THE OREGON HUMANITIES CENTER

Tags: Oregon Humanities Center, International Film Series, Pacific Hall, Yamada Language Center, Romance languages, presents, Humanities Center, The School of Music, Beall Hall, Humanities, Stephen Wooten, University of Oregon, Karen Kelsky, 2000-2001, UO faculty, Howard Davis, Robert Hurwitz, Oregon State University Press, Louise Westling English Crossan, Africa, Historical Jesus, University of Illinois, Conference Humanities Faculty Books, Intercultural Literary Studies, Leiden University, Robert Kyr, African Studies, Oregon State University, Doug Blandy, Lawrence Hall, Walter Scott, John Dominic Crossan, Lyons Press, Religious Studies, Steven Shankman, Professor of Law Jeffrey Ostler History, free public lecture, Harvard University Law School, Gerlinger Alumni Lounge, the International Studies, Jeffrey Hurwit Art History Mary Jaeger Classics Leon Johnson Fine and Applied Arts, Christopher Hitt, Dianne Dugaw English Olakunle George English Evlyn Gould, the Department of Anthropology, Undergraduate Studies Karen Sprague, Julia Heydon, Western Humanities Alliance, Jesus Seminar, DePaul University, Professor Alma Gottlieb, Classics Julia J. Heydon Associate Director, American Academy, Professor Mineke Schipper, Knight Law Center, Ruthann L. Maguire, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies, Professor Edmond Keller, Professor Paul Tiyambe Zeleza, Art Education Visible, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, William Cronon, Oregon, public outreach efforts, Robert L. Davis, Charles Lachman, Juan Armando Epple, Daniel K. Falk, East Asian languages and literatures, Humanities Center Board of Visitors, National Research Council, Indiana University Press, Humanities Center Research, CSWS, University Percussion Ensemble, University of Kansas, UO Percussion Ensemble, Robert D. Clark Lecturer, Diana K. Myers, Hieronymus Bosch, Daniel Wojcik, Terry Tempest Williams, National Art Education Association, Blyth Carpenter, Carol Ann Bassett, Nature Conservancy, New York University Press, Clare Lees, University of Chicago Press, Steven T. Brown, Boalt Alumni Association, Thomas Connolly, James Crosswhite, Virginia Cartwright, Honors College, University Senate, anthropology, art history, Charles Dowd, University of Utah Press, La obra literaria de Fernando Algeria, Barbara K. Altmann, Teaching Fellowships, Fritz Gearhart, Juan Epple, New York University, Southern Illinois Univ. Press, the University of Oregon
Content: Newsletter: Winter 2001 THE OREGON HUMANITIES CENTER
"Engaging Africa" Symposium at UO March 1st and 2nd
Steven Shankman Director Distinguished Professor, CAS English; Classics Julia J. Heydon Associate Director
"Over the past several years," notes Stephen Wooten of the Department of Anthropology and the International Studies Program, "the study of Africa has gained increasing visibility and importance at the UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. More than a dozen faculty members from across campus are currently engaged in Africa-related research and teaching. Strong enrollments reveal that our students are eager to enhance their understanding of Africa, its people, and their lives." To highlight the University's emerging strength in African Studies and to raise public awareness of African issues, the African Studies Committee and the Oregon Humanities Center have joined forces to organize a symposium entitled "Engaging Africa."
Ruthann L. Maguire On Thursday, March 1, at 4:00 p.m., Professor Alma Gottlieb of the Department of Administrative Program Specialist Anthropology at the University of Illinois will deliver a keynote address which will focus on 2000-2001AdvisoryBoard children and religion among the Beng people of Cфte d'Ivoire.
Dianne Dugaw English Olakunle George English Evlyn Gould Romance Languages Ellen Herman History Jeffrey Hurwit Art History Mary Jaeger Classics Leon Johnson Fine and Applied Arts
The symposium will continue on Friday morning, March 2, from 9:30 to noon, with a panel session and discussion. The panelists are Professor Edmond Keller, political science, and Director of the African Studies Center, UCLA; Professor Mineke Schipper, Chair of Intercultural Literary Studies at Leiden University; and Professor Paul Tiyambe Zeleza, history, and Director of the Center for African Studies, University of Illinois. These speakers will offer their perspectives on the importance of engaging Africa in the new millennium. Both keynote address and panel discussion are free and open to the public and will take place in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge. In a related event, noted Cameroonian novelist Mongo Beti will present a reading on Friday, March 2 at 7:30 p.m. in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge. Our focus on African Studies will continue in the spring with a public lecture by Princeton musicologist Kofi Agawu. For more information, contact the Humanities Center at 541-346-3934, or Stephen Wooten, co-organizer of the symposium, at 541-346-5299 or by e-mail at [email protected] Noted Jesus Scholar John Dominic Crossan to Visit Campus on February 22
Ronald Kellett Architecture Massimo Lollini Romance Languages Grant McKernie Theatre Arts
The department of Religious Studies, in collaboration with the Oregon Humanities Center, is proud to host John Dominic Crossan for the 2000-01 Gaston Lecture in Christianity on Thursday, February 22, 2001 at 7:30 p.m. in 175 Knight Law Center. Crossan will give a free public lecture entitled "Method and Meaning in Historical Jesus Research." He will also conduct a seminar for UO faculty on Friday, February 23rd.
