The Politics of picturing: an exhibition of works by Peter Burgess

Tags: Australia, Melbourne, Suzanne Davies, Biennale of Sydney, Brisbane, Paul Taylor, Art Network, Art Projects, Institute of Modern Art, Sydney Selected Group Exhibitions, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, University of Melbourne, Museum of Modern Art, Contemporary Art, Sydney Morning Herald, Juan Davila, George Paton Gallery, political art, Terry Smith, Australia Council, Experimental Art Foundation, John Davies, University of Tasmania Copyright, social critique, social function, Metropolitan Museum and Art Center, Brisbane Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane, Pratt Gallery, New York University East Gallery, Santiago Matta Gallery, Tasmanian School of Art, The Politics, Tasmanian School of Art Gallery University of Tasmania, Tim Johnson Lyndal Jones Geoff Lowe, Tim Johnson Lynda, Merilyn Fairskye, Alfred Rethel, Juan Davila Pieta, Tony Coleing, Peter Tyndall, Roland Barthes, Pam Debenham, Jacques Lacan, Tim Johnson, Jonathan Holmes, Pat Brassington, School of Art, art practice, representation, Juan Davila Pam Debenham John, Cliff Dolliver, David Stephenson, Contemporary Art Society, social purpose, Craft Council Gallery, Sydney, Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education, Sydney, Modern Art, Chilean Art, Ray Hughes, Ray Hughes Gallery Downtown, Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane Ray Hughes Gallery, Landscape Art, Los Angeles Institute of Con- temporary Art, Australian Art, Nelly Richard, Australian Perspecta, Fable of Australian Art, pub.City Art Institute, Roslyn Oxley Gallery, Sydney, Suzanne Davies Essay, Ivan Dougherty Gallery, National Art School, Sydney, Selected Group Exhibitions, Garry Anderson Gallery, New South Wales Institute of Technology, Sydney Studied Art and Education, Art Gallery, Brisbane Selected Group Exhibitions, Santiago Tolarno Galleries, Australian National Gallery, National Gallery of Victoria, Sydney City Library, City Art Institute, Sydney, Sydney Watters Gallery, Coventry Gallery, Sydney, Sydney, Australia, New York Pratt Institute, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Middlesborough Art Gallery
Content: The Politics Of Picturing . .'v A,_.····*·····.····~ ~···· ··· ··· ·-·· _~·....a··.~.....· ·· t e ·v . Tasmanian School of Art Gallery University of Tasmania 1984 5-27 JUNE
Tasmanian School of Art Gallery Committee Lutz Presser, Chairperson Pat Brassington, Secretary lan Atherton Cliff Dolliver Jonathan Holmes Milan M ilojevic Gayle Pollard Glenn Puster David Stephenson Paul Zika
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Q) .J: 1- Catalogue published by the Tasmanian School of Art, University of Tasmania Copyright 1984 The Artists and the Tasmanian School of Art National Library of Australia card number ISBN 0 85901 2468
An exhibition of works by Peter Burgess Tony Coleing Juan Davila Pam Debenham John Dunkley-Smith Richard Dunn Merilyn Fairskye Tim Johnson Lyndal Jones Geoff Lowe Peter Tyndall Exhibition Curator Suzanne Davies Catalogue Suzanne Davies Poster Jon Williamson Typesetting Penny Hawson Printing Specialty Press Pty . Ltd. Acknowledgements The Tasmanian School of Art Gallery Committee and the Curator, Suzanne Davies, wish to express their appreciation to all the participating artists, to those who lent work and to the following for their assistance : Richard Dunn Barrett Watson Michael Giles Robert Treseder John Davies This project was assisted by the Commonwealth Government through the Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council
The Politics of Picturing In general, when political art is considered, it is understood as that art which is clear in its political references, has social purpose or attempts some social critique around particular issues - in other words that art which is politically overt. These ideas of politics in art tend to isolate so called politic· al art from mainstream artistic practice. The effectiveness of that art in any real sense, either aesthetic or political, is severely curtailed by its polemicized placement on the mar· gins of artistic practice. The definition of political art is too narrow. For some, the idea of political art has become synonymous with 'communi· ty' focused murals or the placing of artists within the community. In this case, social relevance 'the political' , is the making of art which serves some apparent social function, independent and frequently critical of its studio production and gallery method of display. This simplistic view of the social function of art is linked in opposition to elitist 'art for art's sake' aesthetics. The use value of art is locked into this binary system. What seems to dominate the thinking around and about this use of art is that public funding demands accountability, justification and responsibility - community needs versus 'excellence' for the few. There is, arguably, an element of expediency on both sides in the promotion of this polarisation. My intention is not to engage these arguments but to make some observations in passing, as a means to beginning to discuss a more specific concern with the strategies of current art practice. The official enthusiasm for community artwork represents l.ess a considered criticism of 'elite' art practice as much as a pragmatic solution to the need for democratic socialist governments to be seen to be acting on their principles. 1 Such refocusing of support offers a useful 'solution' on at least two levels. First, that government funding of the arts in general is more attractive if viewed in terms of an ostensibly popular, broad and (hopefully) democratic base and secondly, that such government sponsored arts programmes, linked to community interest, advertise themselves in the electorate. Much work receiving official funding sanctions is problematic for the purpose of this discussion because of its demonstrated orthodoxy of representation or its mode of picturing. Another view is that politics linked to art is identified with a period now passed - the late 60's and 70's - and is con sidered 'inappropriate' for these pragmatic times. I want to open up the definition to include work which isn't normally considered overtly political in an issue or party-political sense. Work about which it may be argued there is an attempt 'to explore representational systems as apparatuses of power' (Louis Marin) informed either by notions of Marxist ideological criticism (emphasising what the work says) or, by post-structuralism's performative view (what the work does). Here is the focus of my concern. The politics of picturing
is centrally linked to the codes of representation - the way pictures are constructed and their link with the world. The re-distribution of economic support for the visual arts may be desirable, yet seldom does, nor perhaps can, the officially sanctioned work offer a substantial critique of existing social formations by maintaining the transparency of the codes of representation. By failing to challenge the construction of representations within particular dominant codes there is a failure to identify the basis of power and its dependence on these material and interpretive structures. The historical connection between Classical representation and 17th century social and economic life has been strongly argued in order to expose the essentially political function which representation served - In Classical representation, the person who represents the world is transformed from a subjective being enmeshed in space and time into a transcendent, objective Mind that appropriates reality for itself and thereby dominates it. 2 In moving from a single vanishing point to our world of 'a plurality of vanishing points, a plurality of perspectives .. .' there is a consequent disruption of the codes, the 'representational apparatus' (the mechanics of transmission and reception) is fragmented and through this it becomes possible, to articulate those implicit strategies and tactics whereby representation achieves its putative transparency (Owens). In this sense, 'representation is used against itself to destroy the binding or absolute status of any representation' (Frederic Jameson) . Returning to the question of orthodox representation it is relevant to take account of Derrida's claim that - What (any) institution cannot bear, is for anyone to tamper with language .. . It can bear more readily the most apparently revolutionary ideological sorts of 'content' if only that content does not touch the borders of language and of all the juridico-political contracts that it guarantees. 3 If '"-'e take visual representation to be analogous to 'language', it may well follow that the ready toleration, absorption and problematics of much self declared political art is as a consequence of its failure to expose the nature and function of all representations. There is a further thread which must be drawn into this discussion and that concerns the relationship of the work in this exhibition with that more readily curatorially supported studio art (I am thinking of 'neo-expressionism') and the means by which the political dimension of these exhibited works can be conveniently diminished or denied. Such discussion begs the question of the context of display, where co-option into mainstream aesthetics under the rubric of, for example, the New Art which has been prescriptively labelled as 'expressionistic' or 'emblematic', serves to deny a critical voice on the part of the artist. Still more poetic, at times theoretically sophisticated and extremely useful voices provide shelter for those who, using only the rhetoric of anti-interpretive positions, predictably deny 'engagement' or 'intervention' while planning strategies of individual survival (after the holocaust?!) predicated on collusion or capitulation. But these too are only fragments.
