) Verse: Poetry written in unrhymed iambic pentameter Iambic Pentameter ("pent"=five) ("meter"=measure): a line of poetry that contains 5 iambs Iamb: a metrical foot, or unit of measure, that consists of an unstressed syllable EX: It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear. EX: But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? Couplets: When Shakespeare rhymes, he usually uses couplets-2 consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme. Couplets usually occur at the end of a scene or when a character leaves the scene. EX: Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow That I shall say good night till it be morrow. Shakespearean Syntax (Word Order): Notice the following 6 sentences: I ate the sandwich. I the sandwich ate. Ate the sandwich I. Ate I the sandwich. The sandwich I ate. The sandwich ate I. Four words can create six unique sentences which carry the same meaning. When you are reading Shakespeare, look for his unusual word arrangement. Locate the subject verb, and object of the sentence. Notice that the object of the sentence is often placed at the beginning in front of the verb and the subject. This should help with making sense of Shakespeare.
Think about how the characters are portrayed, how the lines are delivered, the themes, and the basic similarities and differences in each major scene listed below.
Text Version
Zeffirelli Version
Luhrmann Version
Prologue
Fight Scene
Text Version
Zeffirelli Version Party Scene
Luhrmann Version
Balcony Scene
Text Version
Zeffirelli Version Wedding Scene
Luhrmann Version
Confession Scene
Text Version
Zeffirelli Version Death Scene
Luhrmann Version
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet Week 2, Day 3 Concept / Topic to teach: How to Compare / Contrast Standards Addressed: Write to compare and contrast objects, groups, or concepts (QCC, SAT1, CE) (LA09_E1998-41) General Goals: To learn how to compare and contrast Specific Objectives: Hand out compare/contrast sheets. Divide into groups of three-four and assign each group a topic to compare / contrast. Each group will make a bulleted list of similarities and differences. Watch Luhrmann and Zeffirelli movies up until Romeo and Juliet meet. Discuss similarities and differences in the two films. Fill in compare/contrast sheets from Tuesday for homework. Required Materials: TV, DVD player, Zeffirelli and Luhrmann DVDs, and compare / contrast instructions and handouts Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Set up compare/contrast scenario for students- Teacher will compare cats to dogs. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 10 minutes: Mini lesson on comparing and contrasting cats and dogs 20 minutes: Hand out instructions, divide into groups of three-four, assign each group their topic (see attached), and create a bulleted list. Collect for a daily grade. 10 minutes: Watch Zeffirelli version of prologue and fight scene (fill in sheet) 10 minutes: Watch Luhrmann version of prologue and fight scene (fill in sheet) 2 minutes: Wrap up and finish for homework
Comparison/Contrast Prewriting You have probably engaged in comparison and contrast quite often. People frequently discuss which is better, one movie or another; which restaurant has the best food and service; which teacher is the hardest; which computer they would rather use; and so on. In order to do so, they compare (that is, examine the cases to see what they have in common) and contrast (identify ways in which they are different). The following procedures will help you engage in comparison/contrast tasks. 1. Get into groups of three-four and compare and contrast two fast food restaurants. 2. Think of areas in which you can compare and contrast the two restaurants. For instance, let's say you choose to compare McDonald's fries to Burger King's fries. You might look to compare and contrast the taste, saltiness, texture, and appearance. What areas of comparison can you think of for two items you are thinking about? 3. Think about how your two items measure up in each area of comparison you have identified. Make a bulleted list, diagram, or paragraph of how the items compare and contrast to each other. Have one copy per group.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet Week 2, Day 4 Concept / Topic to teach: Compare and contrast along with reading Act II Scene I Standards Addressed: Write to compare and contrast objects, groups, or concepts (QCC, SAT1, CE) (LA09_E1998-41) Read for a purpose; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT1, ACT, CE) (LAT1_B2001-7) General Goals: To familiarize students with different interpretations of the play. Specific Objectives: Watch the party scene from both movies. Read Act II Scene I as a class. Required Materials: TV, DVD player, Zeffirelli and Luhrmann DVDs, and Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Have students fill in compare/contrast sheets for the party scene (Act I Scene V) Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 10 minutes: Fill in compare/contrast sheets of the text 10 minutes: Watch Zeffirelli version of party scene and fill in c/c sheet 10 minutes: Watch Luhrmann version of party scene and fill in c/c sheet 20 minutes: Read Act II Scenes I and II as a class. Point out that the last line of Scene I and first line of Scene II make a rhyming couplet. (Benvolio says, "To seek him here that means not to be found" ­ Romeo says, "He jests at scars that never felt a wound") 2 minutes: Wrap up
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet Week 2, Day 5 Concept / Topic to Teach: Shakespearean sonnet Standards Addressed: Listen to, read and identify characteristics of various genres including drama, novels, short stories, poetry, non-fiction, Technical Writing, and satire (QCC, HSGT,SAT1, ACT) (LAT1_D2001-24) General Goals: To understand and be able to interpret the Shakespearean sonnet Specific Objectives: To differentiate Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnet. Have students determine rhyme scheme for the Shakespearean sonnet. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader and sonnet handout (see attached) Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Explain the difference between Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnets Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 7 minutes: Explain sonnets 40 minutes: Pass out sonnet form in dialogue sheets. Review and explain rhyme scheme. Complete worksheets in pairs. 5 minutes: Go over correct answers
Sonnet Form in Dialogue
Reread the lines below which form a type of contest of wit between Romeo and Juliet in their first meeting. Then read the information on the background of the sonnet and follow the directions for analysis.