James O'Fallon Frank Nash Professor of Law Jeffrey Ostler History Ann Tedards Music Nancy Tuana Philosophy Louise Westling English
Crossan, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at DePaul University, is one of the most prolific and influential scholars on the historical Jesus debate and early Christianity. He has written eighteen books, four of which have become national bestsellers. He was co-chair of the famous Jesus Seminar from its founding in 1985 to 1996 and has received awards for scholarly excellence from both the American Academy of Religion and DePaul University.
For more information or for disability accommodations, call Religious Studies at 541-346-4971, or e-
mail [email protected]
Inside:
"Taking Nature Seriously"
Director's Report
2
Conference
Humanities Faculty Books and Awards 2-3
Feb. 25-27, 2001
Work-in-Progress Schedule
4
contact 541-346-5015
Winter Pull-Out Calendar
C1-6
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~humanctr/ University of Oregon · 154 PLC · Eugene OR 97403-5211 541 346-393(5441) 346-3934
University of Oregon The Oregon Humanities Center 5211 University of Oregon Eugene,OR 97403-5211 ADDRESSSERVICEREQUESTED The University of Oregon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution committed to cultural diversity and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. To obtain this newsletter in an alternative format, call Ruthann Maguire at 3461002.
MARK YOUR CALENDARS... We will continue our series of Work-in-Progress Talks by University of Oregon faculty and graduate students on current or recent research each Friday at 12:00 NOON (unless otherwise noted) in the Center's Conference Room, 159 PLC, as a "brown-bag lunch" event. JANUARY 19: (NOON) Gray Whaley, history, "The 'Right' to Exterminate Indians: Economic and Racial Speculations by the Citizens of Oregon Territory." 26: (NOON) Ruihua Shen, Comparative Literature, "'The Eastern European Heroine': The First Prototype of the New Woman in 20th-Century Chinese Literature." FEBRUARY 2: (NOON) Special round table discussion on General Education requirementswith Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies Karen Sprague in 159 PLC. 9: (NOON) Martha Bayless, English, "Parodies and Nonsense in Medieval Culture." 16: (NOON) Christopher Hitt, English, "'The Wilderness Has a Mysterious Tongue': Ecocriticism and the Romantic Sublime." MARCH 9: (NOON) Lea Williams, comparative literature, "Writing on All Fronts: Gender, Testimony, and the Literature of War." 16: (NOON) Jean Luc Robin, Romance languages, "Old Rhetoric for New Science in Galileo and Descartes." Please note these weekly meetings on your calendars. All interested UO faculty are invited and encouraged to attend. Be sure to visit our website at http:// darkwing.uoregon.edu/~humanctr/
Director's Report, continued from page 2 In October, Humanities Center Associate Director Julia Heydon and I attended the Western Humanities Alliance (WHA) annual conference, hosted this year by the Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington. The topic was "The Pious and the Profane," which elicited a number of interesting papers from across a wide range of disciplines. Next year's conference, to be held at UC Davis, will be on the subject of "Civility and Uncivil Society." Those interested in participating should get in touch with me or Julia. The annual WHA conference offers humanities graduate students (as well as faculty) at institutions in the western United States the chance to deliver scholarly papers to faculty and graduate students from a number of humanistic disciplines. This WHA meeting in Seattle allowed us to see and talk with some of our humanities colleagues from the western region of the United States. Later in the fall, Julia and I attended the annual meeting of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI), this year cosponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation, at UC Berkeley. The topic of this year's CHCI conference, which is rapidly becoming an international body, was "Thinking Rights, Engaging Communities." I was particularly struck by the presentation of a two-person team who recently completed a moving documentary film on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission instituted by Bishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa following the fall of the apartheid regime. We look forward to seeing you at our upcoming events, including our "Engaging Africa" symposium (see story, p. 1), our O'Fallon Lecture in Law and American Culture to be delivered by Frank Michelman, a specialist in constitutional law from Harvard University Law School (April 9); and our Kritikos Lectures, to be presented this year by a figure of truly national prominence, James Q. Wilson (May 15 and 17). We also hope to see you at the many events we cosponsor, such as violinist Jaap Schroeder's lecture/demonstration (cosponsored by the School of Music) of the Bach partitas for solo violin (April 6).
Director's Report, Winter 2001
I am pleased to report that the past year has been a very successful one for the Humanities Center in many ways. First, our endowments grew by a robust 38% during FY1999-2000; this includes both new gifts (we received three gifts of over $15,000 each, and one gift of nearly $30,000) and the interest we earned on previous donations. Second, thanks to a generous "challenge grant" from Provost Moseley and former Vice Provost for Research Tom Dyke, we are able to award two additional Humanities Center research fellowships for the next three years. If we are successful at raising external funds for this program, the pledge of two additional fellowships will be extended for two more years. We are thus in the beginning stages of a campaign to raise the funds necessary to endow these two additional fellowships.