Of more substantial concern is to counter the accusation of 'paralysis' directed to deconstructive practice - that positions of this kind may lead into another closed circle. Michael Ryan in addressing this problem suggests that such a fear arises from working with too simple a notion of the sort of knowledge (or science, if knowledge is taken as a matter of technology, construction and convention) required for radical action ... Only from the viewpoint of capitalist rationalism or party patriarchalism does the persistent positing of an alternative, of a continuous displacement along a seriality of revolutions which is multisectoral and without conclusion, seem 'irrational or 'paralytic', It is paralytic of their rationalist power, but it is equally an opening onto a plural diffusion of powers. 4 There are a number of features which these works share in varying degrees. These are the use of the layering of images, the gathering of images cut from already existing sources, the use of images which are already subject to mechanical reproduction or in the process of building representations of the picture are further subject to mechanical means, and finally discontinuities with in the representations built. These are all processes which may be identified with collage and montage. Such processes are used by these artists towards specific ends, and while they may open up meanings within the works, they are ambiguous only within limits. These processes operate to open up the images to allow a critique of orthodox codes which ensure consistency and accessibility yet are not so open ended as to suggest a disconnected world where any thing can mean anything - that aspect which has made Derrida so attractive to the 'apolitical' artist/ curator/dealer alike. It is through an open ended ambiguity that nothing can be said and no critique can be made. This is the means by which any form of engagement can be curtailed. Suzanne Davies Footnotes 1. It could be argued that in these conditions, socialism means the preservation of surplus value and the exploitation of labour under more humane planning and self management. Michael Ryan, Marxism and Deconstruction. A Critical Articulation, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore and London, 1982, p.224 2. Craig Owens, "Representation, Appropriation and Power", Art in America, May 1982, p.17 3. Jacques Derrida, "Living On: Borderlines" in Deconstruction and Criticism, Seabury, New York, 1979, p .94-5. 4. Ryan, opcit. p.213-216
Trying To Describe Things-Man ., Nov.21, 1983, Graphite/Erased Graphite, Electrostatic print on Laminated Papers, 2 sections Irregular, approx. 81x183cm, Life size figure 67x191cm, 1983 Courtesy of the artist
Detail- 'Trying To Describe Things- Mon., Nov. 21, 1983'
Peter Burgess Born 1952 Sydney, Australia, lives New York
Studied
1971-72 1973-76 1977 1979-81
Architecture, New South Wales Institute of Technology, Sydney Studied Art and Education, Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education, Sydney, Dip. Art (Ed.) Post-graduate study in Lithography, Pratt Graphics Center, New York Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, M.F.A. (Photography)
1978 1981 1982 1983 1984
'Clearinghouse - some art reference', Coventry Gallery, Sydney 'Information ln .Formation', Pratt Gallery, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y . 'Hebdomus and Other Works 1979-82', Art -Empire-! ndustry, Sydney 'Hebdomus', Avago Gallery, Sydney 'The Dated Spectator', Artspace, Sydney (curated by Q.E.D.) 'Private/Public Places, Photographic Works 197783', Garry Anderson Gallery, Sydney
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1980
'Artist's Publications', Tweed Museum of Art,
University of Minnesota
1981
'Artist's Books', Zone Center for the Arts, Spring-
field, Mass.
1982
'3 Offset Attitudes', Sydney City Library, Sydney
1983
'Smallworks', New York University East Gallery, New York 'Australian and International Artists for the Fourth Biennale of Sydney', Coventry Gallery, Sydney '5th Miami International Print Biennial', Metropolitan Museum and Art Center, Miami, Florida 'Drawing '83 - U.K. Drawing Biennale', Middlesborough Art Gallery, then touring British Isles 'Australian Perspecta '83', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 'A.U.S.T.R.A.L.I.A.', Zona, Florence, Italy 'Taste, Place and Transition - Expatriates New York', Ivan Dougherty Gallery, City Art Institute, Sydney 'Artist's Books', Artspace, Sydney
~
Trying to Describe Things - Wed., June 15, 1983. Graphite/Erased Graphite, Electrostatic print on Laminated Paper. 2 Sections- Scraper board drawing 4" x 6" Irregular, approx. 36" x 72"
Poland, acrylic o n canvas, 170x430cm, 1982 Courtesy Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane One of six paintings in a series titled 'Recent Wars'
Tony Coleing
Born 1942 in Warrnambool, Victoria Lives in Sydney
1962 1963 1963/68 1964/ 68 1965 1965/68 1968/71 1971/72 1973
Worked in New Zealand Lived in England Travelled in Europe Worked in Theatrical decor for the Royal Theatre in London Visited Iceland London, Europe Lived in Australia (New South Wales) Revisited Europe Returned to Australia
Court
Studied 1958-59 National Art School, Sydney
Selected Individual Exhibitions
1969 1971 1974 1975 1977 1978 1980 1981
Gallery A, Melbourne and Sydney Gallery A, Sydney Watters Gallery, Sydney Watters Gallery, Sydney 'Surfboard Rider Drawings' , Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane (with Marr Grounds) 'The Biennale :Visual Arts '80' (39th Biennale of Venice) Australian Pavilion, Venice (with Kevin Mortensen and Mike Parr) Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane (with Kevin Mortensen) 'We Point the Bone/Bone the Bomb', Ray Hughes
1982
Gallery Downtown, Anne Street, Brisbane Roslyn Oxley 9, Sydney 'Clocks and Lorries' (with Margaret Dodd), at Adelaide Festival, Adelaide 'Recent Wars', (with Adrian Hall), Ray Hughes Gallery Downtown, Anne Street, Brisbane
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984
'The Queensland Connection', Contemporary Art Society, Adelaide 'Ray Hughes Gallery at Pinacotheca', Melbourne 'Landscape into Art', Australian National Gallery, Canberra 'Big Drawings', Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane 'The Collage Show: 1982/83', Regional Development Program No.1 0, Visual Arts Board, Australia Council, Sydney, 1982 'Australia Perspecta '83', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 'Group Show', Artspace 'Nine New Prints', Ray Hughes Gallery, October, Brisbane 'International Survey of Painting and Sculpture', Museum of Modern Art, New York