Romeo: Juliet: Romeo: Juliet: Romeo: Juliet: Romeo:
If I profane with my unworthiest hand. This holy shrine, the gentle sin in this. My lips two blushing pilgrims ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much. Which mannerly devotion shows in this: For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch. And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss. Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? Aye, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do. They pray: grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake. Then move not while my prayers' effect I take.
The sonnet as a form developed in Italy in the thirteenth century. A century later, Petrarch raised it to its greatest perfection and gave it his own name (the Petrarchan sonnet). Wyatt and Surrey introduced the form to England, but because the rhyme pattern was too confining for English (the Italians allowed no more than five rhymes), it was modified. Because Shakespeare achieved greatest fame with the English sonnet, his name became attached (the Shakespearean sonnet). The petrarchan form consists of two divisions: eight lines with a rhyme scheme of abba abba (called an octave) and six lines with varying pattern of ced cec or cde cde (called a sestet).
The Shakespearean form consists of four divisions: three sets of four lines each (called quatrains) and a pair of rhyming lines (called a couplet) with a usual rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efef gg.
Meter for both sonnet forms is usually iambic pentameter which consists of five metrical feet with each foot having an unstressed, stressed pattern.
Analysis 1. Mark the rhyme scheme with letters at the end of each line. 2. Grammatically divide the poem into sections. 3. Scan several lines of poetry to determine the meter. Mark the iambs. 4. Underline all the words which relate to the metaphor of the pilgrim approaching the shrine.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 3, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: Teaching students to read in pairs and how to reword what is written in modern English. Standards Addressed: Read for a purpose; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-6) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Establish voice through tone, word choice, rhetorical devices and literary devices (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_E2003-1) General Goal(s): To have students make sense of what they are reading. Specific Objectives: Read Act 2, Scene 3 in pairs. Have students rewrite the scene in pairs using modern English. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, Paper and Pencil Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Quickly recap as a class what has happened so far and prepare them for Romeo's visit to Friar Laurence. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 5 minutes: Recap Act 2, Scene 2 as a class 30 minutes: Divide into pairs and read Act 2, Scene 3 15 minutes: Rewrite Act 2, Scene 3 in pairs (pass out directions) 2 minutes: Finish rewriting scenes for homework and be prepared to read them in class
Rewriting Act 2, Scene 3 While reading this scene in pairs, one of you took on the role as Romeo and the other Friar Lawrence. Imagine how their conversation would be different today. Rewrite this scene in modern English. The plot should not change, only the way it is written (Think about the setting. Are they in Brooklyn or South Georgia?). Be creative! ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 3, Day 2 Concept / Topic to Teach: Public speaking Standards Addressed: Speak in a clear, understandable manner (QCC, CE) (LA09_A1998-2) Recognize speaker's purpose and identify verbal and nonverbal components of communication (QCC, CE) (LA09_A1998-5) General Goal(s): To prepare students for reading in front of an audience. Specific Objectives: Have students act out their versions of Act 2, Scene 3 for the class. Begin reading Scene 4 as a class. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Have students review their re-written scenes. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 5 minutes: Students break into pairs and review the re-written version of Act 2, Scene 3 that they wrote yesterday. 45 minutes: Students either read or act out their scenes for the class. 2 minutes: Any extra class-time will be spent reading Act 2, Scene 4 and students must finish this for homework.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 3, Day 3 Concept / Topic to Teach: Examine the types of love in R & J and find textual examples Standards Addressed: Prewrite to generate ideas for writing (QCC) (LA09_E1998-32) General Goal(s): To learn the different types of love found in the play (unrequited, romantic, parental, friendship, love of family honor). Specific Objectives: Students will brainstorm the types of love they see represented by characters in the play (thus far). They will work in pairs to find examples of the different types of love from the text. These will then be cited on the board (categorically). Required Materials: Text, Handout of types of love Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Teacher will cite example of unrequited love from play (Romeo's crush on Rosaline, "She has forsworn to love, and in that vow/ Do I live dead that live to tell it now" (1.1.231-2)) Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 10 minutes: Pass out sheet and explain kinds of love (attached) 25 minutes: Work in pairs to find examples of each kind of love 15 minutes: Come together as a class and have students write examples on the board 2 minutes: Be prepared to write compare/contrast essay tomorrow.