Our public outreach efforts have also been gaining momentum. We are approaching the 150th episode of our weekly television
program, "UO Today," which now has the potential of reaching 500,000 households in Oregon. Our last three endowed
lecturers have drawn large and enthusiastic crowds. Last spring, author and environmental activist Terry Tempest Williams,
our 1999-2000 Robert D. Clark Lecturer, enchanted a crowd of nearly 800 people in the EMU Ballroom with a meditation on
a painting by the 15th-century artist Hieronymus Bosch. This fall, the distinguished environmental historian William Cronon
of the University of Wisconsin-Madison delivered our 2000-2001 Clark Lecture to a standing-room only crowd in 177 Lawrence
Hall. Also this past fall, Diana K. Myers, an expert in Himalayan culture and our 2000-2001 Cressman Lecturer, delivered a
beautifully illustrated slide-lecture to a similarly packed house. Her talk was about hand-woven textiles and the central role
they play in Bhutanese society. The following day, Ms. Myers gave a talk to about fifty or sixty people (again, a capacity
crowd) at an exhibit of Bhutanese textiles at the White Lotus Gallery here in Eugene. It is gratifying for us to be able to offer
stimulating programs that are of interest both to the academic community at the University of Oregon, as well as to the public
at large. We are very grateful to Humanities Center Board of Visitors members Russ and Blyth Carpenter for bringing Diana
K. Myers to our attention.
continued on page 4
HUMANITIES FACULTY Awards, Honors, Fellowships & Books
Please refer to the Spring 2000 newsletter for announcement of 2000-01 Humanities Center Research and Teaching Fellowships.
Henry Alley, Honors College; Steven T. Brown, East Asian languages and literatures; Virginia Cartwright, architecture; James Crosswhite, English; Howard Davis, architecture; Jane I. Dawson, political science; Dianne Dugaw, English; Juan Epple, Romance languages; Daniel K. Falk, religious studies; Fritz Gearhart, music; Richard Hildreth, law; Leon Johnson, art; Karen Kelsky, anthropology; Charles Lachman, art history; Clare Lees, English; Steven Lowenstam, classics; and Daniel Wojcik, English, were recipients of the 2000 Summer Research Awards. Barbara K. Altmann, Romance languages, published "Hearing the Text, Reading the Image: Christine de Pizan's Livre du Debat de deux amans" in Aux champs des йcritures (Champion, 2000). Carol Ann Bassett, journalism and communications, published "White Water, Dark Future" in American Nature Writing 2000 (Oregon State University Press, 2000) and "Mount Mazama" in The Mountain Reader: A Nature Conservancy Book (Lyons Press, 2000). Raymond Birn, history, was appointed visiting professor at the Collиge de France in Paris for spring 2001. He will be lecturing on 18thcentury French censorship practices. Doug Blandy, arts and administration, coedited Remembering Others: Making Invisible Histories of Art Education Visible (National Art Education Association, fall 2000). Alexandra "Sandy" Bonds, theatre arts, received a U.S. Institute for Theatre Technology Fellowship of $15,000 to pursue her research on Chinese opera costumes. Jack Boss, music, published "Schenkerian-
Schoenbergian Analysis and Hidden Repetition in the Opening Movement of Beethoven's Op. 10, No. 1 Piano Sonata" in Music Theory Online. Cristina Calhoon, classics, received a stipend to attend the NEH Summer Seminar, "Representing Geography and Community in the World of Imperial Rome" at the American Academy in Rome. Suzanne Clark, English, is the author of Cold Warrior: Manliness on Trial in the Rhetoric of the West (Southern Illinois Univ. Press, 2000). Thomas Connolly, State Museum of Anthropology, published Newberry Crater: A Ten-Thousand-Year Record of Human Occupation and environmental change in the Basin-Plateau Borderlands (University of Utah Press). Contributors include museum faculty Dennis Jenkins and Guy Tasa, and anthropology graduate student Scott Byram. Howard Davis, architecture, published The Culture of Building (Oxford Univ. Press, 1999). Robert L. Davis, Romance languages, coauthored Entrevistas: Introduction to Culture and Languages in Spanish ( McGraw Hill, 2000). Andrй Djiffack, Romance languages, published Mongo Beti: la quкte de la libertй (Paris: L'Harmattan), and "The Myth of Ruben" in Research in African Literature (Indiana University Press, 2000). Paul Doerksen, music, published "AuralDiagnostic and Prescriptive Skills of Preservice and Expert Instrumental Music Teachers" in the Journal of Research in
Music Education. Charles Dowd, music, produced a classical CD, Concerto for Timpani, and a classical video, Sonata No. 1 for Timpani and Piano. Ian Duncan, English, published "Walter Scott, James Hogg, and Scottish Gothic" in Companion to the Gothic (Blackwell, 2000). James Earl, English, was elected President of the University Senate for 2000-2001. Jan Emerson, CSWS, edited Imagining Heaven in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays (Garland, 2000), which included her article "Harmony, Hierarchy and the Senses in the Vision of Tundal." Juan Armando Epple, Romance languages, published Actas de Palo Alto: La obra literaria de Fernando Algeria (Mosquito Editores, 2000). Jon Erlandson, anthropology, won the 1999-2000 Thomas Herman Faculty Achievement Award for Distinguished Teaching. Caroline Forell, law, coauthored A Law of Her Own: The Reasonable Woman as a Measure of Man (New York University Press, 2000). Dave Frohnmayer received the 1999 Citation Award from the Boalt Alumni Association at the University of California, Berkeley, for his distinguished career in law and public service. Amalia Gladhart, Romance languages, published The Leper in Blue: Coercive Performance and the Contemporary Latin American Theater (North Carolina Studies in Romance Languages and Literatures, 2000). Bryna Goodman, history, published "Im-