Pieta, photograph, collage, 91 x79cm, 1984 Courtesy ot the artist
Juan Davila Austral ian Born 1946 in Santiago, Chile Moved to Australia in 1974 Lives in Melbourne
Study 1964-69 Law School of the University of Chile 1970-72 Fine Arts School of the University of Chile
Selected Individual Exhibitions
1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1982 1983 1984
Latinamerican Artistic Coordination, CAL Gallery, Santiago Matta Gallery, Santiago Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Latinamerican Artistic Coordination, CAL Gallery, Santiago Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne 'Hot Art', Video-performance, Melbourne City Square Roslyn Oxley Gallery, Sydney 'Fable of Austral ian Painting', Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne 'Ned Kelly', Praxis, Fremantle 'Fable of Chilean Painting 73/ 83', Sur Gallery, Santiago 'Adelaide Festival', Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1981 1982
'Spectres of Our Time', Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 'Vision in Disbelief', 4th Biennale of Sydney
1983 1984
'Nelly Richard, Carlos Leppe, Juan Davila, Martin Munz, Video-performance', Chilean-French Institute of Culture, Santiago 'Popism', National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 'Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction', George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne 'Sexual Imagery in Art', Tasmanian School of Art, University of Tasmania, Hobart 'Artist's Proof, Leppe, Cardenae, Davila', performance, XII Biennale of Paris 'Nu-View', Australian Video, State Film Centre, Melbourne 'Fringe Network Festival', Melbourne 'Open Video Festival', Artspace, Sydney 'Australian Perspecta', Art Gallery of N .S.W., Sydney 'Comic Stripping', George Paton Gallery, Melbourne 'Continuum', Japan 'Anzart', Hobart Metro TV video event, Sydney 'From Another Continent: Australia. The Dream and the Real', Museum of Modern Art, Paris 'Recent Australian Painting: a Survey 1970-1983', Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 'Vox Pop Into the Eighties', National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 'Form - Image - Sign', Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth '5th Biennale of Sydney'
The Third Degree, cibachrome print, 102x147cm, 1980-84. Collection of the Artist.
Pam Debenham Born in Launceston, Tasmania, lives in Sydney
Studied
1977-79 1982
Diploma of Visual Arts, Sydney College of the Arts Bachelor of Arts (Visual Arts). Sydney College of the Arts
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1981 1982 1983
'Womens Art at Work', 3 months touring exhibition, Melbourne 'All Australia Poster Show', George Paton Gallery, Melbourne University Print Council 'Exhibition 10', 2 year travelling show 'From The Inside Out', Women and Arts Festival, Craft Council Gallery, Sydney 'Out of Print', Art-Empire-Industry, Sydney 'Continuum '83', Tokyo, Japan, exhibiting with the Lucifoil Poster Collective 'Truth Rules O.K?', Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide
Exterior ... London (The Mall), Twin projector slide installation for darkened space, 162x35mm slides, colour, mute, indefinite duration, London, 1981. Collection of the Artist.
John Dunkley-Smith Born 1946 in Ballarat, Victoria, lives Melbourne
Studied
1964 -65 1966 1967-71 1974-76
Ballarat Teachers' College, Ballarat, Victoria Melbourne Teachers' College, Melbourne Ballarat School of Mines and Industries, Ballarat, Victoria Hornsey College of Art, London
Selected Individual Exhibitions
1979 1980 1981 1982 1982 1983 1984
'Window Sequences 1 & 2', Art Projects, Melbourne 'Film Works', University Gallery, University of Melbourne 'Exterior with Seagulls' . Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane 'Five or Six Cityscapes', Art Projects, Melbourne 'Interior No.1 1981', Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane 'Interior No.1 1981', Art Projects, Melbourne 'Interiors 2 - 5', PS 1, Institute for Art and Urban Resources, New York 'Window Sequences 1979-1982', Art Projects, Melbourne 'Exterior . . . San Francisco 1982', 80 Langton Street, San Francisco 'John Dunkley-Smith- Installations 1979-1984', University Gallery, University of Melbourne 'Interior No.8', Artspace, Sydney
] 1
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1982
'Ten Years of Living Cinema', The Collective For Living Cinema, New York
'Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction', George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne
'Film as Art', Victorian College of the Arts Gall -
ery, Melbourne and touring all Australian states 'Filmmakers' Visions', Wellington City Art Gall ery, Wellington
'Preston to Phillip - A Survey', Reconnaissance Gallery and The Springworks, Melbourne
'Australian Filmmakers with Fourth Biennale of Sydney', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
'Old World/New Works', The Clocktower, New York
1983
'D'Un Autre Continent: L'Australie. Le Reve
et le Reel', ARC, Musee d.Art Moderne de Ia
Ville de Paris, Paris
'Drawings (Schematic, Expressionist & Psycholog-
ical)', Art Projects, Melbourne
'Continuum '83', Studio 200, Tokyo 'A Melbourne Mood - Cool Contemporary Art',
)
Australian National Gallery, Canberra
'Australian Perspecta 1983', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 'Tall Poppies', University Gallery, University of
Melbourne 'Xenophillia', The Clocktower, New York
1984
'Australia : Nine Contemporary Artists', Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
The Tower, The Museum, The Banner, The Barricade, oil stick on paper, 228x336cm, 1984. Courtesy Yuill Crowley Gallery
Richard Dunn Born at Sydney, 1944, lived Europe 1966-1976, lives in Sydney Studied 1962-64 University of New South Wales, Faculty of Archi- tecture 1966-69 Royal College of Art , London, School of Painting
1972 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1983
Gallery A, Sydney Gallery A, Sydney Warehouse Gallery, Melbourne Gallery A, Sydney 'Six Positions', modernArt, Sydney ' Heuristic Models', Institute of ModP.rn Art, Brisbane 'Tools of Coincidence', Art Projects, Melbourne 'Monastery', modernArt, Sydney 'Barricades', QED, Sydney (a dialogue of objects). Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane 'Barricades No.3 (The Sheet, The Monochrome and The Banner) 1848', Art Projects, Melbourne 'A-K: Normal and Domestic', Yuill Crowley Gallery, Sydney