Types of Love in Romeo and Juliet (Acts I and II) Unrequited Love: Romeo for Rosaline, Paris for Juliet Romantic Love: Romeo and Juliet Parental Love: Lord and Lady Capulet for Juliet, Lord and Lady Montague for Romeo, Nurse for Juliet Friendship: Romeo and Benvolio, Romeo and Mercutio, Romeo and Friar Laurence, Nurse and Juliet Love of Family Honor: Tybalt, Mercutio, Romeo Cite examples from the text. Be sure to include where you found the quote (Act, scene, line number). Be prepared to explain how the quote is representative of the specific type of love. Unrequited Love: Romantic Love: Parental Love:
Friendship: Love of Family Honor:
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet Week 3, Day 4 Concept / Topic to Teach: Assign essay on comparing/contrasting two types of love (students choose). Standards Addressed: Write and support thesis statements (QCC, SAT 1, ACT) (LA09_E1998-37) Write to compare and contrast objects, groups, or concepts (QCC, SAT 1, CE) (LA09_E1998-41) Use available technology to assist in writing (QCC) (LA09_E1998-48) General Goals: To display an understanding of the different types of love covered in the play through writing a compare/contrast essay. Specific Objectives: Students will type an essay in the computer lab on (their choice) two types of love discussed in class the previous day (unrequited, romantic, parental, friendship, and love of family honor). They will cite one example (from R & J) from both types of love in their paper. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader and computer lab Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Reread the example from class on Friday about Romeo and Rosaline. Go over their notes on the types of love. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 10 minutes: Reread example from class and review the five different types of love. 40 minutes: Have students quietly type their compare/contrast essays. 2 minutes: Take up essays.
Format for Compare/Contrast Essay Introduction Background information as to why you chose the two types of love Purpose / Focus of essay First Body Paragraph First type of love description and quote from play Second Body Paragraph Second type of love description and quote from play Third Body Paragraph Similarities between the two Fourth Body Paragraph Differences between the two Conclusion Summarize main points * Remember to include important character information with your quotes from the text.
Rubric for Compare/Contrast Essay This Is A Test Grade! An A paper will exhibit: · Two types of love taught in class · Knowledge in comparing/contrasting two items · Correct format for paper (including introduction, thesis, and conclusion) · Relevant and creative examples from the text A B paper will exhibit: · Two types of love taught in class · Some knowledge of how to compare/contrast two items · Correct format for paper (including introduction, thesis, and conclusion) · Knowledge of the text is not exhibited as clearly, yet is creative A C paper will exhibit: · Two types of love taught in class · No real understanding of comparing/contrasting two items · Format for essay is incorrect · Knowledge of the text is not exhibited
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 3, Day 5 Concept / Topic to Teach: Discuss character. Standards Addressed: Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I , ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) Document sources of quotations, ideas and facts (QCC, SAT I) (LA09_E1998-45) Develop a central idea with examples, illustrations, facts and details (QCC, SAT I, ACT) (LA09_E1998-38) General Goal(s): To have students begin thinking about a character that interests them and the qualities related to that person. Specific Objectives: Pass out and explain Venn Diagrams. Read Act 2, Scene 5. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, Venn Diagrams Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Journal: Are you skeptical of Romeo's love for Juliet. Why or why not? Provide evidence from the text. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 10 minutes: Journals: (Skepticism about Romeo's love) 10 minutes: Read Act 2, Scene 5 aloud as a class 30 minutes: Pass out and explain Venn Diagrams. Students must pick a character and start working on these. 2 minutes: Assign Act 2, Scene 6 for homework.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 4, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: How scenes can be interpreted in multiple ways. Standards Addressed: Analyze relationship between plot and theme in a work (QCC, HSGT, SAT I) (LA09_D1998-25) Take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (QCC, SAT I) (LA09-G1998-65) Outline information (QCC) (LA09_G1998-69) General Goal(s): To have students compare different interpretations of the balcony and wedding scenes. Specific Objectives: Watch Luhrmann's and Zeffirelli's versions of the balcony and wedding scenes. Have students write down characteristics of these scenes in relation to what they expected in the play. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, television, DVD player, Luhrmann's and Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet DVD's Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Students review the balcony and wedding scenes (Act 2, Scene 2 and Act 2, Scene 6) in Romeo and Juliet and write down characteristics about these scenes presented in the play (they have a handout). Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 10 minutes: Review Act 2, Scenes 2 & 6 and take notes on handout 20 minutes: Watch Act 2, Scenes 2 & 6 in the Luhrmann movie and take notes on handout 20 minutes: Watch Act 2, Scenes 2 & 6 in the Zeffirelli movie and take notes on handout 2 minutes: Read Act 3, Scene 1 for homework
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 4, Day 2 Concept / Topic to Teach: Understanding character Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) General Goal(s): To begin working on body biographies based on the information written on student's character Venn diagrams. Specific Objectives: Take a quiz on Act 3, Scene 1 to ensure students have read. Divide students into groups based on the characters they used for their Ven diagrams (around 4 students per group). Begin body biographies. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, markers, butcher paper, CD player (play Baroque music softly while students work in groups) Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Quiz over Act 3, Scene 1 Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 5 minutes: Quiz over Act 3, Scene 1 5 minutes: Have students take out their character Venn diagrams and divide into groups (about 4 people) with people who chose the same character. 40 minutes: Pass out body biography rubrics and directions. Pass out butcher paper. Groups begin drawing their body-biographies. Remember that there must be evidence for all traits cited and quotes should be included (page numbers are important). 2 minutes: Clean up and read Act 3, Scene 2 for homework
Quiz Act 3, Scene 1 Briefly summarize what happened in Act 3, Scene 1 (2-4 sentences). How could the events that occurred in this scene change Romeo and Juliet's relationship (what do you think)?