provisations on a Semi-Colonial Theme, or How to Read a Celebration of Transitional Urban Community" in the Journal of Asian Studies, November 2000, and "Being Public: The Politics of Representation in 1918 Shanghai" in the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, June 2000. Evlyn Gould, Romance languages, published "Cleansing Jewish Gold: Mallarmй, Barrиs, Lazare" in French Forum, No. 25, September 2000. Roland Greene, English, published Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (University of Chicago Press, 1999). Thelma Greenfield, English emerita, and Norma Comrada coauthored Ethiopian Collection (Oregon State University Press, 2000). Debra Gwartney, creative writing, won New York University's fiction contest, judged by novelist E.L. Doctorow. Her story will be published in NYU's Washington Square Review. Robert Haskett, history, was awarded a NCSA position for spring 2002. He will be teaching about British influence in Latin America from the 16th century to the late 20th century. Kenneth Helphand, landscape architecture, published "Leaping the Property Line: Observations on Recent American Garden History" in Perspectives on Garden Histories (1999). Garrett Hongo, creative writing, was named a 2000-2001 College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor. Shari Huhndorf, English, published "Nanook and His Contemporaries: Imagining Eskimos in American Culture, 1897-1922" in the fall 2000 issue of Critical Inquiry. She received a grant from the National Research Council for work on her forthcoming book, Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Experience. Karen Kelsky, anthropology, received an NEH Fellowship for University Teachers for the writing of her forthcoming book Women on the Verge: Gender, Race, and the Erotics of the International in Japan. Kenneth Kempner, education, received an Outstanding Faculty Award during the Multicultural Affairs Awards and Graduate Ceremony in May 2000. Lauren Kessler, journalism and communication, is the author of The Happy Bottom Riding Club: The Life and Times of Pancho Barnes (Random House, 2000). Linda Kintz, English, published "Performing Capital in Caryl Churchill's Serious Money" in Theatre Journal, 1999. Robert Kyr, music, was commissioned by the Oregon Repertory Singers to compose On the Nature of Creation, an a cappella piece performed in March 2000. His two violin concerti, On the Nature of Harmony and On the Nature of Love, were performed in Nov. 1999 and Jan. 2000 respectively. Dorianne Laux, creative writing, is the author of Smoke (Boa Press, 2000). Clare Lees, English and comparative literature, received an ACLS Senior Fellowship for 2000-2001 for "Vision, Knowledge, and Anglo-Saxon Culture." Albert Leong, Russian and East European Studies, published "Gulag and Laogai" last spring in the Proceedings of the First InterNational Conference on the Laogai. David Li, English, published "Can Asian Ameri-
can Studies Abandon the Nation?" in Navigating Islands and Continents: Conversations and Contestations in and Around the Pacific (University of Hawaii Press, 2000). Massimo Lollini, Romance languages, published "La scrittura dell'inizio: Leopardi e il problema della genesi" in Forum Italicum, Vol. 34, No. 2 (spring 2000). He was also named the Hatzantonis Fellow in Italian Language and Literature. Glen Love, English emeritus, edited Fishing the Northwest (Oregon State University Press, 2000). Michael Majdic, Knight Library Media Services, and Denise Matthews, journalism and communication, won a first place Gold Camera Award from the U.S. International Film and Video Festival of Chicago for their video documentary, Roll on Columbia: Woody Guthrie and the Bonneville Power Administration. The video also won an Award of Distinction from the Videographer Awards 2000. Lynette Boone, Andy Kirkpatrick and Brian Hinderberger, Media Services, were also on the documentary team. Deb Merskin, journalism and communication, published "That Time of the Month: Adolescence, Advertising, and Menstruation" in Sexual Rhetoric: Media Perspectives in Sexuality, Gender, and Identity (Greenwood Press, 1999). She also published "What Every Girl Should Know: An Analysis of Feminine Hygiene Advertising" in Growing Up Girls: Popular Culture and the Construction of Identity (Peter Lang, 1999). Madonna Moss, anthropology, won the 19992000 Thomas F. Herman Faculty Achievement Award for Distinguished Teaching. Julianne Newton, journalism and communication, is the author of The Burden of Visual Truth: The Role of Photojournalism in Mediating Reality (Lawrence Erlbaum Associated, 2000). She was invited to be one of a select group of reviewers to initiate PhotoAmericas 2000, an international photography festival held in Portland in October. One of her photographs was selected for the cover of the inaugural issue of Feminist Media Studies (March 2001). James O'Fallon, law, published Nature's Justice: Writings of William O. Douglas (Oregon State University Press, 2000). He was also elected to membership in the American Law Institute. Hal Owen, music, published Music Theory Resource Book (Oxford Univ. Press, 2000). Paul Peppis, English, is the author of Literature, Politics, and the English AvantGarde: Nation and Empire, 1901-1918 (Cambridge University Press, 2000). He also received a CAS Junior Professorship Development Award. Beth Hege Piatote, CSWS, won a Gold Award from the District VIII Council for Advancement and Support of Education for her feature article, "Diversity," in the Autumn 1999 edition of Oregon Quarterly. Daniel Pope, history, edited American Radicalism (Blackwell, 2000) in the series Blackwell Readers in American Social and Cultural History. Rob Proudfoot, international studies, won the 1999-2000 Charles E. Johnson Memorial Award for exceptional service to the university and its community, and the 1999-2000