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1980 1981
'Frame of Reference', Ewing Gallery , University of Melbourne 'Frame of Reference', A.G.D .C. Touring Ex hibition
1982 1983 1984
'Austral ian Perspecta', Art Gallery of N .S.W., Sydney 'The Beacon', n-space, Sydney 'Popism', National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 'Temple of the Winds', n-space, Melbourne 'New Acquisitions', National Gallery of Victoria The Philip Morris Arts Grant, 'Australian Art of the Last Ten Years', Australian National Gall ery, Canberra 'The Seventies', Australian Paintings and Tapestries from the collection of the National Australia Bank, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 'Attitudes to Drawing', Ivan Dougherty Gallery, Sydney 'From Another Continent- Australia', The Dream and the Real, Paris ARC, Museum of Modern Art of the City of Pari s Gallery Beiderberg-Muller, Amsterdam Drawing 'Sex', Yuiii / Crowley Gallery
Shortcut to Romance, oil and acrylic on canvas, five panels each 122x 122cm, 1984 Merilyn Fairskye Born 1950, Melbourne, Australia Currently lives and works in Sydney
Studied
1970-72, 74 National Art School, Sydney
1975
Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education, Sydney {Dip.Art)
Selected Individual Exhibitions
1980 1981 1982
Avago, Sydney Art Workshop, University of Sydney "The Easter Show", Filmmakers Cinema, Sydney
Murals
1979 1980 1980-82 1983 1984
Garibaldi with Michie! Dolk, Garibaldi's, Riley Street, Darlinghurst This is Your Life, Ardwirkz Billboard Collective ACI Glassworks Mural with Michie! Dolk and Jeff Stewart, ACI Waterloo Woolloomooloo Mural Project Stage 1, with Michie! Dolk , Woolloomooloo Positions Vacant-Painters and Decorators, Refs Required with Michie! Dolk, a disposable mural with installation, Art Gallery of NSW We Are Still Here with Carol Ruff, Kingston, Tasmania Person to Person with M ichiel Dolk, Woolloomooloo Mural Project Stage II
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1981
'Japan' with Sandy Edwards, Filmmakers Cinema, Sydney
demeanour in givit't ~(\r there plOY bt. many fe~turi>s of ateounl or ~dmtssions mad12 b~ 1\ ~hfth mJt di$dO..~..;. ~!'\OU§t Jcftticn-
1982 1983
Austral ian Centre of Photography, Sydney 'The Panel Show', Australian Centre of Photography, Sydney 'From the Inside Out', Craft Council Gallery, Sydney 'Sexual Imagery in Art', Tasmanian School of Art Gallery 'Australian Perspecta '83', Art Gallery of NSW
Tim Johnson Born 1947 in Sydney, New South Wales Lives in Sydney
Studied University of New South Wales, Sydney University of Sydney
Selected Individual Exhibitions
1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1977 1979 1982 1984
'Off the Wall', Gallery A, Sydney 'Installation as Conceptual Scheme', lnhibodress, Sydney 'Diary, Voyeur, Fittings, Disclosures, etc.,' Pinacotheca, Melbourne 'Installation as Conceptual Scheme', Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Photographs of performances, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane Paintings, Gallery A, Sydney Paintings, Erskine Street Gallery, Sydney 'Notes on Painting', Gallery A, Sydney Paintings, Mori Gallery, Leichardt, Sydney 'Wheel of Life', paintings, Mori Gallery, Leichardt, Sydney 'The Drunken Boat', Mori Gallery, Leichardt, Sydney
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1980
'Leichardt Performance Festival', Sydney 'Aboriginal Land Rights Exhibition', National Trust Centre, Observatory Hill, Sydney Anti-Uranium Mining Exhibition, Sydney
Anatjari No.1 and John Jagamara at Papunya, acrylic on canvas, 61x61cm, 1981 private collection
1981 1983 1984
'APMIRA: Aboriginal Land Rights Exhibition', Paddington Town Hall, Sydney 'Artists for Peace' exhibition, Sydney 'Perspecta', Art Gallery of New South Wales 'Waiting for Technology', 'n' space and Yuill Crowley Gallery, Sydney 'The Life of Energies', Artspace, Sydney 'Minds on Masonite', Art Unit, Sydney 'Artists for Peace' exhibition, Sydney
Books by Tim Johnson 'Spare Parts' (1971); 'Fittings' (1971); 'Public Fittings' (1972); 'Disclosure' (1973); 'Be An Artist' (1974); 'Coin· cidence' (1974); 'E.S.P.' (1976); 'You' (1976); 'Alienation' (1976) Films by Tim Johnson 'Public Fittings' (1972); 'Disclosure' (1973); 'Excursion' (1973)
Tim Johnson Visit to Papunya II, acrylic on canvas, 76x91cm, 1983 Private collection Anatjari No.1 Jampitjinpa Kulku/ka, acrylic on canvas, 183x183cm, 1980. Collection of Tim Johnson
....c. eEn ;).. QJ .:.! c: ::::J 0 c: ..c ..0..., >..ac. ~ .00..> 0 ..c 0..
Prediction Piece No.7, Version 1, Mixed media installation, 1984
Lyndal Jones
1949
Born in Sydney, New South Wales , lives Mel -
bourne
Studied
1968-72 Monash University (B.A. Dip.Ed.)
Performance Works
1977 1978 1979 1980 1981
At Home Coming and Going, 'Ten Years at La Mama', La Mama Theatre, Melbourne Fair Weather (in collaboration with Nanette Hassall) Festival of Sydney, Sydney Town Hall Storey Hall, Royal Melbourne Institute of Tech nology, Melbourne ' European Dialogue', Biennale of Sydney (1979), Sydney Town Hall At Home At Home, La Mama Theatre, Mel- bourne At Homes On The Road Again, La Mama Theatre, Melbourne 'ACT 2, Festival of Performance Art', Austral ian National University Arts Centre, Canberra (1980) 110 Chambers Street, New York City, New York (1980) At Home Ladies A Plate, George Paton Gallery , University of Melbourne Dances To Order, University Gallery, University of Melbourne At Home Domestic Bliss, George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne Short Travel, 'First Australian Sculpture Trienn- ial', LaTrobe University, Melbourne Prediction Pieces Nos 1 - 4, George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne 'ACT 3: Ten Austral ian Performance Artists',
1982 1983 1984
Canberra School of Art Gallery , Canberra (1982) Prediction Piece No 4 (Versions 1, 2 & 3), 'Vision in Disbelief' , Biennale of Sydney, Cell Block Theatre, Sydney Prediction Piece No 5 (Versions 1 & 2), 'I mage '83', Extensions, Melbourne 'Continuum '83', Studio 200, Tokyo Japan Prediction Piece No 7 (Versions 1, 2 & 3), 'Aus- tralia: Nine Contemporary Artists', Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, U.S.A. 'Anzart in Edinburgh : Meaning & Excellence', Richard De Marco Gallery, Edinburgh, U.K.
Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980
1980 1981 1982 1983
'Act 2: Festival of Performance Art', Au stralian National University Arts Centre, Canberra Solo Performance, 110 Chambers Street, New York City, New York 'First Australian Sculpture Triennial', La Trobe University, Melbourne 'Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction', George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne 'Vision in Disbelief' , Biennale of Sydney, Cell Block Theatre, Sydney 'Act 3 : Ten Australian Performance Artists', Canberra School of Art Gallery, Canberra 'Works by Australian Video Arti sts', touring exhibition, Japan 'Australian Perspecta 1983', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 'Image '83', Extensions, Melbourne 'Continuum '83', Studio 200, Tokyo, Japan
The Idea of Bad Government, acrylic on linen, 152x366cm, 1982/83, Collection of Budget Rent-a-Car ~J· r,;'f? ~ t
··
The Idea of Good Government, acrylic on linen, 152x366cm,
1982/83
Not in this exhibition, but the pair to 'Bad Government'
Geoff Lowe Born Melbourne 1952 Currently lives and works in Melbourne Studied RMIT 1969-72 Selected Individual Exhibitions 7 solo exhibitions in Mlllbourne and Sydney Selected Group Exhibitions since 1980 Recently exhibited in 'Figures and Faces Drawn from Life' at Heide Gallery and 'Apocalypse and Utopia' at University Gallery, Melbourne, curated by John Nixon
Peter Tyndall detail A Person Looks At A Work of Art! someone looks at something ..... . SOMEONE AND SOMETHING BECAUSE ..... . (apparent) bl ack & white & colour photocopy and acrylic paint, 244x472cm, 1982 Collection of the Artist Collection of Melbourne College of Advanced Education
Bibliographies Peter Burgess Maloon, Terence; 'Art', Sydney Morning Herald, (October 30), 1982 Blackall, Judith; 'Italy - A.U.S.T.R.A.L.I.A. at Zone', Art Network, Vol. II pp.44-45, 1983 Davies, Suzanne and Dunn, Richard; 'Grappling with Diver- sity; Australian Perspecta, 1983', Art Network, Vol.10 pp. 11-15, 1983 Maloon, Terence; 'When Fake Masterpieces may be Some- thing Else', Sydney Morning Herald (May 14) 1983 Stringer, John; 'Taste, Place and Transition - Expatriates New York', catalogue essay, pub. City Art Institute, 1983 Dupain, Max; 'Photography', Sydney Morning Herald, (March 3) 1984 Tony Coleing Ross Lansell: 'Melbourne Commentary: Harald Szeemann in Australia', Studio International, London, Vol.182, October 1971 Alan McCulloch : 'Australia', Art International, Lugano, Vol. XIV, No.4, April1970 Alan McCulloch: 'Letter from Australia', Art International, Lugano, Vol. XIV, No.10, December 1970 Terry Smith: 'The Provincialism Problem', Artforum, New York, September 1974 Sandra McGrath: 'Tony Coleing', Art and Australia, Sydney, Vol.11, No.4, April1973 Noel Hutchison: 'Sculpturscape '73', Art and Australia, Sydney, Vol.11, No.1, July 1973 Venice Biennale: Visual Arts '80, General Catalogue, Bi- ennale of Venice, 1980 Suzanne Davies: 'Australians in Venice', Art Network 2, Spring 1980 Robin Wallace Crabbe: 'Tony Coleing', Venice Biennale 1980: Australia, Australian catalogue, Sydney, Visual Arts Board, Australia Council, 1980; reprinted in The Collage Show: 1981/82, Visual Arts Board, Regional Development Program No .10, Sydney, Australia Council, 1982 Juan Davila: Writings by the Artist 'The Nude in Contemporary Art', CAL magazine, Santiago, 1979 'Tod / Etcetera/Ratman', Papers of the Freudian School of Melbourne, 1980 'Spider Woman in Australia', Art & Text No.4, Melbourne, 1981 'Love of Chile', La Separata, Santiago, 1982 'Love of Australia', Art Network, September Issue, Sydney, 1982 'Leppe : Southamerican Waiting Room', La Separata, Santi- ago, 1982 Interview of Nelly Richard, Art & Text No.8, Melbourne, 1983 Photo-Romance, Virgin Press, February Issue, Melbourne, 1983 Jenny Watson catalogue, Roslyn Oxley Gallery, Sydney, 1983 'Good Luck', Stuff, May Issue, Melbourne, 1983 Comic Stripping Catalogue, George Paton Gallery, Melbourne, 1983
'Landscape Art in Western Australia', Praxis M, Fremantle, 1983 'Fable of Australian Art', Art Press 74, October, Paris, 1983 Exhibition 'From Another Continent. The Dream and the Real', catalogue, Paris, 1983 Exhibition 'Fable of Chilean Painting', catalogue, Santiago, 1983 Selected Catalogues and Publications Nelly Richard : 'The Mechanism of Illusion in Davila ' , 1977 Nelly Richard: 'The Body in / of the Painting of Davila/ Fragments', 1979 Bravo magazine, Santiago 1979, 'The Irruption of Desire in the Painting of Davila' Frenando Balcells, 'Davila : the Offensive Liberality', La Bicicleta, Santiago 1980 Rafael del Villar : 'On Semiotics and Painting: an Analysis of a representative of the New Generation of Chilean Art after the Coup D.Etat by the Military Junta in Chile', 1981 Gaspar Galaz and Milan lvelic : 'The History of Chilean Painting', Catholic University of Valparaiso Ed ., 1982 Paul Taylor : 'Popism', National Gallery of Victoria, 1982 Shane Simpson: 'The Visual Artist and the Law', The Law Book Co . 1982 Patricio Marchant: 'On the Use of Certain Words', Art & Text, No.9 1983 Justo Mellado: 'The Dispute of the Biblical Quotation', catalogue, Santiago, 1983 Nelly Richard : 'BodyWithoutSoui',Art& Text No.121984 Lorena Mazzocco: 'Reply to Discussion Evening Report', F.A.S.S., Broadsheet, Vol.2, No .4 1983, Melbourne Uni- versity John Dunkley-Smith Sam Rohdie: 'The Films of John Dunkley-Smith', Cinema Papers, No.18, Melbourne, October-November 1978 Janine Burke: 'The Melbourne Scene', Art and Australia, Vo1.17, No.3, Sydney, March 1980 Sam Rohdie: 'The Avant Garde', The New Australian Cinema Scott Murray (Ed), Nelson, Melbourne 1980 Jennifer Phipps: 'Recent Artists' Film in Australia', Flash Art, No.1 01, Milan, January / February 1981 Adrian Martin: ·,Little Films We Made', Filmnews, Sydney, April 1981 Rolando Caputo: 'Outside the Cultural Image: Three In- stances of Alternative Australian Film', Art & Text, No.3, Melbourne, Spring 1981 John Dunkley-Smith: 'No Explanation, No Explication', Notes on Art Practice, John Nixon (Ed), Art Projects, Melbourne 1982 Judy Annear: (Catalogue Essay), Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne, 1982 Alison Fraser: (Catalogue introduction), Film as Art, Vic- torian College of the Arts Gallery, Melbourne, 1982 John Dunkley-Smith: (Artist's statement). Ten Years of Living Cinema, Vincent Grenier (Ed), The Collective Cinema, New York, 1982 Suzanne Davies: 'Art in the Age of Mechanical Repro· duction', Art Network 7, Spring 1982