Body Biography (Test Grade!!!) For your chosen character, your group will be creating a body-biography. This is a visual and written portrait illustrating several aspects of the character's life within the play. Usually students trace someone in the group and use this outline to represent the character. Drawings and writings are both inside and surrounding the character. You have many possibilities for filling up your giant sheet of paper. Listed are several ideas, but you are encouraged to come up with your own. The choices must be based on the text because you will be explaining them at a showing of your work. Above all, your choices should be creative, analytical, and accurate. When presenting or showing your work to the class certain objectives must be accomplished. Your body-biography should: · Review significant events, choices and changes involving your character · Communicate to us the full essence of your character by emphasizing the traits the maker her/him who s/he is · Promote discussion of your character Body Biography Requirements Your portrait must contain: · A review of significant happenings in the play thus far · Visual symbols · An original text (creative writings by the group: poem, letter, etc.) · Your character's three most important lines from the play Body Biography Suggestions 1. Placement-Think about where symbols and dialogue are placed. For example, the area where your character's heart would be might be appropriate for illustrating the important relationships within his or her life. 2. Spine-A character's spine is his/her objective within the play. What is the most important goal for your character? What drives his/her thoughts and actions? This is her/his spine. 3. Virtues and Vices-What are your character's most admirable and worst qualities? How can you visualize them? 4. Color-Colors are often symbolic. What color(s) do you most associate with your character? Why? How can these be effectively presented in your body biography? 5. Symbols-What objects can you associate with your character that illustrate her/his essence? Are there objects mentioned in the play or additional ones that seem to correspond with the character? 6. Mirror, Mirror-Consider both how your character appears to others on the surface and what you know about the character's inner self. Do these images clash or correspond? What does this tell you about the character? 7. Changes-How has your character changed within the play? Visualize or trace these changes. (Smagorinsky, 2002, 264-265)
Body Biography Rubric (Test Grade) An A Body Biography: · Contains all 4 body biography requirements (a review of significant happenings of the play, visual symbols, an original text, your character's three most important lines from the play) · Is an accurate depiction of the character (based on evidence from the play) · Creatively represents character traits and actions · Exemplifies ideas or issues that go beyond the text (gender issues, marital and love issues, gang and family loyalty issues, issues of violence) and stimulates discussion during your presentation · Prepared to explain and answer questions about you body biography during your presentation A B Body Biography: · Contains all 4 body biography requirements · Is an accurate depiction of character · Character traits and actions are represented, but not very creatively · Touches on ideas or issues that go beyond the text · Somewhat prepared to explain and answer questions about your body biography during your presentation A C Body Biography: · Contains only 3 body biography requirements · Does not accurately depict the character · Character traits and actions are not represented creatively. They seem thrown together and not thought out. · Does not connect to ideas or issues that go beyond the text · Not prepared to explain or answer questions about your body biography during your presentation
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 4, Day 3 Concept / Topic to Teach: Understanding character Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) General Goal(s): To complete body biographies. Specific Objectives: Finish body biographies and prepare students for presenting them. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, butcher paper, markers, CD player (listen to Baroque music) Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Collect body biographies from yesterday and divide into groups. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 50 minutes: Finish body biographies and be prepared to present them tomorrow. 2 minutes: Clean up and read Act 3, Scene 3 for homework
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 4, Day 4 Concept / Topic to Teach: Presenting and explaining ideas Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) General Goal(s): To teach students how to defend ideas and support them with evidence from the play. To prepare students for presentations. Specific Objectives: Have students present their body biographies. Required Materials: Body biographies Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Divide into their groups and look over their body biographies. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping (have students divide into groups) 50 minutes: Present body biographies 2 minutes: Make sure students are prepared to discuss Act III through Scene III tomorrow.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 4, Day 5 Concept / Topic to Teach: Act III, Scenes I-III Standards Addressed: Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT< SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) General Goal(s): To ensure student's understanding of Act III, Scenes I-III Specific Objectives: Divide class into three groups. Each group is responsible for covering important events of one of the scenes. They present the information to the class and then as a group we will add to and discuss what is said. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Write about a time when you were separated from someone you love or care about. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 5 minutes: Journal (Write about a time when you were separated from someone you love or care about.) 15 minutes: Divide class into three groups. Each group covers one scene from Act III. 15 minutes: Groups present their findings to the class. Class discussion 15 minutes: Read Act III, Scene IV as a class 2 minutes: Finish for homework (Get caught up on reading!)