Thomas F. Herman Achievement Award for Distinguished Teaching. Gina Psaki, Romance languages, published "The Sexual Body in Dante's Celestial Paradise" in Imagining Heaven in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays (Garland, 2000) and "Chivalry and the Medieval Italian Romance" in The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Romance (Cambridge University Press, 2000). She was also named the Giustina Family Professor in Italian. Elizabeth Reis, history, published American Sexual Histories (Blackwell, 2000) for Blackwell's Social and Cultural History in America series. Gordon Sayre, English, edited American Captivity Narratives: An Anthology (Riverside/ Houghton Mifflin, 2000). Steven Shankman, English, classics, and Oregon Humanities Center, and Stephen Durrant, East Asian languages and literatures, are the coauthors of The Siren and the Sage: Knowledge and Wisdom in Ancient Greece and China (Continuum Books, New York and Cassell Academic Press, London, 2000). Steven Shankman also published a book of poems, Kindred Verses (R.L. Barth, 2000). Sharon Sherman, English, published "Ballad, Legend, and Film: The Representation of Frankie Silver," in the spring 2000 issue of The Journal of American Folklore. She was featured in a webcast project sponsored by Intel entitled "Digital American Dream." Carol Silverman, anthropology, received an $8000 grant (with an additional $3000 for translation) from the Open Society Institute, Budapest, to aid in the writing of her manuscript Performance, Identity, and Politics: Balkan Roma 1970s-1990s. Jonathan Skolnik, Germanic languages and literatures, published "Writing Jewish History Between Gutzkow and Goethe" in the Fall 2000 issue of Prooftexts. Marian Smith, music, published Ballet and Opera in the Age of "Giselle" (Princeton University Press, 2000). Al Stavitsky, journalism and communication, coauthored A History of Public Broadcasting (Current Publishing, 2000). Norman Sundberg, psychology emeritus, was awarded the 2000 Life Time Achievement and Distinguished Service of the Year Award by the Lane County Psychologists' Association. Christine L. Sundt, visual resources, was one of 19 artists featured in a November 1999 exhibition in the Jacobs Gallery at the Hult Center. Mуnica Szurmuk, Romance languages, published "Entre mujeres: sexo, naciуn y escritura en El cielo dividido de Reina Roffй" in Sexualidad y naciуn (Instituto Internacional de Literatura Iberoamericana, 2000), and Mujeres en viaje. Escritos y testimonios (Alfaguara, 2000). Pimone Triplett, creative writing, published two poems in The Paris Review. Marc Vanscheeuwijck, music, published "The City and the Church: Music, Liturgy, and Government in Late 17th-Century Bologna," in Alamire Yearbook 2000. He wrote the preface and critical apparatus for the facsimile edition of Domenico Gabrielli's complete works for cello (Forni, 1998). He also revised and wrote articles on nineteen composers including G.P. Colonna, G.A. Perti, G. Torelli, D. Gabrielli, and P. Francheschini for the New Grove Dictionary of Music & Musicians, 2nd edition (Macmillan, 2000).
Ongoing Events
Humanities Winter 2001 Pull-Out Calendar, C-1 /OHC = cosponsored by the Oregon Humanities Center
The Knight Library is hosting a special exhibition entitled "Two Private Presses from Verona: The Officina Chimerea and Edizioni Ampersand," featuring books printed by two of the most distinguished private presses still operating in Italy. The exhibition opens on February 26, 2001 with a free public lecture and slide show by printers Alessandro Corubolo, Gino Castiglioni, and Alessandro Zenalla. For information, call James Fox at 346-1904.
The Museum of Natural History continues its exhibit entitled Lay of the Land, featuring Oregon Landscape Photography by geologist Ewart Baldwin, until April 1, 2001 in the museum lobby. For information, call 346-3024.
JANUARY 9: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents The Funeral (Japan) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011.
9: Art History presents Christopher Young, archaeologist and Head of World Heritage and International Policy for English Heritage, speaking on "From Stonehenge to Ironbridge: the English Approach to World Heritage" at 7:30 p.m. in 115 Lawrence. The event is cosponsored by AAA and the Maude I. Kerns Bequest. For information, call 346-3677.
12: The School of Music presents the East European Folk Ensemble, performing for Balkan folkdancing at 8 p.m. in Agate Hall Auditorium. Dance instruction will be provided. $3. For information, call 346-5678. 16: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (Brazil) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011.
17: The Classics Department presents Professor Andrea Falcon, philosophy, University of Padua, who will give a talk on "Aristotle and the Limits of Natural Science" at 3 p.m. in 810 PLC (classics department conference room). For information, call346-4155. /OHC
17: CSWS presents Lorraine Brundige, graduate student, philosophy, speaking on "A Return to Reciprocity," from noon to 1 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall. For information, call 346-5015.