Bibliographies Peter Burgess Maloon, Terence; 'Art', Sydney Morning Herald, (October 30). 1982 Blackall, Judith; 'Italy - A.U.S.T.R.A.L.I .A. at Zone', Art Network, Vol.ll pp.44-45, 1983 Davies, Suzanne and Dunn, Richard; 'Grappling with Diver- sity; Australian Perspecta, 1983', Art Network, Vol.10 pp.11-15, 1983 Maloon, Terence; 'When Fake Masterpieces may be Some- thing Else', Sydney Morning Herald (May 14) 1983 Stringer, John; 'Taste, Place and Transition - Expatriates New York', catalogue essay, pub.City Art Institute, 1983 Dupain, Max; 'Photography', Sydney Morning Herald, (March 3) 1984 Tony Coleing Ross Lansell: 'Melbourne Commentary: Harald Szeemann in Australia', Studio International, London, Vol.182, October 1971 Alan McCulloch: 'Australia', Art International, Lugano, Vol. XIV, No.4, April 1970 Alan McCulloch: 'Letter from Australia', Art International, Lugano, Vol. XIV, No.10, December 1970 Terry Smith: 'The Provincialism Problem', Artforum, New York, September 1974 Sandra McGrath: 'Tony Coleing', Art and Australia, Sydney, Vo1 .11, No.4, April1973 Noel Hutch ison: 'Sculpturscape '73', Art and Australia, Sydney, Vol.11, No .1, July 1973 Venice Biennale: Visual Arts '80, General Catalogue, Bi- ennale of Venice, 1980 Suzanne Davies: 'Australians in Venice', Art Network 2, Spring 1980 Robin Wallace Crabbe: 'Tony Coleing', Venice Biennale 1980: Australia, Australian catalogue, Sydney, Visual Arts Board, Australia Council, 1980; reprinted in The Collage Show: 1981/82, Visual Arts Board, Regional Development Program No.1 0, Sydney, Australia Council, 1982 Juan Davila: Writings by the Artist 'The Nude in Contemporary Art', CAL magazine, Santiago, 1979 'Tod/Etcetera/Ratman', Papers of the Freudian School of Melbourne, 1980 'Spider Woman in Australia', Art & Text No.4, Melbourne, 1981 'Love of Chile', La Separata, Santiago, 1982 'Love of Australia', Art Network, September Issue, Sydney, 1982 'Leppe: Southamerican Waiting Room', La Separata, Santi- ago, 1982 Interview of Nelly Richard, Art & Text No.8, Melbourne, 1983 Photo-Romance, Virgin Press, February Issue, Melbourne, 1983 Jenny Watson catalogue, Roslyn Oxley Gallery, Sydney, 1983 'Good Luck', Stuff, May Issue, Melbourne, 1983 Comic Stripping Catalogue, George Paton Gallery, Melbourne, 1983
'Landscape Art in Western Australia', Praxis M, Fremantle, 1983 'Fable of Australian Art', Art Press 74, October, Paris, 1983 Exhibition 'From Another Continent. The Dream and the Real', catalogue, Paris, 1983 Exhibition 'Fable of Chilean Painting', catalogue, Santiago, 1983 Selected Catalogues and Publications Nelly Richard : 'The Mech ani sm of Illusion in Davila ', 1977 Nelly Richard: 'The Body in/of the Painting of Davila/ Fragments', 1979 Bravo magazine , Santiago 1979, 'The Irruption of Desi re in the Painting of Davila' Frena ndo Balcells, 'Davila : the Offensive Liberality ', La Bicicleta, Santiago 1980 Rafael del Villar: 'On Semiotics and Painting: an Analysis of a representative of the New Generation of Chilean Art after the Coup D. Etat by the Military Junta in Chile', 1981 Gaspar Galaz and Milan lvelic: 'The History of Chilean Painting', Catholic University of Valparaiso Ed. , 1982 Paul Taylor: 'Popism', National Gallery of Victoria , 1982 Shane Simpson : 'The Vi sual Artist and the Law ', Th e Law Book Co . 1982 Patricio Marchant: 'On the Use of Certain Word s', Art & Text, No.9 1983 Ju sto Mellado : 'The Dispute of the Biblical Quotation ', catalogue, Santiago, 1983 Nelly Richard: 'BodyWithoutSoui',Art& Text No.121984 Lorena Mazzocco: 'Reply to Di scussion Evening Report', F.A.S.S., Broadsheet, Vol.2, No.4 1983, Melbourne Uni- versity John Dunkley-Smith Sam Rohdie: 'The Films of John Dunkley-Smith', Cinema Papers, No.18, Melbourne, October-November 1978 Janine Burke: 'The Melbourne Scene', Art and Australia, Vol.17, No.3, Sydney, March 1980 Sam Rohdie: 'The Avant Garde', The New Australian Cinema Scott Murray (Ed), Nelson, Melbourne 1980 Jennifer Phipps: 'Recent Artists' Film in Australia', Flash Art, No.101, Milan, January / February 1981 Adrian Martin: ·,Little Films We Made', Filmnews, Sydney, April 1981 Rolando Caputo: 'Outside the Cultural Image: Three In- stances of Alternative Australian Film', Art & Text, No .3, Melbourne, Spring 1981 John Dunkley-Smith: 'No Explanation, No Explication', Notes on Art Practice, John Nixon (Ed), Art Projects, Melbourne 1982 Judy Annear: (Catalogue Essay), Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, George Paton Gallery, University of Melbourne, 1982 Alison Fraser : (Catalogue introduction). Film as Art, Vic- torian College of the Arts Gallery, Melbourne, 1982 John Dunkley-Smith: (Artist's statement). Ten Years of Living Cinema, Vincent Grenier (Ed), The Collective Cinema, New York, 1982 Suzanne Davies: 'Art in the Age of Mechanical Repro- duction', Art Network 7, Spring 1982
Thomas Lawson : "The Beast' and John Dunkley-Smith', (Review). Artforum, New York, March 1983 Paul Taylor: (Catalogue essay). Tall Poppies, University Gall- ery,. University of Melbourne, 1983 Sue Cramer : 'Masterpieces and Tall Poppies', Art Network, No .10, Sydney, Winter 1983 Robert Rooney: 'Tall Poppies', (Review). Flash Art, No .114, Milan, November 1983 Alan Krell: 'Australian Perspecta 1983', Art and Australia, Vol.21, No.2, Sydney, Summer 1983 Paul Taylor: 'A Culture of Temporary Culture', Australia: Nine Contemporary Artists, Los Angeles Institute of Con- temporary Art, Los Angeles, 1984 Richard Dunn Writing by the artist 'Each new work carries its own constraints', in Roadshow: Works on Paper (exhibition catalogue), Visual Arts Board, Australia Council, Sydney, 1978 'There are many levels to working with art', Institute of Modern Art Bulletin, Brisbane, February 1979 'Two Squares - placing a line/rationalising six squares placement', in The Works and its Context (exhibition