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 5, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: Discussion of Act III Scene V Standards Addressed: Read for a purpose; Expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT1, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-6) General Goal(s): To gain understandings of how much effect parental control and arranged marriage have on the young lovers at this point in the play. Specific Objectives: Complete the "we know" activity (see attached) followed by students' reading aloud and discussing Scene V Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): "We know" activity Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 15 minutes: "We know" activity (write on board and have students take notes) 5 minutes: Journal: (What do you think will happen next?) 30 minutes: Read Act III Scene V aloud with class. 2 minutes: Wrap up. Read Act IV, Scene I for HW
(Teacher Copy) Write this title What We Know on the board in front of the class. These are things and ideas that we know about going into Act III Scene V. This activity is to serve the purpose of understanding where the young lovers are in their time together in reference to the final outcome. This will also help us see that though Juliet's marriage to Paris has already been arranged, that she does not know it yet. This will help us all led into Scene V. Encourage the class to come up with these on their own. Give hints or ideas if there is no feedback, but try not to give them the answers. · Romeo and Juliet have been married to each other now by Friar Laurence · No one knows of this marriage · Tybalt was slain by Romeo · Romeo has been banished from Verona for the death of Tybalt · Romeo has made plans with Friar Laurence to escape to Mantua until the whole thing blows over · Meanwhile, Juliet is heartbroken for having lost her cousin Tybalt, but knows that her loyalty now lies with her husband · Juliet has been given to Paris for marriage by her father · Juliet has no knowledge of her arranged marriage to Paris as she mourns both her cousins' death and the banishment of Romeo What do you think will happen next?
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 5, Day 2 Concept / Topic to Teach: Act IV Standards Addressed: Read for a purpose, expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT 1, ACT, CE) (LAT1_B2001-7) General Goal(s): That the students will gain a better understanding of what is most important to Romeo and Juliet at this point in the play Specific Objectives: Discuss Scene I and read aloud scenes II & III. Scene V is read silently. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): What would you do journal? (Directions below) Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 7 minutes: What would you do journal? Paris tries to hurry the date of the wedding in the hope of cheering up Juliet, yet she still denies him. If you were to be forcibly married to someone who you disliked, what would you do? 5 minutes: Group discussion of Act V Scene I 35 minutes: Read Act IV Scene II and III in class as a group. Cut Scene IV (it is an option but not required reading) and have students read Scene V silently. Talk about the whole of Act IV in terms of the Friar's plan for Juliet. Do you think it will work? What would you have done differently if you were in her place? 5 minutes: Be prepared with compare/contrast sheet for movies tomorrow
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 5, Day 3 Concept / Topic to Teach: Compare/Contrast the two movies Standards Addressed: Write to compare and contrast objects, groups, or concepts (QCC, SAT1, CE) (LA09_E1998-40) General Goal(s): To help the students relate to Juliet when she chooses to take the vial of medicine given to her by Friar Laurence Specific Objectives: Watch the two movie versions of Act IV Scene I (the confession scene) and compare/contrast the two versions Required Materials: TV, DVD player and Romeo and Juliet 1968 DVD, 1996 DVD, and comparison/contrast sheet from portfolio Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Discussion of journal from yesterday: If you were to be forcibly married to someone who you disliked, what would you do? Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 5 minutes: Lead in from prior journal and prepare for the intensity of this scene 15 minutes: Watch Zeffirelli version of Act IV Scene I and fill in sheet 15 minutes: Watch Luhrmann version of Act IV Scene I and fill in sheet 10 minutes: Read Act V, Scene I as a group aloud 2 minutes: Read Act V, Scene II for HW
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 5, Day 4 Concept / Topic to Teach: Discuss the climax of the play, Act V, Scene III Standards Addressed: Read for a purpose; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions or to stimulate ideas (QCC, HSGT, SAT 1, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-6) General Goal(s): To finish the play. Specific Objectives: Read Act V, Scene III. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Discuss how the climax of the play is in the very last scene rather than in the middle of the text. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 40 minutes: Read and discuss Act V Scene III. 10 minutes: Begin discussing how the feud was resolved. The youth set the adult world straight. Was it worth it? 2 minutes: Wrap up and come prepared for movies with compare/contrast sheets
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet Week 5, Day 5 Concept / Topic to Teach: Compare and Contrast movies. Tie the play together with journal. Standards Addressed: Write to compare and contrast objects, groups, or concepts (QCC, SAT1, CE) (LA09_E1998-40) General Goal(s): Have a greater understanding of the major themes in the play (types of love) and the ability to relate them to everyday life. Specific Objectives: Watch the death scenes and write the journal. Required Materials: TV, DVD player, both DVDs Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Write journal in response to character death Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance and housekeeping 15 minutes: Write journal. Assignment: Six people died in Romeo and Juliet, all died from love. The Prince states at the end of the play "See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, / That Heaven finds means to kill your joys with love," (5.3.302-3). Write a short response journal on which death(s) affected you the most. 15 minutes: Watch Zeffirelli version of death scene and fill in sheets 15 minutes: Watch Luhrmann version of death scene and fill in sheets 5 minutes: Look over compare/contrast sheet for final turn in. Remember: This is 50% of your participation grade. 2 minutes: Be thinking about your favorite scene for the final project
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 6, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: Prepare students for Final Project Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) General Goal(s): To have students interpret a scene Specific Objectives: Go over Final Project goals. Pass out assignments and rubrics. Allow students time to decide which project they want to complete. Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet Red Reader, goals, rubrics, and assignments Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Pass out and go over the Final Project goals. Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 10 minutes: Pass out and go over Final Project goals 40 minutes: Pass out and explain assignment choices and rubrics. Allow students to decide which project they would like to do. They must pick the scene, project, and group members (if applicable) by tomorrow. 2 minutes: Prepare to work Final Project. They are due on Monday.