18: Ann Tedards, School of Music, presents "Twentieth-Century Women Composers: A Retrospective," 4- 5:30 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall as part of the CSWS Teaching and Tea Series and the Feminist Humanities Project. For information, call 346-5015. 18: The Creative Writing Program presents Lan Samantha Chang, author of Hunger, a collection of short stories, at 8 p.m. in the Knight Library Browsing Room. For information, call 346-0544.
19: Oregon Humanities Center Work-in-Progress Series: Gray Whaley, history, will give a talk on "'The Right to Exterminate Indians': Economic and Racial Speculations by the Citizens of Oregon Territory" at 12 noon in the Humanities Center Conference Room, 159 PLC. Brown-bag lunches welcome. For information, call 346-3934.
20: The School of Music presents Bob Minzer, jazz saxophone, with the Oregon Jazz Ensemble at 7:30 p.m. in Beall Hall. $10, $7. For information, call 346-5678. 23: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents Death of a Bureaucrat (Cuba) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011.
23: The School of Music Chamber Music Series presents Lucy Shelton, soprano, and Milagro Vargas, mezzo-soprano, performing duets by Brahms, Handel, Purcell, Ibert, Mendelssohn, and a premiere by Tom Manoff, at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. Pre-performance talk with Robert Hurwitz at 7 p.m. $25, $20, $10. For tickets and information, call 682-5000 or 346-4363.
26: Oregon Humanities Center Work-in-Progress Series: Ruihua Shen, comparative literature, will give a talk on "'The Eastern European Heroine': The First Prototype of the New Woman in 20th-Century Chinese Literature" at 12 noon in the Humanities Center Conference Room, 159 PLC. Brown-bag lunches welcome. For information, call 346-3934.
26: The Center for the Study of Women in Society presents Hendrik Hartog, Bicentennial Professor of the History of
American Law and Liberty, Princeton University, in a talk entitled "Man and Wife in America: A History" from 1 - 3 p.m. Place tba. For information, call 346-3406 or contact . 26-27: The University Theatre presents Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa at 8 p.m. in Robinson Theatre. $10, $8, $5. For tickets and information, call 346-4363. 30: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents Blue (France) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011. FEBRUARY 1-4, 9-10: The University Theatre presents Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa at 8 p.m. in Robinson Theatre (2 p.m. on 2/4/01). $10, $8, $5, $4. For information, call 346-4363. 1: The Comparative Literature Program presents Henry Sayre, Oregon State University, speaking on "18 October 1977 and the End of History; Or, History Painting and the End of Art" at 4:30 p.m. in the Knight Library Browsing Room. For information, call 3463986. /OHC 2: The Oregon Humanities Center hosts a special roundtable discussion on General Education requirements with Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies Karen Sprague at 12 noon in 159 PLC. 2: The School of Music Faculty Artist Series presents Victor Steinhardt, piano, with the Oregon String Quartet and Oregon Brass Quintet, at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $7, $4. For information, call 346-5678. 5: The School of Music Faculty Artist Series presents the Oregon Brass Quintet performing music by Leonard Bernstein, Anthony Plog, and Victor Ewald at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $7, $4. For information, call 346-5678. 6: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents All About My Mother (Spain) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011. 6: The School of Music Chamber Music Series presents Red Priest, the United Kingdom's most theatrical and outrageously different Baroque ensemble, at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $25, $20, $10. Pre-performance talk with Robert Hurwitz at 7 p.m. For information, call 682-5000 or 346-4363. 7: CSWS presents Mary Wood, English, speaking on "This Puzzling Case: Narratives of Schizophrenia," noon to 1 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall. For information, call 346-5015. 7: The School of Music presents the Oregon Wind Ensemble at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 8: The School of Music Faculty Artist Series presents Gregory Mason & Friends, an evening of French and Latin Chamber Music by Saint-Saens, Poulenc, Ginastera, and Piassola, at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $7, $4. For information, call 346-5678. 8: The Creative Writing Program presents Porter Shreve, author of The Obituary Writer and 2001 Visiting Writer, at 8 p.m. in the Knight Library Browsing Room. For information, call 346-0544. 9: Oregon Humanities Center Work-in-Progress Series: Martha Bayless, English, will give a talk on "Parodies and Nonsense in Medieval Culture" at 12 noon in the Humanities Center Conference Room, 159 PLC. Brown-bag lunches welcome. For information, call346-3934. 9: CSWS presents Eileen Boris, Blair Hull Professor of Women's Studies, University of California-Santa Barbara, in a talk entitled "No Right to Layettes or Nursing Time: Toward a History of Maternity Leave in the United States" from 1 - 3 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall. For information, call 346-3406. 10: The School of Music Children's Concert Series presents Music and All That Jazz at 10:30 a.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3, $2. For information, call 346-5678. 11: The School of Music presents the University Symphony at 7:30 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678.