catalogue), V.A.B., Australia Council, Sydney, 1979 'In spite of efforts to resolve contradictions', in Biennale of Sydney: European Dialogue (exhibition catalogue), Sydney, 1979 'The Monastery and the Condition for Seeing', in Frame of Reference (exhibition catalogue), Ewing/Paton Gallery, Melbourne 1981 'A Dialogue of Objects', Institute of Modern Art Bulletin, Brisbane, 1981 '!The Spirit of Practice!', in Notes on Art Practice, J. Nixon Ed. Art Projects, Melbourne, 1982 'The Pursuit of Meaning: A Strategy of Parts', in Art & Text, No.6, Melbourne, June 1982 'Skating on Thin Ice', On The Beach, No.2, 1983 'Grappling with Diversity : Perspecta 1983', Art Network No.1 0, Winter 1983, with Suzanne Davies Essay in 'From another continent: Australia. The Dream and the Real' Catalogue, Paris ARC, Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris, 1983 Books, Catalogues with writing by others Geoffrey de Groen: Conversations with Australian Artists, Quartet, Melbourne, 1978 Grazia Gunn: The Work and its Context (exhibition cata- logue), Australia Council, Sydney, 1979 Bernice Murphy: Australian Perspecta (exhibition cata- logue), Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1981 Paul Taylor: Popism, (exhibition catalogue), National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1982 Memory Holloway: 'Popism', Art Network No.7, Spring 1982 Paul Taylor: 'Popism - The Art of White Aborigines', Flash Art 112, May 1983. See also On the Beach No.1, Autumn 1983 Terence Maloon: 'From Pyrmont to Athens', Sydney Morning Herald, May 7, 1983 John Young: 'Anything Still', Art & Text Spring, 1983 Paul Taylor : Essay in Real Life, N.Y., 1983 Anne Dagbert: 'Australian Perspecta', Art Press, 74, Octo- ber, 1983
Leon Paroissien: Essay in D'un autre continent: I'Australie. Le reve et le reel, (exhibition catalogue). ARC/Musee d'Art Moderne de Ia Ville de Paris, 1983 Merilyn Fairskye Robyn Heks: 'Mural Painting in Australia', Art Network, 5, 1982 Michie! Dolk & Merilyn Fairskye: 'There's no success like failure Or, the story of a mural in the workplace', Fuse 6/3, 1982 Terry Smith: 'Against the Grain, New Audiences and Chang- ing Strategies in Australian Art', Australian Art Review, Sydney, 1982 Art in Australia, Summer, 1982 and Summer 1983 Donna Foster & Amanda Holts: Art in Print, Frantic Fingers Publication, 1982 Neville Weston: In the Public Eye: Public Art in Australia, 1983 Suzanne Davies & Richard Dunn: 'Grappling with Diversity: Perspecta 1983', Art Network, No.1 0, Winter, 1983 Tim Johnson Donald Brook: 'Sydney commentary: New Art in Aus- tralia', Studio International, London, February 1971 Austral ian Broadcasting Commission: Contemporary Austral ian Art, 1974 Graeme Sturgeon: The Development of Australian Sculpture, 1788- 1975, Thames & Hudson, 1978 Max Germaine : Artists and Galleries of Australia and New Zealand, Lansdowne, Sydney, 1979 M. Dransfield: Voyage into Solitude, University of Queens- land Press, Brisbane, 1978 Andrew Crocker: Mr. Sandman Bring Me A Dream, Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd ., Alice Springs, and The Aboriginal Artists Agency, Sydney; Sydney 1981 Soldiers of Rock and Roll: An Aural History of Radio Birdman, WEA 1982 Tim Johnson: Tension 3, 1984 Lyndal Jones Suzanne Spunner, "At Home - A Series of Solo Performances by Lyndal Jones", Lip, Melbourne 1980 Daryl Chin, "Lyndal Jones. On the Road Again", Live No 4, New York 1980 Paul Taylor, "The Strategy of Presence in Two Works at the Triennial", Art Network, Issue 3 & 4, Sydney 1980 Lyndal Jones, "Performance, Feminism and Women At Work", Lip, Melbourne 1981 / 2 Suzanne Davies, "The Melbourne Scene", Art & Australia, Vol.19 No.4, Sydney 1982 Adrian Martin, "Scenes", Art & Text, No.6, Melbourne 1982 Suzanne Davies, "Art in the Age of Mechanical Repro- duction", Art Network 7, Spring 1982 Lynda! Jones, "Prediction Piece No 9", Art & Text No .9, Melbourne 1983 Lyndal Jones, " .. .But is it Sculpture?" Sculpture, Edited by M. Darby, B. Dover, R. Zunde. Curriculum and Re search, Melbourne 1983 Geoff Lowe Paul Taylor : 'Items on the Menu', Art & Text, No .10, 1983 Memory Holloway : 'Closing the Gaps', Studio International, Vol.196, No.1002, 1983 Suzanne Davies : 'Geoff Lowe Powell Street Gallery ' , Art Network, No.11, 1983
~~~:jWi~f J l ·l· . ...~~=..~-·-A-_-1:.:..··.'JCI(. 1'N ·· Cover Image: Detail , Peter Burgess - Trying to Describe Things
The Politics of Picturing
Notes on the Works
Suzanne Davies
1. The Source of Peter Burgess' imagery in "Trying to
apparently overt political subject matter through the use
Describe Things', 1983, is the media, specifically the
of Alfred Rethel's 1848 'Death on the Barricades' the
front page of the New York Times. It is through this
role of artist as producer and the qualifying authority
vehicle that he attempts to describe his relationship
of the museum are more appropriately read. However,
to the world and on its supplied images that he el-
the use of metaphor in image selection complicates
aborates by bringing forth associated images, severing
this dialogue of images, for instance, 'The Tower' is
and layering. His focus of interest includes the comp-
both 'chimney' and 'beacon'.
licity of the context, American culture, within which the reporting of these events is received.
7. Merilyn Fairskye's 'Shortcut to Romance', 1984, combines fragments of a text drawn from the Sydney
2. Like Burgess, Tony Coleing's 'Poland', 1982, uses the media, the relation between the local and the distant, and two 'wars' (current events) as its basis, by drawing an ironic analogy between the civil strife of Poland (real conflict) and the then current cricket match between the Pakistani tourists and the Australian XI (constructed conflict). The similarity of these two
Morning Herald reports of a judge's findings after application for damages in a rape trial was rejected. The text is elaborated through its 'illustration' by images from both media and constructed sources. This elaboration throws into question the trial, the media report and 'acceptance' of rape as an aspect of 'romance'.
spectacles is already determined by their representation for us by the media.