Romeo and Juliet: Final Project Goals This is 50% of your unit grade Throughout this unit we have studied multiple interpretations of the same work, Romeo and Juliet. We have looked at two movie versions, the Red Reader annotated notes, and worked individually, in groups and as a class, to create our own meaning of the work. In some cases, there has been disagreement concerning the interpretation of specific scenes. Your task is to rewrite, draw, or perform a scene of your choice from Romeo and Juliet to convey your understanding of the play. To do so, you must meet the following criteria: · Choose a scene from Romeo and Juliet with the teacher's approval. · Display knowledge of the scene. · Respond creatively to the scene through writing, visual art, or performance. These must show evidence of individuality, hard work, and an understanding of the scene. · If working in groups, delegate responsibilities. Who will provide props? Who will ensure that you stay on task? Who is a strong writer? Who is directing? What will everyone contribute? · Practice presentations or create rough drafts of writing and visual art. · Use the time provided in and out of class efficiently. This includes staying on task to ensure a well-thought-out product. · Turn in a one to two page paper explaining your decisions. If working in a group you must explain your contributions as well.
Final Project After having read and understood the play of Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare, your assignment is to choose one of the following options to display your knowledge or interpretation of one major scene from the play. The major scenes include the opening fight scene, the party scene, the balcony scene, and the death scene at the end of the play. (You may also choose a different major scene with my approval). There are three options as to how you may represent the scene. · Oral Presentation Choose a group with no more than four people. Select the scene of your choice and recreate it on video to be shown in class next Monday and Tuesday. You must follow the guidelines on the rubric and goals handouts. You will receive a group grade as well as an individual grade, so be sure that everyone participates! Have fun! · Re-Writing a Scene Individually or with a partner, you must re-write one of the scenes listed above by creating a different beginning, ending, or even time period. The possibilities are endless! You must write in dialogue using the same characters in the scene, but add your own twist! You must follow the guidelines on the rubric and goals handouts. If you choose to work with a partner, you will receive a group grade as well as an individual grade. · Visual Interpretation Calling all artists! Individually or with a partner you must represent one of the scenes listed above creatively through art. You may draw, build, use the computer, or sculpt. The possibilities are endless! You must follow the guidelines on the rubric and goals handouts. *Everyone Must Provide the Following! Every student must provide a written student rationale with their scene interpretation. If you are working in groups, everyone must still provide their individual rationale. Please follow the guidelines on the written student rationale rubric. This will ensure you an excellent grade! This is to show me what you have learned about your work on the scene and how well you worked with others (if in a group). I want you to provide your reasoning for the scene choice and the way you chose to respond. This counts for 50% of your unit grade!
Written Student Rationale Rubric
Teacher Name: Ms. Berry, Ms. Hummel, Ms. Donovan
Student Name: ________________________________________
CATEGORY Focus on Topic (Content) 60 %
4
3
2
1
The writer clearly
The writer explains The writer does not The writer does not
explains his/her
his/her reasons for clearly explain his/her explain his/her reasons
reasons for choosing a choosing a scene and reasons for choosing a for choosing a scene
scene and what his/her his/her contributions (if scene or his/her
or his/her contributions
contributions were to applicable), but not as contributions (if
(if applicable).
the group (if
clearly.
applicable).
applicable).
Grammar & Spelling (Conventions) 10%
Writer makes occasional proofreading errors or flaws. Writer manipulates mechanics for effect.
Writer makes limited Writer demonstrates
errors which are not mixture of correct and
severe enough to
incorrect elements.
interfere with meaning.
Errors interfere with understanding and are repeated and are severe.
Flow & Rhythm (Sentence Fluency) 10%
Writer exhibits extensive sentence variety in length, type, and sentence structure.
Writer demonstrates Writer demonstrates
variety in length and competence with
type of sentences.
simple sentences.