Humanities Winter 2001 Pull-Out Calendar, C-3 12: The Museum of Natural History presents Saturday Safari, an exploration of the World of the Camera, with activities, exhibits of hand-tinted photographs, nature photography and more, from noon to 3 p.m. $2 per person, $5 per family. Museum members free. For information, call 346-3024. 13: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents Cries and Whispers (Sweden) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011. 14: CSWS presents Deborah Tze-lan Sang, East Asian languages and literatures, speaking on "The Emerging Lesbian: Female Same Sex Desire in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture," from noon to 1 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall. For information, call 346-5015. 14: Cristina Calhoon, classics, presents "Power, Poison, and Politics in Ancient Rome," 4-5:30 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall as part of the Teaching and Tea Series and the Feminist Humanities Project. For information, call 346-2263. 15: The Germanic Languages and Literatures Department presents Christine Ingebritsen speaking on "Why Do Norway and Iceland Resist Europeanization?" at 3:30 p.m. in 228 Chiles. For information, call 346-4051. 16: Oregon Humanities Center Work-in-Progress Series: Christopher Hitt, English, will give a talk on "'The Wilderness Has a Mysterious Tongue': Ecocriticism and the Romantic Sublime" at 12 noon in the Humanities Center Conference Room, 159 PLC. Brown-bag lunches welcome. For information, call 346-3934. 20: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents The Boxer and Death (Czech Republic) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011. 22: The Religious Studies Department and the Oregon Humanities Center present a public lecture by John Dominic Crossan at 7:30 p.m. in 175 Law Center. Crossan will speak on "Method and Meaning in Historical Jesus Research." See story on page 1. For information, contact Daniel Falk at 346-4980. /OHC 23: The School of Music presents The Jazz Cafe at 8 p.m. in Room 186 Music. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 25: The School of Music Faculty Artist Series presents Romantic chamber music, featuring works by Schumann and Gieseking, at 4 p.m. in Beall Hall. $7, $4. For information, call 346-5678. 25-27: The Conference "Taking Nature Seriously: Citizens, Science, and Environment" brings together scientists, community activists and humanists who are working on environmental issues. Co-sponsored by CAS, CSWS, the Humanities Center, the Environmental Studies Program, and the Departments of biology, English, and philosophy. For information, call 346-5399 or 346-5015 or check the website . /OHC 26: The Romance Languages Department presents Sharon Kinoshita, UC-Santa Cruz, who will be speaking on "The Poetics of MiscegeNation: The Case of Medieval French Romance" at 3 p.m. Place tba. For information, call 346-4033. 27: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents Taxing Woman (Japan) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011. 27: The School of Music presents the UO Women's and Men's Choruses at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. Free. For information, call 346-5678. 28: The School of Music presents the Campus Band and Campus Orchestra at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. Free. For information, call 346-5678. MARCH 1-2: The Oregon Humanities Center and the African Studies Committee present a symposium entitled "Engaging Africa" in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge. See page 1 for story. For information, call 346-3934 or check our website. 1: The Creative Writing Program presents Philip Levine, author of The Mercy and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, at 8 p.m. in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge. For information, call 346-0544.
Humanities Winter 2001 Pull-Out Calendar, C-4 1: The School of Music presents Dalton Baldwin giving a vocal master class at 7 p.m. in Beall Hall. For information, call346-5678. 1-3, 8-10: The University Theatre presents Triumph of Love: A Musical at 8 p.m. in Arena Theatre. Also on Feb. 28. $7, $6, $5. For tickets and information, call 346-4363. 2: The School of Music Faculty Artist Series presents Mark Beudert, tenor, and Dalton Baldwin, piano, performing works by Berlioz, Strauss, Poulenc, and Turina at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $7, $4. For information, call 346-5678. 2-3: The Dance Department presents the 2001 Faculty Concert at 8 p.m. (also 2 p.m. on 3/3/01) in Dougherty Dance Theatre. For information, call 346-3386. 3: The School of Music Children's Concert Series presents the Oregon Children's Choir at 10:30 a.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3, $2. For information, call 346-5678. 4: The School of Music presents the Oregon Wind Ensemble and the UO Symphonic Band at 3 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 4: The School of Music presents the University Singers and the UO Chamber Choir at 7:30 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 5: The School of Music presents Poetry in Song, art songs performed by vocal students of Milagro Vargas, Ann Tedards, and Mark Kaczmarczyk at 7 p.m. in Beall Hall. Free. For information, call 346-5678. 6: The Yamada Language Center International Film Series presents The Dinner Game (France) at 7 p.m. in 121 Pacific Hall. Free. For information, call 346-4011. 6: The School of Music presents the Oregon Opera Ensemble at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 7: CSWS offers a Grants Workshop hosted by S. Marie Harvey, research director, for Faculty and Graduate Student Research Grants from noon to 1 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall. For information, call 346-5015. 7: The School of Music presents Flute Class Recital by students of Richard Trombley at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. Free. For information, call 346-5678. 7: The School of Music presents The Jazz Cafe with guest artist Nancy King at 8 p.m. in Gerlinger Lounge. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 8: The Comparative Literature Program presents Thomas Pfau, Duke University, in a lecture entitled "Poetics of Trauma: Lyric and Modernity around 1800" at 4:30 p.m. in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge. For information, call 346-3986. / OHC 8: The School of Music Chamber Music Series presents Cypress String Quartet, with works by Mozart, Mendelssohn, and Janacek, at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $25, $20, $10. Free pre-performance lecture with Robert Hurwitz at 7 p.m. For information, call 682-5000 or 346-4363. 9: Oregon Humanities Center Work-in-Progress Series: Lea Williams, comparative literature, will give a talk on "Writing on All Fronts: Gender, Testimony, and the Literature of War" at 12 noon in the Humanities Center Conference Room, 159 PLC. Brown-bag lunches welcome. For information, call 346-3934. 9: The School of Music presents the UO Gospel Choir at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 10: The School of Music presents Future Music Oregon at 8 p.m. in Room 198 Music. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 11: The School of Music presents the University Symphony at 3 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 3465678.