8. Tim Johnson both uses and celebrates his relationship to the Papunya people, further commenting by
3. Juan Davila's 'Pieta', 1984, reflects work done on the subject within psychoanalytic theory (Jacques Lacan) and its significance for feminism, and within Art History (Leo Steinberg). Davila challenges the familiar codes and conjunctions, in this case by his radical and provocative disruption of relationships within the Pieta scene and his location of it within a domestic environment. His indexing of other artists and the elements in the work (Dittborn, lmmendorf) further
overlaying Buddhist imagery in what may be read as tragic pictures of destruction of a culture, as if a:t play with a romantic discourse, yet clearly taken out of the context of anthropqlogical or ethnographic concerns. 'Anatjari No.1 and John Jagamara at Papunya', 1981, provides in the context of this exhibition the source of Anatjari No.1 Jampitjinpa's 'Kulkulka', 1980, the author himself, and confirms Johnson's position as subject to this authorship.
disrupts the function of normal discourse, by relocat-
ing the discourse within the realm of figures of author- ity and the suture.
9. Amongst the predictive methods explored in Lyndal Jones' 'Prediction Piece No.7' 1984 is astrology - that
extreme fom) of determinism which attributes 'essences'
4. Pam Debenham's 'The Third Degree', 1980-1984, interrogates the construction of art history and theory
to the subject. Yet here the method of astrology is used against itself since, as Lyndal Jones says,
by 'revising' Tom Roberts' 'Shearing the Rams' adding
Central to all Prediction Pieces is an examination of the
a photomontaged self-portrait to her own hand separat-
act(s) of prediction ... The processes through which we
ed print 'Strong Feminine Labour', 1980, which was
arrange our future(s) within our minds and, hence, our
based on it. It foregrounds the role of women as pro·
ability to plan, to intervene. it is an examination of the
ducers (labour and imagery) while suggesting a critique
foundations upon which we can organise and create
of the application of Roland Barthes' term 'second
change.*
degree' by Paul Taylor and others. 'The Third Degree'
is a copy of a copy of a copy, with each subsequent . I 10. Geoff Lowe's diptych 'The Idea of Good Government',
version further specifying and elaborating new, yet
1982/3 and 'The Idea of Bad Government' 1982/3 is
coherent ideas drawn from that much reproduced prime source.
based on the allegorical frescoe of the Italian trecento Lorenzetti brothers. Allegory provides a means of layering images and meanings, where the modern text
5. The construction of John Dunkley-Smith's slide installation, 'Exterior ... London (The Mall)', 1981,
speaks through the historical text and becomes a method of mediation and retrieval. It is significant that the
is based on the difference between images (a 3600
model is Medieval, based on collective practice rather
panorama of Pall Mall, London) through their arbitrary
than individual endeavour.
matching or mis-matching, as they proceed through the
two carousels. Moments occur when new meanings are suggested by coherence in the conjunction or its unexpectedness. The structuralist bias of the work both allows and severely limits the range of meaning and conjunction of imagery. A degree of realism enters the work apart from the clear and significant play with its
11. In Peter Tyndall's 'detail, A Person Looks At A Work of Art/someone looks at something ... SOMEONE AND SOMETHING BECAUSE ... (apparent)', 1982, newspaper images of 'famous' people, the Princess of Wales, Red Brigade's Machine gun granny, Russian cosmonauts, a local football hero, (ex) President Gultieri and two
material (film, tripod, slide, projector) as the neutral
children playing (with paint) share a hand gesture or
gaze of the camera records the site, its people and
gestures and are appropriated into the confines of 'Hand-
weather. Yet this is no ordinary site but the site of
space' - Tyndall's nominated method of framing and
the Monarchy.
display. Depending on the original context and who speaks through these gesture, so the reading of the imag-
. 6. Richard Dunn's 'The Tower, The Museum, The Bann- I
es chages from aggression, repulsion, display to greeting.
er , The Barricade', 1984, self-describes i.ts images .tt'This installation includes the transcript of a speech to be
layered one within the other by a process akin to filmic
read 3 times, the speaker being represented here by the 3
montage. This work is drawn both from, and compounds, images and signs within two previous installation works ('Barricades' 1981-1984) . While having
personas in the catalogue photographs. The invitation is extended to anyone to read, to speak, to actively assume a part.
Peter Burgess
Trying To Describe Things-Man., Nov.21, 1983, Graphite/
Erased Graphite, Electrostatic print on Laminated Papers,
2 sections - Irregular, approx. 81x183cm, Life size figure
67x191cm, 1983
· ··

Trying To Describe Things-Wed., June15, 1983, Graphite/ Erased Graphite, Electrostatic print on Laminated Papers, 2 sections - Scraper Board Drawing 4x6", Irregular, approx. 36x72"
Tony Coleing Poland, acrylic on canvas; 170x430cr'n, 1982 Courtesy Ray Hughes Gallery , Brisbane One of six paintings in a series titled 'Recent Wars'
Juan Davila Pieta , photograph, collage, 91x79cm, 1984
Pam Debenham The Third Degree, cibachrome print, 102x147cm, 1980-84. Collection of the Artist
John Dunkley-Smith Exterior .·. London (The Mall) , Twin projector slide installation for darkened space, 162x35mm slides, colour, mute, indefinite duration, London, 1981. Collection of the Artist
Richard Dunn The Tower, The Museum, The Banner, The Barricade, oil stick on paper, 228x336cm, 1984. Courtesy Yuill Crowley Gallery
Merilyn Fairskye Shortcut to Romance, oil and acrylic on canvas, five panels each 122x122cm, 1984 Collection of the Artist
Tim Johnson Visit to Papunya II, acrylic on canvas, 76x91cm, 1983 Private collection Anatjari No.1 and John Jagamara at Papunya, acrylic on canvas, 61 x61 em, 1981 Private collection
Anatjari No.1 Jampitjinpa Kulkulka, acrylic on canvas, 183x183cm, 1980 Collection of Tim Johnson
Lynda! Jones Prediction Piece No.7, Version 1, Mixed media installation , 1984
Geoff Lowe
The Idea of Bad Government, acrylic on linen, 152x366cm, 1982/83, Private Collection Collection of Budget Rent-a-Car
The Idea of Good Government, acrylic on linen, 152x366cm
1982/83
'
Not in this exhibition, but the pair to 'Bad Government'
Peter Tyndall detail A Person Looks At A Work of Art/ someone looks at something ..... SOMEONE AND SOMETHING BECAUSE ..... (apparent) black & white & colour photocopy and acrylic 244x472cm, 1982 Collection of the Artist
paint,

File: the-politics-of-picturing-an-exhibition-of-works-by-peter-burgess.pdf
Title: The Politics of picturing : an exhibition of works by Peter Burgess
Author: Curated by Suzanne Davies
Subject: An exhibition of works by Peter Burgess
Keywords: Tasmanian School of Art Gallery Committee, exhibition, University of Tasmania, Peter Burgess, Suzanne Davies, Art, Australian 20th century, Political aspects, Exhibitions.
Published: Wed May 28 10:23:38 2014
Pages: 21
File size: 1.11 Mb


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