There may be
There is a mixture of
occasional run-ons or effective and
ineffective sentences, ineffective sentences.
but they do not detract
from the meaning.
Writer frequently uses fragments and runons. The sentences are not clear and detract from the meaning.
Transitions (Organization) 10%
A variety of thoughtful transitions are used. The paper reads smoothly.
Transitions clearly
Some transitions work
show how ideas and well; but connections
paragraphs are
between other ideas
connected, but there is are fuzzy.
little variety.
The transitions between ideas and paragraphs are unclear or nonexistent.
Word Choice 10%
Writer uses vivid words Writer uses vivid words Writer uses words that
and phrases that linger and phrases that linger communicate clearly,
or draw pictures in the or draw pictures in the but the writing lacks
reader's mind, and the reader's mind, but
variety, punch, or flair.
choice and placement occasionally the words
of the words seems are used inaccurately
accurate, natural, and or seem overdone.
not forced.
Writer uses a limited vocabulary that does not communicate strongly or capture the reader's interest. Jargon or clichйs may be present and detract from the meaning.
Your score is ______/100
Oral Presentation Rubric
Teacher Name: Ms. Berry, Ms. Hummel, Ms. Donovan
Student Name: _____________________________
CATEGORY Content 60%
4 Shows a full understanding of the topic.
3 Shows a good understanding of the topic.
2
1
Shows a good
Does not seem to
understanding of parts understand the topic
of the topic.
very well.
Props 10% Enthusiasm 10%
Student uses props (could include costume) that show considerable work/creativity and which make the presentation better.
Student uses prop(s) that show(s) some work/creativity and which make the presentation better.
Student uses prop(s) that makes the presentation a little better.
The student uses no prop(s) OR the prop(s) chosen detract from the presentation.
Facial expressions and Facial expressions and Facial expressions and Very little use of facial
body language
body language
body language do not expressions or body
generate a strong
sometimes generate a generate enthusiasm. language. Did not
interest and
strong interest and
generate much interest
enthusiasm about the enthusiasm about the
in topic being
topic.
topic.
presented.
Preparedness/ Group Dynamic 10% Clarity/ Volume/ Eye Contact 10%
Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. Group worked efficiently and every member contributed and was pertinent to the final product.
Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. Overall everyone worked together with little disagreement.
The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Student did not work well with group.
Student does not seem at all prepared to present. Obvious lack of effort was shown and the group members rely on basically one person to do everything.
Speaks clearly and distinctly all of the time. Conveys confidence. Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members all of the time. Establishes eye contact frequently with the camera and looks relaxed.
Speaks clearly and distinctly all of the time. Volume is loud enough to be heard at least 90% of the time. Establishes eye contact often.
Speaks clearly and distinctly most of the time. Volume is loud enough to be heard more than half of the time. Rarely looks at the camera.
Often mumbles or can not be understood. Volume is too soft to be heard by any audience members. Slouches, does not establish eye contact, and does not appear confident at all during the presentation.
Your score is _____/100
Rewritten Scene Rubric
Teacher Name: Ms. Berry, Ms. Hummel, Ms. Donovan
Student Name: ________________________________________
CATEGORY Creativity Dialogue
20 The scene contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination.
15 The scene contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination.
10 The scene contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination.
5 There is little evidence of creativity in the scene. The author does not seem to have used much imagination.
There is an
There is too much
appropriate amount of dialogue in this scene
dialogue to bring the interpretation, but it is
characters to life and it always clear which
is always clear which character is speaking.
character is speaking.
There is not quite
It is not clear which
enough dialogue in this character is speaking.
scene interpretation,
but it is always clear
which character is
speaking.
Content
Shows a full understanding of the scene.
Shows a good understanding of the scene.
Shows a good
Does not seem to
understanding of parts understand the scene
of the scene.
very well.
Preparedness/ Group Dynamic Vocabulary/ Grammar
Student is completely prepared and has obviously thought out the scene. Group worked efficiently and every member contributed.
Student seems pretty prepared and showed some thought about the scene. Everyone worked together with little disagreement.
The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that the scene required more thought. Student did not work well with group.
Student does not seem at all prepared. The student did not participate in the project.
Uses vocabulary and grammar appropriate for the scene and its context. Extends audience vocabulary by defining words that might be new to most of the audience.
Uses vocabulary and Uses vocabulary
Uses several (5 or
grammar appropriate appropriate for the
more) words or
for the scene and its audience. Does not phrases that are not
context. Includes 1-2 include any vocabulary understood by the
words that might be that might be new to audience.
new to most of the
the audience.
audience, but does not
define them.
Your score is _____/100
Visual Interpretation of Scene Rubric
Teacher Name: Ms. Berry, Ms. Hummel, Ms. Donovan
Student Name: ________________________________________
CATEGORY Creativity 60%
4
3
2
1
The visual
The visual
The visual
There is a lack of
interpretation is very interpretation is
interpretation is a little evidence of creativity
creative and displays a somewhat creative and creative and is
and thought in the
well-thought-out
displays a well-
somewhat thought-out. visual interpretation.
product.
thought-out product.