Humanities Winter 2001 Pull-Out Calendar, C-5 12: The Romance Languages Department presents Caroline Jewers, University of Kansas, in a lecture entitled "Returning to the Ovidian Fold: Of Metamorphoses X, the Romance of The Romance of the Rose, and American Beauty" at 3 p.m. Place tba. For information, call 346-4033. 12: The School of Music presents the UO Percussion Ensemble at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 14: CSWS presents Stephanie Wood, Women's Studies, in a lecture entitled "Mexico's Founding Mothers and Fathers: Early Mesoamerican Gender Complementarity?" from noon to 1 p.m. in 330 Hendricks Hall. For information, call 346-5015. 14: The Dance Department presents Dance Quarterly, an informal showing of ongoing repertory and works-inprogress, at 7 p.m. in Dougherty Dance Theatre. Free. For information, call 346-3386. 16: Oregon Humanities Center Work-in-Progress Series: Jean Luc Robin, Romance languages, will give a talk on "Old Rhetoric for New Science in Galileo and Descartes" at 12 noon in the Humanities Center Conference Room, 159 PLC. Brown-bag lunches welcome. For information, call 346-3934. 16: The School of Music presents the Oregon Jazz Ensemble and the Jazz Lab Bands at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 18: The School of Music presents Chamber Musicale at 1 p.m. in Beall Hall. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 18: The School of Music presents the University Percussion Ensemble at 3 p.m. in Room 198 Music. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 18: The School of Music presents Harp Ensemble, by students of Sally Maxwell, at 4 p.m. in Beall Hall. Free. For information, call 346-5678. 18: The School of Music presents the University Gospel Ensemble at 6 p.m. in the EMU Ballroom. $5, $3. For information, call 346-5678. 21: CSWS presents Anna Carr, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at the Australian National University, as part of the Ecological Conversations Public Lecture Series, speaking on "The Laymen are Revolting: Environmental Stewardship, Trust and Post-Kuhnian Institutional Science" from 7 - 9 p.m. in the Knight Library Browsing Room. For information, call 346-5399. This publication is available in a large print format upon request. For disability accommodations for any Oregon Humanities Center event, please call Elena Rudy at 346-3934, one week prior to the date of the event.
Humanities Winter 2001 Pull-Out Calendar, C-6 Looking Ahead to Spring 2001: April 6 & 10, 2001: The School of Music brings to campus Jaap Schroeder, violinist, for a lecture/demonstration on the Bach partitas for solo violin on April 6 at 4 p.m. in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge, and a performance of Mozart, Haydn, Kraus, and Boccherini piano trios on April 10 at 8 p.m. in Beall Hall. The Humanities Center is co-sponsoring this event. April 9, 2001: The Humanities Center's 2001 O'Fallon Lecturer in Law and American Culture is Frank Michelman, Harvard Law School. Michelman specializes in constitutional law. The lecture will be held in 175 Law at 7:30 p.m. May 3 & 4, 2001: The "Engaging Africa" symposium continues with African musicologist Kofi Agawu, Princeton University, in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge. Time tba. May 15-17, 2001: The Humanities Center's 2001 Kritikos Professor in the Humanities, James Q. Wilson, UCLA Professor Emeritus, will speak on issues related to Public Policy and politics and the decline of the American family. The Eugene lecture will be held on Tuesday, May 15 in 175 Law. Time tba. The Portland lecture on May 17 will be in the Crystal Ballroom at the Benson Hotel at 5:45 p.m.
Tune in to UO Today!
The Oregon Humanities Center presents a 30-minute weekly television show that takes you inside the university. Center director Steven Shankman interviews faculty, staff, and visiting lecturers about their research and interests.
Upcoming Programs:
Jan. 8
William Cronon, history, environmental studies and geography Univ. of Wisconsin, Oregon Humanities Center Robert D. Clark Lecturer
Jan. 15
Anand Prahlad, English Ben Saunders, English
Jan. 22 Fabienne Moore, Romance languages Andrй Djiffack, Romance languages
Jan. 29
Mуnica Szurmuk, Romance languages Amalia Gladhart, Romance languages
Feb. 5
Teresa Flores, Rockefeller Fellow, CSWS Sanja Saftic, Rockefeller Fellow, CSWS
Feb. 12
Arun Ghandi, Waging Peace in the New Millenium, interviewed by Robert Kyr
Feb. 19
Robert Kyr, music Simeon Vilensky, poet and Gulag survivor, with Al Leong, REESC
Wednesdays at 8:00 p.m. on Channel 12
UO Today is also broadcast on Channel 97 on Monday at 9 p.m., Tuesday at 9 a.m., Thursday at 10:00 p.m. and Friday at 10:00 a.m. For days and times in other Oregon cities, check the UO Today schedule on our website: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~humanctr/

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