Description 10%
Presents a complete and detailed visual interpretation of the scene.
Presents a detailed Presents a detailed Does not present a
visual interpretation of visual interpretation of detailed interpretation
most of the scene.
some of the scene. of the scene.
Aesthetics 10%
Student's visual interpretation shows effort and is visually pleasing.
Student's visual interpretation shows some effort and is visually pleasing.
Student's visual interpretation shows some effort and is somewhat visually pleasing.
Student's visual interpretation does not show effort and is not visually pleasing.
Preparedness/ Group Dynamic 10%
Student is completely prepared. Group worked efficiently and every member contributed.
Student seemed pretty Student is somewhat
prepared. Group
prepared, but did not
worked together with work well with group
little disagreement. members.
Student does not seem at all prepared and did not participate in the project.
Interpretation 10%
Creates artwork exemplifying a unique and well thought out interpretation of the scene
Creates artwork exemplifying a somewhat unique and well thought out interpretation of the scene.
Creates artwork that is Creates artwork that
somewhat thought out exhibits neither
but is not a unique
uniqueness nor
interpretation of the thought in its
scene.
interpretation of the
scene.
Your score is _____/100
Group Evaluation
Your name: __________________________ Assignment: __________________________
Group member
Helpful? Yes or No
Participatory? Took Yes or No group off topic?
OVERALL 1-5
Comments (if any)
1- As though the person was not even there 2- Not helpful in the least, off task 3- Participated somewhat, but lacked focus 4- Helpful to the whole group 5- Was great to work with and contributed well
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo and Juliet, Week 6, Day 2 Concept / Topic to Teach: Final Project Standards Addressed: : Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) General Goal(s): To work on final project. Specific Objectives: Students divide into groups to work on Final Projects Required Materials: Romeo and Juliet text and Art & Writing Supplies Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Divide into groups (if applicable) Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & Housekeeping 50 minutes: Work on final projects. Students must make some serious progress today! 2 minutes: Work on Final Project for HW! It is due on Monday
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet, Week 6, Day 3 Concept / Topic to Teach: Final Projects Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) General Goal(s): To have students interpret a scene from R & J Specific Objectives: Students divide into groups and work on final projects Required Materials: Text, Art & Writing Supplies Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Divide into groups (if applicable) and begin Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & Housekeeping 50 minutes: Work on final project. Tomorrow is the last day in class you will be able to work on it! Anyone who needs to video-tape their oral presentations may go to the media-center tomorrow during class or is responsible for making an appointment on their own. 2 minutes: Work on final project for homework.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet, Week 6, Day 4 Concept / Topic to Teach: Final Project Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) Identify protagonists and antagonists and their motivation (QCC, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_D1998-27) General Goal(s): Work on Final Project Specific Objectives: Have students work on Final Project. Today is the last day they will spend on it in class. Students must work on Final Project Rationale tomorrow during class. Required Materials: Text, Art & Writing Supplies Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Divide into groups (if applicable) and begin working Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & housekeeping 50 minutes: Students work on final project. Those that need to go to the media-center to videotape may. Be prepared to work on Project Rationale tomorrow. 2 minutes: Work on projects for homework and prepare outline for rationale tonight.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet, Week 6, Day 5 Concept / Topic to Teach: Writing Rationales Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) General Goal(s): To get students started on their rationales Specific Objectives: Meet in the computer lab. Students may bring outlines and begin rationales in class. Required Materials: Computer lab, Text, Outlines Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Meet in computer lab Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & Housekeeping 50 minutes: Work on rationales 2 minutes: Wrap up. Final Projects and Rationales due Monday
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet, Week 7, Day 1 Concept / Topic to Teach: Presentations Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) General Goal(s): To watch the movies of the oral presentations and the informal presentations of other final projects Specific Objectives: Watch movies of oral presentations and the informal presentation of other final projects. Required Materials: TV, VCR, Projects Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Have students sit down to watch presentations Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & Housekeeping 5 minutes: Collect Projects and rationales 45 minutes: Watch videos of oral presentations and informal presentations of projects. 2 minutes: Wrap up and finish tomorrow.
Lesson Plan Title: Romeo & Juliet, Week 7, Day 2 Concept / Topic to Teach: Watch Videos of oral presentations and informal presentation of project Standards Addressed: Make and defend inferences and conclusions (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B1998-10) Interpret author's meaning (QCC, HSGT, SAT I, CE) (LA09_B1998-14) General Goal(s): To watch presentations Specific Objectives: Have students finish watching videos of oral projects and informal presentations of projects Required Materials: TV, VCR, Projects Anticipatory Set (Lead-In): Get comfortable to watch video presentations! Step-By-Step Procedures: 3 minutes: Attendance & Housekeeping 50 minutes: Finish watching videos of oral presentations and informal project presentations. 2 minutes: Take a break

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